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Concrete T-beam Bridge Design

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INSTRUCTIONS
:

Work in groups
composed of

3 members
only
.

WRITE
your solutions on
short bond paper
and submit your

papers in a
folder.

For references,
go to the library
or use the
internet for more
information.

This
seatwork/homew
ork is to be
submitted next
week and is
equivalent to
one quiz.
CONCRETE TBeam BRIDGE

DESIGNPROBLE
M STATEMENT
Design a
reinforced
concrete T-beam
bridge for a 44ft-wide roadway
and three-spans
of 35 ft

42 ft

35 ft with a skew
of 30 as shown
in Figure 1. Use
the concrete
deck of Figures 2
and 3previously
designed for an
HL-93 live load, a

bituminous
overlay, and a 8ft spacing of
girders.Use fc

= 4.5 ksi, fy =
60 ksi, and
follow the outline
of AASHTO
(2004) LRFD

Bridge
Specifications,Se
ction 5, Appendix
A5.3.
FIGURE 1: Tbeam bridge
design
example: (a)
elevation, (b)
plan, and (c)

section.FIGURE
2: Traditional
design of
interior deck
spans.

FIGURE 3:
Concrete

barrier and
connection to
deck
overhang.Outli
ne of AASHTO
(2004) LRFD
Bridge
Specifications,
Section 5,
Appendix

A5.3.A.
Develop
General
SectionB.
Develop
Typical Section
and Design
Basis
1. Top Flange
Thickness

[A5.14.1.5.1a]2.
Bottom Flange
Thickness (not
applicable to Tbeam)3. Web
Thickness
[A5.14.1.5.1c
and
C5.14.1.5.1c]4.
Structure Depth

(Table 2.1) [Table


A2.5.2.6.3-1]5.
Reinforcement
Limits6. Effective
Flange Widths
[A4.6.2.6.1]
C. Design
Conventionally
Reinforced
Concrete

Deck D. Select
Resistance
Factors (Table
7.10)
[A5.5.4.2]E.
Select Load
Modifiers
[A1.3.2.1]F.
Select
Applicable

Load
Combinations
(Table 3.1)
[Table A3.4.1-1]
G. Calculate
Live-Load
Force Effects
1. Select Number
of Lanes
[A3.6.1.1.1]2.

Multiple
Presence (Table
4.6)
[A3.6.1.1.2]3.
Dynamic Load
Allowance (Table
4.7) [A3.6.2.1]
Not applied to
the design lane
load.4.

Distribution
Factors for
Moment
[A4.6.2.2.2]a.
Interior Beams
with Concrete
Decks (Table 6.5)
[A4.6.2.2.2b and
TableA4.6.2.2.2b1]b. Exterior

Beams (Table
6.5) [A4.6.2.2.2d
and Table
A4.6.2.2.2d-1]c.
Skewed Bridges
(Table 6.5)
[A4.6.2.2.2e]d.
Distributed LiveLoad Moments5.
Distribution

Factors for Shear


[A4.6.2.2.3]a.
Interior Beams
(Table 6.5)
[A4.6.2.2.3a and
Table
A4.6.2.2.3a-1]b.
Exterior Beams
(Table 6.5)
[A4.6.2.2.3b and

Table
A4.6.2.2.3b-1]c.
Skewed Bridges
(Table 6.5)
[A4.6.2.2.3c and
Table
A4.6.2.2.3c-d.
Distributed LiveLoad Shears6.
Reactions to

Substructure
[A3.6.1.3.1]
H. Calculate
Force Effects
from Other
Loads
1. Interior
Girders

2. Exterior
Girders
I. Investigate
Service Limit
State
1


3. Prestress
Girders Not
applicable.4.
Investigate
Durability
[C5.12.1]5.
Crack Control
[A5.7.3.4]a.
Effective Flange

Width
[A4.6.2.6.1]b.
Positive Bending
Reinforcement

Exterior Girder
(Table 3.1)[Table
A3.4.1-1] Service
I limit state,

i = 1.0, gravity
load factors =
1.0,
momentsfrom
Table E7.3-2:6.
Investigate
FatigueFatigue
Limit State (Table
3.1) [Table
A3.4.1-1]7.

Calculate
Deflection and
Camber (Table
3.1) [Table
A3.4.1-1]Service
I limit state,

i = 1.0, gravity
load factors =
1.0a.

Live-Load
Deflection
Criteria
(optional)
[A2.5.2.6.2]b.
Section
Properties at
Location 104

Transformed
cracked section
from
Section7.10.3,
Part I.5b:c.
Estimated LiveLoad Deflection
at Location 104
Assume

deflection
ismaximum
where moment is
maximum.d.
Dead-Load
Camber
[A5.7.3.6.2]

J. Investigate
Strength Limit
State
1. Flexurea. and
b. Prestressed
Beams Not
applicable.c.
Factored Flexural
Resistance
[A5.7.3.2, Table

A3.4.1-1]
Exterior girder
has slightly
larger moment.d.
Limits for
Reinforcement2.
Shear (Assuming
No Torsional
Moment)a.
General

Requirementsb.
Sectional Design
Model [A5.8.3]