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CropWatch

BERRIES HARD AND GREEN EL 33


H Hot Weather
The first signs of berry colour and softening
has occured in Pinot Gris, Pinot Noir and
Chardonnay. This will continue rapidly now,
with milder weather expected. Shoot growth is
beginning to slow down this week however
there is still plenty of tip growth.
Disease levels are static over the last week,
but hot weather has not stopped disease.
Botrytis
The sugars of ripening fruit are needed for
bunch rotting moulds - a rule of thumb - is
Botrytis only shows infection once berries
reach 9o Baume.
The risk period for botrytis begins during
February, however it is possible to find Botrytis
in green fruit now (left).
Be alert for rain or heavy dew in the next two
This message from Adelaide Hills CropWatch was compiled months and assess your bunches for any
moulds.
for the week ending Friday, January 15th 2010
2010 and will be
Downy Mildew
updated prior to January 23rd.
The rainfall on Tuesday morning did not
More Pest and Disease information is available at cause an increase in Downy Mildew (a
warm, wet night).
www.adelaidehillswine.blogspot.com Growers need to be aware of any oilspots
(lower left). Most monitored vineyards have a
low level of oilspots and the risk of any spread,
causing vines to lose their leaves, reduces as
we get closer to harvest.
If you have downy at a high level seek specific
advice otherwise at a minimum maintain
downy protection as near as practical before
rain.
Low risk level: 1 oilspot <50 metres of row.

Moderate risk level: 1 oilspot per 20 metres.

High risk level: 1 oilspot per 5 metres &


hotspots of several dozen on a vine.

CropWatch SA Adelaide Hills is a service provided by the Adelaide Hills Wine Region Inc. DJ’s Grower Services provide vineyard monitoring data, interpret weather data &
compile the messages. Information is general in nature and should not be relied upon. Always seek professional advice specific to your vineyard. All photos (c) James
Hook & Richard McGeachy unless noted. CropWatch acknowledges the support of James Hook & Matthew Wilson in preparing this message.
Powdery Mildew
For most vineyards the ‘battle’ against Powdery Mildew is almost over. Disease levels remain low and the
developing fruit is clean. However there are some exceptions to this and fruit has bunch Powdery Mildew
infections (below).

Why do some vineyards have Powdery on bunches?


Poor history of control - Blocks that had significant levels of Powdery in earlier vintages have struggled to
keep their fruit clean in this season. Powdery Mildew levels build up from season to season. The disease
survives from year to year as flagshoots (buds that get infected with Powdery and burst the next) or
Cleistothecia (powdery spores). In ‘problem’ vineyards Powdery started the year with higher levels than
those that have been well protected in the past. Once Powdery Mildew has a headstart it is much harder to
control.
Vineyard not well sprayed (the 3 T’s) - Correct timing & treatment applied with the correct technique.
This spring it was difficult for growers to keep up a protection over their vineyard due to rain events and wet
conditions in September and early October. Some vineyards missed early sprays or were sprayed at too
long an interval for their growth.
Good spray timing needs to be supported by use of an appropriate fungicide treatment applied with the
required spray cover and correct dose in the tank.
The spray technique is also very important. Effective spray coverage is crucial for whatever fungicide is
used. In many vineyards rapid growth produced large canopies that were difficult to spray effectively with
the equipment available. Also weather events like rain and high winds caused poor coverage.
CropWatch SA Adelaide Hills is a service provided by the Adelaide Hills Wine Region Inc. DJ’s Grower Services provide vineyard monitoring data, interpret weather data &
compile the messages. Information is general in nature and should not be relied upon. Always seek professional advice specific to your vineyard. All photos (c) James
Hook & Richard McGeachy unless noted. CropWatch acknowledges the support of James Hook & Matthew Wilson in preparing this message.