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Asbury Park Press

FRIDAY 01.16.15

ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

Tourists ride in a classic 1950s American car on the Malecon in Havana, Cuba. A new set of U.S. government regulations takes
effect today, loosening more than 50 years of travel and trade restrictions for Cuba.

RELATIONS WITH CUBA

MARILYN MANSON
LEADS ’90S REVIVAL
Shock rocker returning to New Jersey
JERSEY ALIVE!

State Department of Education monitor
Michael Azzara says the Lakewood school
board will have to learn to live within its
means.

Lakewood’s
fiscal picture
gets uglier
School district says debt
actually stands at $6M
KEVIN PENTÓN @KEVINPENTONAPP

OPENING THE
FLOODGATES?
Shore residents of Cuban descent are skeptical
looser restrictions will improve country’s future
STEPH SOLIS @STEPHMSOLIS

Cuban Travel

The new regulations that roll out today on U.S. travel to Cuba don’t allow for tourism, but locals of Cuban
descent and travel agents believe the eased restrictions might eventually open the floodgates to the Communist nation.
The U.S.’s action removes many of the legal and bureaucratic obstacles for travel to the once-taboo island. President Barack Obama announced Dec. 17 that
he was renewing diplomatic relations for the first
time since they were cut off 54 years ago, following
the Cuban missile crisis.
Most U.S. travelers still will be required to go on
supervised group trips, but now virtually any U.S.
company or organization can offer such trips without
the paperwork and inspections that discouraged past
expansion of travel to Cuba. Some tour operators, already seeing unprecedented interest in legal travel to

Q: Can U.S citizens visit Cuba?
A: The U.S. Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control oversees
travel to Cuba. There are 12 categories of people who are
allowed to visit.

See CUBA, Page A4

“It looks like it’s better for politics and
business ... for the people, there won’t be
any differences at this point.”

LAKEWOOD — School district officials were wrong
when they estimated last spring that Lakewood’s finances were in the red by some $5 million. The final tally is even higher.
The new deficit total is $6.06 million, the school district announced Wednesday. The question now is how to
address the red ink.
“It’s certainly a lot of money,” Dieter Lerch, an accountant hired by the district to conduct its annual audit, told the Lakewood Board of Education.
His recommendation? Lakewood can borrow from
state coffers and pay the money back over 10 years.
That suggestion did not sit well with resident Bill
Hobday, who said the board is not taking its fiscal responsibilities seriously. He saw borrowing as no solution.
“I don’t get the feeling that you’re worried” about
overspending, Hobday told the board. “There has to be
some semblance of order where you know what you can
afford to spend and what you cannot.”

PATRICIA CANEDA

See DEFICIT, Page A4

Bruce Coleman of Marlton

Q: What changed?
A: The groups of people allowed to visit Cuba remain the
same, but they no longer need to apply for a license to travel.
Q: What about everybody else?
A: That’s fuzzier. It’s still illegal for Americans to visit Cuba if
they don’t fit into one of those 12 groups, but without the
need to apply for a license it could be impossible for the government to enforce such a restriction.
Q: How do U.S. travelers buy goods in Cuba?
A: Banks and credit card companies have been prohibited from
doing business in Cuba. That gets lifted in these new rules. But
don’t expect to see ATMs or businesses accepting Visa, MasterCard or American Express immediately. So travelers — in the
near term — still need to bring a lot of cash.
Q: What can Americans bring back?
A: Authorized visitors can bring home up to $400 worth of
goods acquired in Cuba for personal use. This includes no more
than $100 worth of alcohol or tobacco products.
Source: Associated Press

Hearts on their sleeves
Army veteran Bruce Coleman of
Marlton got one of his tattoos for the
same reason — to remember fallen comrades in Iraq, where he served.
Younger veterans’ tattoos are different from those worn by their World War
II and Korean War counterparts — today,
they are often larger, more colorful and
artistic, relating more personal, intimate
stories of their military service.
The 26-year-old Einstein disliked the

CAROL COMEGNO @CAROLCOMEGNO

CHRIS LACHALL/STAFF
PHOTOGRAPHER

Andrew Einstein did what a lot of
leathernecks do immediately after surviving Marine boot camp.
He got a tattoo.
It would not be the only one.
After tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Mount Laurel resident got
several other symbols of his military service, including one emblazoned over his
left rib cage to memorialize the death of
two fellow Marines.

See TATTOOS, Page A4

CONTROVERSY ERUPTS OVER LACK OF OSCAR NOMINEE DIVERSITY PAGE 1B

THE CONVERSATION ON RACE
Tune in to APP’s Conversation on Race 12:30 p.m. Monday, Martin Luther King Jr. Day on
APP.com.
The panel discussion will be led by APP staff writer Jay Scott Smith; APP Community
Conversation Editor Randy Bergmann; Jiles Ship, former president of the National Organization
of Law Enforcement Executives; Sean Di Somma of the Monmouth County Young Republicans; and more.
Visit app.com/raceconversation to read The Conversation on Race series and learn more about the forum


as we count down to King Day.

ADVICE
CLASSIFIED
COMICS
LOCAL
MOVIES

JERSEY ALIVE
D6
JERSEY ALIVE
A3
JERSEY ALIVE

OBITUARIES
OPINION
SPORTS
WEATHER
YOUR MONEY

A15
A10
C1
C12
A14

VOLUME 136
NUMBER 14

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