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INDEX

ABSTRACT
1. Introduction
1.1 Advocacy skills
1.2 Existing system with limitations
1.3 proposed system with features
2. System Analysis
2.1 Requirements
2.1.1 Software & Hardware requirements
2.1.2 Functional & Non-Functional requirements
2.1.3 Technology specification
2.2 Modules & Description
3. System Design
3.1 Block diagram
3.2 Softwares & Hardwares
3.2.1 What is the project?
3.2.2 Why the project
3.2.3 Where the project
3.2.4 Who is the user?
3.2.5 When it is applicable
3.2.6 How youre implementing
3.3 Data flow diagrams
3.4 ER-diagrams
3.5 UML diagrams
4. Data Dictionary
5. Screens
6. Reports
7. System Testing
8. Scope & Expansion
9. Conclusion
10. Glossary
11. Biography

ABSTRACT

This system targets to improve efficiency and productivity of advocates in law practice. Our
fully integrated Advocate Personal Assistance System Software, you will be able to work
with

more

efficiency,

lower

risk

and

improve

client

service.

Our software pulls the features advocates profoundly need automated such as new client,
case

details,

status

of

each

case

of

particular

client.

1. INTRODUCTION
The Indian High Courts Act, 1861 (commonly known as the Charter Act) passed by the
British Parliament enabled the Crown to establish High Courts in India by Letters Patent and
these Letters Patent authorised and empowered the High Courts to make rules for advocates
and attorneys (commonly known as Solicitors). The law relating to Legal Practitioners can be
found in the Legal Practitioners Act, 1879 (18 of 1879), the Bombay Pleaders Act, 1920 (17
of 1920) and the Indian Bar Councils Act, 1926 (38 of 1926).
After Independence it was deeply felt that the Judicial Administration in India should be
changed according to the needs of the time. The Law Commission was assigned the job of
preparing a report on the Reform of Judicial Administration. In the mean while the All India
Bar Committee went into detail of the matter and made its recommendations in 1953. To
implement the recommendations of the All India Bar Committee and after taking into account
the
recommendations of the Law Commission on the subject of Reform of Judicial
Administration in so far as the recommendation relate to the Bar and to legal education, a
Comprehensive Bill was introduced in the Parliament.
STATEMENT OF OBJECTS AND REASONS
The Bill seeks to implement the recommendations of the All India Bar Committee made in
1953, after taking into account the recommendations of the Law Commission on the subject
of Reform of Judicial Administration in so far as the recommendations relate to the Bar and
to legal education.
The main features of the Bill are, (1) The establishment of an All India Bar Council and a common roll of advocates, and
advocate on the common roll having a right to practice in any part of the country and in any
Court, including the Supreme Court;
The integration of the bar into a single class of legal practitioners know as advocates;
The prescription of a uniform qualification for the admission of persons to be advocates;

The division of advocates into senior advocates and other advocates based on merit;
The creation of autonomous Bar Councils, one for the whole of India and on for each State.
Following the recommendations of the All India Bar Committee and the Law Commission,
the Bill recognised the continued existence of the system known as the dual system now
prevailing in the High Court of Calcutta and Bombay, by making suitable provisions in that
behalf: It would, however, be open to t he two High Courts, if they so desire, to discontinue
this system at any time.
The Bill, being a comprehensive measure, repeals the Indian Bar Council Act, 1926, and all
other laws on the subject.
The Notes on clauses explain, whenever necessary, the various provisions of the Bill.Act 25
of 1961
The Advocate Bill was passed by both the Houses of Parliament and it received the assent of
the President on 19the May, 1961 and it become The Advocates Act, 1961 (25 of 1961).
1. GUIDELINES FOR ADVOCATES
Who can be an advocate?
Advocacy is the process of standing alongside an individual who is disadvantaged, and
speaking out on their behalf in a way that represents the best interests of that person.
If a service user of our agency has asked you to be their advocate, this means they would like
you to act on their behalf. You may be a family member or friend of the person, or a member
of an advocacy service.
Service users and prospective advocates should be aware that interpreters cannot be used as
advocates, as they have a distinct role to play in interpreting communication between two or
more parties.
No staff members of UPCS are to accept a formal nomination as an advocate for UPCS
clients.
Responsibilities as a service user advocate.
Being an advocate may mean your attendance or involvement could be required during
assessments and reviews of the service users personalized plan, or should the service user
want a representative to communicate or negotiate with us on his/her behalf regarding access
to their personal information; lodging a complaint; or any
Issue related to our service performance. We ask our service users to complete a Notification
of Support Person/Advocate Form when they wish to appoint or change their advocate.

Service Users are free to change their advocates whenever they


Wish, however, whenever a change occurs another nomination form is to be completed.
Definitions;
Advocate: An advocate is a person who, with explicit authority,
Represents other persons interests.
Informal Advocate: A friend or family member who is nominated by service user as their
personal advocate.
Systems Advocate: An organization or professional advocate who can act for a disadvantaged
individual or group of individuals in an
Institutional setting.
Legal Advocate: A nominated advocate whose role has legal status, for example holding and
Enduring Power of Attorney
The role of an advocate explained Advocacy may involve speaking, acting or writing on
behalf of an individual (or group) who has limited ability to exercise his/her rights. Advocacy
is a mechanism to
To choice and control
To resolution of complaints
To non-discrimination, and
To protection of legal and human rights, and freedom form abuse and neglect.
Advocacy differs from mediation and negotiation. Mediation and negotiation
processes aim to reach mutually acceptable outcome between the parties.
The role of the advocate is not impartial, as he or she has an obligation to operate
entirely from the perspective of the service user in negotiating an outcome.
Advocacy is concerned with genuine major needs, and aims to protect the interests
and promote the welfare of the service user.
The advocacy perspective is specialized and quite distinct from the service provider
perspective.
As advocates and advocacy organizations often stand in contradiction to the system in
terms of attitudes towards people in need and beliefs regarding how best to serve them,
effective
Advocates strive for independence and minimize conflict of interest. It is therefore
appropriate that interpreters accept the advocacy role, as their interpreting responsibility does
not permit the necessary independence required of an advocate.

Advocacy may involve a degree of conflict with service providers and other authorities and
therefore may be costly in terms of emotional stress and other demands.
Checklist for advocates
As an advocate or a service user we ask you to be aware of the following and to
ensure that:
The service user has given written authority for you to act on his/her behalf;
You inform us that you are acting as the service users advocate;
You always act in the best interests of the service user;
The service user is aware of any issues and developments in relation to services;
The service user is kept informed of any developments in relation to the issue/s where
you are representing their interests, and that any decisions will be made by the service user;
You encourage the service user to provide feedback to you about the services they are
receiving;
You advise the service about any changes in service user circumstance and any
concerns about changing service user needs;
You are prepared to relinquish the role of advocate should the service user wish this;
You avoid representing them in circumstances where there may be conflict of interest;
and
You do not act as interpreter for the service user while acting in the advocacy role.

1.1 Advocacy skills

Advocacy Defined. Advocacy is a type of problem solving designed to protect personal,


and legal rights, and to insure a dignified existence. There are many types of advocacy. For
example, system advocacy, is useful for changing "the system;" additionally, it is used to
promote causes. Legal advocacy is what lawyers are paid to do, and legislative advocacy is
designed to change laws. Self-advocacy, involves advocating for oneself; while individual
advocacy involves advocating for another. While there are many types of advocacy, the focus
of this section will be self-advocacy.
Well practiced advocacy skills will increase your chances of getting what you want;
when you want it. Effective advocacy is built on a broad based analytical approach to
problem solving. The links in this section will guide you step-by-step, through the skillful
implementation of a self-advocacy plan. Links elsewhere on this page will take you to related
resources.
Why Self-Advocacy? Self-advocacy skills can help you avoid or solve problems with family
and loved ones, doctors and lawyers, employers, associates, and friends. Self-advocacy skills
can help you obtain reasonable and necessary accommodations in both public and private
settings. They can be useful in matters of public entitlements, such as education, housing,
employment, transportation and taxation.
The forms (tools) in this section will provide self-advocacy skill builders that can be use in
both private and public matters. In these pages you will learn the basics of self-advocacy. You
will learn to identify and define problems, design and implement action plans and track and
measure results. Exercises in this section are designed to build skills that will enable you
to identify, resolve, and in many instances, prevent problems.
Empowerment through Advocacy. Well practiced self-advocacy skills can give you
important advantages in most situations. Sometimes you will be subjected to information that
is incorrect or inaccurate. Other times, you will face situations that require you to make
choices about things that are inappropriate, immoral or unethical. Then, there are times when
your rights to hub mane treatment and dignified existence will have been ignored or denied.
Self-advocacy skills can help you identify, analyze, and make informed decisions concerning
such choices. The regular exercise of self-advocacy skills will empower you to gain more
control over your life.

Problem Definition. Advocacy takes time and effort. Developing a clear and specific
definition of the problem helps minimize frustration and waste. Additionally, defining the
problem requires you to distinguish major issues from incidental details. It means getting to
the heart of the issue and, if possible figuring out what is causing it. In some cases, defining
the problem also leads to ideas for its solution. Advocacy skills will give you essential maps
and tools for defining and resolving problems.
Getting Started. If you have had a head injury you will be confronted with the advice of
many professionals in the fields of medicine, education, and/or rehabilitation.
You might become confused by all the different opinions you receive about your care, or
you might not agree with a particular professional's advice or plan of care. The challenge
then becomes how to advocate effectively for your needs without alienating those whose help
you need?
Building Expertise. Educate yourself about your condition. Where head injury is involved,
you might want to become expert in matters of Post Concussion Syndrome. There are many
ways that you can become expert about your condition. This web site and its links will
provide a solid basis for building such expertise. Increasingly, public and university libraries
hold a wealth of knowledge about head injury as well as many other medical conditions and
disabilities.
If you become familiar with the medical terms, possible prognosis and treatment choices
for your condition, you will gain the respect of professionals. Increased confidence will
come with your growing medical expertise. The application of the self-advocacy skills in this
section will give you the power to achieve your objectives.
Keep Good Records. Keep written records of all meetings, telephone calls, and written
communications about your condition. You are entitled to copies of your medical and
rehabilitation records, so be sure to ask for copies from each professional. It is also helpful to
have a friend or family member to go with you.
Keep good notes of items covered and action plans. At the end of each contact or visit
confirm the accuracy of your notes and impressions. Ask for opinions in writing, ask the
professional you are working with to sum up the results of any conclusions or action plans in
a letter or memorandum to you. That way, you will know right away whether you have a clear
understanding of any agreements that have been reached.

Problem Solving. If you do not agree with a recommended treatment or plan of action, you
have options. First, you can present your concerns in writing to the professional you are
working with. A written document is often more clear and convincing than a conversation
that can become emotional on such issues.
Next, you can get a second or third opinion. When your well-being is at stake, it is
important to compare the advice from several professionals and choose the option that is best
for you. If you feel there is a need, you can take your problems up the chain of command.
Sometimes patients are reluctant to "'go over a professionals head" in an organization, but
that is why there are levels of authority. You may find that your problems are easily solved at
the second or third level above the one where you started.
Importance of Attitude. Finally, you are the last word on your treatment you do not have to
agree to any plan that you do not feel is in your best interest. Trust yourself, you may not
have lots of degrees, titles or letters after your name, but you are the expert and ultimate
authority when it comes to your needs. You can get the best care for yourself being friendly yet firm, assertive - not angry, and persistent - not pushy.
A positive attitude about your advocacy efforts is critical to your success. As a society we
hold many different cultural values. Some of these values make it hard to feel good about
your self when you advocate; however, other values can make you feel good about your
advocacy efforts. The values and practices expressed in these pages will help you create a
positive image of yourself as an advocate.
Persistence Pays Off. Effective advocacy requires follow through. You must follow up to
ensure that agreements reached are carried out and that promises made are promises kept.
Exercises in this section will help you track and determine whether agreements are actually
implemented.
Exercises in this section will help you build skills to identify, define, solve and prevent
problems. You will also learn to set goals and objectives, analyze and track outcomes. Skills
in this section will empower you to make informed thoughtful decisions. In other words,
they will help you to know what to do, and give you the know how to do it. In the process
you will develop skills to gain more control over your life.
1.2

Existing system with limitations:

In the existing system the details of the add client, update client etc are maintained in
advocate. Hence the process is automated .All the activities done for maintaining the details
are performed manually. This is a time consuming process and also there may be a
redundancy of data
a. Makes reasonable efforts to schedule meetings, hearings and discovery by agreement
whenever possible and considers the scheduling interests of opposing counsel, the
parties, witnesses and the court. Misunderstandings are avoided by sending formal
notices.
b. Does not arbitrarily or unreasonably withhold consent to a request for scheduling
accommodations.
c. Does not engage in delay tactics in scheduling meetings, hearings and discovery.
d. Tries to verify the availability of key participants and witnesses either before a
meeting, hearing or trial date is set or if that is not feasible, immediately after so that
he or she can promptly notify the court or other tribunal and opposing counsel of any
likely problems.
e. Notifies opposing counsel and, if appropriate, the court or other tribunal as early as
possible when scheduled meetings, hearings or depositions must be cancelled or
rescheduled
1.3

Proposed system with features:

In the proposed system the process of maintaining repository is automated. The system to be
developed is intended to be user friendly. Redundancy of data is reduced, time consumed is
less interaction among client, system and advocate is more.
PURPOSE:
Project Advocates exists to insure our Customers project objects are achieved Core Values
and

Beliefs

Project Advocates business fundamentals are governed by these inviolable values and beliefs:
o

INTEGRITY. TRANPARENCY We conduct all business with the highest standards of


honesty and fairness; we can be trusted to provide accurate information allowing good
team decision making. We consistently deliver on our promises.

ENJOYMENT.PERSONAL GROWTH We believe work should be fun and


intrinsically satisfying; we seek to attract and work with professionals that are
passionate about improvement in process and product.

RELATIONSHIPS.RESPECT.ACCOUNTABILITY We believe that is a privilege to


be on a team and all members are to be respected and valued with all being accountable
for the projects success.

STEWARDSHIP.GENEROSITY - We believe in giving back to the community,


families, and professionals that have allowed for us to succeed in achieving our
purpose and our mission

SCOPE:
The Advocate General first examined the territorial scope of the prohibition of a Community
trademark court and second discussed the scope of the coercive measures.
FEATURES:
1. The establishment of an All India Bar Council and a common roll of advocates, and
advocate on the common roll having a right to practice in any part of the country and in any
Court, including the Supreme Court;
2. The integration of the bar into a single class of legal practitioners knows as advocates;
3. The prescription of a uniform qualification for the admission of persons to be advocates;
4. The division of advocates into senior advocates and other advocates based on merit;
5. The creation of autonomous Bar Councils, one for the whole of India and on for each
State.

2. SYSTEM ANALYSIS
2.1.1) Software Requirements:
Language Specification

C# with Asp.Net

Databases

SQLSERVER 2005

Framework

.Net 3.5

Operating Systems

Windows 2000,

Windows NT 4.0, Windows 9x


Hardware Requirements:
Processor

Pentium IV & LATER

RAM

512MB RAM & above

Hard Disk

80GB & above

2.1.2) Functional Requirements:


In software engineering, a functional requirement defines a function of a software
system or its component. A function is described as a set of inputs, the behavior, and outputs
(see also software).
Functional requirements may be calculations, technical details, data manipulation and
processing and other specific functionality that define what a system is supposed to
accomplish. Behavioral requirements describing all the cases where the system uses the
functional requirements are captured in use cases. Functional requirements are supported by
non-functional requirements (also known as quality requirements), which impose constraints
on the design or implementation (such as performance requirements, security, or reliability).
How a system implements functional requirements is detailed in the system design.
As defined in requirements engineering, functional requirements specify particular
results of a system. This should be contrasted with non-functional requirements which
specify overall characteristics such as cost and reliability. Functional requirements drive the
application architecture of a system, while non-functional requirements drive the technical
architecture of a system.
The Functional Requirements of our site Explore India are
Only Administrator should create the Authorization for staff.
Administrator and Event manager should only have rights to modify/create
packages as well as to plan tour schedules.
Administrator and Goods trader should only have authority to insert/update
goods profile and check transactions.
Non-Functional Requirements:
In systems engineering and requirements engineering, a non-functional
requirement is a requirement that specifies criteria that can be used to judge the operation of a

system, rather than specific behaviors. This should be contrasted with functional requirements
that define specific behavior or functions.
In general, functional requirements define what a system is supposed to do
whereas non-functional requirements define how a system is supposed to be. Non-functional
requirements are often called qualities of a system. Other terms for non-functional
requirements are "constraints", "quality attributes", "quality goals" and "quality of service
requirements". Qualities, that is, non-functional requirements, can be divided into two main
categories:
1. Execution qualities, such as security and usability, which are observable at run time.
2. Evolution qualities, such as testability, maintainability, extensibility and scalability,
which are embodied in the static structure of the software system.
2.1.3) Technology specification:
.NET Framework:
The .NET Framework is a new computing platform that simplifies application
development in the highly distributed environment of the Internet. The .NET Framework is
designed to fulfill the following objectives:

To provide a consistent object-oriented programming environment whether object code

is stored and executed locally, executed locally but Internet-distributed, or executed remotely.

To provide a code-execution environment that minimizes software deployment and

versioning conflicts.

To provide a code-execution environment that guarantees safe execution of code,

including code created by an unknown or semi-trusted third party.

To provide a code-execution environment that eliminates the performance problems of

scripted or interpreted environments.

To make the developer experience consistent across widely varying types of

applications, such as Windows-based applications and Web-based applications.

To build all communication on industry standards to ensure that code based on the .NET

Framework can integrate with any other code.


The .NET Framework has two main components: the common language runtime and
the .NET Framework class library. The common language runtime is the foundation of the

.NET Framework. You can think of the runtime as an agent that manages code at execution
time, providing core services such as memory management, thread management, and
remoting, while also enforcing strict type safety and other forms of code accuracy that ensure
security and robustness. In fact, the concept of code management is a fundamental principle
of the runtime. Code that targets the runtime is known as managed code, while code that does
not target the runtime is known as unmanaged code. The class library, the other main
component of the .NET Framework, is a comprehensive, object-oriented collection of
reusable types that you can use to develop applications ranging from traditional commandline or graphical user interface (GUI) applications to applications based on the latest
innovations provided by ASP.NET, such as Web Forms and XML Web services.
The .NET Framework can be hosted by unmanaged components that load the common
language runtime into their processes and initiate the execution of managed code, thereby
creating a software environment that can exploit both managed and unmanaged features.
The .NET Framework not only provides several runtime hosts, but also supports the
development of third-party runtime hosts.
For example, ASP.NET hosts the runtime to provide a scalable, server-side environment
for managed code. ASP.NET works directly with the runtime to enable Web Forms
applications and XML Web services, both of which are discussed later in this topic.
Internet Explorer is an example of an unmanaged application that hosts the runtime (in
the form of a MIME type extension). Using Internet Explorer to host the runtime enables you
to embed managed components or Web Forms controls in HTML documents. Hosting the
runtime in this way makes managed mobile code (similar to Microsoft ActiveX controls)
possible, but with significant improvements that only managed code can offer, such as semitrusted execution and secure isolated file storage.
The following illustration shows the relationship of the common language runtime and
the class library to your applications and to the overall system. The illustration also shows
how managed code operates within a larger architecture.
Features of the Common Language Runtime
The common language runtime manages memory, thread execution, code execution,
code safety verification, compilation, and other system services. These features are intrinsic
to the managed code that runs on the common language runtime.

With regards to security, managed components are awarded varying degrees of trust,
depending on a number of factors that include their origin (such as the Internet, enterprise
network, or local computer). This means that a managed component might or might not be
able to perform file-access operations, registry-access operations, or other sensitive functions,
even if it is being used in the same active application.
The runtime enforces code access security. For example, users can trust that an
executable embedded in a Web page can play an animation on screen or sing a song, but
cannot access their personal data, file system, or network. The security features of the runtime
thus enable legitimate Internet-deployed software to be exceptionally feature rich.
The runtime also enforces code robustness by implementing a strict type- and codeverification infrastructure called the common type system (CTS). The CTS ensures that all
managed code is self-describing. The various Microsoft and third-party language compilers
generate managed code that conforms to the CTS. This means that managed code can
consume other managed types and instances, while strictly enforcing type fidelity and type
safety.
In addition, the managed environment of the runtime eliminates many common
software issues. For example, the runtime automatically handles object layout and manages
references to objects, releasing them when they are no longer being used. This automatic
memory management resolves the two most common application errors, memory leaks and
invalid memory references.
The runtime also accelerates developer productivity. For example, programmers can
write applications in their development language of choice, yet take full advantage of the
runtime, the class library, and components written in other languages by other developers.
Any compiler vendor who chooses to target the runtime can do so. Language compilers that
target the .NET Framework make the features of the .NET Framework available to existing
code written in that language, greatly easing the migration process for existing applications.
While the runtime is designed for the software of the future, it also supports software of
today and yesterday. Interoperability between managed and unmanaged code enables
developers to continue to use necessary COM components and DLLs.
The runtime is designed to enhance performance. Although the common language
runtime provides many standard runtime services, managed code is never interpreted. A

feature called just-in-time (JIT) compiling enables all managed code to run in the native
machine language of the system on which it is executing. Meanwhile, the memory manager
removes the possibilities of fragmented memory and increases memory locality-of-reference
to further increase performance.
Finally, the runtime can be hosted by high-performance, server-side applications, such
as Microsoft SQL Server and Internet Information Services (IIS). This infrastructure
enables you to use managed code to write your business logic, while still enjoying the
superior performance of the industry's best enterprise servers that support runtime hosting.
.NET Framework Class Library

The .NET Framework class library is a collection of reusable types that tightly integrate
with the common language runtime. The class library is object oriented, providing types from
which your own managed code can derive functionality. This not only makes the .NET
Framework types easy to use, but also reduces the time associated with learning new
Features of the .NET Framework. In addition, third-party components can integrate
seamlessly with classes in the .NET Framework.
For example, the .NET Framework collection classes implement a set of interfaces that
you can use to develop your own collection classes. Your collection classes will blend
seamlessly with the classes in the .NET Framework.
As you would expect from an object-oriented class library, the .NET Framework types
enable you to accomplish a range of common programming tasks, including tasks such as
string management, data collection, database connectivity, and file access. In addition to these
common tasks, the class library includes types that support a variety of specialized
development scenarios. For example, you can use the .NET Framework to develop the
following types of applications and services:

Console applications.

Scripted or hosted applications.

Windows GUI applications (Windows Forms).

ASP.NET applications.

XML Web services.

Windows services.

For example, the Web Forms classes are a comprehensive set of reusable types that
vastly simplify Web GUI development. If you write an ASP.NET Web Form application, you
can use the Web Forms classes.
C#.NET
Introduction to Web Forms (C#.NET)

Web Forms is the new platform for Microsoft Web application development, based on
the .NET Framework. This framework provides a clear, object-oriented, extensible set of
classes that enable you to develop rich Web applications. Additionally, Web Forms can act as
the local user interface in a multi-tier distributed solution. Web Forms is a framework for
building Windows client applications that utilize the common language runtime. Web Forms
applications can be written in any language that the common language runtime supports.
ACTIVE X DATA OBJECTS.NET
ADO.NET Overview
ADO.NET is an evolution of the ADO data access model that directly addresses user
requirements for developing scalable applications. It was designed specifically for the web
with scalability, statelessness, and XML in mind.
ADO.NET uses some ADO objects, such as the Connection and Command objects, and
also introduces new objects. Key new ADO.NET objects include the Dataset, Data Reader,
and Data Adapter.
The important distinction between this evolved stage of ADO.NET and previous data
architectures is that there exists an object -- the Dataset -- that is separate and distinct from
any data stores. Because of that, the Dataset functions as a standalone entity. You can think of
the Dataset as an always disconnected record set that knows nothing about the source or
destination of the data it contains. Inside a Dataset, much like in a database, there are tables,
columns, relationships, constraints, views, and so forth.

A Data Adapter is the object that connects to the database to fill the Dataset. Then, it
connects back to the database to update the data there, based on operations performed while
the Dataset held the data. In the past, data processing has been primarily connection-based.
Now, in an effort to make multi-tiered apps more efficient, data processing is turning to a
message-based approach that revolves around chunks of information. At the center of this
approach is the Data Adapter, which provides a bridge to retrieve and save data between a
Dataset and its source data store. It accomplishes this by means of requests to the appropriate
SQL commands made against the data store.
The XML-based Dataset object provides a consistent programming model that works
with all models of data storage: flat, relational, and hierarchical. It does this by having no
'knowledge' of the source of its data, and by representing the data that it holds as collections
and data types. No matter what the source of the data within the Dataset is, it is manipulated
through the same set of standard APIs exposed through the Dataset and its subordinate
objects.
While the Dataset has no knowledge of the source of its data, the managed provider has
detailed and specific information. The role of the managed provider is to connect, fill, and
persist the Dataset to and from data stores. The OLE DB and MSACCESS .NET Data
Providers (System.Data.OleDb and System.Data.SqlClient) that are part of the .Net
Framework provide four basic objects: the Command, Connection, Data Reader and Data
Adapter. In the remaining sections of this document, we'll walk through each part of the
Dataset and the OLE DB/MSACCESS .NET Data Providers explaining what they are, and
how to program against them.
The following sections will introduce you to some objects that have evolved, and some
that are new. These objects are:

Connections. For connection to and managing

transactions against a database.

Commands. For issuing SQL commands against a database.

Data Readers. For reading a forward-only stream of data records from a MSACCESS data

source.

Datasets. For storing, remoting and programming against flat data, XML data and

relational data.

Data Adapters. For pushing data into a Dataset, and reconciling data against a database.

When dealing with connections to a database, there are two different options:
MSACCESS .NET Data Provider (System.Data.SqlClient) and OLE DB .NET Data Provider
(System.Data.OleDb). In these samples we will use the MSACCESS .NET Data Provider.
These are written to talk directly to Microsoft MSACCESS. The OLE DB .NET Data
Provider is used to talk to any OLE DB provider (as it uses OLE DB underneath).
Connections
Connections are used to 'talk to' databases, and are represented by provider-specific classes
such as SQLConnection. Commands travel over connections and result sets are returned in
the form of streams which can be read by a DataReader object, or pushed into a Dataset
object.
Commands
Commands contain the information that is submitted to a database, and are represented by
provider-specific classes such as SQLCommand. A command can be a stored procedure call,
an UPDATE statement, or a statement that returns results. You can also use input and output
parameters, and return values as part of your command syntax. The example below shows
how to issue an INSERT statement against the Northwind database.
DataReaders
The DataReader object is somewhat synonymous with a read-only/forward-only cursor
over data. The DataReader API supports flat as well as hierarchical data. A DataReader object
is returned after executing a command against a database. The format of the returned
DataReader object is different from a record set. For example, you might use the DataReader
to show the results of a search list in a web page.
Datasets and Data Adapters
The Dataset object is similar to the ADO Record set object, but more powerful, and with one
other important distinction: the Dataset is always disconnected. The Dataset object represents
a cache of data, with database-like structures such as tables, columns, relationships, and
constraints. However, though a Dataset can and does behave much like a database, it is
important to remember that Dataset objects do not interact directly with databases, or other
source data. This allows the developer to work with a programming model that is always
consistent, regardless of where the source data resides. Data coming from a database, an

XML file, from code, or user input can all be placed into Dataset objects. Then, as changes
are made to the Dataset they can be tracked and verified before updating the source data. The
Get Changes method of the Dataset object actually creates a second Dataset that contains
only the changes to the data. This Dataset is then used by a Data Adapter (or other objects) to
update the original data source.
The Dataset has many XML characteristics, including the ability to produce and
consume XML data and XML schemas. XML schemas can be used to describe schemas
interchanged via Web Services. In fact, a Dataset with a schema can actually be compiled for
type safety and statement completion.
Data Adapters (OLEDB/SQL)
The Data Adapter object works as a bridge between the Dataset and the source data.
Using the provider-specific SqlDataAdapter (along with its associated SqlCommand and
SqlConnection) can increase overall performance when working with a Microsoft
MSACCESS databases. For other OLE DB-supported databases, you would use the
OleDbDataAdapter object and its associated OleDbCommand and OleDbConnection objects.
The DataAdapter object uses commands to update the data source after changes have
been made to the Dataset. Using the Fill method of the DataAdapter calls the SELECT
command; using the Update method calls the INSERT, UPDATE or DELETES command for
each changed row. You can explicitly set these commands in order to control the statements
used at runtime to resolve changes, including the use of stored procedures. For ad-hoc
scenarios, a Command Builder object can generate these at run-time based upon a select
statement. However, this run-time generation requires an extra round-trip to the server in
order to gather required metadata, so explicitly providing the INSERT, UPDATE, and
DELETE commands at design time will result in better run-time performance.
1. ADO.NET is the next evolution of ADO for the .Net Framework.
2. ADO.NET was created with n-Tier, statelessness and XML in the forefront. Two
new objects, the Dataset and DataAdapter, are provided for these scenarios.
3. ADO.NET can be used to get data from a stream, or to store data in a cache for
updates.
4. There is a lot more information about ADO.NET in the documentation.

5. Remember, you can execute a command directly against the database in order to do
inserts, updates, and deletes. You don't need to first put data into a Dataset in order
to insert, update, or delete it.
6. Also, you can use a Dataset to bind to the data, move through the data, and navigate
data relationships
SQL SERVER
DATABASE
A database management, or DBMS, gives the user access to their data and helps them
transform the data into information. Such database management systems include dBase,
paradox, IMS, Sql Server and SQL Server. These systems allow users to create, update and
extract information from their database.
A database is a structured collection of data. Data refers to the characteristics of
people, things and events. SQL Server stores each data item in its own fields. In SQL Server,
the fields relating to a particular person, thing or event are bundled together to form a single
complete unit of data, called a record (it can also be referred to as raw or an occurrence).
Each record is made up of a number of fields. No two fields in a record can have the same
field name.
During an SQL Server Database design project, the analysis of your business needs
identifies all the fields or attributes of interest. If your business needs change over time, you
define any additional fields or change the definition of existing fields.
SQL Server Tables
SQL Server stores records relating to each other in a table. Different tables are
created for the various groups of information. Related tables are grouped together to form a
database.
Primary Key
Every table in SQL Server has a field or a combination of fields that uniquely
identifies each record in the table. The Unique identifier is called the Primary Key, or simply
the Key. The primary key provides the means to distinguish one record from all other in a
table. It allows the user and the database system to identify, locate and refer to one particular
record in the database.
Relational Database

Sometimes all the information of interest to a business operation can be stored in one
table. SQL Server makes it very easy to link the data in multiple tables. Matching an
employee to the department in which they work is one example. This is what makes SQL
Server a relational database management system, or RDBMS. It stores data in two or more
tables and enables you to define relationships between the tables and enables you to define
relationships between the tables.
Foreign Key
When a field is one table matches the primary key of another field is referred to as a
foreign key. A foreign key is a field or a group of fields in one table whose values match
those of the primary key of another table.
Referential Integrity
Not only does SQL Server allow you to link multiple tables, it also maintains
consistency between them. Ensuring that the data among related tables is correctly matched
is referred to as maintaining referential integrity.
Data Abstraction
A major purpose of a database system is to provide users with an abstract view of the
data. This system hides certain details of how the data is stored and maintained. Data
abstraction is divided into three levels.
Physical level: This is the lowest level of abstraction at which one describes how the data
are actually stored.
Conceptual Level: At this level of database abstraction all the attributed and what data are
actually stored is described and entries and relationship among them.
View level: This is the highest level of abstraction at which one describes only part of the
database.

Advantages of RDBMS

Redundancy can be avoided

Inconsistency can be eliminated

Data can be Shared

Standards can be enforced

Security restrictions can be applied

Integrity can be maintained

Conflicting requirements can be balanced

Data independence can be achieved.

Disadvantages of DBMS
A significant disadvantage of the DBMS system is cost. In addition to the cost of
purchasing of developing the software, the hardware has to be upgraded to allow for the
extensive programs and the workspace required for their execution and storage. While
centralization reduces duplication, the lack of duplication requires that the database be
adequately backed up so that in case of failure the data can be recovered.
FEATURES OF SQL SERVER (RDBMS)
SQL SERVER is one of the leading database management systems (DBMS) because
it is the only Database that meets the uncompromising requirements of todays most
demanding information systems. From complex decision support systems (DSS) to the most
rigorous online transaction processing (OLTP) application, even application that require
simultaneous DSS and OLTP access to the same critical data, SQL Server leads the industry
in both performance and capability
SQL SERVER is a truly portable, distributed, and open DBMS that delivers unmatched
performance, continuous operation and support for every database.
SQL SERVER RDBMS is high performance fault tolerant DBMS which is specially designed
for online transactions processing and for handling large database application.

SQL SERVER with transactions processing option offers two features which contribute to
very high level of transaction processing throughput, which are

The row level lock manager

Enterprise wide Data Sharing


The unrivaled portability and connectivity of the SQL SERVER DBMS enables all the
systems in the organization to be linked into a singular, integrated computing resource.
Portability
SQL SERVER is fully portable to more than 80 distinct hardware and operating
systems platforms, including UNIX, MSDOS, OS/2, Macintosh and dozens of proprietary
platforms. This portability gives complete freedom to choose the database sever platform
that meets the system requirements.
Open Systems
SQL SERVER offers a leading implementation of industry standard SQL. SQL
Servers open architecture integrates SQL SERVER and non SQL SERVER DBMS with
industries most comprehensive collection of tools, application, and third party software
products SQL Servers Open architecture provides transparent access to data from other
relational database and even non-relational database.
Distributed Data Sharing
SQL Servers networking and distributed database capabilities to access data stored
on remote server with the same ease as if the information was stored on a single local
computer. A single SQL statement can access data at multiple sites. You can store data where
system requirements such as performance, security or availability dictate.
Unmatched Performance
The most advanced architecture in the industry allows the SQL SERVER DBMS to
deliver unmatched performance.
Sophisticated Concurrency Control

Real World applications demand access to critical data. With most database Systems
application becomes contention bound which performance is limited not by the CPU
power or by disk I/O, but user waiting on one another for data access. SQL Server employs
full, unrestricted row-level locking and contention free queries to minimize and in many
cases entirely eliminates contention wait times.
OVEVIEW:
The application is completely windows based. Database which are accessed by users through
system.
2.2 MODULE & DESCRIPTION
Modules proposed in the system:
. Client
. Advocate
Module Description:
Client:
The client can interact with advocate about his case etc

Advocate:
Advocate can view, he has to decide the section depend upon the case.

3. SYSTEM DESIGN

3.1) Block diagram of System:


Client
Hearing
Advocate

Sql
Database

3.2.1) what is project?


Our vision is to provide a menu of professional project management alternatives for our
customers based on the needs of the project. We will customize our services and partner with

firms that can best meet the project objectives on behalf of the customer. The size of our firm
and experience of our principals allows us to collaborate with all stakeholders to ensure the
project objectives relative to time; cost, quality, and risk are met.
Most would agree that every project deserves an advocate.

3.2.2) Why the project?


It is useful to draw a comparison with the legal system. We can represent ourselves in court.
We can buy kits to allow us to process all the legalities of a purchase house. We can prepare
our own will. In most cases however we rely on a legal advocate or lawyer. A law graduate
once told me he had trained to become a librarian. Much of the training is to know the legal
process, and which book to find in order to look up laws, statutes, precedents etc.

3.2.3) Where the project?


Provide applicants with a single point of contact to coordinate and resolve issues,
facilitate and
Support decision making, act as a catalyst for change, and implement best practice models.
Project advocates will track details of services provided for all projects and help identify
service
Issues that need to be addressed either locally or at Department level. In addition, patterns of
Service issues will be analyzed for streamlining plan review, inspections and the issuance of
the
C of O; for setting service levels for reviews, approvals and required sign-offs; and for
instituting systematic operational or policy changes in plan exam, inspection, enforcement, or
other areas.
3.2.4) who is user?
In this process client & advocate is user

Get involved early in the development process, while there is still time to make
changes

Do research into user interface design so that you can back your comments with
industry research and standards.

Become a strong advocate for usability testing. By gathering user input, you can have
a better idea about how to make products that users will want to buy and use.

Consider limitations in schedule, staffing, and tools. You will have a better chance in
getting your suggestions approved if they are realistic.

3.2.5) When it applicable?


The first, the half-year convention, assumes that all property placed into service, or
disposed of during a case & client was placed into service, or disposed of, at the mid-point of
that year
The second, the mid-month convention, assumes that all property placed into service or
disposed of notaries & hearing was placed into service, or disposed of, at the mid-point of
that month.
The third, the mid-quarter convention, assumes that all property placed into service or
disposed of day schedule & appointment during any quarter of was placed into service, or
disposed of, at the mid-point of that quarter

3.2.6) how youre implementing?


Implementing with client & advocate, so that it required some properties like add, submit
etc... When we appeal to court submit case details & description. We have particular priority,
giving details to the advocate.

3.3 Data flow diagrams

DATAFLOW DIAGRAMS
Data flow diagrams (bubble charts) are directed graphs in which the nodes specify
processing activities and the arcs specify data items transmitted between processing nodes. A
data flow diagram might represent data flow between individual statements or blocks of
statements in a routine, data flow between sequential routines, data flow between concurrent
process, or data flow in a distributed computing system, where each node represents a
geographically remote processing unit.
Unlike flow charts, data flow diagrams do not indicate decision logic or condition under
which various nodes in the diagram might be activated. Data flow diagrams can be expressed
using special symbols. These symbols can be used to denote processing nodes, data nodes,
and data sources and data stores.
A Data Flow Diagram (DFD) is a graphical technique that depicts information flow and
transforms that are applied as data move to represent a system or software at any level of
abstraction. Data Flow Diagram may be partitioned into levels that represent increasing
information flow and functional detail. The notation used to create a DFD is illustrated in the
given as:
1. Process: A Process transforms incoming data flow(s) into outgoing data flow(s).
2. External Entity: An External Entity is a system element (hardware a person) that
produces information for.
3. Transformation by the software or received information produced by the software.
4. Data Store: A repository of data for the use of one or more process.
4. Arrow ( ): A data item or collection of data items, the arrowhead
direction of data flow.

indicates the

Data Flow

Processing Node

Source or Destination

Data Store

DATA FLOW DIAGRAMS

Context Level DFD/LEVEL 0:

Top Level DFD/ LEVEL 1/HIGH LEVEL:

Detailed Level DFD LEVEL 2/ LOW -LEVEL

3.4 ER-diagrams:

3.5

UML Diagrams:
UML DATA

The UMLs four structural diagram exists to visualize, specify, construct and document
the static aspects of system. Just as the static aspects of a house encompass the existence and
placement of such things as walls, doors, windows, pipes, wires and vents. So to do the static
aspects of a software system encompass the existence and placement of such things classes,
interfaces, collaborations, components and nodes.
The UMLs structural diagrams are roughly organized around the major groups of things
you will find when modeling a system.
1.

CLASS DIAGRAM: classes, interfaces and collaborations

2.

OBJECT DIAGRAM: objects

3.

COMPONENT DIAGRAM: components

4.

DEPLOYMENT DIAGRAM: nodes.

CLASS DIAGRAM:
A class diagram shows a set of classes, interfaces, collaborations and their
relationships. Class diagrams are the most common diagrams found in modeling object
oriented system. Class diagram that includes active classes are used to address the static
process view of a system.
COMPONENT DIAGRAM:
A component diagram shows a set of components and their relationships. Component
diagrams are related to class diagrams in that component typically maps to one or more
classes, interfaces or collaborations. It is used to illustrate the static implementation view of a
system.

DEPLOYMENT DIAGRAM:
A deployment diagrams shows a set of nodes and their relationships deployment
diagrams are related to component diagrams in that node typically encloses one or more
components.

USECASE DIAGRAMS:
A use case diagram shows as set of use cases and actors and their relationships. Use
case diagrams are especially important in organizing and modeling behavior of a system.
SEQUENCE DIAGRAM:
A sequence diagram is an interaction diagram that emphasizes the time ordering of
messages. A sequence diagram shows a set of objects and messages sent and receive by those
objects. The objects are typically named or anonymous instances of other things, such as
collaborations, components and nodes. We can use sequence diagrams to illustrate the
dynamic view of a system.
COLLABORATION DIAGRAM:
A collaboration diagram is an inter action diagram that emphasizes the structural
organization of the objects that send and receive messages. It shows a set of objects, links
among those objects and messages sent and receive by the objects. The objects are typically
named or anonymous instances of classes but may also represent instance of other things such
as collaborations, components and nodes.
RELATIONSHIPS
1. Dependency:
Dependency is a semantic relationship between two things in which change to one thing
may affect the semantics of other things.
Graphically a dependency rendered as a dashed-line, possibly directed occasionally
including a label.

Fig: Dependency
2. Association:
Association is a structural relationship that describes set of links.
A link being a connection among objects. Aggregation is a special kind of association a
structural relationship between a whole and its parts.
It is graphically rendered as a solid-line. Such as multiplicity and role names.
Employer _________________ employee
Fig: Association
3. Generalization:
Generalization is a specialization/generalization relationship in which objects of
specialized element (child) are substitutable for object of the generalized element (parent).in
this way the child shares the structure and behavior of the parent.
Graphically rendered as a solid-line with a hollow over-head pointing to the parent.

Fig: Generalization
4. Realization:
A realization is a semantic relationship between classifiers. Where in one classifier
specifies a contract that another classifier guarantees to carry-out you will encounter
relationships in two places between interfaces and classes or components between use case
collaborations.
Graphically rendered as cross between generalization and dependency relationships.

Fig: Realization

5. Class:
A class is a description of set of objects and the same attributes, operations relationships
and semantics. A class implements one or more interfaces.
Graphically rendered as a rectangle, usually including a name, attributes and operations.

Fig: Classes
6. Use case:
Use case is a description of set of sequence of actions that a system performs that yields
an observable result of value to a particular actor.
Graphically rendered as an ellipse with solid-lines, usually including only its names.

Fig: Use case

7. Collaborations:

Collaboration defines an interaction is a society of roles and other elements that work
together to provide some co-operative behavior thats bigger than the some of elements.
Therefore collaborations have structural as well as behavioral dimensions.
Graphically rendered as an ellipse with dashed-lines usually including only its names.

Fig: collaboration

8. Component:
A component is a physical and replicable part of a system that confirms to provides the
relation of set of interfaces. In a system we can find and encounter different kinds of
deployment components such as com+ components and java-beans.
A component typically represents the physical package logical elements such as classes,
interfaces and collaborations.
It is graphically rendered as rectangle with tabs usually including only its names.

Fig: Component

9. Node:
A node is a physical element that exists at run-time and represents a computational
resources generally having at least some memory and often processing capability.
Graphically rendered as a cube, usually including only its names.

Fig: Node

UML DIAGRAMS

Use case diagram for online exam:


Usecase analysis:
The use case diagram is used to identify the primary element and processes. That
form the system the primary element are termed as actors and the processes are called use
cases.
The use case diagram show which actors interacts with each use case.
Use case diagram of UML are used to view system from this perspective as a set of discrete
Activities or transactions.
A ellipse represents a use case and a
Stick figure represents an actor operating with in the use case.

An actor can be user, system or other entity.

The initiating actor appears on the left of the use case and the receiving actor appears
on the right.

The actor is identified by a name below the stick figure

The name of the use case appears either in the side or below the ellipse.

An association line is a that connects an actor and to the use case and represents
communication between the actor and use cases

The association line is solid similar to the line that connect associated classes.

USECASE DIAGRAM:

CLASS DIAGRAM:

SEQUENCE DIAGRAM:

STATE DIAGRAM:

Collaboration Diagram:

Deployment diagram :

Following deployment diagram references to a unified application scenario.


Deployment refers to transforming the project to the required end user along with
project document.
Deployment diagram are also essential each application since it narrates the
package scenario of interaction.

Activity diagram:
The process flows in the system are captured in the activity diagram similar to a state diagram
an activity diagram also consists of activities, action, transitions

Initial and final states and guard conditions

Processes involving different use case are show in work flows.

Example: from ordering to delivery and payment activity diagram describe the work slow
behavior of a system.
Sequence diagram:
A sequence diagram is an interaction diagram that details how operations are
carried out. What message are sent and when sequence diagram are organized according to
time it represents the interaction between different objects in the system.
The important aspects of a sequence diagram are that it is time ordered.
This means that the exact sequence of the interaction between the object is
represented step by step different objects in the sequence diagram interact with each other by
passing

4.DATA DICTIONARY

Data Dictionary
Advocacy activities include those actions taken in support for a program, initiative, or
specific change, often stemming from an increased awareness of issues or dissatisfaction with
current practices and policies. Self-advocacy is undertaken by individuals directly affected by
the issues and may be enhanced by building capacity in effective expression, strategy
development and implementation, and leadership. Self-advocacy is closely related to selfdetermination.

5. Screens:

Case Database:

Client Database:

Appointment Database:

Hearing database:

Startup page:

Main design:

New customer:

Appointment:

Old customer:

Today hearing:

Today appointments:

Case details:

Customer list:

Contact us:

About us:

Change password:

Login program:
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;

using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
namespace advocate2
{
public partial class startuppage : Form
{
public startuppage()
{
InitializeComponent();
}
private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
{
SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection("user
id=sa;password=trylogic;database=advocate");
SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("select * from startup where username='"
+ textBox1.Text + "'and password='" + textBox2.Text + "'", con);
con.Open();
SqlDataReader dr;
dr = cmd.ExecuteReader();
if (dr.Read() == true)
{
master obj = new master();
obj.Show();
this.Hide();
}
else
{
MessageBox.Show("username or password wrong");

textBox2.Text = "";
textBox1.Text = "";
textBox1.Focus();
}
con.Close();
}
}

}
}

Master page Program:


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
namespace advocate2
{
public partial class master : Form
{

public master()
{
InitializeComponent();
}
private void newCustomerToolStripMenuItem1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
newcustomer obj = new newcustomer();
obj.MdiParent = this;
obj.Show();
}
private void appointmentToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
appointment obj1 = new appointment();
obj1.MdiParent = this;
obj1.Show();
}
private void oldCustomerToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
oldcustomer obj = new oldcustomer();
obj.MdiParent = this;
obj.Show();
}
private void todayHearingToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
todayhearing obj = new todayhearing();
obj.MdiParent = this;
obj.Show();
}
private void customerListToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{

customerlist obj = new customerlist();


obj.MdiParent = this;
obj.Show();
}
private void changePasswordToolStripMenuItem_Click_1(object sender, EventArgs
e)
{
change_password obj = new change_password();
obj.Show();
obj.MdiParent = this;
}
private void exitToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
Application.Exit();
}
private void allClientsToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
all_clients obj = new all_clients();
obj.Show();
obj.MdiParent = this;
}
private void todayAppointmentsToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
todayappointments obj = new todayappointments();
obj.Show();
obj.MdiParent = this;
}
private void casedetailsToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
casedetails obj = new casedetails();
obj.Show();
obj.MdiParent = this;

}
private void contactusToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
contactus obj = new contactus();
obj.Show();
obj.MdiParent = this;
}
private void aboutAdvocatePASToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
about obj = new about();
obj.Show();
obj.MdiParent = this;
}
}
}

New customer Program:


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
namespace advocate2

{
public partial class newcustomer : Form
{
public newcustomer()
{
InitializeComponent();
}
private void newcustomer_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
comboBox1.Items.Add("male");
comboBox1.Items.Add("female");
comboBox2.Items.Add("criminal");
comboBox2.Items.Add("accident");
comboBox2.Items.Add("murder");
comboBox2.Items.Add("property");
comboBox2.Items.Add("public defence");
comboBox2.Items.Add("civil case");
comboBox2.Items.Add("labour law");
comboBox2.Items.Add("patent");
comboBox2.Items.Add("real estate");
comboBox2.Items.Add("corporate");
comboBox3.Items.Add("high");
comboBox3.Items.Add("medium");
comboBox3.Items.Add("low");
}
private void comboBox1_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
}
private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{

try
{
SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection("user
id=sa;password=trylogic;database=advocate");
SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("insert into newcustomer values(" +
textBox1.Text + ",'" + textBox2.Text + "'," + textBox8.Text + ",'" + comboBox1.SelectedItem
+ "','" + comboBox2.SelectedItem + "'," + textBox4.Text + ",'" + textBox5.Text + "','" +
textBox6.Text + "','" + comboBox3.SelectedItem + "','" + textBox7.Text + "')", con);
con.Open();
cmd.ExecuteReader();
con.Close();
MessageBox.Show("records inserted successfully");
textBox1.Text = "";
textBox2.Text = "";
textBox4.Text = "";
textBox5.Text = "";
textBox6.Text = "";
textBox7.Text = "";
textBox8.Text = "";
comboBox1.Text = "";
comboBox2.Text = "";
comboBox3.Text = "";
textBox1.Focus();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
}
}
private void textBox8_Validating(object sender, CancelEventArgs e)
{
if (textBox8.Text.Length < 2)
{

MessageBox.Show("min age 10");


textBox8.Text = "";
textBox8.Focus();
}
}
private void dateTimePicker1_ValueChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
DateTime date = dateTimePicker1.Value;
textBox6.Text = date.ToShortDateString();
textBox6.Text = dateTimePicker1.Value.ToShortDateString();
}
private void textBox2_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
{
if(char.IsLetter(e.KeyChar)==false&&e.KeyChar!=8)
{
e.Handled = true;
}
}
private void textBox8_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
{
if (char.IsDigit(e.KeyChar) == false && e.KeyChar != 8)
{
e.Handled = true;
}
}
private void textBox4_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
{
if (char.IsDigit(e.KeyChar) == false && e.KeyChar != 8)
{

e.Handled = true;
}
}
}
}
Appointing Program:
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
namespace advocate2
{
public partial class appointment : Form
{
public appointment()
{
InitializeComponent();
}
private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
SqlConnection

con

new

SqlConnection("user

id=sa;password=trylogic;database=advocate");
SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("insert into appointment
values('"+textBox1.Text+"','"+textBox2.Text+"','"+textBox3.Text+"',"+textBox4.Text+")",co
n);
con.Open();
cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

con.Close();
MessageBox.Show("record saved");
textBox1.Text = "";
textBox2.Text = "";
textBox3.Text = "";
textBox4.Text = "";
textBox1.Focus();
}
private void dateTimePicker1_ValueChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
DateTime date = dateTimePicker1.Value;
textBox2.Text = date.ToShortDateString();
}
private void textBox1_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
{
if (char.IsLetter(e.KeyChar) == false && e.KeyChar != 8)
{
e.Handled = true;
}
}
private void textBox4_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
{
if (char.IsDigit(e.KeyChar) == false && e.KeyChar != 8)
{
e.Handled = true;
}
}

private void textBox3_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)


{

if (char.IsDigit(e.KeyChar) == false && e.KeyChar !=


8&&char.IsWhiteSpace(e.KeyChar)==false)
{
e.Handled = true;
}
}

}
}

Old customer program:


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
namespace advocate2
{
public partial class oldcustomer : Form
{
public oldcustomer()
{
InitializeComponent();
}
Class2 obj = new Class2();
private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{

string str="update newcustomer set casetype='"+comboBox2.SelectedItem+"',


hearingdate='"+textBox2.Text+"'where cid='"+textBox1.Text+"'";
obj.action(str);
MessageBox.Show("record updated");
}
private void oldcustomer_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
comboBox2.Items.Add("criminal");
comboBox2.Items.Add("accident");
comboBox2.Items.Add("murder");
comboBox2.Items.Add("property");
comboBox2.Items.Add("public defence");
comboBox2.Items.Add("civil case");
comboBox2.Items.Add("labour law");
comboBox2.Items.Add("patent");
comboBox2.Items.Add("real estate");
}
private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
SqlConnection

con

new

SqlConnection("user

id=sa;password=trylogic;database=advocate");
SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter("select * from newcustomer where cid=" +
textBox1.Text + "", con);
DataSet ds = new DataSet();
da.Fill(ds);
dataGridView1.DataSource = ds.Tables[0];
}
private void dateTimePicker1_ValueChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
DateTime date = dateTimePicker1.Value;
textBox2.Text = date.ToShortDateString();
}

}
}

Today hearing program:


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
namespace advocate2
{
public partial class todayhearing : Form
{
public todayhearing()
{
InitializeComponent();
}
private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection("user
id=sa;password=trylogic;database=advocate");
SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter("select * from newcustomer where
hearingdate='" + textBox1.Text+ "'", con);
DataSet ds = new DataSet();
da.Fill(ds);
dataGridView2.DataSource = ds.Tables[0];

}
private void dateTimePicker1_ValueChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
DateTime date = dateTimePicker1.Value;
textBox1.Text = date.ToShortDateString();
}
}
}

All clients program:


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

using System.Data.SqlClient;
namespace advocate2
{
public partial class all_clients : Form
{
public all_clients()
{
InitializeComponent();
}
private void all_clients_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
SqlConnection

con

new

SqlConnection("user

id=sa;password=trylogic;database=advocate");
SqlDataAdapter da= new SqlDataAdapter("select * from newcustomer ", con);
DataSet ds = new DataSet();
da.Fill(ds);
dataGridView1.DataSource = ds.Tables[0];

}
}
}

Today appointment program:


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
namespace advocate2
{
public partial class todayappointments : Form
{
public todayappointments()
{
InitializeComponent();
}
private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
try
{

SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection("user


id=sa;password=trylogic;database=advocate");
SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter("select * from appointment where
date='" + textBox1.Text+"'", con);
DataSet ds = new DataSet();
da.Fill(ds);
dataGridView1.DataSource = ds.Tables[0];
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
}
}
private void dateTimePicker1_ValueChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
textBox1.Text = dateTimePicker1.Value.ToShortDateString();
}

}
}

Case details:
using System;

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
namespace advocate2
{
public partial class casedetails : Form
{
public casedetails()
{
InitializeComponent();
}
private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
SqlConnection

con

new

SqlConnection("user

id=sa;password=trylogic;database=advocate");
SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter("select cname,hearingdate,casedetails
from newcustomer where cid=" + textBox1.Text + "", con);
DataSet ds = new DataSet();
da.Fill(ds);
dataGridView1.DataSource = ds.Tables[0];
}
}
}

Customer list program:


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
namespace advocate2
{
public partial class customerlist : Form
{
public customerlist()
{

InitializeComponent();
}
private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
SqlConnection

con

new

SqlConnection("user

id=sa;password=trylogic;database=advocate");
SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter("select cid,cname,phnum from
newcustomer ", con);
DataSet ds = new DataSet();
da.Fill(ds, "as");
dataGridView1.DataSource = ds.Tables[0];

}
}
}

Contact us program:
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
namespace advocate2
{
public partial class contactus : Form
{
public contactus()
{
InitializeComponent();
}
}
}

About we program:
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
namespace advocate2
{
public partial class about : Form
{
public about()
{
InitializeComponent();
}
}

Change password program:


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;

using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
namespace advocate2
{
public partial class change_password : Form
{
public change_password()
{
InitializeComponent();
}
private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
SqlConnection

con

new

SqlConnection("user

id=sa;password=trylogic;database=advocate");
string query = "update startup set password='" + textBox2.Text + "'where password='"
+ textBox1.Text + "'";
SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(query, con);
con.Open();
cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
MessageBox.Show("password changed successfully");
con.Close();
}
private void textBox2_Validating(object sender, CancelEventArgs e)
{
}

private void textBox3_Validating(object sender, CancelEventArgs e)


{
if (textBox2.Text != textBox3.Text)
{
MessageBox.Show("password missmatch");
}
}
}
}

6. REPORTS

Reports:
This Report displays the information about all the hearings with in specified date.

7.SYSTEM TESTING

System Testing:

The Defendant needs to test the advocate to see if the advocate is sufficiently independent
and robust.
The first test of this would be when the arrested person instructs the advocate to sit in at the
police interrogations and tell the police that the client would make a note of the police
questions and respond to any valid questions by producing a written statement later. If the
advocate is in any way reluctant then he/she is perhaps not sufficiently independent.

8.SCOPE & EXPANSION

Scope & Expansion:


The Legal Consultancy service was brought under the advocate service was defined under
sub-clause . The Legal services provided to a business entity by any other business entity in
relation to advice, consultancy or assistance in any branch of law were covered.
However, the services provided by way of appearance before any court, Tribunal or any
authority and the services provided by the individuals were excluded.

9.CONCLUSION

Conclusion:
As a rule, the proceedings are concluded by a written opinion, in which the Advocate states
his findings, draws attention to any irregularities established and provides recommendations
to the offender as to how they should be rectified. The Advocate may also set a time limit,
within which the offender is requested to notify him of the measures adopted to rectify any
irregularities.

If the Advocate's opinion is accepted and the irregularities in question are rectified, it is then
considered that you have received moral satisfaction and that the procedure is thus concluded.
This does not mean, of course, that you may not exercise your rights in other instances, such
as before the courts.

10. GLOSSARY

Glossary:
An advocate is someone who, with your permission, will act independently on your behalf
and represent your views and interests to another party, such as a robbery, council, If you are
dealing with a robbery,

council, they all have an obligation to assist you to find

an advocate if you feel that you need one.

11.BIOGRAPHY

Biography:
. INTERNET
. FOR.NET INSTALLATION

www.support.microsoft.com
. FOR SQL

www.msdn.microsoft.com

. FOR ASP.NET

www.asp.net
www.aspoday.com
www.aspfree.com
www.msdn.microsoft.com/net/quickstart/aspplus/default.com

. BOOKS REFERRED

Microsoft Visual studio 2008


Microsoft SQL 2005