‘PROJECT’ FINALLY

HEADS TO THEATERS
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 18

FAR BELOW NORMAL

NEW SURVEY SHOWS FAR LESS SNOW THAN LAST MONTH IN
CALIFORNIA
STATE PAGE 5

SKYLINE WINS
WILD OPENER
SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015 • Vol XV, Edition 143

Plans for next year’s Super Bowl kicking off
San Mateo County officials and organizers set sights on coming crowd in 2016
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

With eager fans loading up on
chips, dips and brewskies for this
weekend’s big game, San Mateo
County officials are gearing up for
the 2016 Super Bowl set to draw
thousands to the Peninsula.
As Santa Clara’s new Levi’s
Stadium is set to host the 50th

Social worker
facing 10 new
felony counts

Super Bowl, locals are hopeful of
attracting big crowds that will
need places to eat, sleep and spectate as they indulge in one of the
nation’s most beloved pastimes.
While fans are still a long ways
from knowing who to root for during the 2016 game, officials says
it’s critical to start planning for
the influx of visitors now.
“It’s not just the people going

into the stadium to watch the
Super Bowl, there’s people that
just want to be part of the excitement and all of these people are
going to be looking for things to
do, things to see, they want to be
part of the picture,” said Anne
LeClair, president of the San
Mateo County Silicon Valley
Convention and Visitors Bureau.
“With this Super Bowl now in

everyone’s mind, … [next year’s
is] just starting to heat up and I’m
sure it’s going to be gaining lots
of momentum. People are very
excited.”
From hotel rooms and transit to
viewing parties and specialty
restaurant menus, LeClair said
planning for next year’s big event
now is critical.
Feb. 23 marks the start of the

50-week countdown to Super Bowl
50 and LeClair said that’s when
things will really begin to kick
off.
LeClair said the bureau is excited
to work with local businesses and
cities on generating ideas and promoting football-themed events.
San Mateo Councilman David

See PLANNING, Page 31

South City OKs redesign
Council approves downtown improvement project despite residents’ concerns

Third victim comes forward in
former HSA employee sex case

By Austin Walsh

By Bill Silverfarb

er, bicyclist or pedestrian, generally it’s … just inattention,” Wall
said. “And the [consequences] are
there can be felony prosecution
for manslaughter if someone is
killed. Certainly the damage to
people’s lives that are forever
changed after being hit by a car.
So the whole message is slow
down, pay attention, drive safely

A large-scale plan to overhaul
and beautify downtown South San
Francisco received unanimous City
Council approval Wednesday
night amid concerns that the project may drive up prices and force
longtime residents out of town.
The Downtown Station Area
Specific Plan, took three years of
planning and proposes building a
new, more vibrant, transit-oriented and family-friendly downtown
region within half a mile of the
Caltrain station on and around
Grand Avenue.
Over the proposed 20-year life
span of the redesign effort, the city
is hoping to add roughly 1,400
new housing units, some of which
are intended to be part of the
mixed-use residential development
that’s targeted to add more highdensity housing opportunities
downtown.
But some residents are concerned
that with the new housing opportunities will come the exorbitant
rental rates currently plaguing the
region, and causing some families
to relocate.
Gustavo Lopez, a former South
San Francisco resident, advocated
for the council to consider implementing policy that controlled
rents in the new downtown area.
“We should have policies enacted that are going to keep people
here,” he said.
Lopez, who said he had to move
from South San Francisco when
his rent became too expensive,
implored city officials to not cave
to pressure of builders from outside
of the area who desire to capitalize
on ever-increasing rental rates
across the Bay Area without con-

See SAFETY, Page 23

See SSF, Page 23

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A third girl has alleged a former
San Mateo County social worker
had sex with
her, according
to the District
At t o rn ey ’s
Office.
M a n u e l
Sedillo, 38, of
Santa Clara, was
charged with 10
felony
Manuel Sedillo new
counts Thursday
and had his bail raised from
$400,000 to $600,000, prosecutor Sean Gallagher told the Daily
Journal.
He was already being charged on
suspicion of dozens of felony sex
abuse crimes against two 16-yearold East Palo Alto girls who were
on his caseload when he worked
for the county’s Human Services
Agency, according to the District
Attorney’s Office.
A preliminary hearing scheduled
for Thursday did not proceed as the
District Attorney’s Office amended
its complaint against Sedillo.
The third victim is now 21 and
was on Sedillo’s caseload when she
was also 16, Gallagher said.
Sedillo “was charged with her
protection,” Gallagher said.
The investigation continues
into whether Sedillo may have any
other victims. The new charges
include unlawful sexual intercourse, oral copulation and sexual
penetration with a minor, he said.
If convicted, Sedillo is facing
decades in prison and mandatory
registration as a sex offender.

See SEDILLO, Page 31

RONNY DIEHL/DAILY JOURNAL

Jose Granados Jr. crosses Maple Avenue at Grand Avenue across from South San Francisco City Hall.

Police step up pedestrian safety effort
South City officers encouraging driver safety after bicycle, pedestrian deaths
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

In an effort to raise awareness
while deterring injuries and fatalities, South San Francisco police
will spend February stepping up
bicycle and pedestrian safety operations.
South San Francisco police have
investigated two fatalities and 145
injury collisions over the last

three years while mapping out
locations where pedestrian or
bicyclist involved collisions were
most prominent.
Through February, officers will
be looking for violations, saturating accident-prone areas, educating the public and conducting
undercover stings, said police Lt.
Keith Wall.
“One of the overriding themes
on both sides, whether it’s a driv-

2

FOR THE RECORD

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“Only when we are no
longer afraid do we begin to live.”
— Dorothy Thompson, author, journalist, radio commentator

This Day in History

1615

Thomas Rolfe, the only child of John
Rolfe and his wife, Rebecca (the former Pocahontas), was born in
Jamestown in the Virginia Colony.

In 1 6 4 9 , England’s King Charles I was executed for treason.
In 1 8 1 5 , the U.S. House of Representatives joined the
Senate in agreeing to purchase the personal book collection
of former President Thomas Jefferson to replace volumes
lost when the British burned the U.S. Capitol and its congressional library during the War of 1812.
In 1 8 8 2 , the 32nd president of the United States, Franklin
Delano Roosevelt, was born in Hyde Park, New York.
In 1 9 11 , James White, an intellectually disabled black
man who’d been convicted of rape for having sex with a 14year-old white girl when he was 16, was publicly hanged in
Bell County, Kentucky.
In 1 9 3 3 , Adolf Hitler became chancellor of Germany. The
first episode of the “Lone Ranger” radio program was broadcast on station WXYZ in Detroit.
In 1 9 4 8 , Indian political and spiritual leader Mohandas K.
Gandhi, 78, was shot and killed in New Delhi by Nathuram
Godse, a Hindu extremist. (Godse and a co-conspirator were
later executed.) Aviation pioneer Orville Wright, 76, died in
Dayton, Ohio.
In 1 9 6 2 , two members of “The Flying Wallendas” highwire act were killed when their seven-person pyramid collapsed during a performance at the State Fair Coliseum in
Detroit.
In 1 9 6 8 , the Tet Offensive began during the Vietnam War as
Communist forces launched surprise attacks against South
Vietnamese provincial capitals.
In 1 9 6 9 , The Beatles staged an impromptu concert atop
Apple headquarters in London; it was the group’s last public
performance.
In 1 9 7 2 , 13 Roman Catholic civil rights marchers were
shot to death by British soldiers in Northern Ireland on what
became known as “Bloody Sunday.”

Birthdays

Actor Gene
Hackman is 85.

Singer Phil Collins
is 64.

Actor Wilmer
Valderrama is 35.

Actress Dorothy Malone is 90. Producer-director Harold
Prince is 87. Actress Tammy Grimes is 81. Actress Vanessa
Redgrave is 78. Chess grandmaster Boris Spassky is 78.
Country singer Jeanne Pruett is 78. Country singer Norma
Jean is 77. Former Vice President Dick Cheney is 74. Rock
singer Marty Balin is 73. Rhythm-and-blues musician
William King (The Commodores) is 66. Actor Charles S.
Dutton is 64. World Golf Hall of Famer Curtis Strange is 60.
Actress-comedian Brett Butler is 57. Singer Jody Watley is
56. Actor-filmmaker Dexter Scott King is 54. The King of
Jordan, Abdullah II, is 53. Actor Norbert Leo Butz is 48.

REUTERS

A church made entirely from ice is seen during the night at Balea Lac resort in the Fagaras mountains, Romania.

In other news ...
Police find dismembered body
inside suitcase San Francisco
SAN FRANCISCO — San Francisco
police found a dismembered body
when they opened a suitcase abandoned on a downtown street and then
made another gruesome discovery
when they uncovered more body parts
nearby.
Police
spokeswoman
Grace
Gatpandan said Thursday that it’s
unclear if all the remains belong to
one person. She says investigators
have a rough description of a suspect
but aren’t releasing additional details
because the investigation is ongoing.
Gatpandan says officers responding
to a call about a suspicious package
Wednesday afternoon opened the suitcase to find either human or animal
remains. A medical examiner confirmed the body parts were human.
Identifiers such as gender and race
weren’t immediately known, and
police did not release any more details
about the additional remains, including where they were found.

Holy mackerel! Belfast
warned not to eat free fish
BELFAST, Northern Ireland — This
fish tale might be a wee bit hard to
stomach.
Belfast City Council is advising its
citizens: Don’t eat fish found lying on
the roadside. They’re too fishy.

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Jan. 28 Powerball

©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

CACOH

RETRAY

12

UNIONTOWN, Pa. — Officials in
western Pennsylvania are trying to
figure out how a man who’s been dead
for more than two years wound up
being reappointed to a county industrial authority board.
Fayette County officials said
Wednesday it seemed they never tried
checking in with Larry Markwood
before reappointing him. He died in
August 2012.
County commissioners say they
conducted interviews with candidates
and received letters from members
who want to be reappointed or leave
the board, but Markwood slipped

24

35

49

36

1
Powerball

5

26

27

57

44

7
Mega number

Jan. 28 Super Lotto Plus
2

10

36

43

46

1

2

8

22

28

5

1

Daily Four
3

9

Daily three midday
8

23

through the cracks.
The industrial authority hadn’t met
since 2010, so attendance records
would have been of no use.
Commissioner chairman Vincent
Zapotosky tells the Pittsburgh
Tribune-Review they’ll be smarter
about the reappointment process in
the future.

Shop owner makes
deflated chocolate football
CANONSBURG,
Pa.

A
Pennsylvania candy maker is getting
a big kick out of the New England
Patriots’ scandal over some deflated
footballs.
The
(Washington)
ObserverReporter reports that Bill Sarris had
his Canonsburg staff make a chocolate football with a big dent in the
side. It’s not for sale, but he posted it
on Facebook as a joke.
It’s named the Bradie ball. That’s BR-A-D-I-E to avoid any legal issues.
The picture’s caption says, “Net
weight 13 pounds ... Oops! We meant
11.2 pounds.”
The Patriots and quarterback Tom
Brady have been accused of using
underinflated footballs in the AFC
Championship game. They play
Sunday in the Super Bowl.
Sarris won’t explain how the chocolate got its deflated appearance.
He says only, “You’ll have to ask
the Patriots how they did it.”

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five

Jan. 27 Mega Millions

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

ODUIA

Man who died in 2012 gets
reappointed to county board

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

Tuesday’s health warning follows
the accidental dumping of thousands
of mackerel on to the busy Ravenhill
Road, apparently by a delivery truck
with a loose back door. Locals
grabbed bags to haul in their catch
before passing cars could turn the
stranded school to pulp.
Tommy Bardsley says he bagged 25
mackerel and deemed them off-theboat fresh. “I know fish,” the 61-yearold declared.
The council says Bardsley and other
opportunists don’t know microbiology, because they don’t know where
the fish came from, and they could be
contaminated by automotive pollutants.

2

6

Daily three evening

Mega number

9

1

6

The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben, No. 4,
in first place; Soild Gold, No. 11, in second place;
and California Classic, No. 5, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:48.66.

Fri day : Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs in the lower
60s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Fri day ni g ht: Partly cloudy. Lows in
the upper 40s. North winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday : Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
North winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday ni g ht: Mostly clear. Lows in
the upper 40s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday : Partly cloudy. Highs in the 60s.
Sunday ni g ht: Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s.
Mo nday : Mostly cloudy. Highs in the 60s.
Mo nday ni g ht: Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s.
Tues day : Mostly cloudy. Highs in the 60s.
Tues day ni g ht thro ug h Thurs day : Partly cloudy. Lows
in the lower 50s. Highs in the mid to upper 60s.

RRUUMM
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: IRONY
EVENT
PRICEY
TROUGH
Answer: To fix the car’s motor, he used his —
“ENGINE-UITY”

The San Mateo Daily Journal
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more than once, longer than 200 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

Redwood City makes way for charters
Schools to be spread across district, but some still harbor reservations
By Austin Walsh

Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The decision to grant two charter schools
classrooms on Redwood City Elementary
School District campuses next year is
being made with measured enthusiasm.
The district Board of Trustees unanimously approved allowing KIPP Excelencia
Preparatory to move into Kennedy Middle
Rocketship
and splitting
School,
Education between Hoover and Taft elementary schools.
But some district leaders are not enthusiastic about the approval made Wednesday
night at the board meeting to co-locate the
charters on campuses of existing district
schools.
“To be honest, this is not ideal. This is
not something I’m thrilled about doing,”
said board President Dennis McBride. “We
did not choose the charters, but we did what
we had to do.”
His sentiment is shared by other officials, who cite a state mandate that the district accommodate charter schools.
State law requires public school districts
to allow charter schools on the campus of
existing facilities, so long as they have
classrooms to offer.
Superintendent Jan Christensen recommended the board approve the charters, on
the grounds that the district cannot cite
financial hardships to deny their admission.
McBride said though the nine classrooms
on Kennedy Middle School campus that
KIPP will occupy do not currently host district students, the spaces were still used for
a variety of educational programs.
Some of the classrooms host after-school
language classes designed to help parents
learn to speak English, others are home to
reading development programs, and more

are
music rooms or space for professional
development.
McBride said he has faith that Principal
David Paliughi will find a way to make
room for the charter school to the best of
his ability.
“In a perfect world, I wouldn’t want them
on a campus,” said McBride.
Roughly 60 parents from the Kennedy
community sent McBride emails, expressing their concern about sending elementary
students from the charter school to the middle school campus.
The campus will need to coordinate class
schedules to keep the students separate,
despite their shared facilities.
Kevin Sugar, president of the Redwood
City Teachers Association, said he has
heard frustrations from members of the district who might harbor ill will toward members of the charter community.
Residents living near the middle school
expressed concern to board members about
the impact that additional traffic would
have on the surrounding neighborhood,
said McBride.
Kyle Shaffer, principal of KIPP, said he
wanted to work with the district and existing community in Redwood City to ensure
the relationship was amicable.
“We look forward to working the
Kennedy community and the school district
to make things work as best as possible,”
he said.
Shaffer said the KIPP program has a successful history of co-locating on other public school campuses across the Bay Area.

Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal

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Senior Resources and Services
from all of San Mateo County
— over 40 exhibitors!

Senior Showcase

Goody Bags for first
250 attendees

Health &
Wellness Fair

Free Services include
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9:00am to 1:00pm
Millbrae Recreation Center
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Free Admission, Everyone Welcome

Assisted Living and Memory Care

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* While supplies last. Services subject to change.

Both Rocketship and KIPP are networks
of schools focusing on low-income communities. KIPP had proposed to serve the
North Fair Oaks community in Redwood
City, but the district administration recommended placing the charter at Kennedy for
lack of available classroom space across
the district.
Connect Community Charter School
already serves the North Fair Oaks community from the campus of Fair Oaks
Elementary School.
Trustees also agreed to divide the 400 students projected to enroll in the Rocketship
charter between Taft and Hoover elementary
schools next year, until the school is able
to transition onto the property it purchased
at 860 Charter St.
David Kuizenga, Bay Area vice president
of Rocketship Education, said in an email
that the decision to send the charter students to different campuses is not an ideal
solution, but the charter intends to work
through the temporary adversity.
“Locating Rocketship at two campuses
has caused concern for some families and
will result in challenges but we are committed to working collaboratively with the district to finalize details of the offer and to
develop a workable solution,” he said.
The district may consider relocating KIPP
after next year, when the departure of
Rocketship grants more facility flexibility.

3

Police reports
Ill suited
A man wearing only his underwear was
bothering customers of a restaurant on
Shoreway Road in Belmont before 9:39
a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 27.

REDWOOD CITY
Gun s h o t s h e ard. Multiple gunshots
were heard on Avocet Drive before 7:33
a.m. Saturday, Jan. 24.
Arres t. A person was arrested for driving
under the influence on Fernside Street and
Roosevelt Avenue before 12:50 a. m.
Wednesday, Jan. 21.
Fo und pro perty . Marijuana was found on
Red Oak Way before 10:13 a.m. Thursday,
Jan. 22.
Arres t. A person was arrested for driving
while intoxicated on El Camino Real and
St. Francis before 2:18 a.m. Thursday, Jan.
22.
Di s turbance. Two people were involved
in a fist fight on Middlefield Road before
10:02 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 21.
Sto l en v ehi cl e. A silver Toyota Sienna
was stolen on Arguello Street before 10:55
a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 21.

MILLBRAE

Arres ts . A man and woman were arrested
for shoplifting when they were found in
possession of stolen goods, burglary tools
and a knife on the first block of El Camino
Real before 9:45 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 27.
Arres t. A man was arrested on warrants
when he was found to be in possession of
austin@smdailyjournal.com narcotics and unlawful paraphernalia on
Rollins Road before 12:19 a.m. Tuesday,
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105 Jan. 27.

4

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

5

Defense attorney wants DA
to give up ‘Sunny Day’ case
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A defense attorney in the “Sunny Day”
case has asked Attorney General Kamala
Harris to take over its prosecution based on
San Mateo County District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe initially seeking the death penalty in the high-profile gang murder case.
Paul DeMeester, who represents Roberto
Bustos-Montes, claims Wagstaffe “needlessly used the case as a tool in his personal
political crusade in favor of the death penalty.”
The District Attorney’s Office had considered the death penalty against nine Sunny
Day suspects but is now seeking life in
prison sentences.
Wagstaffe told the Daily Journal Thursday,
however, that DeMeester is simply “grandstanding” and has made inaccurate and false
accusations against him.
DeMeester claims more than $500,000 in
taxpayer money was needlessly spent on the
capital penalty aspect of the case.
In January, Wagstaffe said that he would
not seek death for a third-strike gangmember, Raymond Louis Bradford, charged with
murder and other crimes in the Sunny Day
operation.
Bradford, 28, was the last defendant waiting to hear whether the county would seek
the death penalty against him.
Indictments came after an 18-month long
investigation and a two-month criminal
grand jury probe.
DeMeester sent a letter to the Attorney
General’s Office Thursday claiming
Wagstaffe had used the case “for pure political gain, thereby disregarding his duty to
seek justice and a fair trial in the matter.”
The crimes reportedly began when the Da
Vill and Sac Street gangs of East Palo Alto
teamed up against the Taliban gang of East
Palo Alto and Menlo Park. Between 2012
and 2013, the war allegedly included four

Caltrain conducts late-night
tests of new equipment
Caltrain will be conducting safety tests
for new equipment aimed at enhancing safety and adhering to federal mandates. The
tests require trains to run in the middle of the
night between San Mateo and Menlo Park
from Jan. 30 to Feb. 1, according to the
transit agency.
The tests are part of the Advanced Signal
System
project,
also
known
as
Communications Based Overlay Signal
System Positive Train Control, which will
equip the system with federally-mandated
safety technology. The new system will
increase capacity to help accommodate
future ridership demands by allowing the

CITY
GOVERNMENT
• The San Carl o s
Ci t y
Co un c i l
voted Monday to
send a letter to the
S e quo i a Un i o n
Hi g h
Scho o l
Di s tri ct Bo ard o f Trus tees expressing

murders in East Palo Alto
and San Francisco, a
highway shooting in
Belmont, a robbery, witness dissuasion, drug
trafficking,
bribery,
firearms possession and
conspiracy.
The
investigation,
nicknamed
“Operation
Steve
Sunny Day” in reference
Wagstaffe
to the code phrase used
by gangmembers to indicate a completed murder,
nabbed 16 defendants,
including
BustosMontes, ranging in age
from 19 to 28.
Along with Bradford
and Bustos-Montes, 24,
those arrested were Nina
Paul DeMeester Mehrnoosh Cragg, 24,
of Palo Alto; Emmanuel
Hyland, 25, of East Palo Alto, Ralph Vernon
Fields Jr., 27, of East Palo Alto; Tyrone
Love-Lopez, 22, of East Palo Alto; Eric
Valencia Vargas, 20, of East Palo Alto;
Marvin Jake Ware, 26, of East Palo Alto,
Donte Demon Jordan, 19, of East Palo Alto;
Roshawn Bickham, 25 of Hayward;
LaQuisha Walker, 28, of East Palo Alto;
Leonard James Gaines, 21, of East Palo Alto;
Rodney Levence Mitchell, 22, of Newark;
Robert Wheller Jr., 26, of Hayward; Jerry
Coneal III, 19, of Menlo Park and Miguel
Angel Rivera Jr., 23, of East Palo Alto.
The alleged crime spree began in
September 2012, when Da Vill gangmembers Bradford, Vargas and Ware reportedly
shot into another car on southbound
Highway 101 near the Ralston Avenue exit
and hit two passengers.

bill@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102

Local brief
trains to start and stop quicker while controlling movement during the event of
human error, according to the transit
agency.
The trains are set to run during a two- to
three-hour window between 9 p.m. and 6
a.m. Neighbors may experience noise and
horns during gate crossings at Whipple and
Brewster avenues; Broadway, Maple, Main
and Chestnut streets, as well as the Redwood
City Station pedestrian crossing, according
to Caltrain.
The tests will continue to occur infrequently over the next few months. For more
information
visit
www.caltrain.com/CBOSSPTC.
its concerns about a proposed location in
East San Carlos for a magnet high school
regarding traffic, impacts on nearby
Laureo l a Park, incompatibility with the
city’s General Pl an and significant public opposition. In the letter, signed by
May o r Ro n Co l l i n s , the council
expressed its interest in working together
to find an alternative location for the
school.

REUTERS

Frank Gehrke, chief of snow surveys for the California Department of Water Resources, measures
the snowpack in Phillips.

New survey shows far less
snow than last month in state
By Rich Pedroncelli
and Kristen J. Bender
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ECHO SUMMIT — California’s second
snow survey this winter found the Sierra
Nevada snowpack is far below normal after a
dry, unusually warm January.
The survey on Thursday found a snowpack
water equivalent of just 2.3 inches in the
scant snowpack near Echo Summit, about
90 miles east of Sacramento.
It amounted to just 12 percent of the longterm average for this time of year at the
snow course.
The snowpack supplies about a third of
the water needed by state residents, agriculture and industry. A higher snowpack translates to more water for California reservoirs
to meet demand in summer and fall.

Frank Gehrke, chief of the California
Cooperative Snow Surveys Program, said
there were 7.1 inches of snow on the ground
Thursday.
During the first winter snow survey on
Dec. 30, there were 21.3 inches of snow on
the ground after heavy storms.
“January did not bring any joy,” Gehrke
said. “In December at least we had some
(snowfall) whereas in January we’ve had
zilch. Clearly that is a big concern because
as we move into the spring, the likelihood
of storms drops off.”
The National Weather Service said this
month is likely to be one of the five driest
Januarys on record for Northern California.
The latest survey makes it likely that the
drought will run through a fourth consecutive year. Gov. Jerry Brown declared a
drought emergency on Jan. 17, 2014.

6

LOCAL/STATE

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

Obituaries
Ernie Bean
Ernie Bean died peacefully surrounded by his wife and children who adored him endlessly.
Born in Redwood City to Tex and Vera
Bean, Ernie loved the trucking and crane
business, successfully running E.H. Bean
Trucking and Rigging alongside his
father for nearly 50 years.  
Ernie is survived by Dona, his wife of
65 years, sisters Nancy Morze and Betty
Cheek, and children, Debra Uccelli
(Rich), Ernie (Trynn), Vicki Kirkland
(Jim), Lori Ceccotti (Jack) and Janet
Mauro (Mark), five grandchildren, two
great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews.
He committed himself to building a loving home for his
family and, when grandchildren arrived, he attacked the role
of grandpa with gusto.
“His family always knew to whom they could turn to for
support and a loving hug. He was a problem-solver and toollender for all who knew him. A man of few words but many
stories, the sound of his deep chuckle will forever echo in our
hearts.”
A funeral mass will be 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 31 at St. Pius
Church in Redwood City. In lieu of flowers. the family
request donations to the St. Pius School Endowment Fund.
Please sign the guestbook at www.crippenflynn.com.

Charles John Simontacchi
Charles John Simontacchi, late of South San Francisco
and San Mateo County resident for 82 years, died at his home
Jan. 28, 2015.
Husband of the late Lola Simontacchi,
father of Tami Duff (her husband George);
Frances Simontacchi; Nanci and the late
Cheryl Angeli. Also survived by his
grandchildren George Jr., Holly, Nicole,
Mariah, David, Stephani, Cathy, Lance;
and great-grandchildren Jase, Lance,
Nathan and Gianno along with his other
grandchildren,
great-grandchildren,
nieces, nephews and cousins.
Raised in South San Francisco, California, age 82 years.
A life member of the Masonic Lodge No. 370; a former
instructor at Cahill’s Judo in San Bruno; a retired window
cleaner of Local No. 44, veteran of the U.S. Navy.
Family and friends may visit at noon Thursday, Feb. 5 at
the Chapel of the Highlands, El Camino Real at 194
Millwood Drive in Millbrae, with a funeral liturgy beginning at 2 p.m. Inurnment will be at Woodlawn Memorial
Park in Colma.
In lieu of flowers, his family prefers donations to the
American Diabetes Association at www.diabetes.org or to
The Peninsula Humane Society at www.peninsulahumanesociety.org.
As a public serv ice, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of
approx imately 200 words or less with a photo one time on a
space av ailable basis. To submit obituaries, email information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdaily journal.com.
Free obituaries are edited for sty le, clarity, length and grammar. If y ou would lik e to hav e an obituary printed on a specific date, or more than once, or longer than 200 words or
without editing, please submit an inquiry to our adv ertising
department at news@smdaily journal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Some doctors won’t see patients
that don’t vaccinate children
By Alicia Chang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — With California
gripped by a measles outbreak, Dr.
Charles Goodman posted a clear notice
in his waiting room and on Facebook:
His practice will no longer see children whose parents won’t get them
vaccinated.
“Parents who choose not to give
measles shots, they’re not just putting
their kids at risk, but they’re also putting other kids at risk — especially
kids in my waiting room,” the Los
Angeles pediatrician said.
It’s a sentiment echoed by a small
number of doctors who in recent years
have “fired” patients who continue to
believe debunked research linking vaccines to autism. They hope the strategy will lead parents to change their
minds; if that fails, they hope it will at
least reduce the risk to other children
in the office.
The tough-love approach — which
comes amid the nation’s secondbiggest measles outbreak in at least 15
years, with at least 98 cases reported
since last month — raises questions
about doctors’ ethical responsibilities. Most of the measles cases have
been traced directly or indirectly to
Disneyland in Southern California.
The American Academy of Pediatrics
says doctors should bring up the
importance of vaccinations during vis-

REUTERS

Eighty-six percent of the scientists said childhood vaccines such as the MMR
(measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine should be mandatory, compared to 68
percent of the general public.
its but should respect a parent’s wishes
unless there’s a significant risk to the
child.
“In general, pediatricians should
avoid discharging patients from their
practices solely because a parent refuses to immunize his or her child, ”
according to guidelines issued by the
group.
However, if the relationship
between patient and doctor becomes
unworkable, the pediatrics academy

Tentative ruling: California
must adopt execution process
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — California must
adopt a new process for executing condemned inmates after nearly three
years of delays, a state judge ruled
Thursday in a lawsuit filed by crime
victims.
The tentative ruling by Sacramento
Superior Court Judge Shellyanne
Chang does not order the state to
resume executions, which have been on
hold since 2006. But she said corrections officials can’t wait any longer to
find a new way to conduct executions if
they are reinstituted.
The lawsuit seeks to force state corrections officials to adopt procedures
for a single-drug, barbiturate-only
method of execution.
Chang found that the state

Department of Corrections and
Rehabilitation has a duty to adopt execution procedures, but has the sole discretion to decide how the state will
carry out the death penalty.
The department said it has been drafting new lethal injection regulations,
without putting them into effect since
Gov. Jerry Brown said in April 2012
that the state would switch to a singledrug lethal injection.
No executions can occur until the
new rules are adopted by the department.
The department is reviewing the tentative ruling, said spokeswoman
Deborah Hoffman. She previously said
a nationwide shortage of execution
drugs is slowing the process.
Chang’s ruling will take effect unless
officials can change her mind after oral
arguments scheduled for Friday.

says, the doctor may want to encourage the vaccine refuser to go to another physician.
Some mothers who have been
dropped by their doctors feel “betrayed
and upset, ” said Dotty Hagmier,
founder of the support group Moms in
Charge. She said these parents made up
their minds about vaccines after “careful research and diligence to understand
the risks versus the benefits for their
own children’s circumstances.”

Around the state
California state parks seeking
younger and diverse visitors
FRESNO — The future of
California’s state parks depends on
attracting younger and ethnically
diverse people from cities to experience the state’s vast natural scenery,
according to a commission tasked
with reforming the state parks department.
Parks Forward, the commission
formed following a 2012 scandal
inside the California Department of
Parks and Recreation, will present this
recommendation and others on Friday
in a report to state lawmakers.
The report also calls for forming a
non-profit, called Parks California, to
partner with other organizations and
bring the department financial stability. It also calls for upgrading technology and ending an outdated management practices such as promoting only
law enforcement rangers to leadership
positions.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

7

Obama calls for spending surge, buoyed by economy
By Josh Lederman
and Andrew Taylor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Declaring an end to
“mindless austerity, ” President Barack
Obama called for a surge in government
spending Thursday, and asked Congress to
throw out the sweeping budget cuts both
parties agreed to four years ago when
deficits were spiraling out of control.
Obama’s proposed $74 billion in added
spending — about 7 percent — would be
split about evenly between defense programs and the domestic side of the budget.
Although he’s sought before to reverse the
“sequester” spending cuts, Obama’s pitch
in this year’s budget comes with the added
oomph of an improving economy and big
recent declines in federal deficits.
Taking a defiant tone, Obama vowed not
to stand on the sidelines as he laid out his
opening offer to Congress during remarks
in Philadelphia, where House Democrats
were gathered for their annual retreat.
“We need to stand up and go on offensive
and not be defensive about what we believe
in,” Obama said. Mocking Republicans for

their leaders’ newfound interest in poverty
and the middle class, he questioned
whether they would back it up with substance when it mattered.
Republicans promise to produce a balanced budget blueprint this spring even as
they worry about Pentagon spending. The
Senate’s No. 2 Republican, John Cornyn
of Texas, dismissed the Obama proposals
as “happy talk.” And Sen. Pat Toomey of
Pennsylvania chided the president for
“abandoning spending discipline.”
GOP lawmakers are focused primarily on
reversing restraints on military spending,
while Democrats and Obama are seeking
new domestic dollars for education,
research, health care and infrastructure.
Republicans argue that spending more in
so many areas would undo the hard-fought
reductions in the country’s annual deficit.
They also oppose many of the tax hikes
Obama has proposed to pay for the
increased spending.
Neither party has tender feelings for the
sequester, which cut bluntly across the
entire federal budget and was originally
designed more as a threat than as an actual
spending plan.

REUTERS

Barack Obama makes a point with his finger as he delivers remarks at the House Democratic
Issues Conference in Pennsylvania.

Senate passes bill approving Keystone XL oil pipeline
By Dina Cappiello
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Republican-controlled Senate on Thursday approved a bipartisan bill to construct the Keystone XL oil
pipeline, defying a presidential veto threat
and setting up the first of many battles with
the White House over energy and the environment.
The 62-36 vote advanced a top priority of
the newly empowered GOP, and marked the
first time the Senate passed a bill authorizing the pipeline, despite numerous attempts
to force President Barack Obama’s hand on
the issue. Nine Democrats joined with 53
Republicans to back the measure.

This bill “is an important accomplishment for the country,” said Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. “We are
hoping the president upon reflection will
agree to sign on to a bill that the State
Department said could create up to 42,000
jobs and the State Department said creates
little to no impact on the environment.”
Still the vote was short of the threshold
needed to override a veto, and the legislation
still must be reconciled with the version the
House passed.
“We hope President Obama will now drop
his threat to veto this common-sense bill
that would strengthen our energy security
and create thousands and thousands of new,
good-paying American jobs,” said House

Speaker John Boehner.
Most Democrats framed the bill as a gift to
a foreign oil company that would have little
benefit for the American people, because
much of the oil would be exported. They
tried and failed to get amendments on the
bill to construct the pipeline with U.S.
steel, ban exports of the oil and the products
refined from it, and protect water resources.
The Senate agreed to add an energy efficiency measure, and went on the record saying climate change was not a hoax and the
oil sands should be subject to a tax that
helps pay for oil spill cleanups. Oil sands
are currently exempt.
“This bill is a disgrace,” said Sen. Barbara
Boxer, D-Calif., the top Democrat on the

Senate environment committee. “We tried
on our side to make this a better bill and
they turned us away.”
TransCanada Corp., the pipeline’s developer, disputed the export argument
Thursday, saying it didn’t make sense.
“Those who argue this pipeline is for
export are not being factual,” said Russ
Girling, president and CEO of TransCanada.
“It’s time to approve Keystone XL so we can
transport Canadian and American oil to fuel
the everyday lives of the American people.”
In Philadelphia, anti-pipeline protesters
chanted outside a hotel where Obama was
addressing a retreat of Democratic lawmakers: “Hey, Obama, we don’t want no
Keystone drama.”

8

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

LOCAL/STATE/NATION

Boy Scouts settle
suit over abuse H
By Gillian Flaccus
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — The Boy Scouts of
America settled a sex abuse case Thursday
involving a 20-year-old California man
who was molested by a Scout volunteer in
2007 — a decision that will keep years’
worth of “perversion” files detailing sex
abuse allegations secret from the public.
The announcement of the settlement in
the Santa Barbara case came after three days
of trial. The terms were confidential at the
Boy Scouts’ request, said Tim Hale, the
plaintiff’s attorney.
“I can’t go into details about the number,
but it was a great result,” Hale said.
Hale had won the right to use the “perversion” files to try to show the Boy Scouts
were negligent by not properly training,
educating and warning parents, Scouts and
volunteers about sexual abuse.
He told jurors in his opening statement
that they would receive a CD with 100,000
pages of internal documents from 1971 to
2007 during their deliberations. Many of
the documents have not been seen outside
the Scouts.
The plaintiff’s attorneys had planned to
use up to 100 “egregious” files next week

Attorney general nominee
wins GOP endorsements
WASHINGTON — Attorney general nominee Loretta Lynch won two key Republican
endorsements Thursday
en route to likely confirmation as the first black
woman in the nation’s
top law enforcement job.
“I believe she’s not
only qualified but exceptionally well-qualified
and a very good person,
Loretta Lynch to boot, ” Sen. Orrin
Hatch of Utah, a senior
Republican on the Senate Judiciary
Committee, declared from the dais on the
second day of Lynch’s confirmation hearing to replace Eric Holder.
Another committee Republican, Sen. Jeff
Flake of Arizona, said later he, too, intended to back Lynch. GOP Sen. Lindsey
Graham of South Carolina said he was
inclined to do the same.
That seemed to guarantee Lynch’s
approval by the Judiciary Committee in
coming weeks, since she needs only two
Republican votes on the panel if all
Democrats back her. From there, her nomination would move to the full Senate, where
she also is likely to win approval.

Poll shows giant gap between
what public, scientists think
WASHINGTON — The American public
and U.S. scientists are light-years apart on
science issues. And 98 percent of surveyed
scientists say it’s a problem that we don’t
know what they’re talking about.

while cross-examining witnesses and eliciting testimony from experts, Hale said.
Two files were discussed in open court in
the first three days of trial, he added.
The plaintiff’s law firm has the remaining
files but they are sealed by a judge’s protective order.
Past settlements in similar cases in Texas
and Minnesota also kept the records secret.
In an emailed statement, the Boy Scouts
said the Scouts were “safer because those
files exist” and said in 2012 the Boy Scouts
of America National Council reviewed all
the files from 1965 to the present and
reported to authorities any files that did not
clearly indicate a prior report had been made
to police.
“The behavior included in these reports
runs counter to everything for which the
BSA stands,” Deron Smith, the Boy Scouts
spokesman, said in an emailed statement.
“We regret there have been times when the
BSA’s best efforts to protect children were
insufficient, and for that we extend our deepest apologies to victims and their families.”
The Boy Scouts’ decision to settle three
days into trial is telling, especially with the
files in play, said Jody Armour, a law professor at the University of Southern California
who is familiar with the case.

Around the nation
Scientists are far less worried about
genetically modified food, pesticide use and
nuclear power than is the general public,
according to matching polls of both the
general public and the country’s largest
general science organization. Scientists
were more certain that global warming is
caused by man, evolution is real, overpopulation is a danger and mandatory vaccination against childhood diseases is needed.
In eight of 13 science-oriented issues,
there was a 20-percentage-point or higher
gap separating the opinions of the public
and members of the American Association
for the Advancement of Science, according
to survey work by the Pew Research Center.

Panel recommending changes
to military health care, benefits
WASHINGTON — Top U.S. leaders and
members of Congress reacted cautiously
Thursday to the recommendations of an
independent panel to change the military’s
retirement and health care systems.
The proposals, which would save more
than $20 billion over the next four years,
would allow some of the programs to operate more like existing federal employee
systems, and give service members and
their families greater flexibility in their
health care and retirement choices. There
were no recommended changes to military
pay.
Lawmakers so far have been reluctant to
tamper much with the benefits that
America’s troops and their families receive.
President Barack Obama said he will review
the findings.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Reporters’ notebook

al f Mo o n Bay ’s new Ci ty
Manag er Mag da Go nzal ez
received the 2 0 1 5 Ethi cal Hero
Award from the Internati o nal
Ci ty / Co unty Manag ement
As s o ci ati o n’s Cal i fo rni a affiliate.
Gonzalez was presented the award Jan. 28
during the Leag ue o f Cal i fo rni a
Ci ti es ’ Ci ty Manag ers Department
conference in San Francisco.
The award pays tribute to an individual
whose work exemplifies and models the
association’s code of ethics. Gonzalez was
chosen as having performed with great dignity, honor and integrity, especially when
faced with ethical challenges and political
pressures.
Gonzalez previously served as East Palo
Alto’s city manager before starting with
Half Moon Bay in August and is the president of the Internati o nal Hi s pani c
Netwo rk.
***
The Fo s ter Ci ty Fi re Department
will begin its next hands-on Co mmuni ty
Emerg ency Res po ns e Team Trai ni ng
Wednesday, Feb. 4.
The free series of seven classes totaling
25 hours, trains civilians on how to appropriately respond during a disaster.
Participants learn lifesaving skills such as
disaster medical care and first aid, rescuer
safety, search and rescue techniques, how to
use a fire extinguisher, radio communications, basic disaster preparedness and more.
Classes are held 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. on
Wednesdays at the Foster City Fire
Department, 1040 E. Hillsdale Blvd. A
skills development and mock earthquake
exercise is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March
21. For more information or to register call
the fire department at (650) 286-3350,
email cert@fostercity.org or visit www.fostercitycert.org.
***
After being chosen from nearly 1,200
applicants, Jeremi e Mey er de Vi l l e won
the Bay Meado ws Fame by Frame pho-

tography contest last Friday.
About 400 people attended the event that
displayed 100 photographs from everyday
shutterbugs who posted them on social
media with the hashtag BayMeadowsLife.
De Ville received 29 votes for his photo
of a mural at the downtown San Mateo
Cal trai n Stati o n and won a $500 grand
prize.
***
Sus tai nabl e San Mateo Co unty
announced the winners of its 1 6 th Annual
Sus tai nabi l i ty Awards . They are:
Dev i l ’s Cany o n Brewi ng Co mpany,
in San Carlos, for their pioneering sustainable beer-making and inventive material
reutilization program; GreenCi ti zen, a
Burlingame e-waste recycler, and Puente
de l a Co s ta Sur, an indispensable
resource center for the people of the South
Coast. The brand new high school at Bay
Meadows, Nuev a Scho o l , is the Green
Bui l di ng Award winner, with Green
Bui l di ng Ho no rabl e Menti o ns going
to the Kai s er Permanente Redwo o d
Ci ty Repl acement Ho s pi tal and
Jo hns to n’s Sal two rks in San Carlos.
***
Off the Gri d is planning an event in
Foster City at Leo J. Ry an Park 5 p.m.9 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18 in partnership
with the Parks and Recreati o n
Department. The event will offer
Adirondack chairs overlooking the beautiful Fo s ter Ci ty Lag o o n and feature a
“pop-up” beer garden offering beer and
wine options in the coming months.
Featured trucks will include: Hi l l Co untry
BBQ, Sam’s Cho wder Mo bi l e, We
Sus hi , Euro bi s tro s , Chees e Go ne
Wi l d, Baco n Baco n, SAJJ, Hi y aaa,
Crepe ‘Em Co mi ng , Bl endi d and
Jo hnny Do ug hnuts .
The Reporters’ Notebook is a weekly collection of
facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily Journal
staff. It appears in the Friday edition.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

Letters to the editor
Serra’s actions
Editor,
Serra High School knew the consequences of canceling, at a very late
date, a CCS playoff football game, citing the health of the kids (“Serra football banned from CCS playoffs for two
years” in the Jan. 23 edition of the
Daily Journal). 
Now if it would have been an upper
tier playoff game, that would have
been worth the risk. That’s what they
implied and I defy anyone to dispute
the fact they would have played and
endured those very same risks if only
it were a upper tier playoff. Heck, the
coach doesn’t get credit for a thirdplace finish. Nope, that wouldn’t be
worth it.
Glad we won’t see Serra in the playoffs for a couple of years. Just give up
football, if that’s how you feel. May I
suggest implementing a rhythmic
lunch program in place of football?
Except for the mayhem of mac and
cheese night, that would be much
safer.  

John Dillon
San Bruno

Embrace the plan
while stuck in traffic
Editor,
It would seem that Peter Carey simply doesn’t understand the plan, otherwise known as “Plan Bay Area”
(“Letter: Citizens against more housing” in the Jan. 27 edition of the
Daily Journal). Yes, there is going to
be more and more housing, and the
roads — never designed for the amount
of traffic that exists even today — will
be more and more impacted until they
are nothing more than parking lots.
On the other hand, when people get
frustrated enough with idling away
their time and their gas, they will see
the light. When the revelation finally
comes, they will decide to make use of
the public transit system that doesn’t
exist, and where it does, doesn’t take
them to where they want to go as
freely and conveniently as they would
in a car, that is, if the car weren’t stuck
in traffic.
See the plan Pete, study the plan,
embrace the plan and you can be
enlightened before you get stuck in
traffic: http://planbayarea.org/.

Matt Grocott
San Carlos

Not the best
decision for Millbrae
Editor,
It seems according to the staff directory, a Mr. Joe Tanner is the finance
director of Millbrae.

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Bill Silverfarb, Austin Walsh, Samantha
Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

I did not see any competitive hiring
process posted on CalOpps, announcement made in a public form, or otherwise disclosure of this hire made. The
name Joe Tanner should be familiar —
he is the former city manager of
Vallejo.
The San Francisco Chronicle reported in 2009 that the city of Vallejo paid
Joe Tanner $390,000 to resign. Tanner
had been a lightning rod for criticism
because his salary of $341,000 annually made him the fourth-highest paid
city manager in the state for a city of
117,000.
With all due respect, I do not think
hiring the former city manager of a
hopelessly bankrupt city in the capacity as financial director is the best
direction for the city.
You almost can’t make this stuff up.

Doug Radtke
Millbrae

Martin Luther King
Jr. supported Israel
Editor,
The 68 protesters who marked
Martin Luther King Jr. Day by carrying a large Palestinian flag across the
San Mateo Bridge, blocking rush-hour
traffic, ostensibly to “reclaim” the day
for Dr. King, clearly don’t know their
history. Dr. King was a proud supporter of Israel.  
In one of Dr. King’s last speeches,
on March 25, 1968, he declared:
“Peace for Israel means security, and
we must stand with all our might to
protect its right to exist, its territorial
integrity. I see Israel as one of the
great outposts of democracy in the
world, and a marvelous example of
what can be done, how desert land can
be transformed into an oasis of brotherhood and democracy. Peace for Israel
means security and that security must
be a reality.”  
Since then, Israel has welcomed
home tens of thousands of immigrants
from Ethiopia and the former Soviet
Union, elevated Israeli Arabs to
Israel’s Supreme Court, traded land for
peace with Egypt and Jordan and
repeatedly offered the Palestinians a
state.  
The Palestinians, by contrast, have
carried out the Munich Olympics massacre of 11 Israelis, the Maalot massacre of 21 Israeli children and
responded to Israel’s peace proposals
by bombing Israeli children in
schools, buses, discos and pizzerias,
killing 1,000 Israelis. The Palestinian
government honors terrorists; persecutes political dissenters, gays and
lesbians; backed Sudanese President
Omar al-Bashir, the architect of the
Darfur genocide; and condones honorkillings and female genital
mutilation.  
If anything, Dr. King would be an

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Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

even stronger champion of Israel
today.

Stephen Silver
San Francisco

Praise for additional
bike cars on Caltrain
Editor,
I’d like to thank Caltrain for its commitment to adding a third bike car to
Bombardier trains this year. I often
take my bike on Caltrain from Palo
Alto to San Francisco on train No.
323, which is usually a Bombardier
train. Particularly on days with good
weather, I often find myself getting
bumped from that train. The addition of
another bike car is a great step in minimizing the number of bumps that I and
my fellow passengers experience during the rush-hour commute.

Dan Golden
Palo Alto

America owes a big thank
you to our police officers
Editor,
America, as a free and civilized society, owes a huge thank you, in appreciation for keeping the public safe, to all
of our nation’s law enforcement officers, whether they are police officers,
sheriff deputies, constables, highway
patrolmen or state troopers.
We, as Americans, know that the job
of a police officer is more dangerous
than ever. We Americans know that
there are people who do not obey our
laws, rules and regulations. We
Americans know that there are people
who use their size, weight and strength
to threaten, fight or try to take away a
police officer’s gun, with the sole
intent of killing the police officer. We
Americans know that there are people
who will threaten the police by pointing a gun at them, whether it is a real
gun or a toy gun painted to look like a
real gun. We Americans know that a
police officer only has a split second
to determine whether a gun pointed at
them is real or fake. We Americans
know that there are people who will
use a knife, or other dangerous
weapons, to threaten and endanger
other people, himself or the police,
and the appropriate action must be
taken by the police. We Americans
know that the recent deaths resulting
from police actions have nothing to do
with race, but, rather the “rule of law”
and the safety of the public.
I, for one, am eternally grateful and
thankful for the presence of the men
and women in law enforcement
throughout our nation. They are the
frontline in the fight to keep our country safe and protected.

Michael R. Oberg
San Mateo
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9

Adding bedrooms to a
bedroom community

W

hen Foster City was initially conceived in
1959, it was envisioned that it could be
home to 60,000 people and connected by a
larger State Route 92 that would travel all the way to the
Sierras. There were also plans for a Bayfront Freeway on
landfill and bridges to the east of the city that would
parallel Highway 101.
Over the course of the following decade, changes took
place that kept 92 the length it is and ended plans for
any freeway to be constructed on fill to the east of the
city. There were also concerns about the impact of so
many new people on the area’s schools. Still, creating
the city was a massive undertaking and its location made
it ideal for growth just off
the bridge and close to
Highway 101. It did grow
but, as of the 2010 census,
its population is just over
30,000. And for a bedroom
community, adding any more
bedrooms is bound to cause
some controversy — particularly since its schools are
overcrowded and there are
only a few ways to get in and
out of the city.
So it is with that in mind
that there is some amount of
controversy over some
recent plans to add more
housing to the city. There is
something called the jobs/housing balance with which
many Peninsula cities are contending as businesses —
particularly in the high-tech and biotech fields — are
booming.
Foster City is definitely seeing its share of that
boom. Just this month, global gene sequencing technology firm Illumina penned a deal to take 360,000
square feet of office, lab and parking space at the 20acre Lincoln Centre development with an option to take
another 160,000 square feet. Gilead Science Inc. is also
in the midst of expanding its headquarters from 40 acres
to 72.59 acres to make room for 5,000 potential new
employees. In short, there is a lot of interest in the city
because of its location and there are already a lot of new
jobs in the pipeline.
Now the question is whether the city wants to expand
its housing stock to keep up. Foster City currently has
826 housing units either approved or under construction
and must create up to 430 additional units to meet its
regional housing needs allocation issued by the state
through the Association of Bay Area Governments.
Some could argue that even those numbers won’t do
much to dent the overall housing need in the city and
the area, but others argue that the city need not participate in planning for the additional units because there is
already too much housing in the city.
So is this a case of the already haves unwilling to
help out those who also want what they have? Sort of.
While other cities on the Peninsula are being aggressive
with what is best known as transit-oriented development based mainly along the Caltrain line, Foster City
is sort of stuck in no-man’s land since it is not a quick
walk away from the nearest train station — the Hillsdale
station in San Mateo. It is largely known as the “lastmile” problem, in that public transit can get people
near their homes and offices but not directly to them.
Granted, shuttles could be used, but they haven’t proven
to be the panacea for the traffic congestion created by
new residents and office workers. So with the impact of
new workers, traffic will likely get worse. Those against
additional housing argue that housing will only add to
that.
Some say that creating new housing will enable workers to live near their jobs, but that is easier said than
done in many cases, though many have a goal of doing
just that. More housing opportunities near an office
building will help, but there is fear it will make it
worse. There is also the matter of impact on alreadyovercrowded schools, but that is a subject of a different
column.
In the bigger picture of regional traffic, one could
argue that creating Foster City from farmland and marshes contributed to the overall issue more than 40 years
ago, but that horse has long left the stable. Now, city
officials must contend with how best to serve its 30,000
residents, many of whom are benefiting from low property taxes because of Proposition 13, while ensuring it
stays competitive both with its tax revenue created by
new businesses and in the larger San Mateo County economic and social ecosystem. It’s a tough situation, for
sure.
Jon May s is the editor in chief of the Daily Journal. He
can be reached at jon@smdaily journal.com. Follow Jon
on Twitter @jonmay s.

10

BUSINESS

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Strong earnings, job news give stocks a lift
By Alex Veiga
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dow
17,416.85 +225.48 10-Yr Bond 1.75 +0.03
Nasdaq 4,683.41 +45.41 Oil (per barrel) 44.50
S&P 500 2,021.25 +19.09 Gold
1,257.90

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
McDonald’s Corp., up $4.49 to $93.27
The fast food restaurant operator’s president and CEO Don Thompson
will step down as the company struggles with declining sales.
Coach Inc., up $2.48 to $38.94
The handbag and accessories retailer reported better-than-expected
quarterly profit.
Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., down $8.64 to $89.81
The e-commerce company reported mixed quarterly results as it faces
scrutiny from the Chinese government over the sale of counterfeit goods.
Kate Spade & Co., up $1.95 to $31.68
The apparel retailer posted positive 2014 sales and will close some stores
to redirect focus on its flagship brand.
Nasdaq
Yahoo Inc., down $2.73 to $43.73
The technology company’s stake in Alibaba is becoming less valuable as
that company deals with a counterfeit-goods issue.
Qualcomm Inc. Inc., down $7.30 to $63.69
The chipmaker cut its profit outlook for the year, citing increasing
competition in China and an issue with a major customer.
Extreme Networks Inc., up 26 cents to $3.04
The maker of network infrastructure equipment reported better-thanexpected fiscal second-quarter profit and revenue.
Flextronics International Ltd., up 78 cents to $11.35
The electronics designer and manufacturer reported better-thanexpected quarterly results and a positive outlook.

After a shaky start, U. S. stocks
rebounded Thursday, snapping a twoday losing streak.
Investors welcomed better-thanexpected quarterly results from several
companies, including Ford, Coach and
Harley-Davidson. Homebuilder stocks
surged.
Even energy stocks, which were
down most of the day, recovered in
concert with a slight uptick in oil
prices. Benchmark U.S. crude oil rose
8 cents to close at $44.53 a barrel.
New government data showing that
applications for unemployment benefits fell to the lowest level in almost
15 years added a dash of favorable economic news.
The broader market rally helped the
major stock indexes regain some of
the ground they lost earlier in the
week, though they remain down for
the year.
“We’ve had a bit of a turnaround
since the lows we saw earlier in the
day,” said Anastasia Amoroso, global
market strategist at J. P. Morgan
Funds. “It appears earnings outside of
energy (stocks) have been rather
strong.”
Investors have had no shortage of
market-moving news to digest this

week, from the outcome of a national
election in Greece with potential
implications for the Eurozone, to the
Federal Reserve’s latest take on the
economy and interest rates. It’s also
the busiest week of the current earnings season, with 142 companies in
the Standard & Poor’s 500 scheduled
to report.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 225.48 points, or 1.3 percent, to
close at 17, 416. 85. The S&P 500
index gained 19.09 points, or 1 percent, to 2,021.25. The Nasdaq composite added 45.41 points, or 1 percent, to 4,683.41.
The gains were broad. All 10 sectors
in the S&P 500 rose, led by materials
stocks. Even energy stocks, which are
down more than any other sector this
year, eked out a 0.2 percent gain.
Electronics and audio equipment
maker Harman International Industries
led among the gainers, rising $24, or
23.7 percent, to $125.01. The company reported better-than-expected quarterly results and raised its profit forecast for the year.
Chipmaker Qualcomm notched the
biggest drop among stocks in the S&P
500, shedding $7.30, or 10.3 percent,
to $63.69.
The major market indexes drifted
along through much of Thursday
before turning higher in the after-

noon. For much of the day, investors
looked mainly on the latest batch of
corporate earnings.
Homebuilders
surged
after
PulteGroup reported that completed
home sales increased 7 percent in the
October-December quarter. PulteGroup
climbed $1. 24, or 6 percent, to
$21.82. Rival Ryland Group led the
sector, climbing $2.95, or 8 percent,
to $39.62.
Traders also digested the implications of the steep drop in weekly
unemployment benefit claims last
week.
The big drop is a sign that hiring
will likely remain healthy, which
could bolster the case for the Federal
Reserve to raise interest rates from
near zero sooner, rather than later,
said Doug Cote, chief market strategist
for
Voya
Investment
Management.
“The market is reacting to the Fed
being intent on normalizing interest
rate policy, and today’s numbers added
to that pressure,” Cote said.
Higher interest rates tend to make
stocks less attractive in comparison
to bonds.
The S&P 500 hit a record in late
December, and it’s remained relatively
close to that since. Expectations for
earnings, meanwhile, have been sinking with the price of crude oil.

Even with low prices, U.S. oil industry pushing for exports
By Henry C. Jackson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Never mind dropping
oil prices. U.S. producers are pushing harder than ever for the right to sell U.S. crude
oil overseas.
It might seem counterintuitive: Oil prices
are as low as they have been at any point
since 2009 and the height of the Great
Recession, and some say they could drop
even further. But oil producers are playing a
longer game, betting that long-term
demand will be strong and new markets offer
lucrative rewards for U.S. producers.
Supporters see possible inroads in a

Congress controlled by Republicans who
generally are considered more receptive to
oil exports, as well as some signs that the
Obama administration may at least be open
to consider changes to longstanding policy, which bans the export of raw crude.
The ban was put in place in the 1970s
after the OPEC oil embargo led to fuel
rationing, high prices and iconic images of
long lines of cars waiting to fuel up.
The American Petroleum Institute, the oil
industry’s top lobbying arm, is running TV
ads highlighting the growth of the U.S.
shale oil industry as evidence that the
there’s enough oil for both domestic and
overseas markets. The organization lists

overturning the ban as its top priority for
2015.
Jack Gerard, the organization’s president,
said the policy is the result of “a politically
motivated disconnect between today’s
much-changed energy landscape and the
political orthodoxy of some who continue
to push for arbitrary and unfair limits or an
outright ban.”
Besides the financial incentive, Gerard
and supporters argue that lifting the ban
would help control prices for consumers and
give the U.S. a stronger hand in foreign
policy.
Opponents argue just the opposite: They
say exporting oil now would result in high-

Google’s 4Q earnings disappoint, but CFO eases the letdown
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Google has gotten
into the habit of missing analysts’ earnings
targets, frustrating investors who believe
the online search leader would be more profitable it wasn’t pouring so much money into
far-flung projects such as Internet-connected
eyewear and driverless cars.
The latest letdown came Thursday with the
release of Google’s fourth-quarter financial
results. The earnings were well below analysts’ predictions, marking the fifth consecutive quarter that Google Inc. hasn’t cleared
a key hurdle for publicly held companies.
But investors’ disappointment with the
performance seemed to dissipate during a
pep talk by Google Chief Financial Officer
Patrick Pichette. He assured investors that

Google intends to spend in a “prudent manner” and left open the possibility that the
company might funnel some of its $64 billion in cash back to shareholders, especially if a law is passed to allow money stashed
in overseas accounts to be brought to the
U.S. at lower tax rates.
Those remarks, made during conference
call to discuss the results, reversed an initial
sell-off in Google’s stock.
After shedding 2 percent in extended trading, the shares rebounded to post a 2 percent
gain of $10.47 to $523.70. At the end of
Thursday’s regular session, Google’s stock
had dropped by 8 percent from where it stood
just 13 months ago. The Standard & Poor’s
500 index has climbed by 9 percent over the
same stretch.
Google earned $4.8 billion, or $6.91 per
share, a 41 percent increase from the same

period in 2013. If not for certain expenses
and gains, Google said it would have earned
$6.88 per share. Analysts, on average, had
forecast earnings of $7.12 per share, according to FactSet.
Google’s revenue for the period covering
the holiday shopping season rose 15 percent to $18.1 billion. After subtracting ad
commissions, revenue stood at $14.5 billion — nearly $250 million below analysts’
expectations.
“They are still in investment mode and
that is affecting (profit) margins,” Edward
Jones analyst Josh Olson said.
Pichette described the fourth quarter as
“noisy” because the strengthening dollar
depressed the quarter’s revenue by about
$468 million from what it would have been
had currency rates remained unchanged from
a year earlier.

Visa 1Q profit rises 11 percent, sets 4-for-1 stock split
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Visa’s quarterly profit rose
11 percent as consumer spending grew on
the credit and debit card processor’s massive
payment network.
Visa said Thursday it earned $1.57 billion,
or $2.53 per share, in the October-December
quarter. That compares with a profit of $1.41
billion, or $2.20 per share, in the same period a year ago.
Revenue was $3.38 billion, up from $3.16
billion.
Analysts surveyed by FactSet expected

Visa to earn $2.49 per share on $3.34 billion in sales.
Visa, and its competitor MasterCard, do
not issue credit and debit cards directly.
Instead, the two companies operate payment
networks that banks and merchants sign up
to use, and in exchange Visa and MasterCard
take a percentage of each sale as a fee.
However, since the companies are directly
exposed to spending trends, the companies
function as barometers for the health of the
U.S. consumer.
Visa said it processed $1.2 trillion in payments on its network in the latest quarter, up
11 percent compared to a year ago. Most of

the growth was in the U.S., where payment
volumes were $651 billion in the quarter,
compared with $591 billion in the same
period before.
Visa’s results echoed similar comments
from American Express, which operates its
own payment network and also issues its
own branded credit cards. American Express
said last week it saw a notable uptick in consumer spending late last year.
Visa also announced a 4-for-1 stock split,
effective March 19.
Shares of Visa rose 4 percent in aftermarket trading to $259.03. The stock has
gained 14 percent in the past 12 months.

er gas prices and prevent the U.S. from
achieving a goal of energy independence.
Opponents include many domestic oil refiners, which stand to lose business if crude oil
is exported.
“The oil markets and the markets for various petroleum products are extremely complicated and I think that to mess with this
upsets the equilibrium that’s there,” said Jay
Hauk, executive director of Consumers and
Refiners United for Domestic Energy, or
CRUDE, which represents a group of oil
refiners.
Hauck said the policy shouldn’t change
while the U.S. continues to import great
quantities of oil.

Business briefs
Broadcom tops Street 4Q forecasts
IRVINE — Broadcom Corp. on Thursday
reported fourth-quarter results that topped
Wall Street’s expectations.
The communications chipmaker cited
strong sales to the high-end smartphone
and broadband access markets.
The Irvine-based company posted net
income of $390 million, or 64 cents per
share in the quarter that ended Dec. 31. That
was up from $168 million, or 29 cents a
share, a year ago.
Earnings, adjusted for one-time gains and
costs, came to 90 cents per share in the latest quarter.
The results topped Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was
for earnings of 87 cents per share.

Samsung getting squeezed
SAN FRANCISCO — The runaway success
of Apple’s newest iPhone has fueled a dramatic shift in the global market: the
California tech giant is now neck-and-neck
with South Korea’s Samsung for the title of
world’s leading seller of smartphones.
Apple set the standard for modern smartphones when it released the first iPhone in
2007, but Samsung has been the market
leader since 2011 with its series of supersized smartphones that run on Google’s
Android software. However, Apple made
huge gains in the last quarter, selling 74.5
million iPhones — nearly 50 percent more
than a year earlier — after introducing two
bigger models to compete with Samsung’s
high-end Galaxy S phones.

NBA ALL-STAR RESERVES NAMED: ATLANTA PLACES THREE ON EAST TEAM; WARRIORS’ THOMPSON GETS FIRST ALL-STAR NOD >> PAGE 15

<<< Page 12, Sharks hammer
Ducks to open second half
Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

Panthers stay in second
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The second half of the Peninsula Athletic
League Bay Division girls’ soccer season began
Thursday and coaches’ focus now are to make
sure to finish in the top three in the standings to
assure an automatic berth into the Central Coast
Section playoffs.
With first-place and undefeated Woodside an
almost certain lock to be one of those three
teams, that leaves two spots left.
Both Burlingame and Menlo-Atherton are two
of those teams battling for those playoff spots.
The Panthers came into Thursday’s game in
second place and, with 14 points entering the
game, were only one point ahead of third place
Carlmont. M-A was sitting in fourth place with
11 points.
When the final whistle blew, Burlingame had
solidified its second-place standing with a hardfought 2-1 win over the Bears.
“The ultimate goal is top-3 (in the PAL standings) because [those spots] are automatic qualifiers,” said Burlingame coach Philip DeRosa.
“We just have to take care our business. No question, this (win) was huge.”
It certainly didn’t come easy for Burlingame
(5-1-2 PAL Bay, 8-2-4 overall). The Panthers
scored a pair of first-half goals, but M-A (3-3-2,
6-4-3) scored before halftime to trail 2-1 at the
break.
The Bears applied plenty of pressure in the
second half and had three golden opportunities
to at least tie the game, but all three chances
went for naught.
“It’s frustrating,” said M-A coach Jason Luce.
“We just didn’t get it done.”
M-A outshot Burlingame 7-1 in the second
half, turning the tables from a first half that saw
the Panthers have the better chances, outshooting M-A 9-4 in the opening 40 minutes.
The Bears had a couple of dangerous moments
in the opening minutes of the second half. The
first came in the 52nd minute when Annie
Harrier’s shot from about 12 yards crashed off
the crossbar. A couple minutes later, Amanda
Wiseman’s strike sailed just over the top of the
Burlingame goal.
M-A’s last chance was probably its best to
forge a tie. With about 10 minutes to play,

Skyline rallies
for comeback
in 2015 opener
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

This week marks the start of the 2015
California Community College baseball
season. And boy was Skyline in seventh
heaven on opening day.
The Trojans (1-0) rallied for seven runs in
the seventh inning for a 12-6 come-frombehind victory over Laney College-Oakland
(1-1) Thursday at Skyline College.
With the Trojans trailing
by one run in the bottom
of the seventh, No. 9 hitter
Michael Franco delivered a
clutch bases-loaded, tworun single to put Skyline
ahead 7-6. Franco’s single
opened the flood gates as
the Trojans ultimately sent
10 batters to the plate in
Michael Franco the seven-run inning.
“I knew it was going to be a big at-bat,”
Franco said. “So, I knew I had to get it done
and put the ball in play.”
After both teams’ starting pitchers saw
abbreviated days, the Trojans turned to
right-hander Mike Espino to start the fifth
inning. The freshman threw five scoreless
frames to earn the win. Laney right-hander
Zack Petray took the loss after working 3
2/3 innings.
Through two varsity seasons at El
Camino, Espino never recorded a win
through nine career outings. So, Thursday’s
opening-day win in the freshman’s collegiate debut was one to savor. He allowed just
three hits and walked one while just one
Laney base runner reached scoring position
against him.
“I just knew I had to throw strikes,”
Espino said. “I just had to command my
pitches and my defense would make plays.”
Indeed, the Skyline defense played a flawless game. The Trojans didn’t commit any
errors and got excellent glove work from the
sophomores on the left side of their infield,

Burlingame’s Alexis Prieto wins a header in the second half of the Panthers’ 2-1 win over
See BGAME, Page 14 Menlo-Atherton Thursday in a key PAL Bay Division matchup.

See SKYLINE, Page 16

Hoodie, scowl hide Reported concussions
the Belichick impact down 25 percent in NFL
By Howard Fendrich

By Barry Wilner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHOENIX — He’s been called the Evil
Genius, and he’s been fined for spying on an
opponent. And now there are questions
about deflated footballs.
Any visual portrait of Bill Belichick likely has him wearing a hoodie — and a scowl.
Many of his media duties are marked by terse
answers or outright stonewalling.
All of which masks the impact and
longevity of the New England Patriots
boss, the winningest coach in postseason
NFL history.
Belichick is about to lead his team into its
sixth Super Bowl in 14 seasons. No one,
not Chuck Noll or Tom Landry or Marv Levy
or Bill Walsh — all Hall of Famers — managed that. Since Belichick took over the
Patriots in 2000 after a five-season flop as
head man in Cleveland, there have been 119
coaching changes. In the AFC East alone,
which the Patriots have won 12 of 14 seasons, 17 coaches have come and gone,
according to STATS.

Belichick is the constant.
“I think Coach is
always pretty consistent
with how he’s dealt with
our team, ” Tom Brady
said. “You don’t ride the
highs and lows of the season. Whether it’s one win
Bill Belichick or one loss, you just try
to get better and make
improvements, and you’ve got to play your
best at the end.
“It’s hard to make our team. Coach
Belichick puts a lot of pressure on guys in
training camp. If you make the team, you
know that you have the confidence of the
coaches that you can help us win.
Everybody’s got a skill. Everybody’s got a
skill set. Whoever is on the field has to be
able to go out there and perform their job.”
In the face of the controversies and criticisms the Patriots have faced during his
tenure, Belichick’s approach remains the
same. Yes, he often comes off as ornery, but

See BELICHICK, Page 14

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHOENIX — The number of recorded concussions dropped 25 percent during the regular season, according to the NFL, even as
injury reporting and trips to injured reserve
list rose overall.
Data released by the league Thursday
shows there were 111 concussions in games
during the 2014 regular season, down from
148 in 2013, and 173 in 2012, a 36 percent
drop over that three-year span.
This follows repeated changes by the NFL
meant to cut down on blows to the head,
including reduced practice time and rules
protecting defenseless receivers and barring leading with the crown of the helmet.
“It would have been nice if we had started
this in 1930, but we didn’t,” said San
Francisco 49ers chairman John York, who
leads the owners’ health and safety committee. “And as things came to our attention,
we took more interest in looking at these
questions.”
When preseason games, plus preseason
and regular-season practices, are included,

the 202 concussions this season declined
12 percent from 2013, and 23 percent from
2012. That’s despite no new rules meant to
protect players’ heads.
“Players are changing the way they’re
tackling,” NFL Senior Vice President of
Health and Safety Policy Jeff Miller said.
“They’re changing the way they play the
game.”
Addressing two other areas of player
health, Miller said that as concussions have
gone down, “We have not seen a correlation
with an increase of knee injuries, at all,”
and that “for the fourth consecutive year,
injuries on Thursdays are no greater than
they are on Sunday and Monday.”
In all, the concussion rate is down to 0.43
per game, Miller said, adding: “You have to
play more than two games to get a concussion in the NFL, by those numbers.”
A total of 59 concussions were caused by
helmet-to-helmet or shoulder-to-helmet
hits this season, the league’s data says,
almost exactly half as many as two years
ago.
“With all the technological innovations

See NFL, Page 14

12

SPORTS

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

Girls’ soccer
Sacred Heart Prep 5, Woodside Priory 1
The Gators scored two times in the first half and
added three more in the second Thursday to stay atop
the West Bay Athletic League Foothill Division standings with an undefeated record.
Sophomore Olivia Athens scored four goals for SHP
(6-0 WBAL Foothill, 12-2-1 overall), with senior
Nicole Wheeler rounding out the scoring.
Junior Tierna Davidson had three assists for the
Gators.

Crystal Springs 8, Mercy-Burlingame 1
The Gryphons scored five times in the first half as
they maintained their top spot in the WBAL Skyline
Division with a rout of the Crusaders.
Freshman Nikki Lee had a breakout game for Crystal
Springs (5-0-1 WBAL Skyline, 10-4-1 overall), scoring four times and assisting on two others. Britney
Biddle, Jaime Cleron, Megan Duncanson and Hannah
Williams all scored once for the Gryphons, while EV
Nora, Ally Solorzano and Duncanson all added assists.
Kayla Cullivan scored the lone goal for MercyBurlingame (2-5, 3-10).

WEDNESDAY
Boys’ basketball
Burlingame 54, Hillsdale 49
The Panthers got a team-high 13 points from Justin
Gutang as they held off the Knights in a Peninsula
Athletic League South Division game.
Hillsdale (4-3 PAL South, 13-6 overall) led 16-10 at
halftime, but Burlingame (6-1, 10-9) rallied to tie the
score at 25 at halftime.
Burlingame’s front line of Tyler Garlitos and Bassel
Mufarreh combined for 18 points, scoring nine points
apiece.
Hillsdale was led by Adam Cook, who scored a
game-high 19 points.

Mills 45, Carlmont 24
The Vikings jumped out to a 19-5 lead after the first
quarter and never looked back as they cruised to the
win over the Scots.
Mills (7-0 PAL South, 15-4 overall) led 30-11 at
halftime.
Brandon Matsuno paced the Vikings with a gamehigh 14 points. Marquis Adkins added 10 in the victory.
Sophomore forward Jacob Lloyd led Carlmont (2-5,
9-9) with eight points.

San Mateo 41, Menlo-Atherton 34
The Bearcats beat the Bears for their second win in
three games.
The difference was at the free throw line, where San
Mateo (2-5 PAL South, 7-12 overall) out-scored M-A
(4-3, 10-9) 11-3.
Brendon Wong scored a game-high 12 points to lead
the Bearcats to the win. Jeremiah Tankhim added nine.
M-A was paced by Eric Norton and Blake Henry, who
both scored eight points.

Girls’ basketball

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Carlmont 44, Mills 31
The Scots snapped the Vikings’ four-game PAL
South winning streak, outscoring them 22-6 in the
first and fourth quarters.
Alexa Bayangos led Carlmont (4-3 PAL South, 9-10
overall) with 11 points. Stephannie Tong-Woo added
10 for the Scots.
Mills (4-3, 10-10) was led by Julia Gibbs and Aubrie
Businger, who each scored 10 points. Businger also
pulled down 10 rebounds.

Menlo-Atherton 54, San Mateo 26
The Bears kept pace at the top of the PAL South
Division standings with an easy win over the
Bearcats.
M-A (5-1 PAL South, 13-5 overall) scored in double
digits in every quarter and defensively did not allow
San Mateo (1-5, 2-12) more than nine points in any
period.
Greer Hoyem and Carly McLanahan paced the Bears
with 13 points apiece, while Naomi Baer added 10.
Alyssa Cho led the Bearcats with 12 points.

Menlo School 58, Castilleja 48
The Knights led 41-25 at halftime and then weathered a third-quarter Gators’ rally to pick up a WBAL
Foothill Division win.
Castilleja out-scored Menlo 18-10 in the third quarter to cut its deficit to eight, 51-43, but could not complete the comeback in the fourth.
Menlo (4-1 WBAL Foothill, 15-4) was led by Sam
Erisman, who torched the Gators with 30 points.
Paige Vermeer led Castilleja (1-5, 9-9) with 23 points.

Boys’ soccer
Sacred Heart Prep 5, Harker School 0
The Gators completed the first half of WBAL play
undefeated after shutting out the Eagles.
SHP (6-0 WBAL, 10-1-2) got a pair of second-half
goals from Fernando Monteon. Derek Chou added a
goal and an assist, with Phillip Petrakian and
Matthew MacFarquhar rounding out the scoring for the
Gators.
Nikhil Goel, Josh Lin and Danny Sanchez each
recorded an assist in the victory.

Menlo School 4, King’s Academy 3
Menlo remained three points behind rival Sacred
Heart Prep in the WBAL standing as it held off King’s
Academy.
Menlo (5-1 WBAL, 7-4-1 overall) was led by freshman Dylan Williams, scored three of Menlo’s four
goals. He scored two first-half goals in 10 minutes and
completed the hat trick in the first minute of the second half.
Junior Will Chisolm added a goal and two assists.
Junior Matt Joss also had an assist.

Notre Dame-Belmont 2, Presentation 1
The Tigers picked up their second West Catholic
Athletic League win of the season by beating the
Panthers.
Jessica Parque and Luca Deza hooked up for both
Notre Dame (2-4-1 WCAL, 7-6-1 overall) goals, with
Parque scoring in the 59th and 79th minutes and Deza
assisting on both tallies.

Sharks use 5-goal second
period to beat Ducks 6-3
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN JOSE — San Jose put the
game away with an impressive
burst in the second period. When it
comes to the Anaheim Ducks, the
Sharks rise to the occasion.
Patrick
Marleau,
Barclay
Goodrow and James Sheppard each
had a goal and an assist, and the
Sharks beat the Ducks 6-3 on
Thursday night.
Joe Pavelski scored in the first
as the Sharks improved to 4-0-1
against the division-leading
Ducks this season. Antti Niemi
made 25 stops in his third consecutive win, helping San Jose
extend its home winning streak
against Anaheim to seven.
“You start off good against a team
the first few times playing them and
you feel like you maybe you have
their number,” Sharks center
Andrew Desjardins said. “You feel
like you’re playing good against
them. Sometimes that’s just the way
it goes. They’re ahead of us too, so
it’s like we get up for these games.”
San Jose scored five times in the
second and matched its season
high in goals for the third time,
twice against the Ducks. The
Sharks have outscored their rivals
21-11 this season.
“Everyone was going,” Pavelski
said. “When we had our chances we
scored, and that’s big. You get
those nights when you can finish

49ers brief
Tom Gamble rejoins 49ers as
senior personnel executive
SAN FRANCISCO — Tom
Gamble is returning to the San
Francisco 49ers as a senior personnel executive.
The 49ers announced Gamble’s
hiring Thursday.
Gamble spent the past two seasons as the vice president of player
personnel for the Philadelphia
Eagles. The team revamped its front
office after the season, and the

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who
Patrick Marleau Ducks,
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goals in their
previous
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games. Anaheim
had won six in a
row.
Ducks goaltender
Ilya
Bryzgalov made
19 saves before
Barclay
being replaced
by
Frederik
Goodrow
Andersen late in
the second period.
“I felt good. I
just wasn’t able
to make one or
two more saves
in that period,”
Bryzgalov said.
Joe Pavelski “They scored a
goal on a power
play, then we kill off a penalty and
then they scored again. You have
to make sure not to let them get to
the rebound but I didn’t have much
time to find the puck.”
Ducks coach Bruce Boudreau said
everyone had a hand in the loss.
Eagles said they agreed to part ways.
Gamble spent the previous eight
years with San Francisco, including
the 2011 and 2012 seasons as director of player personnel. He’s entering his 28th season in the NFL.
General manager Trent Baalke
says Gamble “is one of the most
experienced, knowledgeable, and
respected personnel men in the
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an instrumental role in the 49ers’
personnel department previously
and his familiarity with the organization should make his transition
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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

13

Woods struggles with chipping at Phoenix open
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — The focus on Tiger
Woods at the Phoenix open shifted Thursday
from a chipped tooth to his chipping.
Woods struggled mightily with his short
game again, and it didn’t help that he only hit
three greens in regulation on the front nine.
He made three bogeys and a double bogey and
made the turn in 4-over 39.
In his 2015 debut, Woods already was 10
shots behind early leader Keegan Bradley,
who had a 6-under 65.
Woods is playing for only the second time
since he missed the cut at the PGA
Championship last August. He brought in a
new swing consultant during his time off to
heal from back injuries, and expectations
were lower than usual for a player who has
won 79 times on the PGA Tour.
In his first trip to the Waste Management
Phoenix Open since 2001, playing before
the most energetic crowd at an American golf

tournament since the PGA
Championship, Woods
created more groans than
cheers — particularly off
the green.
Just over a week ago,
Woods was photographed
in Italy at a World Cup ski
race with a missing tooth
Tiger Woods from what he said was a
camera inadvertently hitting him in the mouth. The chipped and crack
teeth were easy to replace. His chipping
might be a different story. Woods also duffed a
number of chips at the Hero World Challenge
in December at Isleworth, the course he
knows better than any other in the world.
Not much changed two months later.
Woods didn’t hit his chip with a mid-iron
hard enough from short of the first green and
left it 10 feet short. He sent a routine chip on
the second hole some 15 feet by the cup. And
on the next hole, the par-5 third hole, Woods
was tentative with a flop shot out of the rough
and didn’t reach the green. Another chip on

the par-3 fourth didn’t reach the green, and he
three-putted from 20 feet on the fringe.
The worst of it was at No. 9. His ball was
just outside a bunker, and Woods had to play
an exaggerated hook with his feet in the sand,
and he lost his balance. At least his back
looked to be healthy. The ball came up short
of the green, and Woods bladed a chip that ran
over the back of the green.
Instead of chipping to a close pin, he opted
to putt up the slope. It was the second time on
the front nine that Woods used a putter instead
of chipping. It wasn’t a bad option, but using
a putter once was a rare option for Woods.
The crowd was enormous, as expected, with
Woods playing the rowdiest event on the
PGA Tour for the first time in 14 years.
Bradley didn’t get much attention as he
motored around TPC Scottsdale with seven
birdies for the lead among the early starters.
“I hit a shot in on my last hole to about 10
feet, and it was a pretty good shot, and I didn’t get many claps,” Bradley said.
He turned to his caddie and asked if it was
over the green, or well short. He couldn’t fig-

Serena aims for 19th major in Aussie final
By John Pye
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MELBOURNE, Australia — It wasn’t
until Serena Williams forced herself to
relax, and not focus too intently on a
milestone Grand Slam title, that she
rediscovered the art of winning the
biggest events in tennis.
Now she’s on the verge of a 19th
major championship after beating 19year-old Madison Keys 7-6 (5), 6-2 on
Thursday and setting up an Australian
Open final against long-time rival
Maria Sharapova.
Williams has won all five Australian
Open finals she has contested and won
her last 15 matches against No. 2ranked Sharapova, a five-time major
winner who will be playing her fourth
final at Melbourne Park.
While the 33-year-old Williams is
peerless among active players, there
was a period last year when she wanted
so desperately to win her 18th major
that it proved too distracting. After

winning the U.S. Open in 2013, she
lost in the fourth round at the
Australian Open, the second round at
the French and the third round at
Wimbledon.
“I was so hyped on getting to 18 and
I lost every Grand Slam early. I didn’t
make it to any quarterfinals,” Williams
said. “Then after Wimbledon I decided
to just — not necessarily not care —
but just relax. It all kind of came back
for me after that ... and I think it’s been
working.”
That approach helped her win the
U.S. Open and, if it works again on
Saturday against 2008 champion
Sharapova, it will help Williams move
above Chris Evert and Martina
Navratilova on the list of major winners. She would be behind only Steffi
Graf, with 22 titles, among champions
in the Open era.
The statistics point to another win
for Williams, but she’s not getting
ahead of herself.
“Again. I have to win. Everyone’s

expecting me to win. But we’ll see,”
Williams said. “She’s playing unbelievable. She was almost out of the
tournament and has been playing better every single match. It’s impressive.”
Williams, who has struggled with a
cold for a week, said she’d benefit from
a tough workout in the all-American
semifinal against Keys, who pounded
her with heavy groundstrokes and a big
serve for the first set.
Keys, playing in her first Grand Slam
semifinal, saved seven match points
on serve in a penultimate game that
lasted more than 11 minutes. Williams
closed with an ace in the next game to
reach her 23rd major final.
“She pushed me really hard the first
set ... and I had to really dig deep mentally to get through that,” Williams
said. “It was a little frustrating. I had
like nine or 10 match points and couldn’t close it out. That doesn’t happen so
much. She played like she didn’t have
anything to lose.”

ure out why there was hardly any applause.
“We get up there — perfect shot. And Tiger
was on the second green. No one was watching me,” he said. “It’s just amazing to see the
draw that Tiger has.”
Zach Johnson was among four players at
66, while Angel Cabrera and Justin Leonard
were in the group at 67.
Phil Mickelson, a three-time winner at the
Phoenix Open, also got off to a bad start. He
put two balls in the water on the par-5 15th
and made double bogey and was 3 over
through his opening seven holes. But he
drove to the front of the green on the short
par-4 17th and converted that into a birdie,
and he picked up four more birdies to salvage
a respectable 69.
“I felt like I was a little anxious starting the
round, because I felt like my game was really
where I wanted it to be,” Mickelson said. “I
came out and I just made a bunch of dumb mistakes. ... I ended up playing the front nine
really solid with 3 under and hit a lot of good
shots on some holes I made pars, as well, and
feel much better.”

Sports brief
Men who beat Giants fan at
Dodger park guilty of gun crime
LOS ANGELES — The two men who savagely beat a
San Francisco Giants fan outside Dodger Stadium face up
to 10 years in federal prison on firearms convictions.
City News Service said Louie Sanchez pleaded guilty
Thursday in Los Angeles federal court to being a felon in
possession of firearms.
Sanchez’s partner in crime, Marvin Norwood, pleaded
guilty to an identical charge a week ago. They face sentencing May 7.

14

SPORTS

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

BELICHICK

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Continued from page 11

Continued from page 11

that we’ve had over the past few years, I’m
surprised the numbers keep going down,” St.
Louis Rams team doctor Matthew Matava
said. “Because you’d think, with more vigilance, you’d see more of any sort of condition.”
According to STATS, there were 265 players placed on injured reserve during the regular season in 2014, a 17 percent jump from
the 226 the year before.
This season, for the first time, NFL injury
data was collected by all 32 teams through
electronic medical records, allowing for
more comprehensive accounting. That system does a better job of capturing all injuries
— from a bruise, say, to a broken leg —
according to Christina Mack, an epidemiologist at Quintiles, a clinical research organization that works with the league.
One change is that less-severe injuries,
such as a first-degree sprain, are captured
more frequently now, she said. Something
worse, such as a concussion or torn knee ligament, is just as likely to have been reported
under the old setup.

that’s because he’d rather be coaching,
rather be teaching, rather be dissecting
film.
But according to Vince Wilfork, other
than Brady the longest-tenured Patriot,
Belichick has changed somewhat. Out of
necessity.
“Yeah, I’ve seen the difference in Bill in
the 11 years that I have been here, and I tell
him he is getting soft,” the defensive tackle joked. “But this is a different era of football now with how the team is shaped up,
and how a lot of guys are younger guys. You
don’t really have that veteran team that he
used to have. When I first came in the
league, he had a veteran team that didn’t
take much to get those guys going.
“But he’s more understanding now. I think
when you get so used to having a certain
quality of players and it changes, it’s hard
for you to adapt to change. And I think Bill
had to do a good job of that ever since I’ve
been in the league because we’ve changed so
much.”
Pretty much every successful Super Bowl

coach had to follow that path. Certainly
Noll did as Pittsburgh evolved from the
Steel Curtain-dominated squads to a highscoring bunch. So did Landry, several
times, depending on if he had a Doomsday
Defense or a potent attack built around
Roger Staubach.
Belichick’s first Super Bowl team back in
2001 was fundamentally sound on both
sides of the ball, but far more aggressive on
defense, his specialty. Indeed, Brady was
almost a caretaker that season.
Belichick knew he had something very
special in Brady, though, and when the quarterback rapidly developed, the coach loosened the reins. When they won their consecutive titles for the 2003 and 2004 seasons, Brady was a budding star.
When Belichick recognized that, he built
an unstoppable offense around Brady. In
some ways, he was ahead of the game,
again. While the NFL was evolving into
pass-crazy league, the Patriots already were
there with Brady throwing to Randy Moss
and Wes Welker.
By 2007, Brady was the best quarterback
in the league, breaking records and guiding
New England to a perfect regular season.
Don’t think other coaches around the NFL
haven’t paid attention. His counterpart in

BGAME

wide-open affair, with play flowing back and
forth. M-A had better run of it in the opening
minutes, but Burlingame weathered the storm
and returned the pressure.
The Panthers’ first real scoring chance came
in the 15th minute as Mackenzie Schoustra dribbled nearly the length of the field on a counter
attack following a M-A corner kick. As
Schoustra got to the M-A penalty box, the
Bears defender had closed and, when Schoustra
unleashed her shot, it was blocked point blank
by M-A goalkeeper Jacqueline Foody, who also
finished the game with six saves.
Two minutes later, the Panthers took a 1-0
lead on the first of two Gabriella Walker goals.
The play started along the right flank, as Jayna
Dunning worked a give and go. She took the
pass back, turned and, from 35 yards, lofted a
perfect cross into the M-A penalty box.

Walker, who was closely marked by a M-A
defender, managed to wrap her leg around and
poked the ball just past the dive of Foody and
just inside the left post for the goal.
Five minutes later, in the 22nd minute,
Walker struck again. This time, it was center
midfielder Alysse La Mond who triggered the
goal, sending a perfect one-timer through ball
into the Bears penalty box. Walker ran onto the
ball and popped it over the goalkeeper to put the
Panthers up 2-0.
M-A, however, pulled the goal right back two
minutes later, capitalizing on the one mistake
from the Burlingame defense. A throw-in went
into the Panthers penalty box. It was free for
Chikarov to pick up but, instead, a Burlingame
defender tried to clear it away. It deflected off
another player and a lurking Julia Moreton
pounced on the loose ball, poking it into the

NFL

Continued from page 11
Harrier unleashed a shot from the right side of
the Burlingame penalty box, only to be denied
by Panthers goalkeeper Nina Chikanov, who
parried the shot wide.
Chikanov finished with six saves for the
game.
With Chikanov scrambling to get back into
position, M-A’s Sarah McLeod ran on to the
rebound and had an empty net at which to shoot.
As a Burlingame defender closed on her,
McLeod’s shot went wide of the target.
In the first half, both teams took advantage of
their opportunities. The first 40 minutes was a

this Super Bowl, Seattle’s Pete Carroll,
actually was replaced in New England by
Belichick.
“I know that when (owner Robert Kraft)
was making his choice to hire coach
Belichick, I had one opportunity to say
something to him about that,” Carroll said.
“And I thought that was really a unique hire,
a special hire and a guy that would really fit
in well if (Kraft) let him do what he was
capable of doing. I think Bill is a very open
free-thinker and a guy that needs that kind
of control to be at his best.
“It’s worked historically and in extraordinary fashion.”
To Wilfork, nothing has changed, yet so
much has changed.
“We were a veteran team, (then) it was a
younger team; at one point we were the
youngest team in the league,” he said. “So I
think he had to try to find the identity in
what works for that team. And I think he’s
done a great job over the years of doing
that.
“But at the end of the day, he is still Bill.
He coaches the same way. He demands
everything the same way. But I think he’s
got a little soft heart now. Over time, he got
a little softer, though.”
Even if he is loath to show it publicly.
back of the net.
“It was a total mistake. It did change the focus
of the game,” DeRosa said. “But my defense has
been solid all year long. They did hold their
own.”
Burlingame’s best chance in the second half
came when Guilia Flygare sent a ball to the top
of the penalty box. Alexis Prieto used a backward flick of her head to send the ball on goal
and only a diving block by Foody kept the
Bears’ deficit at one.
Despite the loss, M-A’s Luce was pleased with
the way his team performed.
“Burlingame scored two good goals,” Luce
said. “(I’m) proud of the group and the way we
played.”
For DeRosa, he was just relieved to escape
with the victory.
“We got a crucial, crucial win,” DeRosa said.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Three Hawks, the Warriors
Thompson named All-Stars
By Brian Mahoney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Al Horford, Paul
Millsap and Jeff Teague were
picked Thursday as reserves for the
Eastern Conference All-Star team,
giving the sizzling Atlanta Hawks
three selections.
Kevin Durant and Russell
Westbrook were selected in the
West, despite early season injuries
for the Oklahoma City stars. The
Miami Heat also had two reserves
in Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade.
But Portland surprisingly only
had one in LaMarcus Aldridge.
Point guard Damian Lillard was
not among the seven reserves.
Atlanta has won 17 in a row and
has a 38-8 record, second-best in
the NBA. The Hawks were hoping
for four spots, but Kyle Korver was
not chosen by East coaches.
“Our whole starting five
deserves to be there,” Teague said
before the results were announced.
“We have a good ballclub. We’re
all playing at a really high level
right now. And we’re playing as a
team. That’s all you can really ask
for.”
Cleveland’s Kyrie Irving, last
year’s All-Star game MVP, and
first-timer Jimmy Butler of
Chicago were the other players
announced to the East roster.
The rest of the West reserves for
the Feb. 15 game at Madison
Square Garden in New York are
James Harden (Houston), Klay
Thompson (Golden State), Tim
Duncan (San Antonio) and Chris
Paul (Clippers).
Head coaches in each conference
had to vote for two guards, three
frontcourt players and two players
regardless of position. They
couldn’t vote for players on their
own teams.
The starters were voted by fans
and announced last Thursday.
LeBron James (Cleveland), Pau
Gasol
(Chicago),
Carmelo
Anthony (New York), John Wall
(Washington) and Kyle Lowry
(Toronto) will start for the East.
Stephen Curry (Golden State),
Kobe Bryant (Lakers), Anthony
Davis (New Orleans), Blake

Griffin (Clippers) and Marc Gasol
(Memphis) were voted in from the
West.
Bryant is out for the rest of the
season after surgery to repair a
torn rotator cuff in his shoulder
and his replacement on the roster
will be chosen by Commissioner
Adam Silver. West coach Steve
Kerr of the Warriors will decide
who takes Bryant’s spot in the
lineup.
Atlanta’s Mike Budenholzer will
lead the East. He will get to coach
three of his players, the first trio
of Hawks All-Stars since John
Drew, Eddie Johnson and Dan
Roundfield in 1980.
“We love for our players to have
success and for our players to be
appreciated, ” Budenholzer said.
“Yeah, there’s a sense of pride.
They work really hard. They do a
lot of things we appreciate. If
other people are appreciating
them, that’s a good thing.”
Korver, shooting 53 percent
from 3-point range, still might
have a chance if Wade isn’t able to
play in his 11th consecutive AllStar selection. The Heat star is battling a strained right hamstring.
The powerful West has many
more snubs, including Lillard,
whose Trail Blazers are tied for
third in the conference and who is
averaging 21.8 points.
Sacramento’s DeMarcus Cousins
wasn’t picked despite averaging
23.8 points and 12.3 rebounds as
perhaps the best big man in the
league this season, and neither
Memphis nor Dallas had a reserve
selected despite their strong play
and worthy candidates.
Duncan did make it for a 15th
time, joining Shaquille O’Neal and
Kevin Garnett with the third-most
selections behind Kareem AbdulJabbar (19) and Bryant (17).
Durant will get the chance to
improve his 30.6 points per game
average in the All-Star game, best
all-time. West coaches went with
the league’s reigning MVP even
though he has missed 25 of the
Thunder’s 46 games and the team
is only 23-23, currently out of
playoff position.

15

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015
Edmonton (Bakersfield), Los Angeles
(Ontario) and San Jose (San Jose) will
each move their primary minor
league affiliate to the California cities
this summer.

The NHL’s feeder league will undergo a sizable westward shift, designed
to bring five farm teams closer to
their parent clubs.
The American Hockey League
announced Thursday the creation of a
Pacific Division for next season, the
product of nearly three years of discussions with the NHL. Anaheim
(San Diego), Calgary (Stockton),

Fire alarm again sounds at
Patriots hotel for Super Bowl
CHANDLER, Ariz. — A fire alarm
sounded for the second time in three
nights at the hotel where the New
England Patriots are staying for the
Super Bowl.
Quarterback Tom Brady says he

didn’t hear it and slept through it.
The Sheraton Wild Horse Pass
Resort & Spa says the early morning false alarm on Thursday lasted
two minutes and went off in one
wing. It says the alarm was caused
by a stairwell smoke head and was
being investigated.
It also says the alarm had no
major impact on guests and there
were no evacuations or injuries.
There was another false alarm at
the hotel on the team’s first night
and tight end Rob Gronkowski said
he slept through it.

NHL GLANCE

NBA GLANCE

WHAT’S ON TAP

Sports briefs
NHL’s top minor league to
send 5 teams to California

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT
Tampa Bay 50 31 15 4
Montreal 47 31 13 3
Detroit
49 28 12 9
Boston
49 26 16 7
Florida
46 21 15 10
Toronto
50 22 24 4
Ottawa
47 19 19 9
Buffalo
49 14 32 3
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT
N.Y. Islanders48 32 15 1
Pittsburgh 48 27 13 8
Washington 48 25 14 9
N.Y. Rangers 46 27 15 4
Philadelphia 50 21 22 7
Columbus 47 21 23 3
New Jersey 48 18 22 8
Carolina
47 17 25 5

Pts
66
65
65
59
52
48
47
31

GF
163
127
145
131
114
144
129
92

GA
132
108
128
123
129
155
134
174

Pts
65
62
59
58
49
45
44
39

GF
157
143
144
135
139
119
109
102

GA
135
124
124
111
151
148
135
122

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT
Nashville
47 31 10 6
St. Louis
47 30 13 4
Chicago
48 30 16 2
Winnipeg 50 26 16 8
Dallas
48 22 19 7
Colorado 49 20 18 11
Minnesota 48 22 20 6

Pts
68
64
62
60
51
51
50

GF
145
153
151
140
152
128
131

GA
112
115
112
127
157
141
138

Pacific Division
GP W L OT
Anaheim 49 32 11 6
Sharks
49 26 17 6
Vancouver 46 26 17 3
Calgary
49 26 20 3
Los Angeles 48 21 15 12
Arizona
48 17 25 6
Edmonton 49 13 27 9

Pts
70
58
55
55
54
40
35

GF
146
137
124
140
133
111
113

GA
130
135
118
127
129
161
162

Thursday’s Games
St. Louis 5, Nashville 4, SO
Boston 5, N.Y. Islanders 2
Montreal 1, N.Y. Rangers 0
Philadelphia 5, Winnipeg 2
Arizona 3, Toronto 1
Dallas 6, Ottawa 3
Tampa Bay 5, Detroit 1
Florida 3, Columbus 2
Minnesota 1, Calgary 0
Edmonton 3, Buffalo 2
San Jose 6, Anaheim 3
Friday’s Games
Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
St. Louis at Carolina, 4 p.m.
Nashville at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Buffalo at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Anaheim, 7 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Washington at Montreal, 10 a.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Detroit, 11 a.m.
Arizona at Ottawa, noon
Dallas at Winnipeg, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
Florida at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
Los Angeles at Boston, 4 p.m.
Columbus at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Calgary, 7 p.m.
Chicago at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
Toronto
31
Brooklyn
18
Boston
16
Philadelphia
9
New York
9
Southeast Division
Atlanta
38
Washington
31
Miami
20
Charlotte
19
Orlando
15
Central Division
Chicago
30
Cleveland
27
Milwaukee
24
Detroit
17
Indiana
17

L
15
27
28
37
38

Pct
.674
.400
.364
.196
.191

GB

12 1/2
14
22
22 1/2

8
16
25
27
34

.826
.660
.444
.413
.306


7 1/2
17 1/2
19
24 1/2

18
20
22
30
31

.625
.574
.522
.362
.354


2 1/2
5
12 1/2
13

Pct
.739
.696
.638
.638
.522

GB

2
4 1/2
4 1/2
10

.696
.500
.404
.348
.178


9
13 1/2
16
23 1/2

.837
.696
.574
.364
.277


5 1/2
11
20 1/2
25

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Memphis
34
12
Houston
32
14
San Antonio
30
17
Dallas
30
17
New Orleans
24
22
Northwest Division
Portland
32
14
Oklahoma City
23
23
Denver
19
28
Utah
16
30
Minnesota
8
37
Pacific Division
Warriors
36
7
L.A. Clippers
32
14
Phoenix
27
20
Sacramento
16
28
L.A. Lakers
13
34

Thursday’s Games
Milwaukee 115, Orlando 100
Indiana 103, New York 82
Memphis 99, Denver 69
L.A. Lakers 123, Chicago 118,2OT
Friday’s Games
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Portland at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Houston at Boston, 4:30 p.m.
Toronto at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
Dallas at Miami, 5 p.m.
Golden State at Utah, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Toronto at Washington, 4 p.m.
Dallas at Orlando, 4 p.m.
Sacramento at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Houston at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Portland at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Denver, 6 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 6 p.m.
Phoenix at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

FRIDAY
Boys’ soccer
Sacred Heart Prep at Menlo School, 2:45 p.m.; San
Mateo at Aragon, Hillsdale at Westmoor, Jefferson
at Capuchino, Burlingame at El Camino, 3 p.m.;
Woodside Priory at Crystal Springs, 3:30 p.m.; South
City at Sequoia, Carlmont at Menlo-Atherton,Woodside at Half Moon Bay, Mills at Terra Nova, 4 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Sequoia at Woodside, Hillsdale at Capuchino, San
Mateo at Aragon, Mills at Burlingame, Oceana at
Terra Nova, Jefferson at El Camino, Half Moon Bay
at South City, 6:15 p.m.; Mitty at Notre Dame-Belmont, 7:30 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
St. Francis at Serra, 7:30 p.m.; Sequoia at Woodside,
Hillsdale at Capuchino, San Mateo at Aragon, Mills
at Burlingame, Menlo-Atherton at Carlmont,
Oceana at Terra Nova, Jefferson at El Camino, Half
Moon Bay at South City, 7:45 p.m.
Men’s college basketball
Canada at Skyline, 7 p.m.
Women’s college basketball
San Mateo at Skyline, 5 p.m.
SATURDAY
Boys’ soccer
Valley Christian at Serra, 11 a.m.
Girls’ soccer
Notre Dame-Belmont at Valley Christian, 11 a.m.

NBA ALL-STAR ROSTERS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Starters
Player
Pos Ht
Carmelo Anthony, NY
F
6-8
Pau Gasol, Chi
F
7-0
LeBron James, Cle
F
6-8
Kyle Lowry, Tor
G
6-0
John Wall, Was
G
6-4
Reserves
Chris Bosh, Mia
F-C 6-11
Jimmy Butler, Chi
G-F 6-7
Al Horford, Atl
F-C 6-10
Kyrie Irving, Cle
G
6-3
Paul Millsap, Atl
F
6-8
Jeff Teague, Atl
G
6-2
Dwyane Wade, Mia
G
6-4
Coach: Mike Budenholzer, Atlanta
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Starters
Player
Pos
Kobe Bryant, LAL
G
Stephen Curry, GS
G
Anthony Davis, NO
F
Marc Gasol, Mem
C
Blake Griffin, LAC
F
Reserves
LaMarcus Aldridge, Por F
Tim Duncan, SA
F
Kevin Durant, Okl
F
James Harden, Hou
G
Chris Paul, LAC
G
Klay Thompson, GS
G
Russell Westbrook, Okl
G
Coach: Steve Kerr, Golden State

Wt
240
250
250
205
195
235
220
250
193
253
181
220

Ht
6-6
6-3
6-10
7-1
6-10

Wt
212
190
220
265
251

6-11
6-11
6-9
6-5
6-0
6-7
6-3

240
250
240
225
175
215
200

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16

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Cañada’s lone sophomore RHP deals on opening day
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

It has been a good week on the mound for
El Camino grads.
The Cañada and Skyline baseball teams
won their respective openers and a pair of
Colts alums earned the victories in each.
Skyline freshman Mike Espino took the ‘w’
with five shutout relief innings in Thursday’s
12-6 win over Laney-Oakland. Two days
prior, Cañada right-hander Josh Eclavea — a
former El Camino ace — threw eight innings
to tab the victory in the Colts’ 4-2 win over
Merced.
Eclavea survived a rough first inning in
which he surrendered the only two runs
Merced scored in the game. He allowed six
hits overall, three in the first inning. Cañada
rallied back with one run in the third inning
before taking the lead in the sixth on a basesloaded walk.
“I really liked how the game went because
we jumped into a little bit of adversity right

SKYLINE
Continued from page 11
shortstop Ismael Orozco and third baseman
Phil Caulfield. The game even closed with an
outfield assist as freshman right fielder Brett
Berghammer gunned down a Laney base runner at first to end it.
Skyline starting pitch Aldo Severson was
roughed up, surrendering four runs through 3
1/3 innings. The sophomore right-hander
allowed two runs in each of the first two
innings until departing with two on and one
out in the third. But Skyline right-hander RJ
Hanson kept Laney in check by inducing a
double-play ground to end the inning. It was
one of two double plays turned by Skyline in
the game.

off the bat,” Cañada manager Tony Lucca said.
“But I think it kind of
woke us up and challenged us. … Our kids
were just excited to play
and they fed off of
Eclavea’s outing, obviously.”
Eclavea hasn’t earned
Josh Eclavea
the moniker of staff ace
— yet. The right-hander is the only sophomore starter on staff for the Colts. So, he was
a logical choice to get the opening-day nod.
“He was the only guy who had experience,”
Lucca said. “He had a good fall. He threw the
ball well … and he earned the start for us.”
Eclavea has a three-pitch repertoire — a
fastball, curveball and changeup — all of
which he threw for strikes Tuesday. His
bread-and-butter is his gusty command to the
strike zone. He issued just one walk against
four strikeouts.
Last season, Cañada boasted the Coast

Pacific
Conference
Pitcher of the Year, Sam
Alton. Alton was the surefire ace who carried the
Colts with 102 innings
pitched while posting a
10-1 record in 2014.
“He kind of set the blue
print in front of a guy like
Elijah Saunders Josh to show what it
takes to be successful at
this level,” Lucca said.
Eclavea worked mostly in relief last season, though he did receive two starts down
the stretch. He earned his only win of the
year in relief against Contra Costa on Feb. 1
with two shutout innings. He then got tagged
for his only loss of the year in his first start
April 4 in a disastrous outing against
Chabot, giving up five runs in 2 1/3 innings
in an eventual 15-0 Colts loss.
In his second and final start of the season
though, he bounced back to throw 6 2/3
innings, allowing four runs in a no-decision.

The Colts eventually lost
the game 10-9.
Tuesday
marked
Eclavea’s first victory as
a collegiate starter.
“We’re still looking for
an ace, but if Eclevea keeps
doing what he’s doing, you
may be able to call him our
Rory McDaid ace,” Lucca said.
Also recording a decision in the game was right-hander Chris
Miguel, who earned the save. A sophomore
who served strictly as an infielder last season, Miguel is one of three Colts players
who are slated for two-way duty this season.
Elijah Saunders, who is scheduled to take
the start for Cañada Friday against Reedley,
was the Colts’ opening-day shortstop.
Also, right-hander Rory McDaid — a utility man who can play both third base and center field — is slated to start Saturday’s game
against Sierra.

The Trojans tied it in the bottom of the
third on three straight single. Bongi lined a
two-out single to center. Then Caulfield and
Shane O’Keefe followed with back-to-back
RBI knocks to tie the game at 4-4. But Laney
took the lead right back in the top of the
fourth, touching Hanson for two earned runs
to take a 6-4 lead.
Skyline scratched out an unearned run in the
bottom of the fourth. With two on and one
out, Matt Seubert hit a slow bounder to the
third base bag. Laney third baseman Kaleo
Johnson booted the ball allowing Nobu
Suzuki to score for second base. But the
inning could have been much worse for Laney
had it not been for Johnson’s backhanded
diving catch on a Caulfield line drive to end
the inning.
“He’s a quality young man, so he’s going to
make plays,” Laney manager Francisco
Zapata said of the freshman Johnson.
Skyline finally broke through in the sev-

enth though. Bongi — who went 3 for 3 with
two RBIs on the day and reached base in all
five of his plate appearances — was hit by a
pitch to open the frame. With one out,
O’Keefe singled to right field. Keaton
Eichman followed with an infield single to
load the bases, setting the stage for Franco.
After Franco gave the Trojans the lead,
Berghammer produced a sacrifice fly to score
Eichman. Then Seubert came through by
splitting the right-center gap for a two-run
double. Orozco followed with an RBI single
and Bongi closed the inning with an RBI single, only to be thrown out attempting to
advance to second for the final out of the
inning.
Seubert is an interesting choice for the
Trojans as a No. 3 hitter. Recruited foremost
as a pitcher, Seubert experienced a fray in the
ulnar collateral ligament of this throwing
elbow after throwing 74 2/3 innings at
Carlmont last season. And while he was a

career .311 hitter through three varsity seasons with the Scots, he hit just .246 last year.
Seubert said his throwing arm is now 100
percent healthy. Now it’s a matter of
strengthening his arm for everyday use. But
when he arrived at Skyline in the fall, even
with his pitching future uncertain, he wanted
to be assured of an everyday role. A natural
third baseman, the left side of the Trojans was
already spoken for with a slate of returning
sophomores.
“I had the mindset there were still spots
open and I was going to play hard to get one,”
Seubert said. “But I had no intention of playing first base.”
The victory marked the first opening-day
win for Skyline in over five years.
“We needed that win,” Franco said. “The
team, we felt like were down, but we were
never out of it.”

Saturday, February 21
11 am to 5 pm
The Shops at Tanforan
1150 El Camino, San Bruno

Free admission, everyone welcome
For more information call

650.344.5200

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

17

Around the world
Frenchman linked to
attackers charged, incarcerated
PARIS — French authorities filed preliminary terrorism
charges Thursday against a Frenchman extradited from
Bulgaria and linked to gunmen behind deadly attacks in
Paris, a judicial official said.
Fritz-Joly Joachin was ordered jailed for at least four
months pending further investigation, the official said.
He was arrested Jan. 1 on a French warrant while trying to
cross from Bulgaria into Turkey. French police say that
Joachin, 29, was an associate of the Kouachi brothers, who
killed 12 people in an attack Jan. 7 against newspaper
Charlie Hebdo.
Joachin was given preliminary charges of participating in
an organized crime group with aims to prepare a terrorist act,
and seeking to join extremist fighters in Syria, the official
said. Joachin arrived in France on Thursday from Bulgaria.
Facing French judges, he said that he had been heading to
Turkey on vacation - not to join fighters in Syria - and had a
job waiting for him back in France, the official said. The
source spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the investigation.
REUTERS

Rescue workers are seen at the site of an explosion at a maternity hospital in Mexico City.

Gas blast wrecks Mexico children’s
hospital; at least two dead, 73 injured
By Alberto Arce and Peter Orsi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MEXICO CITY — Injured and bleeding, mothers carrying infants fled
from a maternity hospital shattered by
a powerful gas explosion Thursday,
and rescuers swung sledgehammers to
break through fallen concrete hunting
for others who might be trapped.
At least two people were killed and
73 injured, Mexico City officials said.
The known dead were a woman and a
child. Officials earlier said at least four
people had been killed.
About 75 percent of the hospital collapsed, officials said, and the priority
was to continue digging in search of

any trapped survivors. Authorities said
they had confirmed that none of the
children registered in the hospital were
missing, but said it was possible that
others who had come for appointments
could be trapped.
The city’s health secretary, Armando
Ahued, said the adult victim was a 25year-old woman and the child was a
newborn, between 2 and 3 weeks old.
He said 21 babies were injured, and
nine of those and seven adults were in
serious condition after being rushed to
other hospitals.
Thirty-five-year-old
Felicitas
Hernandez wept as she frantically questioned people outside the wrecked building, hoping for word of her month-old

baby, who had been hospitalized since
birth with respiratory problems.
“They wouldn’t let me sleep with
him,” said Hernandez, who had come
to the city-run Maternity and
Children’s Hospital of Cuajimalpa
because she had no money. Later,
authorities told her to check at another
hospital where she reported finding
her baby uninjured.
The explosion occurred at 7:05 a.m.
when a tanker truck was making a routine delivery of gas to the hospital
kitchen and gas started to leak.
Witnesses said the tanker workers
struggled frantically for 15 or 20 minutes to repair the leak while a large
cloud of gas formed.

Families plead for lives of IS hostages as swap hopes fade
By Karin Laub
and Mohammed Daragmeh
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

AMMAN, Jordan — The father of a
Jordanian fighter pilot and the wife of
a Japanese journalist held by the
Islamic State group pleaded for their
loved ones’ lives after a possible
prisoner swap wasn’t carried out by a
deadline of sunset Thursday.

The extremists had demanded that
Jordan release a female al-Qaida prisoner from death row, and they purportedly threatened in an audio message to
kill the airman if she was not freed by
the deadline.
After sundown in the Middle East,
there was no word on the fate of Lt.
Muath al-Kaseasbeh and journalist
Kenji Goto, and the families’ agonizing wait dragged on.

“We received no assurances from
anyone that he is alive,” Jawdat alKaseasbeh, a brother of the pilot, told
the Associated Press. “We have no
clue about where the negotiations
stand now. We are waiting, just waiting.”
The possibility of a swap was raised
Wednesday when Jordan said it was
willing to trade Sajida al-Rishawi, the
al-Qaida prisoner, for the pilot.

Youth who stormed Dutch
broadcaster claimed to be hacker
HILVERSUM, Netherlands — A 19-year-old brandishing a
fake weapon threatened a security guard to gain access to the
headquarters of Dutch national broadcaster NOS and demand
airtime Thursday night before police stormed a TV studio to
arrest him.
Nobody was injured in the incident, but it forced the NOS
off air for around an hour and set nation on edge, coming just
weeks after the deadly attack on satirical magazine Charlie
Hebdo in Paris that left 12 people dead.
When NOS came back on air, it showed recorded footage of
the young man, wearing a black suit, white shirt and black
tie, and carrying a pistol with what looked like a silencer
attached.
Police said later the gun was a fake and that the man had no
criminal record. Detectives were investigating his possible
motives.

‘Project’
finally sees
the light of day
By Lindsey Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
What have we done to deserve another found-footage
movie? The tired hand-held technique that seemed so
fresh in 1999 with “The Blair Witch Project” long ago wore
out its welcome.
The only thing noteworthy about its use in “Project Almanac,”
which follows a group of high school misfits who invent a time
travel apparatus, is that this particular found footage film isn’t really a horror film, but a sci-fi thriller. Used as a means to gain an entry
See PROJECT, Page 22

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

19

MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

THE CALDWELL GALLERY IN REDWOOD CITY PRES ENTS DIGITAL
PHOTOGRAPHY
CAPTURING
NATURE’ S ELEGANT HAND. The
Caldwell Gallery presents “Nature’s Elegant
Hand” with selections from “With a New
Eye, ” National Parks photographs by
Stephen Johnson, and wildlife moments
captured by photographer Sue Petterson.
Johnson’s With a New Eye was the first alldigital landscape photography project.
From 1994 to 2000, Johnson traveled more
than 75,000 miles, to over 50 national
parks, making thousands of color-accurate,
high-resolution
photographs.
Internationally recognized as a digital photography pioneer, Johnson operates a studio, gallery and education center at the
Pacifica Center for the Arts in Pacifica.
Ongoing exhibitions and photography
workshops are core activities of his studio.
Over the years, Sue Petterson’s interests in
photography have taken her from the jungles of Peru to the frozen tundra of Alaska.
Her subjects have included the migratory
birds of Texas; the Northern Gannet colony
of Bonaventure Island, Quebec, Canada; and
the brown bears, bald eagles and polar bears
of Alaska. Petterson’s published nature
photography can be found in Golden Gate
Audubon Society’s newsletter, its 2014 and
2015 calendars and the San Francisco Bay
Bird Observatory’s Click-Off contest. The
Caldwell Gallery is located on the first floor
of 400 County Center at the Hall of Justice
in Redwood City.
Running concurrently with Nature’s
Elegant Hand is an exhibit featuring artists
from the Burlingame Art Society. On display are watercolor florals by Patricia Barr,
Diana Day Glynn’s realistic subjects in oils
and watercolors, studies in watercolors by
Rose Nieponce and watercolor portraiture

Justin Bieber apologizes for
bad behavior in online video
NEW YORK — Justin Bieber has apologized for his bad behavior in a new video
posted to Facebook.
The singer says in a two-minute video
posted early Thursday that his “arrogant and
conceited” attitude over the last two years
was just to cover up his true feelings. He
said growing up in the industry is tough.
Bieber visited “The Ellen DeGeneres
Show” on Wednesday and said he was “nervous” about the appearance. He said he didn’t know how people would react to him.

by Susan Pizzi. This exhibit is located in
the Community Gallery on the lower level
of the 400 building. In the Rotunda Gallery
at 555 County Center are terra cotta head
sculptures by Dan Woodard of Redwood
City. Woodard views the head and hands as
the most expressive part of the anatomy and
combines them to create sculptures exploring all aspects of the human condition.
All shows are sponsored by the San
Mateo County Arts Commission and are
curated by Boris Koodrin. Gallery hours are
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays.
For
more
information
visit
c m o . s m c g o v . o rg / a r t s - c o m m i s s i o n .
Exhibits run through Feb. 28.
***
MARI MARKS AND HOWARD
HERSH AT STANFORD ART SPACES.
The Spiritual Landscape by Mari Marks and
One Day at a Time: Thirty Years in the Studio
by Howard Hersh are the January-February
exhibits for Stanford Art Spaces. Both
artists employ the medium of encaustic,
i.e., powdered pigments bound in beeswax.
Encaustic has been used since ancient times,
most famously in the later-dynasty portraits
on Egyptian coffins. Marks and Hersh
employ the medium to create abstractions
that combine suggestions of natural
imagery — terrain in Marks, botany in
Hersh — with hints of calligraphy. Marks
said: “Through over 15 years of working
with beeswax I have explored pattern in layering beeswax, pigment and natural materials. ... In reducing my work to the elements
of color, heat and sedimentary deposit, I
value the materiality, the process and the
natural laws underlying the formation of the
natural world.” Hersh said: “My work has a
very philosophical underpinning. Most of
my artist statements go into relationships
between
things.
Real/imagined,
natural/manmade, etc. My premise is that
there is no separation and that everything is
nature itself. I try to communicate this in

People in the news
The 20-year-old was
heavily booed at the
Fashion Rocks event
last year, and his recent
Calvin Klein ad was
ridiculed. His tumultuous
behavior has ranged
from a DUI arrest to eggtossing vandalism to
Justin Bieber clashing with a paparazzo.
Bieber also said he wants people to know
he has a caring side.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SUE PETTERSON

On Guard by Sue Petterson is among the digital photography on display at The Caldwell
Gallery in the Hall of Justice in Redwood City through Feb. 28.
my work by combining disparate elements
and then allowing them to integrate. ... I’ve
always worked in a serial fashion. I’ll pursue a theme until it gradually morphs into
something else.” Stanford Art Spaces is an
exhibition program serving the Paul G.
Allen Building, housing the Center for
Integrated Systems, the program’s longtime
sponsor, and the David W. Packard
Electrical Engineering Building, with
smaller venues located throughout campus.
The shows run March 6. A reception for the
artists is scheduled for 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 29 in the David Packard
Electrical Engineering Building. Please see
Facebook.com/Stanford Art Spaces for more
information. Parking at all university lots
and structures is free after 4 p.m. For further
information contact Curator DeWitt Cheng
at 725-3622 or dewittc@stanford.edu.

***
SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY DEDICATES ITS FIRST OUTDOOR SCULPTURE. Santa Clara University’s de Saisset
Museum celebrates 60 years of curating
California’s stories with the dedication of
“Going Around the Corner with X,” created
and donated by artist Fletcher Benton. The
dedication of the Benton sculpture take
place at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 29. A public reception follows. Museum Director Rebecca
Schapp said: “We couldn’t be more thrilled
to mark such a special milestone with this
one-of-a-kind piece. The generous gift fits
perfectly into our goals to acquire dynamic
and compelling work by noted California
artists.”
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com or www.twitter.com/susancityscene.

20

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Mozart vs. Salieri in
Hillbarn’s ‘Amadeus’
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

Although the title implies that
Peter Shaffer’s “Amadeus” is about
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the
central character actually is
Antonio Salieri, a fellow composer in Vienna.
After the tragically untimely
death of Mozart (1756-1791), it
was rumored that Salieri (17501825) had poisoned him. It’s more
likely that kidney failure was to
blame.
Hillbarn Theatre’s production,
directed by Leslie Lloyd, features
Jerry Lloyd (the director’s husband) as Salieri and Ross
Neuenfeldt as Mozart.
Shaffer’s fictionalized take on
their relationship focuses not on
Salieri’s having poisoned Mozart
but on the elder composer’s doing
everything in his power to thwart
Mozart’s career.
In the process, Mozart is reduced
to abject poverty while most audiences at the time fail to appreciate
his genius.
Salieri, however, recognizes it
immediately and realizes that
Mozart’s music is far superior to
his. He regards it as a gift from
God.
Thus, Salieri is rankled to his
soul, for as a young man he had

promised God that he would live
an upright and virtuous life if only
he could become a great composer.
This approach works for quite
some time as Salieri achieves fame
and fortune, earning a lucrative
position in the court of Emperor
Joseph II (Ray D’Ambrosio).
Hearing Mozart’s music and
meeting the young man causes
Salieri to renounce his vow to God
and instead to undermine Mozart.
In the meantime, Salieri pretends to be Mozart’s friend and
ally. When Mozart advances
despite Salieri’s efforts, the hypocritical Salieri takes credit.
Making Salieri’s hatred for
Mozart even greater is that while
his music appears to come straight
from God, the man himself is callow, shallow and uncouth. Salieri
privately calls him an obscene
child.
As the play opens, Salieri is an
old, feeble, guilt-wracked man in
November 1823. He then recounts
the events from 1781 to Mozart’s
death in 1791.
Hillbarn’s production runs three
hours and 15 minutes with one
intermission. Part of that length
comes from the script, which
could use some judicious cutting.
For example, the opening scene
with Salieri in his wheelchair goes
on too long.
Perhaps the other part of the

‘Amadeus’ continues through Feb. 8 at the Hillbarn Theatre in Foster City.
length comes from the direction
and the differing levels of acting
ability. Lloyd, the only Equity
(professional) actor in the production, is superlative.
Likewise, Neuenfeldt as Mozart
is excellent, making him a more
sympathetic character than seen
in some productions and believably navigating his physical and
mental decline. Also noteworthy
in the cast is Lauren Rhodes as
Constanze Weber, who becomes

Mozart’s wife.
The set by Kuo-Hao Lo is flexible but unattractive, and some
missed cues in Matthew Johns’
lighting design don’t help. Lisa
Claybaugh’s costumes and the wig
and hair designs by Aviva Raskin
evoke the era.
Sound by Jon Hayward features
tantalizing snippets from great
Mozart works like “Cosi Fan
Tutte,” “The Marriage of Figaro,”
“The Magic Flute, ” “Don

First-day frenzy forces
Vegas White Castle to close
LAS VEGAS — A 24-hour White Castle
location on the Las Vegas Strip that opened
to long lines of the burger chain’s fans had
to close for more than two hours to restock
after its grand opening.
The Las Vegas Sun reports the restaurant
reopened at about 3:15 p.m. Wednesday.
The burger slider chain’s first location in
Las Vegas opened to much fanfare Tuesday
afternoon. The nearest location had been
more than 1,500 miles away in Missouri.
White Castle is in the Best Western Plus
Casino Royale on the Las Vegas Strip in
between The Venetian and Harrah’s Las
Vegas.

Giovanni” and others.
The play holds some fascination
not only for its music but also for
its exploration of the man-God
relationship, something that
Shaffer also examined in his more
successful “Equus.”
“Amadeus”
will
continue
through Feb. 8 at Hillbarn
Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd.,
Foster City. For tickets and information call (650) 349-6411 or
visit www.hillbarntheatre.org.

Food briefs
Investors crave Shake Shack:
IPO prices above expected range
NEW YORK — Investors apparently have
a craving for a better burger.
Hamburger chain Shake Shack Inc. has
priced its initial public stock offering at
$21 per share, above its proposed range of
$17 to $19 per share.
It sold 5 million shares, raising $105 million. The banks managing the deal may buy
750,000 more shares.
Shake Shack cooks burgers to order and
promotes its use of natural ingredients,
emblematic of what’s known as the “better
burger” trend.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

21

Distillers get hopping mad for new liquor flavoring
By Michelle Locke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A new flavor is brewing in the world
of craft liquors as distillers borrow
from the beer world and add hops for an
aromatic twist.
Recent products include hopped
whiskies such as R5 from Charbay
Artisan Distillery & Winery in the
Napa Valley and Hopmonster from the
Corsair Distillery with operations in
Tennessee and Kentucky. Other examples include Hatter Royale from New
Holland Brewing Co. in Michigan and
Hopskey from Square One Brewery in
St. Louis. In the non-whiskey category there’s Hophead Vodka from Anchor
Distilling Co. in San Francisco and a
hopped gin from the New York
Distilling Co. Beyond the hard stuff,
there’s even a half-dozen or so hopped
hard ciders.
The move, says H. Joseph Ehrmann,
who carries several of the hop-flavored
liquors at his Elixir bar in San
Francisco, is inspired by the desire to
stand out. “They’re up against the big
boys, the big brands and they’re trying to make something that’s going to
compete and be unique so that people
aren’t looking at them as another
bourbon or another American single
malt.”
It also tracks the boom in India pale
ales — the hoppy beers beloved by
craft beer enthusiasts — as well as the
quest for innovative cocktails.
Industry-wide, there’s been an
explosion of flavored spirits in the

past few years, especially the many
shades of vodka, driven by efforts to
attract new customers and expand shelf
space. But Christopher Null, who
blogs
about
liquor
at
Drinkhacker.com, sees the hop-flavored spirits trend as less about growing market share and more about craft
distillers getting in “mad scientist”
mode, exploring the limits of what’s
possible.
Allen Katz, co-founder of New York
Distilling, laughs at the mad scientist
label, but concedes there’s may be
some truth to it. “We’re just trying to
have fun. We are trying to be purposefully different, not esoteric.”
The Brooklyn distillery’s Chief
Gowanus New-Netherlands Gin harks
back to the days of early Dutch immigrants who were looking to recreate
genever using readily available ingredients. In their case, it was rye. In this
case, an unaged, double-distilled rye
whiskey is put back in a traditional pot
still with juniper and a small amount of
cluster hops, distilled again, then finished off with three months in a barrel
previously used to age rye.
“We’re trying to offer something
that in our case has a historical context, which we like, but that most people have never experienced before,”
says Katz.
Aromatic and assertive, hop-flavored liquors aren’t for everyone, but
they play well with people who are
interested in the craft distilling scene
and in trying new things, says
Ehrmann. “It’s kind of like smoke or

Aromatic and assertive, hop-flavored liquors aren’t for everyone, but they play well with people who
are interested in the craft distilling scene and in trying new things.
spice; you don’t get a huge amount of
people who like it right off the bat.”
Anchor Distilling Co. president
David King says there are two types of
people who like Hophead Vodka, “the
really quite serious craft mixologists
like it because it’s so unusual and the
craft beer guys like it.”
Though it’s definitely a niche market, sales have been steady, with
4,000 9-liter cases sold in the past 18
months, says King. “It’s an acquired
taste, but the people that acquire it like
it very much.”
King was literally led by the nose to
the trend when he walked into the hop
room of sister company Anchor
Brewing and was struck by the rich,
funky smell.
“Have you tried distilling this?” he

See HOP, Page 22

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22 Friday Jan. 30, 2015
Hallmark Channel’s Kitten Bowl
teams vying for purring rights

WEEKEND JOURNAL

PROJECT
Continued from page 18

By Lynn Elber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Football tampering is inevitable when
felines take the field Sunday in Hallmark Channel’s Kitten
Bowl — a four-team playoff to promote the adoption of
shelter animals.
The channel says kitties simply can’t help the fact that
claws and balls don’t go together.
“Our issues tend to be more related to the size of the
‘yarnage’ markers on the ‘kitiron’ and, of course, the length
of their milk breaks,” said Bill Abbott, president and CEO
of Hallmark parent Crown Media Family Networks.
In other words, cute trumps controversy when fluffy, bigeyed kitties are involved, just as it should.
“Kitten Bowl II” kicks off at noon EST, starting with
semifinal matches between the Northpole Panthers and
Hallmark Channel Hearties, and the Good Witch Wildcats
versus the Hallmark Movies & Mysteries Mountain Lions.
The winners then play for ultimate purring rights.
Hallmark goes for giggles as well, with “quartercats”
dubbed Tawny Unitas, Ryan Fitzcatrick and Joe Montuna.
John Sterling and Mary Carillo host the big game, with
Boomer Esiason serving as Feline Football League commissioner.
The kitty contest isn’t the only televised alternative to
Sunday’s Super Bowl match between the Seattle Seahawks
and New England Patriots.
Fish Bowl II is on the Nat Geo WILD channel (6 p.m. EST)
and there’s Animal Planet’s Puppy Bowl (3 p.m. EST) that
kicked off the trend and is in its 11th year. The latter also
promotes pet adoption.

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into the lives of these kids, it makes
what could have been a fresh send up of
genre conventions seem as cheap and
forgettable as all the rest.
In the film, David (Jonny Weston), a
handsome social outcast and brilliant
science mind, finds out that he’s been
accepted into MIT but with a scholarship that just isn’t enough. While digging around in old projects done by his
late father (an inventor of sorts) to try
to find anything of value, he and his
little sister stumble across an old
video recorder of David’s 7th birthday
party, where they notice a shadowy
figure in the mirror in one of the shots:
a 17-year-old David.
While trying to figure out the mystery of how this could be possible,
David and his friends uncover blueprints for a time travel machine and
immediately get to work building it,
testing it, and, eventually, using it. In
a somewhat amusing wink to the audience, the characters keep restating that
they have to film everything.
But, the first hour of the film is so

HOP
Continued from page 21
asked, and Hophead was born.
Hop-flavored liquors are made in
various ways, but the whiskies generally get their flavor by being distilled
from consumer-ready, hoppy beers, as

THE DAILY JOURNAL

relentlessly paced, it feels like it’s on
fast-forward. From the camera movements to the manic dialogue and energy of the teens, the audience is pummeled with jargon and mostly useless
information as the kids try to get a
handle on their new toy.
There also are a host of just out-ofdate references (jokes about films like
“Argo” and “Looper” from 2012) that
only serve to remind that this movie,
previously titled “Welcome to
Yesterday” has been sitting on the
shelf for a year.
Even though those remain, there
were some last-minute edits that took
place (between even an early January
screening and its Jan. 30 release).
Paramount and Michael Bay’s
Platinum Dunes took heat for utilizing
footage of an actual plane crash in the
movie. They “are in the process of
removing the footage from the film
and promotional materials,” the studio
said in a statement on the eve of its
release, declining to specify what will
replace it.
That’s not to say there aren’t any
good ideas here. When the kids finally
figure out how to jump back in time,
and everything mercifully slows down,
things get pretty fun for a while as

they do exactly what you might expect
teenagers would do — going back in
time a few days to ace a failed chemistry test, stand up to your bully, win
some lotto money and so on.
There’s also a great sequence that
brings the teens to the music festival
Lollapalooza that is actually as joyous
to watch as it presumably is to be
there.
Things take a dark turn in the film
when David gets greedy and jumps
back in time alone to try to re-do a
botched moment with his crush (Sofia
Black-D’Elia) and bad things start happening in the future, but interest wanes
as the stakes get higher.
Director Dean Israelite in his feature
debut proves that he has a keen knack
for conveying teen pluck, friendships
and flirtations. The scenes that show
the actual process of time travel are
even quite thrilling and inventive, but
the found-footage gimmick makes it
nearly impossible to evaluate his talents.
It’s time to hang up the GoPro and
return to actual filmmaking.
“Project Almanac, ” a Paramount
Pictures release, is rated PG-13 for
“some language and sexual content.”
Running time: 106 minutes. One and a
half stars out of four.

opposed to the much cheaper regular
whiskey mashes.
Charbay’s R5 Lot No. 3, the current
release, is distilled from Bear
Republic Brewery’s Racer 5 IPA beer
and it takes 10 gallons of beer to
make a gallon of whiskey, which is
further reduced by the 3 percent
“angel’s share” lost during barrel
aging, says Susan Karakasevic, coowner and general manager of

Charbay. The process shows up in the
price, around $80 a bottle.
Charbay’s venture into hop-flavored whisky dates back to 1999,
when the father-son team of Miles
(Susan’s husband) and Marko
Karakasevic became intrigued by the
idea of distilling bottle-ready beer.
The first distillation used 20,000 gallons of Pilsner to create 1,000 gallons of whiskey.

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WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar

SSF

FRIDAY, JAN. 30
‘Peninsula Family Service: Helping
People Live Better Lives.’ 7:30 a.m.
Crystal Springs Golf Course, 6650 Golf
Course Drive, Burlingame. Fee $15,
breakfast included. Sponsored by the
San Mateo Sunrise Rotary Club. To
RSVP call 515-5891.

runs through Feb. 28. Free. For more
information call 281-5063.

Continued from page 1

First Sunday Line Dance with Tina
Beare and Jeanette Feinberg. 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road. $5.
For more information call 616-7150.

Preschool Story Time. 10:30 a.m. to
11 a.m. Belmont Library. For more
information
contact
belmont@smcl.org.

Dragon Theatre’s 15th Season to
Open with a Greek Classic. 2 p.m.
Dragon Productions Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. $22 for general admission. For tickets and info
visit dragonproductions.net.

sideration for established communities.
“Invest not just into big business,
but invest into people. Invest into
South City,” he said.
Tracy Choi, with the Housing
Leadership Council of San Mateo
County, echoed those sentiments, and
invited the council to enact policy
which would stand apart from many
other communities in the Bay Area that
allowed developers to drive rates
upward.
“Some residents are living in a real
fear that they will be pushed out of
their homes and their community,”
said Choi.
Average rental rates in San Mateo
County increased $227 over the course
of the past year, jumping to $2,572
per month, according to a report from
realanswers.biz, a Bay Area-based real
estate demographics website.
Mayor Rich Garbarino worked to
assure residents that their concerns did
not fall on deaf ears, as he reminded
residents that the approval only served
as a working document, and that there
was still time and space to ensure their
fears would be addressed.
“This is just the start,” Garbarino
said. “It’s not cast in stone yet.”
Councilwoman Liza Normandy
agreed with the mayor, and said the
city leadership is taking the issue of
potentially displacing residents seriously.
“Please know that we do care,” said
Normandy, who sits on the board of
the Housing Endowment and Regional
Trust of San Mateo County, which
examines regional housing issues.
She encouraged concerned residents
to participate in the regional planning

Russian Story Time. 11:15 a.m. to
12:15 p.m. Belmont Library. Ideal for
toddlers. For more information contact belmont@smcl.org.
Health and Wellness at the Library:
Lunchtime Yoga with Patti Martin.
Noon. South San Francisco Public
Library, 840 W. Orange Ave., South
San Francisco. Open to all. For more
information contact Anissa Malady at
ssfpladm@plsinfo.org.
Science Club. 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Belmont Library. For more information contact belmont@smcl.org.
South San Francisco High School’s
‘Jazz N’ Tamales’ Dinner Dance. 6
p.m. to 10 p.m. South San Francisco
Municipal Building, 33 Arroyo Drive,
South San Francisco. Fundraiser to
support the South San Francisco
High School Marching and Jazz Band.
Tickets are $25 per person, $45 per
couple, $15 for children ages 4-9
years old and $210 per table of 10. For
tickets call Amy Matthews at either
her day phone 378-4363, at her cellphone 784-5062 or email her at
14mak2@comcast.net.
Dragon Theatre’s 15th Season to
Open with a Greek Classic. 8 p.m.
Dragon Productions Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. $22 for general admission. For tickets and info
visit dragonproductions.net.
SATURDAY, JAN. 31
Free eWaste Collection. 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. San Mateo High School, San
Mateo. All funds raised go toward
SMHS Grad Night activities. For more
information go to http://sanmateogradnight2.wix.com/ewaste.
Core Studio, Second Location
Grand Opening. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Core Studio, 3176 Campus Drive, San
Mateo. There will be classes, local
food and shop vendors with booths
outside. For more information call
766-5895.
Drop-In Tech Help. 11 a.m. South
San Francisco Public Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco. Get
help with e-books, Kindles, NOOKs,
laptops or any other device. Open to
all. For more information contact
Anissa
Malady
at
ssfpladm@plsinfo.org.
Family Read Aloud Multi-Cultural
Story Time. 2 p.m. San Mateo Public
Library, Oak Room, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. There will be Chinese,
Hindi and Spanish stories and crafts.
Free. For more information call 5227838.
Master Kan Kwok-Fan Chinse ink
and watercolor paintings reception. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. 1335 El Camino
Real, Millbrae. Runs through Feb. 15.
Free. For more information call 6364706.
2015 Mavericks of the Seas Photo
Exhibit Reception. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.
300 Main St., Half Moon Bay. Gallery
open Friday through Monday, noon
to 5 p.m. Runs until March 1. For more
information call 726-6335 or go to
coasalartsleague.com.
Wonderous. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Neologian Art Gallery, 1027 S.
Claremont St., San Mateo. There will
be local artists, music and an art auction. $10. For more information go to
www.neologianartgallery.com.
The Libation Bearers. 7:30 p.m.
Dragon Theatre, Redwood City. Buy
your tickets online by leaving a voice
mail at 493-2006 ext. 2.
Post-Show Discussion Panel for
Aeschylus’ Play, ‘The Libation
Bearers.’ 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. Dragon
Productions Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. Tickets are $30. For
more information and to purchase
tickets visit dragonproductions.net.
SUNDAY, FEB. 1
Peninsula Lightning 9U and 10U
Baseball Evaluation. 9 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. Los Prados Baseball Field, 1837
Bahia St., San Mateo. The 9U and 10U
Peninsula Lightning Boys tournament baseball teams have a limited
number of openings for motivated
players who love baseball and are
looking to advance their skills
by competing in a number of city
tournaments and NCTB events at
Twin Creeks Sports Complex during
the 2015 summer baseball season
‘Near and Far.’ Noon to 4 p.m. Twin
Pines Art Center, the Manor, 10 Twin
Pines Lane, Belmont. Travel the world
through the eyes of Luz Maria
Hartley, whose selection of 25 oil
paintings will be on display. Exhibit

MONDAY, FEB. 2
AARP Smart Driver Course. 9 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. San Mateo Senior Center,
2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo.
Register
online
at
www.erecreg.com. For more information call 522-7490.
Tai Chi. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. San Carlos
Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos. Free
and open to the public. Offered every
Monday, Friday and Saturday. For
more information call Rhea Bradley,
Librarian at 591-0341 ext. 237.
Daytime Fiction Book Club. 10 a.m.
to 11 a.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm
St., San Carlos. Free and open to the
public. Offered first Monday of each
month. This month’s book is ‘Mambo
in Chinatown’ by Jean Kwok. For more
information call Rhea Bradley at 5910341 ext. 237.
Portola Art Gallery Presents ‘The
Philippines in Photos: From
Mountains to the Sea’ by Frances
Freyberg. 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Portola Art Gallery at Allied Arts
Guild, 75 Arbor Road, Menlo Park.
Runs Monday to Saturday through
Feb. 28. For more information call
321-0220.
Mentoring Mothers Support
Group. 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. MillsPeninsula Medical Center Family
Birth Center Conference Room,
Second floor, 1501 Trousdale Drive,
Burlingame. Focuses on perinatal
emotional health. Free. Group meets
every Monday. For more information
visit emergencementalhealth.com.
Hearing Loss Association of the
Peninsula meeting. 1 p.m. Veterans
Memorial Senior Center, 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City. Free
refreshments. For more information
call 345-4551.
Bite of Reality Financial Literacy. 4
p.m. Burlingame Public Library 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. A handson money management simulation
that gives students a taste of real
world financial challenges in a fun,
interactive setting. For more information contact John Piche
at
piche@plsinfo.org.
Dance Connection with Live Music
by Ron Gutierrez. Free dance lessons 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m. with open
dance from 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m.
Burlingame Woman’s Club, 241 Park
Road, Burlingame. Admission $9
members, $11 guests. Plan to
join/renew your membership of $20
and save $2 every dance. Members,
bring a new first-time male friend
and earn free entry for yourself with
one free entry per new dancer. Male
dance hosts get free admission. Light
refreshments. For more information
call 342-2221.
TUESDAY, FEB. 3
Computer Coach. 10 a.m. to
noon. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. Free and open to the public. Offered every Tuesday to help
with technical questions. For more
information call Rhea Bradley at 5910341 ext. 237.
‘Need Tax Forms?’ 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San
Carlos. Free and open to the
public. Every Tuesday and Thursday
afternoon volunteers will help you
access the forms/instructions booklets you'll need for completing your
2015 taxes.
The Art of Assertiveness: CSIX-P
Job Support by JAUNTY founder,
Eric Waisman. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. First
Presbyterian Church, 1500 Easton
Drive, Room 201, Burlingame. All welcome. For more information call 5220701.
Wise-Minded Parenting: Seven
Essentials for Raising Successful
Tweens and Teens. 7 p.m. San Mateo
Performing Arts Center, 600 N.
Delaware St., San Mateo. Dr. Laura
Kastner will present highlights from
her book, ‘Wise-Minded Parenting.’
For
more
information
visit
smuhsd.org/peninsulaparentspeakerseries.
Lawyers in the Library. 7 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. The first Tuesday of
each month the library, in partnership with the San Mateo County Bar
Association, the Belmont Library
holds free legal clinics. For more information email belmont.smcl.org.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

SAFETY
Continued from page 1
and drive defensively.”
A pedestrian involved in one of the
most recent major injury accidents was
still hospitalized as of Tuesday after
being struck by a distracted driver Dec.
31, Wall said. The man was walking in
a crosswalk at the intersection of
Airport Boulevard and Butler Avenue
when a driver ran through a red light
while texting, Wall said.
Two pedestrians died just months
apart after being hit by vehicles near
downtown. In March 2012, a 41-yearold man was killed while walking in a
crosswalk by a driver who failed to
yield at Grand and Maple avenues, Wall
said.
A 74-year-old man died in October

process, not just in South San
Francisco, as communities throughout
the Bay Area are feeling the pain of the
housing crunch.
Normandy said the city would further
address the plan’s impact on residential development when the housing
element comes before the council this
spring.
Councilman Pradeep Gupta also supported Garbarino’s belief that the plan
could be adjusted over the course of its
implementation.
“We are setting a target, so that we
don’t go completely adrift,” he said.

Early phases, funding
Construction for early phases of the
plan are already underway. Last year,
the city began installing new parking
meters and bike racks.
Other initial steps include realigning parking spaces, offering loans to
businesses willing to put new awnings
onto their storefronts, widening sidewalks, adding plazas for gathering and
reserving a section of the city’s main
street exclusively for pedestrians.
More ambitious elements of the plan
include redesigning the Caltrain station by extending the platform south
of its current location and constructing
a $20 million underpass at the southeast corner of Grand Avenue and
Airport Boulevard beneath Highway
101.
The city will look to fund the project
through an attempt to secure $49.1
million in grant money from the San
Mateo
County
Transportation
Authority. The city will apply for the
grant allocation at the Transportation
Authority’s board meeting next week.
The underpass would be designed to
grant better access to the Caltrain platform from both directions of Highway
101. Railroad Avenue is also slated to
be extended east so that it connects to
Gateway Boulevard, and new roads will
2012 after walking out into the street
near Grand and Walnut avenues and hit
by a car, Wall said.
It’s critical pedestrians, bicyclists
and drivers remain attentive while
traveling and fault doesn’t inherently
rest on a motorist, Wall said.
“Ninety-nine times out of 100 the
people on the losing end of an accident
or collision are going to be the bicyclist or pedestrian. But quite frequently
we find the person who’s at fault can
very commonly be either a pedestrian
or bicyclist or driver,” Wall said.
Officers will be looking for pedestrians who cross the street illegally, fail
to yield to drivers who have the right
of way while bicyclists will be
stopped and issued citations if they
fail to follow the same traffic laws that
apply to motorists, according to
police.
Police will pay special attention to
drivers speeding, making illegal

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

23

be built to connect Sylvester Road to
the Railroad Avenue extension and
Gateway Boulevard.
The keystone of the downtown project is expected to be City Hall Plaza,
which will offer a space for residents to
congregate on Grand Avenue. Two
other plazas will be constructed near
the Caltrain station and on Linden
Avenue.
According to public documents, the
city also hopes to build roughly
800,000 square feet of commercial
space, 21,000 square feet for industrial
use and 1.2 million square feet of new
office space.
The project could be funded through
creation of financing or assessment
districts, development impact fees, a
city affordable housing trust fund or
city housing bonds. Other options
include using the county’s sales tax
revenue from Measure A, a city housing fund, revenue or general obligation bonds, the city’s general fund, a
public benefit assessment district,
grants from the region and state or federal funding.
And as the new design for downtown
is approved, so is new policy.
At the same meeting, councilmembers unanimously approved banning
use of electronic cigarettes on Grand
Avenue.
E-cigarettes are devices that deliver
nicotine to users, without containing
tobacco. The city’s previously established regulations on smoking did not
apply to the devices, because they do
not contain tobacco and are not lit or
smoked.
Councilwoman Karyl Matsumoto
pushed to ensure that signs would be
posted downtown notifying residents
of the new legislation.

austin@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
turns, failing to stop for signs and
signals and not yielding to pedestrians in crosswalks, according to
police.
Plain-clothed officers will act as
pedestrians under carefully calculated
crosswalk stings to target drivers who
fail to yield or engage in unsafe behavior, Wall said.
The police department is also planning to work with the schools to educate students on traffic safety as well as
the fire department to possibly give
out free bicycle helmets, Wall said.
The enhanced operations are funded
with the help of a grant from the
California Office of Traffic Safety
through the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration. In 2012 alone,
612 pedestrians and 124 bicyclists
were killed in California while 4,743
pedestrians and 726 bicyclists were
killed across the nation, according to
police.

24

COMICS/GAMES

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

DILBERT®

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Costa del —
4 Monastic title
7 Hi-fi records
10 Novelist — Levin
11 Tolerates
13 Edict
14 Not hesitate
15 Forthright
16 “Betsy’s Wedding” star
17 Sari-clad royal
19 Dessert trolley
20 Mav’s foe
21 Serenity
23 Move deceptively
26 Alleviated
28 Turkish title
29 Food additive
30 Reeves of “The Matrix”
34 Ditty or jingle
36 Fleet initials
38 — a lid on it!
39 Oman neighbor
41 Dole out
42 Ventricle neighbor

GET FUZZY®

44
46
47
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

NASA counterpart
Military cap
Circus gear
Diva’s melody
“Kon- —”
Fall mo.
Cheese coating
Utopia
Melodrama shout
Jamie — Curtis
Prior to
Janitor’s tool

DOWN
1 Thailand, once
2 Killer whale
3 Plaster backing
4 Plant life
5 Fixes a road
6 Pharaoh’s god
7 Fragrant shrub
8 Tijuana dad
9 ASAP
12 Swatches
13 False front

18
22
23
24
25
27
29
31
32
33
35
37
40
41
42
43
45
46
48
49
50
51

Outstanding
Cartoon shrieks
Bump
“Yecch!”
Ell proceeder
Winter woe
Comply with
Tarzan’s nanny
Pistachio
Sporty truck
Countless
Locker item
Not glossy
“Diamond Lil”
Nest on a crag
Speak one’s mind
Cactus defense
Not-so-funny Marx
Trot or gallop
Camera feature
Canyon effect
Grind to a halt

1-30-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 2015
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Renovations to
your home will be costly, but will pay off in the long
run. Try to enlist the help of friends and family to
keep the overhead down.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Don’t let problems
you encounter while traveling or dealing with
relatives cause stress. Your health will suffer if
you don’t relax. Past acquaintances are likely to
come back into your life. Assess what they can do
for you before you proceed.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You will have to watch
your budget closely. Don’t buy expensive items from

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

THURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

friends or acquaintances. Channel your thoughts
into your job performance.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — It will be hard to contain
your feelings. Poor drivers will push you to the limit.
Don’t take your frustrations out on the ones you love.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You will need to
examine your motives. Be sure that you are getting
involved in new projects because you believe in them,
not because someone else is joining.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You can express
yourself well at group functions. Don’t be afraid to
promote your beliefs. You will inspire the people you
talk to. Now is the time to take a position of leadership.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Be careful not to ruffle the
feathers of the heavyweights at work. This is the

1-30-15

Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

time to work hard and make yourself indispensable,
not to push your needs and desires.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — You just want to enjoy
life. Don’t hesitate to join groups or get involved in
social activities that include colleagues. You need to be
around other people who can stimulate your creative
imagination and contribute to your new directions.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — You won’t want to deal
with other people’s problems today, but it would be a
good idea to do so if asked. Rewards can be yours if
you give a little of your time.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Social activities will be
a must. Combine work with pleasure. Put your best
foot forward and show your worth. There is much you
can accomplish if you put your mind to it.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Put your
efforts into moneymaking ventures. You can earn
recognition at work if you present your ideas. Be
sure to talk to those in higher positions about
your goals and directions.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Take some time
out to do things with children. They need your love
and support more than you think. Your ability to work
with your hands should be put to good use.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

104 Training

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

CASHIER - PT/FT, Will Train! Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.

110 Employment

HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263233
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Bakers in the City, 2) Love Bug
Bites, 3936 Beresford St., SAN MATEO,
CA 94403. Registered Owner: Glenda
Smith, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Glenda Smith /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/9/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263644
The following person is doing business
as:Zirelli Baseball, 3272 Brittan Ave,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070. Registered
Owner: Michael Gary Zirelli, same address. The business is conducted by an
individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Michael Gary Zirelli/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/15/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).

203 Public Notices

Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000

110 Employment
RETAIL MERCHANDISERS needed for
weekly service work in San Mateo and
Sunnyvale. Smartphone capabilities required.
Knowledge
of
POG’s
preferred. This position is as an Independent Contractor.
Contact Deb (256) 438-5104

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

110 Employment

HOTEL -

NOW HIRING
• Housekeepers PT / FT
• Front desk PT / FT / Temp
Los Prados Hotel
2940 S. Norfolk St.
San Mateo
(650)341-3300

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

25

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263494
The following person is doing business
as: EEG Patterns, 157 Elm Street Apt
306, SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered Owner: Deepthi Duddempudi,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/05/15
/s/ Deepthi Duddempudi /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/05/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263415
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Move Better Now, 2) Move Better
Pilates, 3-West 37th Ave, Suite 23, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner:
Olga Lubarsky, 1308 North Rd, Belmont
CA 94002. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Olga Lubarsky /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/29/14. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-263534
The following person is doing business
as: Edelman Interiors, 1328 Bernal Ave
BURLINGAME, CA 94010. Registered
Owner: Eliza Edelman, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on 01/01/15
/s/ Eliza Edelman /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/06/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263327
The following person is doing business
as: Bella Look, 944 10th Ave, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. Registered
Owner: Lila Vasquez, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Lila Vasquez /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/16/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263539
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Reflections, 205 Collins
Ave, DALY CITY, CA 94014. Registered
Owner: Apollo Fund I, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Theresa Hart /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 1/06/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263552
The following person is doing business
as: Rendezvous Solutions, 4000 Marshall Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA 94403.
Registered Owner: Ankur Shukla, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Ankur Shukla /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/07/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/15, 01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-263409
The following person is doing business
as: New Revival Ministries, 150 Harrison
Ave #2A, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061.
Registered Owner: Jeovanny Escobar,
1312 Maple St, San Mateo CA 94402.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on 12/10/14
/s/ Jeovanny Escobar /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/26/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263627
The following person is doing business
as:Thrift City Furniture, 45 West 43rd
Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner: Albert Campoy, 1921 W
San Carlos St., San Jose, CA 95128.
The business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Albert Campoy/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263473
The following person is doing business
as:Give Thanks Raw, 972 15th Ave,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. Registered
Owner:Julia Beal, same address. The
business is conducted by an individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Julia Beal/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/02/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263402
The following person is doing business
as:SS Strategic Consulting, 1324 El Camino Real #1, BURLINGAME, CA
94010. Registered Owner: Shahida Subedar, same address. The business is
conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 11/26/2014.
/s/ Shahida Subedar/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/23/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263649
The following person is doing business
as:Old County Deli, 1331 Old County
Rd, BELMONT, CA 94002. Registered
Owner: Huda Sami Judeh, 1000 Continentals Way, Belmont, CA 94002. The
business is conducted by an individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Huda Sami Judeh /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/15/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263404
The following person is doing business
as Pinky Nails, 1664 Palm Ave, SAN
MATEO, CA 94402. Registered Owner:
Thuy Nguyen, same address. The business is conducted by an individual. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Thuy Nguyen/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/24/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263561
The following person is doing business
as Frontier Coffee Roasting Company,
2040 Spyglass Dr, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066. Registered Owner: Tyler Toy,
same address. The business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Tyler Toy /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 1/8/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263686
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Organized by Christine 2) Hillsborough Professional Organizer 3)San Mateo Professional Organizer 4) Room
Configurations, 58 E. Poplar Ave., #9,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owner: Organized by Christine, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by an Limited
Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/05/2015
/s/ Christine Sato/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/20/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15, 02/13/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263717
The following person is doing business
as: Sutterfield Consignment, 1174
Broadway, BURLINGAME, CA 94010.
Registered Owner: Greg Holtmann, 469
Clementina St. #18, San Francisco, CA
94103. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2015
/s/ Greg Holtmann/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/21/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15, 02/13/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263720
The following person is doing business
as: Neuroimaging, 35 Bay View Drive,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070. Registered
Owner: Neuroimaging LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Max Wintermark /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/21/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15, 02/13/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263734
The following person is doing business
as: Shama Thai Massage, 1100 Howard
Ave, Suite B, BURLINGAME, CA 94010
Registered owners: Shama Thai Massage, CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Scott Selig /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/22/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15, 02/30/15).

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015
203 Public Notices

210 Lost & Found

296 Appliances

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263699
The following person is doing business
as: AP Enterprise, 129 So. Linden Ave,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
Registered Owner: Mastertech, Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Sandra Gomez/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/21/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/30/15, 02/06/15, 02/13/15, 02/20/15).

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR(415)346-6038

$40.,

WHIRLPOOL DEHUMIDIFIER. Almost
new. located coastside. $75 650-8676042.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263768
The following person is doing business
as: Bodhi Tree Massage Therapy, 407 N.
San Mateo Drive, SAN MATEO, CA
94401. Registered Owner: David Wilson
Da Silva, 385 Oyster Cove Marina, South
San Francisco, CA 94080. The business
is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/David Da Silva/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/26/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/30/15, 02/06/15, 02/13/15, 02/20/15).

297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hardly Used $80 (650)293-7313

298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1980 SYLVANIA 24" console television
operational with floor cabinet in excellent
condition. FREE. (650) 676-0974.

210 Lost & Found
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634

Tundra

Books
$12.,

2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edison Mazda Lamps. Both still working $50 (650)-762-6048

JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861

ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858

LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

NASCAR BOOKS - 1998 - 2007 Annuals, 50th anniversary, and more. $75.
(650)345-9595

COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858

295 Art

LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410

ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648

MICKEY MINI Mouse Vintage 1997 Lenox Christmas plate Gold Trim, Still in
Box $65. (650)438-7345

PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$49 (650)591-9769

NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260

LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291

BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878

FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301

LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.

BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

WW1

296 Appliances

OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260
RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

300 Toys
K'NEX BUILDING ideas $30.
(650)622-6695
LEGO DUPLO Set ages 1 to 5. $30
(650)622-6695

SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35. (650)558-8142

302 Antiques

CHAMPION JUICER, very good, coral
color $25. Phone 650-345-7352

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763

TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good condition, $10. each, (650)571-5899

73 HAPPY Meal toys. 1990's vintage, in
the
original
unopened
packages.
$60.(650)596-0513

CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One
pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208

299 Computers

ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $60. 650-596-0513

DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002

300 Toys

ANTIQUE MAYTAG Ringer type Washing Machine, (1930-35 era) $85.
650-583-7505

$25 OBO. Star Wars, new Battle Droid
figures, all four variations.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.

ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313

FRIDGE, MINI, unopened, plugs, cord,
can use for warmer also $40, (650) 5789208
FRUIT PRESS, unopened, sturdy, make
baby food, ricer, fruit sauces, $20.00,
(650) 578 9208
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED
PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO ABOVE IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS
DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR.
IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 10/11/2006. UNLESS
YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.
Trustor: James S. Proffitt and Lisa S. Proffitt, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS COMMUNITY PROPERTY WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP.
Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC
Recorded 10/20/2006 as Instrument No. 2006-158120 in book ---, page --- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Mateo County, California.
Date of Sale: 02/25/2015 at 12:30 PM
Place of Sale: AT THE MARSHALL STREET ENTRANCE TO THE HALL OF JUSTICE AND RECORDS, 400 COUNTY CENTER, REDWOOD CITY, CA
Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $581,441.87
WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S
CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A
STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR
FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR
SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE:
All right, title, and interest conveyed and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as
Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it
is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt.
More fully described in said Deed of Trust
Street Address or other common designation of real property: : 1092 Manzanita Dr,
Pacifica, CA 94044
A.P.N.: 023-412-090
The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above.
The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the
note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the
obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is:
$581,441.87.
If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's
sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and
the successful bidder shall have no further recourse.
The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the undersigned a
written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located.
NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property
lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction.
You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a
trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the
property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior
lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title
to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of
outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender
may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be
postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information
about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a
courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date
has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call (866) 960-8299, visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices/Sales.aspx using
the file number assigned to this case 2014-04163-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale
may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web
site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.
Date: January 9, 2015
Western Progressive, LLC , as Trustee
C/o 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450
Irvine, CA 92606
Automated Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299
http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.asp
x
For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (866) 240-3530
THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION
WE OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE
(Published 01/30/15, 02/06/15, 02/013/15)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED
PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO ABOVE IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS
DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR.
IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 03/30/2007. UNLESS
YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.
Trustor: Ella Marie Cotton, An Unmarried Woman
Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC
Recorded 4/05/2007 as Instrument No.2007-051724 in book ---, page --- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Mateo County, California.
Date of Sale: 02/13/2015 at 12:30 PM
Place of Sale: AT THE MARSHALL STREET ENTRANCE TO THE HALL OF JUSTICE AND RECORDS, 400 COUNTY CENTER, REDWOOD CITY, CA
Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $953,414.11
WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S
CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A
STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR
FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR
SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE:
All right, title, and interest conveyed and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as
Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it
is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt.
More fully described in said Deed of Trust
Street Address or other common designation of real property: 314 East Santa Inez
Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94401
A.P.N.: 032-211-030
The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above.
The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the
note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the
obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is:
$953,414.11.
If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's
sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and
the successful bidder shall have no further recourse.
The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the undersigned a
written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located.
NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property
lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction.
You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a
trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the
property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior
lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title
to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of
outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender
may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be
postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information
about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a
courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date
has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call (866) 960-8299, visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices/Sales.aspx using
the file number assigned to this case 2013-04227-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale
may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web
site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.
Date: 12/19/2014
Western Progressive, LLC , as Trustee
C/o 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450
Irvine, CA 92606
Automated Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299
http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.asp
x
For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (866) 240-3530
THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION
WE OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE
(Published 01/16/15, 01/23/15, 01/30/15)

302 Antiques

303 Electronics

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

HOME THEATER System" KLH"digital
DVD/CD/MP3.Player
6
speakers
ex.$100. (650)992-4544

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

HOME THEATER, surround sound system. Harman Kardon amplifier tuner and
6 speakers, NEW. $400/obo. Call
(650)345-5502

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313
VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

Very

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with
DVD and VHS Flat Screen Remote 06
$40: (650)580-6324

INFINITY FLOOR speakers ( a pair) in
good condition $ 60. (650)756-9516. Daly City.

KENWOOD STEREO Receiver/cassette
deck/CD,3 speakers box ex/con. $60
(650)992-4544
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PRINTER DELL946, perfect, new black
ink inst, new color ink never installed,
$75. 650-591-0063

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

TUNER AMPS, 3, Technics SA-GX100,
Quadraflex 767, Pioneer VSX-3300. All
for $99. (650)591-8062

FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767

WESTINGHOUSE 28" flat screen TV
LCD with Remote. works perfect, little
used. ** SOLD **

PANASONIC STEREO color TV 36"
ex/con/ $30 (650)992-4544

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED
PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO ABOVE IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS
DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR.
IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/23/2005. UNLESS
YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.
Trustor: Jeffrey L. Varnell, A SINGLE MAN.
Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC
Recorded 12/30/2005 as Instrument No.2005-227129 in book ---, page --- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Mateo County, California.
Date of Sale: 02/23/2015 at 12:30 PM
Place of Sale: AT THE MARSHALL STREET ENTRANCE TO THE HALL OF JUSTICE AND RECORDS, 400 COUNTY CENTER, REDWOOD CITY, CA
Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $1,309,116.62
WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S
CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A
STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR
FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR
SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE:
All right, title, and interest conveyed and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as
Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it
is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt.
More fully described in said Deed of Trust
Street Address or other common designation of real property: : 3747 Hamilton Way,
Redwood City, CA 94062-3406
A.P.N.: 057-234-030
The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above.
The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the
note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the
obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is:
$1,309,116.62.
If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's
sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and
the successful bidder shall have no further recourse.
The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the undersigned a
written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located.
NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property
lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction.
You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a
trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the
property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior
lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title
to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of
outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender
may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be
postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information
about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a
courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date
has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call (866) 960-8299, visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices/Sales.aspx using
the file number assigned to this case 2014-04539-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale
may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web
site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.
Date: January 8, 2015
Western Progressive, LLC , as Trustee
C/o 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450
Irvine, CA 92606
Automated Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299
http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.asp
x
For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (866) 240-3530
THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION
WE OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE
(Published 01/23/15, 01/30/15, 02/06/15)

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

27

303 Electronics

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

310 Misc. For Sale

317 Building Materials

WESTINGHOUSE 32” Flatscreen TV,
model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available **SOLD**

FADED GOLD antique framed mirror,
25in x 33in— $15 Cell number:
(650)580-6324

ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762

WOOD ROCKING chair with foam and
foot rest; swivels; very comfortable and
relaxing. $45 (650)580-6324

STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167

WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $69
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 PIECE cocktail table with 2 end tables,
glass tops. good condition, $99.
(650)574-4021l
BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safely.$99 650-375-1414

GRACO 40" x28" x 28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City
HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mattress (twin size) in great condition. Includes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with additional 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

INTAGE ART-DECO style wood chair,
carved back & legs, tapestry seat, $50.
650-861-0088.

CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038

CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

made in Spain

LEATHER couch, about 6ft long— dark
brown $45 Cell number: (650)580-6324

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465

LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483

DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER, OLD four drawer, painted
wod cottage pine chest of drawers. Solid
and tight. Carved wood handles. 40”
wide x 35.5” high x 17.5” deep. $65. Call
or text (207)329-2853. San Carlos.
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169

ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021
EXECUTIVE DESK 60”, cherry wood,
excellent condition. $275 (650)212-7151
EXECUTIVE DESK Chair, upholstered,
adjustable height, excellent condition,
$150 (650)212-7151

LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
OVAL LIVING room cocktail table. Wood
with glass 48x28x18. Retail $250.
$75 OBO (650)343-4461
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO SET for sale, glass table and six
chairs $100 for the set. (650)678-5133
PATIO TABLE 5’x5’ round, Redwood,
rollers, 2 benches, good solid
condition $30 San Bruno (650)588-1946
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
TORCHIERE $35. (650) 631-6505

ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
dia,

8 SKEWERS, unopened, for fondue,
roasting marshmallows, or fruit, ($7.00)
(650) 578 9208

SINGLE BED with 3 drawer wood
frame,exc condition $99. 650-756-9516
Daly City.

BOXED RED & gold lg serving bowl
18inches - $65 (650) 741-9060 SB

ROUND BEVELED Mirror 22"
hangs, perfect $29, 650-595-3933

SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves
42" x 21" x 17" exc cond $30. (650)7569516
TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141

DOWN
1 Steals, with “off”
2 Former “Fashion
Emergency” host

HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30 OBO
(650) 995-0012
NEW PORTABLE electric fan wind machine, round, adjustable— $15
Cell phone: (650)580-6324
ONE CUP Coffee Maker office, apt, dorm
??? Only $9 650-595-3933

VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720

318 Sports Equipment
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.
(650)637-0930

VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167

CASINO CHIP Display. Frame and ready
to hang, $99.00 or best offer.
650.315.3240

WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208

G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$15.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.

311 Musical Instruments

IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270

ACOUSTIC GUITAR nylon string excellent condition w/case $95. (650)5765026

NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260

POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

NORDIC TRACK AEROBIC EXERCISER -$45. (650)630-2329

ROTISSERIE ELECTRIC machine. Never been used $100 (650)678-5133

BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598

TEA/ UTILITY Cart, $15. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057

SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260

GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461

SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804

VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

TWO SOCCER balls -- $10.00 each
(hardly used) (650)341-5347

307 Jewelry & Clothing

ROLAND GW-7 Workstation/Keyboard,
with expression pedal, sustain pedal, and
owner’s manual. $500. (415)706-6216

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
UPHOLSTERED SIDE office chairs (2).
3ft X 2ft, $85 each, (650)212-7151
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent condition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE CABINETS (2) - each has a
drawer & 1 door with 2 shelves.
36x21x18. $25 each. (650)867-3257
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65.00 (650)504-6058
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
3 Surface fractures
4 Blockhead
5 Fire proof
6 Courses taken
consecutively?
7 Depressing
atmosphere
8 Energy
9 “Downton Abbey”
title
10 Draped garment
11 The first “A” in
A.A. Milne
12 Piles
15 Michael Jackson,
e.g.
17 Tip off
21 One on the other
side
23 Half a
philosophical
duality
25 “The Seven-PerCent Solution”
author Nicholas
26 Adler of Sherlock
Holmes lore
28 Look down
29 Snideness
31 Numerical prefix
32 “Look at this!”
33 Battleground
34 Start over, in a
way
36 Sushi seaweed

COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037

ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

TABLE, WHITE, sturdy wood, tile top,
35" square. $35. (650)861-0088

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Ones calling the
shots?
5 Rock blasters
9 Californie, for one
13 Apple variety
14 Goal for a runner
15 Renaissance
painter Veronese
16 Deep-sea
creature, literally
18 Mozart’s “King of
Instruments”
19 Seat of Dallas
County, Alabama
20 Alternative
strategies,
literally
22 Churchill, for one
24 “Who, me?”
25 1,000 G’s
27 Goes out for a
bit?
30 Fusion, for one
35 Receptionist on
“The Office”
37 It’s frowned upon
39 Yellowish tone
40 Infomercial
offers, literally
43 Time to say
“¡Feliz año
nuevo!”
44 Pioneers’
journey, say
45 Unpopular spots
46 Buck
48 1980s surgeon
general
50 Dennings of
“Thor”
51 __ lane
53 “Who, me?”
55 Toddler’s
transport, literally
61 Alley wanderers
64 Certain Middle
Easterner
65 Preflight
purchase, literally
67 Pirouette,
essentially
68 Settled down
69 “Truth in
Engineering”
automaker
70 First place?
71 Bothersome
parasites
72 Block (up)

306 Housewares

38 Layered snack
41 Venue involving
a lot of body
contact
42 “Right Now (Na
Na Na)” artist
47 Rogers Centre
team, on
scoreboards
49 Majestic display
52 Like some
popular videos
54 Big brass

55 “Heavens to
Betsy!”
56 Crossword
component
57 Collapsed
58 Aware of
59 Where many
subs are
assembled
60 Really, really cool
62 Stir
63 Pass over
66 Downed

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

AMETHYST RING Matching earings in
14k gold setting. $165. (650)200-9730
VAN GOGH “Vase of White Roses”
wood and glass frame. 24” x 30”. $70.
(650)298-8546. p.m. only please

308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW heavy duty" Craftman"
new in box $45.00- D.C. (650)992-4544

CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300
(650)245-4084

CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large, Excellent
Condition, $275 (650)245-4084

CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269

PET FURNITURE covers. 1 standard
couch 2 lounge chairs. Like new $70
OBO (650)343-4461

SAW WITH Scabbard 10 pt. fine steel
only $15 650-595-3933
TOOL BOX Set"Snap-On"on rollers19
drawers 34x56 ex/con.$700.00 (650)9924544
VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517
WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.

310 Misc. For Sale
10 VIDEOTAPES(3 unused) - $3
each/$20 all. Call 574-3229 after 10 am.
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10 "x
10", cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858

01/30/15

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878

322 Garage Sales

GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500

DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373

VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM WITH oak stand: Blue
background show tank. 36"x16.75"x10".
$50, good condition. (650) 692-5568.

CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269

CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517

TWO SPOTTING Scopes, Simmons and
Baraska, $80 for both (650)579-0933

WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045

SKI EQUIPMENT PACKAGE $35. Skis,
poles, boots, jacket. Youth or petite
woman, 4'8"-5'3". (650)630-2329

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer. Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427

WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

xwordeditor@aol.com

WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001

$99

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

315 Wanted to Buy
WE BUY

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

316 Clothes
ALPINESTAR JEANS Tags Attached
Twin Stitched Knee Protection Never
used Blue/Grey Sz34 $65 (650)357-7484
DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484
MAN'S BLACK Shoes 9D tassel slipons,
Excel $15, 560-595-3933
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl, like new
$40 obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

317 Building Materials

PATTERN- MAKING KIT with 5 curved
plastic rulers. $60. Call 574-3229 after
10 am.

BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955

PROCRASTINATION CURE - 6 audiocassette course by Nightingale- Conant.
$30. Call 574-3229 after 10 am

CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041

SEWING MACHINE Kenmore, blonde
cabinet, $25 (650)355-2167

MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605

325 Estate Sales

ESTATE
SALE
Entire
Contents
House Packed
with tons of
Collectibles!
Friday Jan 30th
and
Sat Jan 31st
10 to 4pm
521 Chesterton
Belmont CA
335 Rugs
AREA RUG 2X3 $15. (650) 631-6505

340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598

345 Medical Equipment
INVACARE ADJUSTABLE hospital bed,
good condition. $500. (415)516-4964
PETERMANN BATTERY operated chair
bath lift. Stainless steele frame. Accepts
up to 350 lbs. Easily inserted in/out of
tub. $250 OBO. (650) 739-6489.
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER WITH basket $30. Invacare
Excellent condition (650)622-6695

By Paolo Pasco
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

01/30/15

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015
379 Open Houses

620 Automobiles

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!

List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!

Call (650)344-5200

Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto

440 Apartments

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

BELMONT – 1 BR, 2 BR, and 3BR
apartments No Smoking No Pets
(650)591-4046

470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
ROOMS FOR RENT
BURLINGAME HOTEL
Close to Public Transport.
Shared & Private Bathroom
Weekly No Pet
$200 + Tax shared per week
$300 + Tax Pvt Bathroom per week
Cable TV, wifi. micro, freeze
287 Lorton Ave Burlingame
(650)344-6666

Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos

$49.- $59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax

Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos

HONDA ‘93 LX SD all power, complete,
runs. $2,500 OBO, (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461

625 Classic Cars
90 MASERATI, 2 Door hard top and convertible. New paint Runs good. $4500
(650)245-4084

DODGE ‘89 AIRES Only 44,300 miles! 4
cylinder auto, very good condition, runs
fine. Only $2,000. Broken hip ends driving. (650)591-8062
BMW ‘06 525, silver, fully loaded, 130K
miles, excellent condition. $10,200.
Clean title, smogged. (650)302-5523.
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296

RADIAL TIRE Hankook 235/75/15 NEVER USED, retail $125.00 yours for ONLY $75.00 650-799-0303

Cabinetry

Concrete

TONNEAU COVER Brand new factory,
hard, folding, vinyl. Fits 2014 Sierra 6.6
$475 (650)515-5379

680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

t
Free showroom
design consultation & quote
t
BELOW HOME
DEPOT PRICES
t
PLEASE VISIT

Small jobs only
Local references
Free Estimates
30 years in Business
Licensed-Bonded

(650)248-4205

bestbuycabinets.com
or call

Electricians

650-294-3360
Construction

Cleaning

Drywall
DRYWALL /
PLASTER / STUCCO
Patching w/
Texture Matching
Invisible Repair

SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

650-322-9288

for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

Gardening
BRENT LANDSCAPING
Garden and Landscape
Maintenance

635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374

• Bi-monthly and Monthly
• Reliable and punctual

(650)288-8663

640 Motorcycles/Scooters

620 Automobiles

1978 CLASSIC Mercedes Benz, 240D,
136k miles, 2nd owner, all scheduled
maintenance & records available. Good
condition. All original. Always garaged.
New tires. 4 speed manual. Runs &
drives great. Sunroof. Clean interior.
Good leather and carpets. AM/FM radio.
$4500. Call (650)375-1929

NEW Z Snow Cables for 14" & 15"
wheels, $29 650-595-3933

630 Trucks & SUV’s

1966 CHEVELLE 396 motor. Standardbore block. Standard domed pistons,
rods, crank cam only. 360 HP, code
T0228EJ $600, (650)293-7568

‘08 BMW 528i, beige, great condition,
complete dealer maintenance. Car can
be seen in Foster City. (650)349-6969

HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947

DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

Mention Daily Journal

'06 MERCEDES AMG CL-63.. slate
gray, great condition, 1 owner, complete
dealer maintenance records available.
8,000 miles of factory warranty left. car
can be seen in Fremont...Best offer. Call
(408)888-9171
or
email:
nakad30970@aol.com

BORLA CAT-BACK exhaust system, ‘92
to ‘96 Corvette LT-1, $600/obo.
olivermp2@gmail.com, (650)333-4949

FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,999 /OBO (650)364-1374

1964 HARLEY DAVIDSON FHL Panhead (motor only) 84 stoker. Complete
rebuild. Many new parts.Never run. Call
for details. $6,000. Jim (650) 293-7568

(650) 593-3136

670 Auto Parts

CA LIC# 959138

CALL NOW FOR
SPRING LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Sprinklers and irrigation
Lawn Aeration
Pressure washing, rock gardens,
and lots more!

1973 FXE Harley Shovel Head 1400cc
stroked & balanced motor. Runs perfect.
Low milage, $6,600 Call (650)369-8013
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
(650)670-2888

Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Concrete
AAA CONCRETE DESIGN

650 RVs

Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

COLEMAN LARAMIE
pop-up camper, Excellent Condition,
$2,250. Call (415)515-6072

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

670 Auto Parts

Lic# 947476

from Karl Rothe

Removal of poison oak
and berry bushes
(650)307-4695

(650)533-0187

1961-63 OLDS F-85 Engine plus many
heads, cranks, Int., Manifold & Carbs. All
$500 (650)348-1449

Celebrating 50 years
in the gardening business

Rambo
Concrete
Works

2006 CADILLAC Brake rotors, 4 available, $15 each (650)340-1225
2006 CADILLAC CTS-V Factory service
manuals, volumes 1 thru 3, $100
(650)340-1225
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
CAR TOW chain 9' $35 (650)948-0912

ROSE PRUNING

Flooring

Flamingo’s Flooring

by Greenstarr
www.greenstarr.net

t Walkways
t Driveways
t 1BUJPT
t $PMPSFE
t "HHSFHBUF
t #MPDL 8BMMT
t 3FUBJOJOH XBMMT
t 4UBNQFE $PODSFUF
t 0SOBNFOUBM DPODSFUF
t 4XJNNJOH QPPM SFNPWBM

Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
License # 752250

Since 1985

SHOP
AT HOME

Decks & Fences

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.

CARPET
LUXURY VINYL TILE
SHEET VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
Contact us for a
FREE In-Home
Estimate

650-655-6600

info@flamingosflooring.com
www.flamingosflooring.com
We carry all major brands!

Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING & WINDOWS
Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)278-0157
Lic#1211534

Gutters

ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

O.K.’S RAINGUTTER

New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY

(650)556-9780
OSCAR
GUTTER CLEANING

• Gutters & Downspout Repair
• Roofing Repair
• Screening & Seeling
Free Estimates

(650)669-1453
Lic# 910421

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

Gutters

Hauling

Landscaping

Painting

ROLANDO’S
GUTTER CLEANING
My specialty is power
washing and rain gutter
cleaning. Call me at
(650) 283-9449

CHAINEY HAULING

GET YOUR LAWN
READY FOR SPRING

STAFFORD PAINTING
Interior / Exterior
Residential / Commercial

Handy Help
CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES
• Fences • Decks
• Concrete Work • Pebbles
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling
Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

CHEAP
HAULING!

Call us for our spring yard
maintenance special and get
your home looking beautiful!
Sprinklers, Irrigation, Rock
Gardens and Lawn Aeration!

Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

Specializing In:
Homes, Apts, Storages
Professional, Friendly, Careful
Peninsula Personal mover

(650)630-0424
Painting

HANDYMAN

JON LA MOTTE

Electrical and
General home repair
(650)341-0100
(408)761-0071

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

License 619908

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

HONEST HANDYMAN

Call Joe

(650)701-6072
Lic# 979435

Hauling
AAA RATED!

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

$40 & UP
HAUL

ECONOMY PLUMBING
Fast Free Estimate
24 Hour Emergency Service
Ask About
$48.88 Drain & Sewer
Cleaning Special
(650)731-0510

Fully Lic & Bonded Cal-T190632

Free Estimates
Lic.#834170

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting

CLEAN DRAINS PLUMBING
$89 TO CLEAN ANY

(650)461-0326

BAY AREA
RELOCATION SERVICES

(650)296-0568

The Village
Handyman

Plumbing

Window Washing

TAPIA

ROOFING

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975

&

by Greenstarr

Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564

Chris’s Hauling

CLEANING

Dry Rot, Gutters & Down Spout Repair
FULLY INSURED / LICENSED & BONDED

(650) 367-8795
– SERVING THE PENINSULA –

TAPIAROOFING.NET

LICENSE # 729271

Tree Service

Notices

Yardby Greenstarr
Boss
www.greenstarr.net
www.yardboss.net

t $PNQMFUF MBOETDBQF
DPOTUSVDUJPO BOE SFNPWBM
t 'VMM USFF DBSF JODMVEJOH
IB[BSE FWBMVBUJPO
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SFNPWBM BOE TUVNQ
HSJOEJOH
t 3FUBJOJOH XBMMT
t 0SOBNFOUBM DPODSFUF
t 4XJNNJOH QPPM SFNPWBM

NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
License # 752250

Since 1985

Hillside Tree

Service

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming

• Yard clean up - attic,
basement
• Junk metal removal
including cars, trucks and
motorcycles
• Demolition
• Concrete removal
• Excavation
• Swimming pool removal

Pruning

• Shaping
• Large

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers

Tom 650.834.2365
Chris 415.999.1223

Call Luis (650) 704-9635

Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
License # 752250

MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

GUTTER

Family business, serving the
Peninsula for over 30 years

Moving

Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Free Estimates

Lic.# 891766

CA Lic #692520

Lic.# 983312

DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING

(650)740-8602

(650) 692-2647

CLOGGED DRAIN! SEWER PIPES
Installation of Water Heaters,
Faucets, Toilets, Sinks, Gas, Water &
Sewer Lines. Trenchless
Replacement.

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small

“A Professional Licensed
Contractor”
36 years experience

Roofing

Since 1985

Tile

CUBIAS TILE

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

• Granite Install • Kitchens
• Decks
• Bathrooms
• Tile Repair
• Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates

(650)341-7482

(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492

Experience the “Value Triangle”
Product

Focal Point Design & Cabinetry
1222 So. El Camino Real
San Mateo, CA 94402

650.345.0355
Service

Price
Over 30 Years in Business!

29

Come visit our Showroom or
Call for appointment
M - F 10:00 - 5:30, S 10:00 - 4:00, Closed Sunday
www.focalpointkitchens.com

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

Attorneys

Food

Furniture

Health & Medical

Law Office of Jason Honaker

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F

Bedroom Express

NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE

Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050

2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

www.steelheadbrewery.com

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com

RENDEZ VOUS
CAFE

184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

CALIFORNIA

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

(650)591-3900

Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

106 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR

BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

Tea, espresso, Duvel, Ballast
Point Sculpin and other beers
today

Lunch• Dinner• Wknd Breakfast
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

Financial

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

(650)372-0888

RETIREMENT
PLAN ANALYSIS

401(k) & IRA & 403(b)
(650)458-0312
New Stage Investment Group
Hans Reese is a Registered Representative with, and securities offered
through, LPL Financial,
Member FINRA/SIPC

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

(650) 295-6123

Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

unitedamericanbank.com

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Housing

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)

Please call to RSVP

(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com

Insurance
EYE EXAMINATIONS

UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com

Health & Medical
AMEO ESSENTIAL OILS
Let’s have a Party
Test 43 Oils - Diffusers
Demonstration video
Clinical-grade standards
Listen to Dr. Joshua Plant
Learn the health benefits
Call (650)366-6606

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking

1221 Chess Drive Foster City

Where Dreams Begin

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

BLUE SHIELD OF
CALIFORNIA

www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Legal Services

LEGAL

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

(650)574-2087

legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Loans

REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA

Marketing

GROW

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com

Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS

We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
All Credit Accepted
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker
CA Bureau of Real Estate#746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268

Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY

Where every child is a gift from God

K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco

(650)588-6860

ww.hillsidechristian.com

Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

Sign up for the free newsletter

CARE ON CALL
Massage Therapy

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $24.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

(650)389-2468

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$48

Belbien Day Spa

1204 West Hillsdale Blvd.
SAN MATEO
(650)403-1400

24/7 Care Provider
www.mycareoncall.com
(650)276-0270
1818 Gilbreth Rd., Ste 127
Burlingame
CNA, HHA & Companion Help

Tax Preparation

QUALITY,
FAST
Tax Returns
starting at:

$50

Jie`s Income Tax

1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 350
San Mateo, CA 94402
Office:650-274-0968
Cell:650-492-1273

Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

Wills & Trusts
ESTATE PLANNING
TrustandEstatePlan.com

San Mateo Office
1(844)687-3782
Complete Estate Plans
Starting at $399

LOCAL/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Around the world
Ukraine: Russia-backed rebels
overrun another town in east
ARTEMIVSK, Ukraine — Ukraine’s military conceded Thursday that its forces had
been overrun by Russian-backed separatist
forces in another town in their battle to hold
onto a strategically valuable railway hub.
A soldier wounded in combat for the town,
Vuhlehirsk, said armored vehicles and tanks
were used in the attack on government positions, forcing a hasty retreat.
Defense Ministry spokesman Vladislav
Seleznyov said fighting is now under way to
expel the rebels from Vuhlehirsk.
“We are trying to push the enemy out of
the town,” he said.
The loss of full control over town will further complicate efforts to resist the
onslaught on Debaltseve, a nearby railway
hub that sits between the two main rebelheld cities of Donetsk and Luhansk.
While clashes in east Ukraine rage, hopes
are still being invested in reviving a peace
process that has been undermined with every
new day of fighting.
The leader of the separatists in the
Luhansk region, Igor Plotnitsky, told a
rebel news agency that the success of negotiations planned for Friday will hinge on
lifting what he described as Ukraine’s economic blockade of breakaway regions.

Balloon crew surpasses
distance record in Pacific flight

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

PLANNING
Continued from page 1
Lim said the city is perfectly situated to
show football fans a good time.
“It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity that
we’re going to be hosting the 50th Super
Bowl,” Lim said. “Everybody’s sort of gearing up, trying to figure out how we can use
that [time] to stimulate some business in
the community. … This is going to be a fun
event and we should do everything we can
to bring some of that fun to our neighborhood.”
Smack dab in the middle of the San
Francisco International Airport and the
49ers home stadium, officials are confident
the county will serve as a mecca for pigskin
lovers to play, stay and cheer.
“I believe that most people will be staying along this corridor and we have one of
the best downtowns in the Peninsula so I
feel like there’s going to be a lot of people
here looking for things to do,” said Marcus
Clarke, San Mateo’s economic development director.
LeClair agreed, adding the visitors bureau
has already set aside 7,500 hotel rooms for
media, sponsors and others involved in
Super Bowl operations. Vendors of Super
Bowl packages that include tickets and
hotel stays are also anticipated to start
blocking out rooms quickly, she added.
Promoting public transit is key and the
Bay Area’s Super Bowl 50 Host Committee
is looking at various options to cater to
visitors, LeClair said. She also suggested
creating maps outlining Super Bowl events

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Two pilots
soaring over the Pacific Ocean made history
Thursday, traveling farther than the 5,209mile official world distance record for human
flight in a gas balloon. But according to the
rules of international aviation, they didn’t
set a new record quite yet.
“There it is! There it is!” shouted team
members at the flight’s mission control in Continued from page 1
Albuquerque as a monitor showed the heliumfilled Two Eagles balloon passing the record
Sedillo, who had worked for HSA since
set by the Double Eagle V in 1981.
2006,
was placed on administrative leave in
The Two Eagles pilots, Troy Bradley of
Albuquerque and Leonid Tiukhtyaev of July after the first girl came forward and he
Russia, are aiming to set both distance and ultimately resigned from the Children and
duration records with their flight from Saga, Family Services Department in October just
Japan, which began shortly before 6:30 before he was arrested.
Sedillo knew his alleged first victim since
a.m. Sunday Japan time, and was nearing
she was 11 and was like a father, visiting her
North America on Thursday.

SEDILLO

at various Caltrain stops along the corridor.
Airports have begun to prepare for the
anticipated influx of visitors aboard standard flights and private jets. Gretchen
Kelly, San Mateo County Airports division manager, said the San Jose
International Airport will likely take the
lead and reach out to smaller surrounding
airports that can assist with overflow in
the near future.
The Super Bowl 50 Host Committee
along with public safety officials are
spending this week in Glendale, Arizona, to
take notes on how that community is welcoming and managing fans with fireworks,
music, shopping and even a climbing wall
reminiscent of the Grand Canyon, according to Bay City News Service.
In creating destination-unique events,
Clarke said San Mateo has a wealth of history from which to draw.
“It’s a huge opportunity and what I love
about it is San Mateo has such an athletic
history and particularly a football history.
when she moved to Texas and increasing
their time together when she came back,
according to the District Attorney’s Office.
On July 14, he reportedly took the girl, then
16, to an upscale San Jose hotel where they
had sex.
While Sedillo was out on leave, the second 16-year-old girl claimed to have a sexual relationship with him between June and
the end of July last year, according to the
District Attorney’s Office.
Sedillo’s parents, who posted bail for
their son in October, were in the courtroom

31

There’s a couple people born [or] raised
here, Lynn Swann, who played for the
Pittsburgh Steelers, also Tom Brady and …
John Madden who [played] at the College
of San Mateo,” Clarke said. “Just a lot of
history that we’d love to build upon and celebrate.”
Clarke said city staff plans to team up
with other Bay Area planners and folks
from the visitors bureau to share ideas and
prepare.
Clarke said he’s looking at a marketing
model it used during last year’s Maker Faire
held at the San Mateo County Event Center.
Downtown San Mateo hosted the first
Innovation Week leading up to the faire,
which catered to the tech scene by providing events such as a cocktail crawl, architectural displays and a Burning Man themed
discussion panel.
Clarke added the city is considering outdoor venues for other events that could
pave way for 2016 Super Bowl viewing parties.
“We are going to be experimenting a little bit more with outdoor movies and activating public spaces. … So I think there’s a
lot of opportunities to play the game not
just in establishments, but in cool spaces
to watch the game and interact with fans,”
Clarke said.
Clarke and LeClair said they plan to reach
out to businesses and look forward to creating a master calendar chock full of Super
Bowl events.
“In many ways we’re a football region
with all the people who grew up loving the
49ers and Raiders. We’re just so excited to
have such a special institution for the
United States coming here,” Clarke said.
“It’s just such a special, special honor.”
Thursday when the new charges were added,
Gallagher said.
Sedillo is due back in court March 5 for a
preliminary hearing.
Sheriff’s investigators and Children and
Family Services are working to determine
any other potential victims. Anyone who
may have been victimized or has information should contact Detective Dan Hoss at
363-4066 or dhoss@smcgov. org or
Detective Jesse Myers at 363-4050 or jrmyers@smcgov. org. The Sheriff’s Office
anonymous tip line is (800) 547-2700.

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1407 South B St. San Mateo 94402
www.PeninsulaHealingPlace.com

Reverse Mortgage Financial Assessment to begin March 2015
The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has issued a financial assessment for
reverse mortgage borrowers that will take effect
March 2, 2015
HUD writes in explaining the purpose of financial
assessment, “The mortgagee must evaluate the
mortgagor’s willingness and capacity to timely meet
his or her financial obligations and to comply with the
mortgage requirements.” The mortgage requirements
include paying property taxes, homeowner’s insurance
and keeping up home maintenance.
HUD states, “In conducting this financial
assessment, mortgagees must take into consideration that some mortgagors seek a HECM due
to financial difficulties, which may be reflected
in the mortgagor’s credit report and/or property
charge payment history. The mortgagee must also
consider to what extent the proceeds of the HECM

could provide a solution to any such financial difficulties.” For borrowers who do not demonstrate
their willingness to meet their loan obligations, life
expectancy set-asides will be required.
The mortgagee letter also specifies documents that
must be collected and submitted to all borrowers. The
documentation has been updated to include “Financial
Assessment Documentation” including, credit history,
income verification, asset verification, property charge
verification, residual income analysis, documentation
of extenuating circumstances or compensating factors
and calculations for life expectancy and residual
income shortfall set-asides.
If you have a question about qualifying for a reverse
mortgage today, or how the financial assessment will
impact your situation, contact us today.

A reverse mortgage is a loan that enable
homeowners 62 or older to borrow against the
equity in their home without having to give up
title, or take on a monthly mortgage payment.
The money received can be used for any purpose.
The loan amount depends on the borrower’s age,
current interest rates, and the value of the home.
Borrower must maintain property as primary
residence and remain current on property taxes
and homeowner’s insurance. A reverse mortgage
does not have to be repaid until the borrower
sells or moves out of the home permanently,
and the repayment amount cannot exceed the
value of the home. After the loan is repaid any
remaining equity is distributed to the borrower or
the borrower’s estate.

Carol Bertocchini #0!s650-453-3244

For more information,
please call
Carol Bertocchini,
NMLS ID 455078
650-453-3244

Reverse Mortgage Solutions, Inc. dba Security 1 Lending
NMLS ID 107636. Licensed by the Department of Business
Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending
Act License #4131074. These materials are not from, and
were not approved by HUD or FHA.

32

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Jan. 30, 2015

OYSTER PERPETUAL DATEJUST II

rolex

oyster perpetual and datejust are trademarks.

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