TWO ARRESTS MADE IN

OVERPASS SHOOTING
LOCAL PAGE 3

EGYPT STRIKES

EGYPT BOMBS ISLAMIC STATE MILITANTS, PUSHES
FOR INTERNATIONAL ACTION
WORLD PAGE 8

MILLS SOPHOMORE
A DOUBLE-THREAT
SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015 • Vol XV, Edition 158

Massage parlors and pot clubs facing ban
Extending urgency moratorium on Burlingame City Council’s agenda
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

As officials continue to examine
the changing landscape for laws
governing marijuana dispensaries
and massage parlors,
the
Burlingame City Council is considering extending an urgency
moratorium which would block

those businesses from setting up
shop.
Staff is recommending City
Council pass an urgency moratorium at its Tuesday meeting, which
would renew a similar measure
passed by the council last month.
According to a report from the
office of City Attorney Kathleen
Kane, cities can implement

urgency moratoriums to stop businesses that could pose a threat to
public safety from opening.

temporarily block these businesses from opening in Burlingame,
according to the report.

Considering the nature of massage parlors and marijuana dispensaries, which could bring with
them the danger of human trafficking, prostitution, robberies or
illegal drug sales, it is best the
city exercise the power it has to

“Medical marijuana dispensaries, collectives and commercial-size growing operations have
been associated with increased
risks of robberies, identity falsification, fraudulent resale of marijuana and loitering,” Kane wrote

in the report. “The proposed moratorium would protect the public
from such effects and give the city
time to consider regulatory action
that would be consistent with
long-range planning efforts and
evolving law on the subject.”
With a four-fifths approval by
the council, Burlingame could

See BAN, Page 20

Nurses to rally
for hospitals’
sale at capitol
Seton workers fear facilities will
be closed if sale not approved
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

DAVE NEWLANDS/DAILY JOURNAL

More than 200 people rallied in Redwood City Saturday to urge the passage of a rent control ordinance.

Rent control ordinance urged
Affordable housing advocates march in Redwood City
By Dave Newlands
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

More than 200 people took to
the streets of Redwood City to urge
the passage of a rent control ordinance with claims that escalating
housing costs are hurting the
working poor.
“Rent control is what we’re talking about ... but what it’s really
about is protection. Housing, food
and safety are the core needs of a
community,” Diana Reddy, with

the Housing Leadership Council,
said at Saturday’s march in downtown Redwood City.
The march was a lead-up to a
Planning Commission meeting
Tuesday night where an item on
rent control in Redwood City is on
the agenda.
The latest effort to pass a rent
control ordinance is a joint effort
between the Housing Leadership
Council and San Francisco
Organizing
Project/Peninsula
Interfaith Action.

The march included many
Redwood City business owners
who contend the region has
become too expensive for the
wages they can afford to pay.
“I myself have to drive 35 miles
to my restaurant and I cannot find
any workers because nobody can
afford to live here for what I can
pay,” said a restaurateur who preferred to remain anonymous.
Many at the march also work for
nonprofit agencies that cannot

See RENT, Page 18

Nurses will rally in Sacramento
Tuesday to urge Attorney General
Kamala Harris to approve the sale
of six Daughters of Charity hospitals, including two in San Mateo
County, to its preferred buyer
Prime Healthcare.
Workers at Seton Medical Center
in Daly City and Seton Coastside
in Moss Beach fear the facilities
will be shuttered if Harris does not
approve the sale.
“If this hospital closes, there
will be a health care crisis for
southern San Francisco and
the Peninsula,” Debra Amor, a reg-

istered nurse at
Seton Medical
Center in Daly
City, wrote in a
statement.
By law, Harris
must approve
the sale and is
being advised to
Kamala Harris add a condition
onto the transaction that Prime keep the hospitals open for at least 10 years and
participate in the Medi-Cal managed care and Medicare programs
for at least as long.
Prime, however, has pledged to

See HOSPITALS, Page 18

Student develops online
shopping search engine
Burlingame High School sophomore creates site aimed
at combining best elements of Amazon and Google
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

While many local high school
students might have spent
Presidents Day sleeping in or perhaps getting ready to hit the
slopes for the ski week holiday,
Rohan Nath of Hillsborough was

working hard to achieve his
dreams.
Nath, a 15-year-old sophomore
at Burlingame High School, is in
the midst of developing a website
designed to help online shoppers
find the best deals available from a
variety of Web retailers.

See ALLVERS, Page 20

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2

FOR THE RECORD

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“People show their
character by what they laugh at.”
— German proverb

This Day in History
During the Civil War, Columbia, South
Carolina, burned as the Confederates
evacuated and Union forces moved in.
(It’s not clear which side was responsible for setting the blaze, or whether it
had been deliberate.)
In 1 8 1 5 , the United States and Britain exchanged the instruments of ratification for the Treaty of Ghent, ending the War
of 1812.
In 1 8 6 3 , the International Red Cross was founded in
Geneva.
In 1 9 0 4 , the original two-act version of Giacomo Puccini’s
opera “Madama Butterfly” received a poor reception at its premiere at La Scala in Milan, Italy.
In 1 9 1 3 , the Armory Show, a landmark modern art exhibit,
opened in New York City.
In 1 9 2 5 , the first issue of The New Yorker magazine (bearing
the cover date of Feb. 21) was published.
In 1 9 3 3 , Newsweek magazine was first published under the
title “News-Week.”
In 1 9 4 4 , during World War II, U.S. forces invaded Eniwetok
Atoll, encountering little initial resistance from Imperial
Japanese troops. (The Americans secured the atoll less than a
week later.)
In 1 9 5 9 , the United States launched Vanguard 2, a satellite
which carried meteorological equipment.
In 1 9 6 5 , comedian Joan Rivers made her first appearance on
“The Tonight Show” with Johnny Carson.
In 1 9 7 2 , President Richard M. Nixon departed the White
House with his wife, Pat, on a historic trip to China.
In 1 9 8 5 , Murray P. Haydon became the third person to
receive a permanent artificial heart as doctors at Humana
Hospital Audubon in Louisville, Kentucky, implanted the
device. (Haydon lived 488 days with the heart.)
In 1 9 9 5 , Colin Ferguson was convicted of six counts of murder in the December 1993 Long Island Rail Road shootings
(he was later sentenced to a minimum of 200 years in prison).

1865

Birthdays

Basketball Hall of
Famer Michael
vJordan is 52.

TV personality
Paris Hilton is 34.

Actor Joseph
Gordon-Levitt is
34.

Actor Hal Holbrook is 90. Mystery writer Ruth Rendell is
85. Singer Bobby Lewis is 82. Actor-comedian Barry
Humphries (aka “Dame Edna”) is 81. Country singer-songwriter Johnny Bush is 80. Actress Christina Pickles is 80.
Football Hall-of-Famer Jim Brown is 79. Actress Brenda
Fricker is 70. Actress Rene Russo is 61. Actor Richard Karn is
59. Actor Lou Diamond Phillips is 53. Actor-comedian Larry,
the Cable Guy is 52. TV personality Rene Syler is 52. Movie
director Michael Bay is 51. Singer Chante Moore is 48. Rock
musician Timothy J. Mahoney (311) is 45. Actor Dominic
Purcell is 45.

AUSTIN WALSH/ DAILY JOURNAL

Families gather in Central Park in San Mateo to enjoy the pleasant weather during Presidents Day.

In other news ...
The
Ivy
League
university
announced Monday the gift was left by
1936 graduate William Scheide, who
died last November at age 100.
The 2, 500-volume collection
includes the first six printed editions
of the Bible, an original printing of
the Declaration of Independence and
Beethoven’s autographed music
sketchbook.
Princeton President Christopher
Eisgruber calls it “one of the greatest
collections of rare books and manuscripts in the world today.”
The collection has been housed at
Princeton’s Firestone Library since
1959. It will continue to be accessible
to students, scholars and the public
upon request.
The library has begun digitizing the
collection to make it even more accessible.

Police chased tractor-trailer
34 miles, dodged thrown fridge
BELLE VERNON, Pa. — A tractortrailer driver threw items from his cab
at police — including socks, shoes
and a small refrigerator — as he led
them on a 34-mile chase in western
Pennsylvania,
authorities
said
Sunday.
Police in Westmoreland County said
a man called emergency dispatchers

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Feb. 14 Powerball

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

CANHR

TULIFE

1

44

51

45

28

Feb. 13 Mega Millions
4

20

44

74

65

14
Mega number

Feb. 14 Super Lotto Plus
8

9

18

22

31

4

12

15

23

24

5

9

2

Daily Four
1

Daily three midday
3

27

1

7

Daily three evening

Mega number

7

1

4

The Daily Derby race winners are Winning Spirit,
No. 9, in first place; Big Ben, No. 4, in second place;
and Gorgeous George, No. 8, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:48.02.

AYDAPY
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here:
Yesterday’s

24

(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: KOALA
ORBIT
CAMPUS
ROTATE
Answer: The prices on the granite floor tiles were —
ROCK-BOTTOM

The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com
jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com
twitter.com/smdailyjournal

endangering, resisting arrest and other
counts. Court documents indicate he
had requested representation by the
public defender’s office, which rang
unanswered Sunday.
State police told the Pittsburgh
Tribune-Review that Boyer was the
only occupant of the truck, which
hauls sand used in the hydraulic fracturing drilling process, known as
fracking. Police did not disclose his
employer.

Bill would repeal last
reference to dueling in Idaho law
BOISE, Idaho — A 151-year-old
state law that reportedly drew its
inspiration from the legendary duel
between former Vice President Aaron
Burr and former Treasury Secretary
Alexander Hamilton might soon be
taken off the books.
The House Judiciary, Rules and
Administration Committee voted
Friday to consider ridding Idaho of the
rule on jurisdiction for out-of-state
duels. The law was passed during
Idaho’s very first territorial legislature
in 1864.
Currently, the law states that Idaho
has jurisdiction if a person dies in the
Gem State after getting injured in a
duel out-of-state.
Republican Rep. Thomas Dayley
joked that some lawmakers may want
to take advantage of the statute before
its repeal would take effect in July.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five
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just before 2 a.m. Saturday and said he
planned to wreck his truck. State
troopers tried to stop the vehicle near
Washington Township but the driver
disregarded the emergency lights and
sirens, and a pursuit began along
Route 70 and later the Pennsylvania
Turnpike, police said.
“During the pursuit, the driver threw
numerous items at pursuing troopers
from the cab” including a steel canister that struck a Greensburg state
police unit and disabled it, police said.
The driver also threw a mini refrigerator before the truck was stopped with
spike strips shortly after 3 a. m.
Saturday.
The driver refused orders to leave the
cab, police said, so troopers entered
and used a stun gun to subdue him. He
was taken to a hospital because officers believed he was under the influence of a controlled substance, namely
Xanax, and for other injuries, police
said.
“It should be noted that during the
pursuit the operator threw his shoes
and socks at troopers. When the windows were broken to make entry into
the cab, the operator’s feet were cut
during his resistance to arrest,” police
said. At the hospital, he was treated for
cuts on his feet, and a blood sample
was taken for testing.
The driver, identified as Christopher
Charles Boyer, 47, of Mifflintown, is
charged with aggravated assault, fleeing or attempting to elude, reckless

Princeton gets $300M book
collection, its largest donation

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Tues day : Mostly cloudy. Areas of fog in
the morning. Highs in the lower 60s.
Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Tues day ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. Patchy
fog. Lows in the upper 40s. Northwest
winds around 5 mph.
Wednes day : Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs in the mid 60s. North winds 5 to 10
mph.
Wednes day ni g ht: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 50s.
North winds 10 to 15 mph decreasing to around 5 mph after
midnight.
Thurs day : Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Thurs day ni g ht thro ug h Saturday ni g ht: Mostly
clear. Lows in the lower 50s. Highs in the upper 60s.
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 200 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Two arrested in overpass shooting
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

Police have arrested two people in connection with the shooting of a 19-year-old
man who was hit while walking on the
Peninsula Avenue/Highway 101 overpass
during Friday’s evening commute.
On Saturday, investigators identified San
Mateo residents, Jose Ramirez, 19, and
Daniel Nau, 19, as primary suspects in the
shooting and warrants were issued for their
arrests, according to police.
Ramirez was arrested Saturday with the
assistance of the Daly City and South San
Francisco police departments when he was
seen walking just a short distance away
from his girlfriend’s residence, according to
police.
North County Regional SWAT Team was
called to execute a valid search warrant
Sunday at a residence in Oakland where

Scammers steal from
South San Francisco resident
The South San Francisco Police
Department is urging area residents to be
aware of cyber-scams and avoid becoming
a victim after one South San Francisco
woman was scammed out of nearly $1,000.
On Feb. 4, a resident of the 600 block of
Marcie Circle received a cold-call from
someone claiming to represent a software
company that talked her into purchasing
$279.99 worth of security software. She
also allowed them remote-access to her computer so they could install the software.
The purported software company called
back later, telling the victim that her license

Nau was thought to be hiding and was
taken into custody later that morning,
surrendering without incident, according
to police.
Detectives searched the residence and
along with other evidence, seized multiple
firearms from inside which will be analyzed
to determine if they were used in either this
case or similar cases.
Both Nau and Ramirez were booked into
county jail for attempted murder and gang
enhancement, as well as other related
offenses.
On Friday, police began receiving multiple calls of shots fired around 4:40 p.m. and

found the man suffering from two gunshot
wounds, said San Mateo police Sgt. Rick
Decker.
The victim, a San Mateo resident, was
found on the south sidewalk near the center
of the overpass and was semi-conscious as
he was transferred to the hospital, Decker
said.
Decker said the victim suffered from critical injuries after being shot twice, but could
not confirm initial reports the man was shot
in the hip and the back.
The victim was considered in critical but
stable condition as of Friday evening,
according to police.
Anyone with any information is urged to
come forward and contact police at (650)
522-7700. Anyone wishing to remain
anonymous can call the secret witness line
at (650) 522-7676 or report online at
http://tinyurl.com/SMPDTips.

Local briefs

been a victim of similar crimes to report the
fraud to their local authorities.

Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com

on the security software was expired, and
she’d be receiving a refund. The software
company told the victim they would wire
$1,000 into her checking account and
instructed her to create a Western Union
account with $700 to facilitate the refund.
After sending the money, the victim discovered that when she allowed the so-called
software company to have remote access to
her computer, they transferred $1,000 from
her savings account into her checking
account.
The money she wired them was actually
her own.
Police are urging anyone who may have

Small plane makes crash
landing on Hayward golf course
A pilot has made a crash landing on a golf
course in Northern California after the small
plane he was on lost power.
The pilot and golfers on the course were
not injured in Saturday afternoon’s incident
on the Skywest Golf Course in Hayward.
Hayward Fire Capt. Don Nichelson said
the plane lost power as it took off from
Hayward Executive Airport shortly before 1
p.m. The pilot brought the plane down on its
belly on a fairway at the golf course, about a
mile away.

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

3

Police reports
Antisocial club
A man was arrested for being drunk and
disturbing customers at the Peninsula
Social Club on North B Street in San
Mateo before 1:29 a.m. Wednesday,
Feb. 11.

SAN MATEO
Theft. Someone stole a pair of shoes from
the DSW Shoe Warehouse on West Hillsdale
Boulevard before 4:22 p.m. Wednesday, Feb.
11.
Theft. Four people were caught shoplifting
on a security camera in Victoria’s Secret at
the Hillsdale Shopping Center before 10:57
a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 11.
Th e f t . Garbage cans were stolen on
Cherrywood Drive before 10:10 a. m.
Wednesday, Feb. 11.
Di s turbance. A woman disguised as a doctor was going up to cars and being aggressive to passengers at Planned Parenthood on
Baywood Avenue before 10:54 a.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 10.

FOSTER CITY
Sus pended l i cens e. A man was arrested
for driving with a suspended license before
2:58 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 11.
Reckl es s dri v i ng . A car was seen driving
recklessly on East Hillsdale Boulevard
before 6:56 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 11.
Arres t. A man was arrested for having an
outstanding traffic warrant on Lurline Drive
before 12:20 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 11.
Arres t. A person was arrested and sent to
First Chance for being drunk in public on
Town Green Lane before 9:53 a.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 10.

4

STATE

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Many sex offenders killed in California prison
Protective housing in prisons
WHAT ARE THEY?

Women’s prisons do not have Sensitive Needs Yards.

Sensitive Needs Yards are separate cell blocks, common
areas and outdoor recreation yards set aside for inmates
who would likely be harmed if they were in the general
population with other prisoners. They include sex
offenders; inmates with youthful appearances; inmates
who have left prison gangs; have been assaulted; have
enemies in the general prison population; have drug
or gambling debts; or are former law enforcement or
correctional officers.

HOW MUCH DO THEY COST?

WHO IS THERE?
California prisons hold a total of 37,457 inmates labeled
as “sensitive needs,” nearly 28 percent of the overall
inmate population. Forty percent of the sensitive-needs
inmates are registered sex offenders.

WHERE ARE THEY?
California has 47 of the yards scattered within 21 of the
state’s 34 prisons. All of them are in men’s prisons.

Prison officials say there is no additional cost, as Sensitive
Needs Yards are run like any other housing unit.

HOW ARE THEY PART OF THE PROBLEM?
Of 11 inmate homicide cases closed by the inspector
general’s office during the first half of 2014, 10 were
of sensitive-needs inmates. Of those 10, eight were
killed in their cells. Another sensitive-needs inmate
was seriously injured in his cell but survived.
Prison officials have identified nearly 100 gangs within
Sensitive Needs Yards, according to Matthew
Buechner, a special investigator who trained other
corrections officials on problems with prison gangs
until he recently retired.
Corrections department spokeswoman Terry
Thornton said officials are most concerned about “a
handful” of the most active gangs.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — Shortly after 2 a.m. on
April 6, 2010, a guard at Salinas Valley State
Prison noticed Alan Ager’s cellmate trying to
stuff something under a mattress. It was Ager,
blood trickling from his mouth and a cloth
noose tied around his neck.
The convicted child molester died 10 days
later without regaining consciousness, his
death earning his cellmate a second life sentence. California state prisoners are killed at
a rate that is double the national average —
and sex offenders like Ager account for a disproportionate number of victims, according
to an Associated Press analysis of corrections records.
Male sex offenders made up about 15 percent of the prison population but accounted
for nearly 30 percent of homicide victims,
the AP found in cataloging all 78 killings
that corrections officials reported since
2007, when they started releasing slain
inmates’ identities and crimes.
The deaths — 23 out of 78 — come despite

the state’s creation more than a decade ago of
special housing units designed to protect the
most vulnerable inmates, including sex
offenders, often marked men behind bars
because of the nature of their crimes.
In some cases, they have been killed
among the general prison population and, in
others, within the special units by violenceprone cellmates. Officials acknowledge that
those units, which also house inmates trying
to quit gangs, have spawned their own gangs.
Corrections officials blamed a rise in the
prison homicide rate on an overhaul meant to
reduce crowding. As part of the effort, the
state in 2011 began keeping lower-level
offenders in county lockups, leaving prisons
with a higher percentage of sex offenders and
violent gangmembers.
Violence and homicides won’t decline
unless the state goes well below the prison
population level set by the courts — 137.5
percent of the system’s designed capacity,
said James Austin, president of the JFA
Institute, a Washington, D.C., consulting
firm that works on prison issues.

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LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

5

Motorcyclist killed in collision with dump truck
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

PETER MOOTZ/
DAILY JOURNAL

A motorcyclist was killed in a collision
with a dump truck in Woodside Monday
afternoon, a San Mateo County Sheriff’s
spokeswoman said.
Deputies were notified of the collision at
Cañada Road and Olive Hill Lane around
3:15 p.m., San Mateo County Sheriff’s
Deputy Rebecca Rosenblatt said.
A 43-year-old Redwood City man driving
a Harley-Davidson motorcycle was in the
blind spot of the dump truck when the collision occurred, according to Rosenblatt.
The motorcyclist suffered fatal injuries,
she said.
A 61-year-old Burlingame man driving
the dump truck remained at the scene and
was cooperative with investigators,
Rosenblatt said.
Alcohol or drugs don’t appear to be a factor in the collision, she said.
Rosenblatt said the incident is “not
thought to be a criminal accident, just an
unfortunate accident.”
The San Mateo County coroner’s office
responded to the scene.

Sheriff’s Sgt.
Steve Pettit
looks at a
motorcycle
that was hit
by a dump
truck at
Cañada Road
and Olive Hill
Lane in
Woodside. The
43-year-old
Redwood City
man driving a
HarleyDavidson
motorcycle
was pounced
dead on
scene.

The Foster City Lions Club

First Annual Cioppino Fest
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT!
We Serve

Saturday Feb. 28th
Doors Open – 5:30 pm
Dinner – 6:30 pm

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6

LOCAL/NATION

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Exams based on
Common Core
standards begin
By Kimberly Hefling
and Julie Carr Smyth
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

STOCKPORT, Ohio — Sixthgrader Kayla Hunter considers herself pretty tech savvy. She has a
computer at home unlike about
half her classmates at her elementary school. And it matches up
well with the one she’ll use this
week to take a new test linked to
the Common Core standards.
Still, the perky 11-year-old worries. During a recent practice exam
at her school in Ohio, she couldn’t
even log on. “It wouldn’t let me,”
she said. “It kept saying it wasn’t
right, and it just kept loading the
whole time.”
Her state on Tuesday will be the
first to administer one of two tests
in English language arts and math
based on the Common Core standards developed by two separate
groups of states. By the end of the
school year, about 12 million
children in 29 states and the
District of Columbia will take
them, using computers or electronic tablets.
The exams are expected to be
more difficult than the traditional
spring standardized state exams
they replace. In some states,
they’ll require hours of additional
testing time because students will
have to do more than just fill in
the bubble. The goal is to test stu-

dents on critical thinking skills,
requiring them to describe their
reasoning and solve problems.
The tests have multimedia components, written essays and multistep calculations needed to solve
math problems that go beyond
just using rote memory. Students
in some states will take adaptive
versions in which questions get
harder or easier depending on their
answers.
But there’s been controversy.
The tests have been caught up in
the debate playing out in state legislatures across the country about
the federal role in education.
Although more than 40 states
have adopted Common Core,
which spells out what reading and
math skills students should master
in each grade, several have decided
not to offer the tests — known as
the Smarter Balanced Assessment
Consortium, and Partnership for
Assessment of Readiness for
College and Careers, or PARCC.
Some states are introducing other
new state standardized tests this
year.
The Common Core tests fulfill
the requirement in the federal No
Child Left Behind law for annual
testing in reading and math in
grades three to eight and again in
high school. But as Congress
seeks to rewrite the education law,
there’s debate over whether the
tests should be required by
Washington, and whether students

Common Core exams are expected to be more difficult than the traditional spring standardized state exams they
replace. In some states, they’ll require hours of additional testing time because students will have to do more than
just fill in the bubble.
are being tested too much. Parents
in pockets of the country have
joined a movement to “opt out” of
these standardized tests.
Questions also have been raised
about students’ keyboarding skills
and schools’ computer capacities.
In the Appalachian foothills
where Kayla attends Morgan
South Elementary School, administrators and teachers worry that
they don’t have the bandwidth to
provide reliable Internet connectivity on testing day. Both tests
offer a paper option. PARCC officials anticipate that about a quarter

of students will use the paper version; Smarter Balanced officials
estimate roughly 10 to 20 percent
will take it on paper.
Just eight days before the test,
the Morgan Local School District
in rural southeastern Ohio ordered
200 more Chromebooks, which
worked best during the practice
run.
The week before the test, Kayla
and her classmates huddled in pairs
sharing what devices were available at the school. “They’ll be
more comfortable with the technology, but it is a worry of mine

that, as far as the content that’s on
it, there’s still stuff I could be
doing to prepare for the test,” says
their teacher, Carrie Young.
Eleven-year-old Colton Kidd
says the screens on the
Chromebooks are too small.
Classmate Josie Jackson, 12,
prefers pencil and paper. But Liam
Montgomery likes computerized
tests: “It’s easier to get the
answers down, because I don’t
have to flip back and forth.”
In some places, school administrators and state leaders are only
grudgingly moving forward.

M

ercy Hi g h Scho o l is hosting a
Candy -Gram Dri v e to raise
money
for
the
Raf i k i
Org ani zati o n is Siaya County, Kenya.
Students are encouraged to buy CandyGrams for classmates at Mercy, Serra and
Ri o rdan hi g h s cho o l s .
The Rafiki Organization was founded in
1987 by a Mercy graduated, to provide
health services to AIDS orphans in the
region.
***
Two students from Redwood City are
among the recipients for Cal i f o rn i a
Water Serv i ce Co mpany ’s (Cal Water)
inaugural college scholarship program
cycle.
Recipient Mel i s s a Mas t, a graduate of
Sequo i a Hi g h Scho o l , is majoring in
psychology and anthropology at the
Uni v ers i ty o f Cal i fo rni a, Berkel ey
and is interested in mental health and forensics and works as a research assistant for
graduate students in clinical psychology.
Recipient Samantha Mas t, a graduate of
Sequoia High School, is majoring in history at Chapman Uni v ers i ty. She is interested in Colonial American history and is a
member of Al pha Gamma Del ta sorority.
Cal Water’s scholarship program is
funded by Cal Water’s shareholders, not
ratepayers. The program is administered by
Scho l ars hi p Manag ement Serv i ces
nonprofit. 
The next scholarship cycle will open in
spring 2015 for students pursuing higher
education in the fall of 2015. To be eligible
for a scholarship, students must live in a Cal
Water service area, enroll in full-time undergraduate study at an accredited two- or fouryear college or vocational-technical
school, and not already possess a degree or
diploma from an accredited two- or four-year
college or vocational-technical school. To

learn more about the program visit calwater.com/community/scholarship.
***
Redwo o d Ci ty will host a regional summit to help school district leaders improve
teaching and student learning outcomes
through the effective use of technology May
4 and 5.
***
Mi l l s Hi g h Scho o l took 14 students to
compete at the So uth Bay Reg i o nal
Ac ade mi c De c at h l o n — an annual
national competition in which students
compete by completing exams in science to
art to economics. As well, students are tested for their abilities to give prepared and
impromptu speeches, write an essay and sit
for an interview. At the end of the day, the
Mills team was just 98 points shy of the
needed 30,000 to reach the state championship.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school news.
It is compiled by education reporter Austin Walsh.
You can contact him at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or
at austin@smdailyjournal.com.

NATION/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

7

Winter storm slams South; cold freezes Northeast
By Adam Beam
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FRANKFORT, Ky. — Snow swirled sideways in Kentucky and the typically
bustling state capital of Frankfort came to a
frozen halt Monday as a storm walloped
parts of the South, which unlike the
Northeast, had been mostly spared this winter.
That all changed with a mix of snow, sleet
and freezing rain across the region, making
roads treacherous and knocking out power
to thousands of people. Luckily, the storm
arrived on a holiday, Presidents Day, when
many schools and businesses were already
closed and the morning commute was not as
busy.
Officials also made certain roads were prepared this year after Southern cities — most
notably Atlanta — were caught off guard a
year ago when a winter storm stranded thousands of people on interstates overnight.
Raleigh suffered a similar fate last year.
Still, some weren’t quite ready for the
winter blast.
RL Doss said he had already used his 1987
GMC Suburban — which can haul up to
three-quarters of a ton with ropes and chains
— to rescue several people and their cars on
the hills surrounding Frankfort. Cars were
fishtailing and sliding off the slick roads.
“I look at it this way. Everybody is trying
to get out, to get their last bit of food and
stuff, getting home from work and people
leaving for work and stuff, and it happens,”
he said, shivering in a pair of tan overalls
pulled over a hooded sweat shirt.
Glancing at his truck, the burgundy behemoth, he said: “I like to see what the truck
can do and what it can’t do. I push it to its
limits.”
In the Northeast, which has been
slammed by seemingly endless snow, the
white stuff stopped falling but the temperatures were bitterly cold. New York City came
close to breaking a 127-year-old record

running in the snow because it gives them a
nice cushion as opposed to the harder,
packed earth.
Arkansas, where temperatures plummeted
from the 70s on Saturday to highs in the
30s a day later, had nearly 30,000 people
without power at the peak of the storm.
Roads were slushy and traffic was moving
slowly in Tennessee. Justyn Jackson, a
meteorologist with the National Weather
Service in Nashville, said the last bad winter storm in the city was 2010 when up to 4
inches of snow fell.
“A lot of cities up North, they deal with
this several times during the winter. It’s really not uncommon for them at all,” Jackson
said. “Down here, especially in Nashville,
although it’s not rare, it certainly on average happens once or twice a winter.”
Georgia officials were taking no chances,
bringing in more personnel to the state
operations center and pre-treating roads
with a mixture of salt and water. Atlanta was
expected to get rain, dodging any icy or
REUETRS snowy conditions. Up to a quarter of an inch
A pedestrian walks through the snow during a winter blizzard in Cambridge, Mass.
of ice could accumulate in a handful mountainous northern counties.
when the temperature in Central Park hit 3 one tanker went into the Kanawha River and
North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory says he
degrees, just 2 degrees above the record set nearby house caught fire. It wasn’t clear if hopes the government is “over-prepared
in 1888, said Jeffrey Tongue, a National the winter storm had anything to do with and underwhelmed.” It’s been almost a year
Weather Service meteorologist.
the crash.
since a winter storm dumped as much as 22
Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh said the
The storm was headed toward the inches of snow in the North Carolina mounlatest snow storm left one person dead, Carolinas overnight, and then expected to tains and pelted the eastern part of the state
apparently due to a heart attack while shov- march through the Mid-Atlantic and with ice. In Raleigh, much like Atlanta,
eling snow. A partial roof collapse at an Northeast.
many abandoned their cars alongside the
eight-building apartment complex in
Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear urged peo- road or in parking lots — if they could navPortsmouth, New Hampshire, left 500 to ple to stay home if possible. By Monday igate.
700 people looking for warmth. In New afternoon, 9 inches of snow had fallen in
John Moore, a meteorologist with the
Jersey, a 66-year-old woman who had been Louisville and other parts were buried under National Weather Service in Memphis, said
drinking at a benefit was found dead in the a foot of snow.
he believes Tennessee was prepared in part
snow, just two doors from her home.
In central Kentucky, home to much of the because of the embarrassing scene that parFirefighters working on a blaze in state’s signature thoroughbred industry, alyzed Atlanta last year.
Philadelphia left behind a building coated horses kept warm by galloping through the
“We got the word out ahead of time to let
in icicles. No one was hurt.
deep snow, pausing occasionally to shake it people know, that even if we’re not expectWest Virginia getting hit hard by the off from their thick winter coats. Ned ing a lot, still check your forecast before
snowstorm when a train carrying crude oil Toffey, general manager of Spendthrift you leave home in the morning because
derailed about 30 miles Charleston. At least Farm in Lexington, said the horses enjoy stuff can change so quickly,” he said.

Eurozone issues Greece an ultimatum
By Pan Pylas and Lorne Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BRUSSELS — European creditors issued
Greece with an ultimatum Monday, saying
the country must accept a key condition in
bailout talks by the end of the week or face
having to meet its debt commitments on its
own — a prospect that many in the financial
markets think would leave Greece little
option but to leave the euro.
After a meeting of the 19 finance ministers
of the eurozone over how to make Greece’s
debts sustainable broke down in seemingacrimony after barely more than three hours,
Greece was told it has to ask for an extension
to its bailout program before further negotiations on the country’s future financing and
economic course can take place.
“We simply need more time and the best
way for that at this point is extend the current
program which would allow a number of
months for us to work on future arrangements,” said Jeroen Dijsselbloem, the head
of the so-called eurogroup.
Without some sort of financing arrangements in place after the current bailout ends

after Feb. 28, Greece would face real difficulties meeting its obligations, such as debt
repayments, over the coming months.
Bankruptcy and a potential exit from the euro
would loom for Greece once again.
That’s why investors grew increasingly
concerned Monday that a deal may not
emerge in time to avoid a so-called “Grexit”
from the euro — the main stock market in
Greece fell 3.8 percent while the euro
slipped.
Investors are worried that the two sides are
poles apart especially as a cornerstone of the
election campaign of Greece’s new left-wing
government was to scrap the bailout program. In return for 240 billion euros ($275
billion) of rescue money from 2010 onwards,
successive Greek governments have had to
implement a wide array of austerity measures
such as deep cuts to spending and pensions.
The new Syriza government, in power for
barely three weeks, blames those measures
for the country’s economic ills — the Greek
economy is around a quarter smaller than in
2008, despite a recent modest return to
growth while unemployment and poverty
have swelled.

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8

WORLD

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Egypt strikes IS in Libya, pushes for international action
By Hamza Hendawi and Maggie Michael
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS

The father of one of the Egyptian Coptic men killed in Libya mourns at a church before attending
mass in El-Our village.

SEQUOIA UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT

SEEKS APPLICATION

FOR AN INTERIM APPOINTMENT AS A BOARD TRUSTEE

Long standing Board member, Olivia Martinez, will be leaving her position
as a school district trustee effective March 1. The Board of Trustees will be
making an interim appointment to fill the vacant seat for the remainder of
Dr. Martinez's current term, which expires in December 2015.
To qualify to be considered for the appointment, a candidate needs to be a
resident of the district, at least eighteen years old, and a U.S. citizen. To be
considered as a candidate, please fill out the application on the district
website (www.seq.org) and submit it to the district by the March 5 deadline.
Please submit the application to the Superintendent’s Office at 480 James
Avenue, Redwood City, 94062. The Board will interview all qualified candidates at a special Board meeting to be held on March 11, 2015. The
interviews and selection process will occur publicly in open session and it
is expected that the Board will make its selection at this special meeting
after the conclusion of the interviews. If you have any questions about the
process or would like more information about the district, please contact
James Lianides, superintendent, at 650-369-1411 X 22213 or by e-mail at
jlianides@seq.org

CAIRO — Egypt bombed Islamic State
militants in neighboring Libya on Monday
and called on the United States and Europe
to join an international military intervention in the chaotic North African state after
extremists beheaded a group of Egyptian
Christians.
The airstrikes bring Egypt overtly into
Libya’s turmoil, a reflection of Cairo’s
increasing alarm. Egypt now faces threats
on two fronts — a growing stronghold of
radicals on its western border and a militant
insurgency of Islamic State allies on its
eastern flank in the Sinai Peninsula — as
well as its own internal challenges.
Islamic State group weapons caches and
training camps were targeted “to avenge the
bloodshed and to seek retribution from the
killers,” a military statement said. “Let
those far and near know that Egyptians have
a shield to protect and safeguard the security
of the country and a sword that cuts off terrorism.”
The announcement on state radio repre-

Battle persists for Ukraine
railway hub, despite peace deal
LUHANSKE, Ukraine — Intense artillery
exchanges between Ukrainian government
forces and Russian-backed separatists persisted Monday around a strategic town in
eastern Ukraine — fighting that threatens
to dash a cease-fire deal brokered by
European leaders last week.
Under the cease-fire agreement negotiated by the leaders of Ukraine, Russia,
Germany and France, the warring sides are
to begin withdrawing heavy weapons from
the front line Tuesday. That plan already
looks at risk, with the rebels saying they
are not satisfied that conditions are in
place for the process to go ahead.
Associated Press reporters in Luhanske, a
government-held town 15 kilometers (9
miles) northwest of the bitterly contested
railway hub of Debaltseve, heard sustained
shelling Monday. Some of the artillery
appeared to be outgoing, suggesting it was
being fired by Ukrainian troops.

Gunman in Copenhagen
attacks just got out of jail
COPENHAGEN, Denmark — The Danish
gunman who attacked a free-speech seminar
and a synagogue in Copenhagen was
released about two weeks ago from a jail
where he may have been radicalized while
serving time for a vicious stabbing.

sents Egypt’s first public acknowledgement
of military action in post-Moammar
Gadhafi Libya, where there has been almost
no government control.
Libya is where the Islamic State group has
built up its strongest presence outside Syria
and Iraq. Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah
el-Sissi is lobbying Europe and the United
States for a coordinated international
response similar to the coalition air campaign in those countries.
“What is happening in Libya is a threat to
international peace and security,” said ElSissi.
El-Sissi spoke with France’s president
and Italy’s prime minister Monday about
Libya, and sent his foreign minister, Sameh
Shukri, to New York to consult at the United
Nations ahead of a terrorism conference
opening Wednesday in Washington.
The bombs were dropped by U.S.-made F16 fighter jets that left Egyptian bases for
targets in the eastern Libyan city of Darna,
according to Egyptian and Libyan security
officials who spoke on condition of
anonymity because they were not authorized to talk the press.

Around the world
As Denmark mourned the two victims,
these and other troubling details emerged
Monday about Omar Abdel Hamid ElHussein’s path to the country’s worst terror
spree in three decades.
El-Hussein was arrested 15 months ago
in a vicious knife attack on a train passenger, and while he was awaiting trial, a
change in his behavior last summer set off
enough “alarm bells” for jail authorities to
alert PET, Denmark’s counter-terror
agency, a source close to the investigation
told AP.

Indonesia moving two Aussies,
five other foreigners for execution
JAKARTA, Indonesia — Eight convicted
drug smugglers, including seven foreigners, will be transferred to an Indonesian
prison island this week for imminent execution despite international appeals for
clemency, an official said Monday.
Among the eight are Andrew Chan, 31,
and Myuran Sukumaran, 33, the ringleaders
of a group of nine Australians arrested in
2005 for attempting to smuggle 8.3 kilograms (18.3 pounds) of heroin to Australia
from the Indonesian resort island of Bali.
The seven other members of the group —
dubbed the “Bali Nine” by Australian media
— have received prison sentences ranging
from 20 years to life.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

Finding the right balance for Belmont zoning
By Eric Reed and Charles Stone

T

he city of Belmont is incredibly attractive to dynamic and
growing families because of
its excellent schools, proximity to
employers, open spaces, tight-knit
community and natural beauty. Many
people want to move here and, in the
past, housing demand could be satisfied with construction of new singlefamily homes. Unfortunately, those
days are gone. Being rich in a supply
of good jobs, but poor in supply of
homes, prices have soared. New families must often stretch their budget
just to be able to achieve some semblance of the American dream — a 60year-old modest two-bedroom, onebathroom, one-car garage home.
Moving “up” from starter homes can
be cost-prohibitive (if a larger house
can even be found). As a result, traditional home mobility does not exist
here. This is a common problem on
the Peninsula.
Just as community needs change
over time, home owner needs do too.
Families grow, are presented with the
opportunity and need to care for an
elderly parent, or are faced with welcoming an adult child — and perhaps
his or her family — back home. It is
our belief that every family in
Belmont deserves the opportunity to
have a home that meets their needs
while continuing to preserve our small
town feel. But that is challenging in
Belmont at the present time.
Current home modification zoning
ordinances are among the most restrictive in San Mateo County. In fact, during our respective City Council campaigns and during our tenure as elected
members of the Belmont City
Council, many residents have
expressed their frustration with the
significant challenges and roadblocks
to remodeling homes to accommodate
changing needs. In our experience,
some of our ordinances, as written,
seem to work against residents when
they should be working for them.

For example,
home size should
vary in relation to
lot size. In most of
Belmont, whether
you have a 6,000square-foot lot or a
25,000-square-foot
lot, today your maximum allowable living space is the
same. We believe
larger lots can support reasonably
larger homes and
support changes
that reach this goal.
Furthermore, project review requirements should be
aligned with project impact. Parking
requirements should be based on vehicle ownership statistics, not set at an
arbitrary number. For those with onecar garages, our ordinances make it
incredibly hard to add room for a
growing family without adding another garage — regardless of what type of
space is being added or whether it will
result in the addition of a new car or
driver. These families should not be
effectively prohibited from adding on
to their homes and instead forced to
face the prospect of moving. Buying a
bigger home is no longer a realistic
option for most people.
As in most similar communities, our
Planning Commission should be
spending its precious and valued volunteer time analyzing new home projects, reviewing substantial home additions, updating our general plan,
working on our housing element,
working on a downtown and evaluating opportunities to build workforce
housing. But our current rules require
commission review of all projects
adding more than 399 square feet —
whether they include a bedroom or
not. This is one of the strictest
requirements in the county. This
results in costly and time-consuming
delays but also a great deal of uncer-

Guest
perspective
tainty. Our residents deserve timely
processes, more certainty and less
ambiguity. Freeing the Planning
Commission from review of small
projects that should only require a
simple administrative process will
enable it to spend time on important
long-term issues. That’s why we support increasing the threshold for commission review.
Some say our proposals will dramatically alter the feel of our town; that
“McMansions” will abound. Don’t be
fooled. Slope, floor area ratio and setback requirements (all of which remain
in place under our proposed changes)
restrict most Belmont lots from building these types of massive homes and
will continue to do so. San Mateo has
similar rules, but overly large homes
have not overtaken that city.
Our proposed modifications have
been discussed at three public meetings and staff is working hard to provide an assessment of potential
impacts. Once this process is complete, the modifications will, again,
be put in front of the Planning
Commission for further feedback and
recommendations. After that, the
council will examine them in public
again before any changes are finalized.
The process is fluid and feedback is
welcome. We look forward to continued input from the public as we follow
through on our promise to take action
to make Belmont the very best it can
be.
Eric Reed is the v ice may or of Belmont
and Charles Stone is a Belmont councilman. These opinions are their own
and do not reflect the position of the
Belmont City Council or city staff.

Letter to the editor
Brian Williams
Editor,
Brian Williams’ precipitous fall as
NBC’s network anchor is a sad testimony of its obsession to project its
newsmen as modern day superheroes
into the line of fire — real or imaginary — to beat out its rivals and
improve its ratings. Contrast
Williams with Richard Engel of CNN,
who exposes himself to incredible,
real risk reporting from the hotspots
throughout the world.
Brian Williams was a larger-thanlife, charismatic, charming and talented newsman who had no need to
inflate his resume. It was ironic that

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Bill Silverfarb, Austin Walsh, Samantha
Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

he might have escaped scrutiny but
for a Chinook crew member who was
actively engaged in a real firefight —
who challenged Williams’ false
account. Unfortunately, lying has
become endemic. Leaders of our
biggest financial institutions have
told a lot of lies, and suffered no consequences. Elected leaders of our
nation have told a lot of lies that led
our nation into a protracted, expensive and deadly war — a war that led
directly to the birth of al-Qaida and
its progeny, the ISIL — and those
leaders suffered no consequences.
Remember Phil Donahue, whose show
was cancelled because of his opposi-

BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen
Kathleen Magana
Joe Rudino

Charles Gould
Paul Moisio

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Mari Andreatta
Robert Armstrong
Arianna Bayangos
Sanne Bergh
Kerry Chan
Caroline Denney
Darold Fredricks
Mayeesha Galiba
Dominic Gialdini
Tom Jung
Dave Newlands
Jeff Palter
Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner
Emily Shen
Samson So
Gary Whitman

Ricci Lam, Production Assistant
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

tion to the invasion of Iraq? 
The modern heroes of journalism,
the truth tellers, suffer jail time and
heavy fines — Alayne Fleischmann,
who exposed the financial shenanigans at JP Morgan, and James Risen,
the New York Times reporter who
exposed the NSA’s massive wiretapping. Editors and reporters have
repeatedly raised concerns of the lack
of access and transparency undermining journalism. It’s time to embrace
truth-telling and shun falsehood.

Jagjit Singh
Los Altos
OUR MISSION:
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accurate, fair and relevant local news source for
those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
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information resource in San Mateo County.
Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we
choose to reflect the diverse character of this
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9

Our collective journey

W

hat really makes you and I different from one
another? It goes without saying that you could
probably point out a number of differences for
which we are not concerned with here. I only raise the
question to draw your attention to the fact that we hear
this question posed much more frequently than we do
about our vast similarities — that is our collective successes, failures, vices, virtues and, perhaps most importantly, our cultural and historical journey through numerous challenges in our attempt to make the American dream
a reality.
Last Sunday, I toured the San Mateo County History
Museum. My favorite display is an exhibit entitled, “Land
of Opportunity: the Immigrant Experience in San Mateo
County.” This exhibit tells the stories of immigrants who
faced numerous hardships, but still found the faith and
resilience to make a place for themselves on the
Peninsula. The groups include the
Irish, Italians, Chinese, Japanese,
Mexicans, Portuguese and Filipinos.
The museum is currently working with
Stanford University to develop an
African-American exhibit.
Displaying everything from the
finest Chinese clothing to the vast cultural customs of the Irish, the large
hall unequivocally highlighted the
beauty in many cultures.
To the left wall behind the wondrous cultural displays
were long historic descriptions of the injustices faced by
many cultures in their efforts to achieve equal rights,
opportunity and ultimately the American dream. There are
an unfathomable number of hardships, racial injustices
and biased laws perpetrating prejudicial actions that made
it all but impossible for many of these cultures to make
the United States their home.
The Native Americans faced several fatal atrocities in
their attempt to maintain their culture and customs in
North America. According to Ward Churchill, a former professor of ethnic studies at the University of Colorado, the
North American Indian population declined from about 12
million in 1500 to under 240,000 in 1900 as a result of “a
vast genocide ... the most sustained on record.”
The Chinese immigrants also faced their fair share of
challenges. As the Chinese immigrants migrated to
California in the second half of the 19th century, Congress
enacted the Chinese Exclusion Act as the pinnacle symbol
of resistance to Chinese immigration in America.
The Immigration Restriction Act of 1924 placed barriers
on Jewish emigrants from entering the United States, even
through the heart of World War II — a time in which many
Jewish emigrants faced a life-or-death challenge in their
flight from extermination camps in Germany.
Of course, African-Americans have spent hundreds of
years fighting to secure fundamental rights — such as the
right to vote, the right to equal protection under the laws
and most notably the right to be free of involuntary servitude.
In spite of the countless injustices perpetuated on mass
ethnic groups destined to make the United States their
home, these groups collectively found within them a faith
and resurgence which enabled them to fight and endure for a
better day, albeit that day was nowhere in sight.
One of the most evident outcomes of the resilient human
spirit in such hardships was the creed of nationalism —
the strong pride and belief in one’s cultural heritage, traditions and customs. At the heart of nationalism is the belief
that what makes us very unique is the driving force
enabling each of us to triumph through what others may
call impossible odds.
As such, nationalism has and continues to be a great
focal point that gives cultures a sense of pride and
resilience. The problems arise when cultures allow the
love of their own culture to be accompanied by a distaste
for the culture and customs of others. From this phenomenon, we have witnessed racism, mass genocide, fascism
and slavery.
It goes without saying that no culture should wipe clean
from memory the injustices they have overcome, for it is
essential that each culture prevent those atrocities from
reoccurring in the future. That being said, it is equally
important to have an admiration and respect for each and
every culture, regardless of race, creed or circumstance. If
there is anything that history teaches us, it is that the survival of humanity has the greatest outcome when we can
cherish what binds us together — be it our collective journey of challenges or triumphs — more than the many differences that drive us apart.
Yes, we are all different. And yet, we are all the same. It
is embracing our differences, however, which should make
us appreciate the uniquity in all cultures, and in turn — the
similarities that bind us together.

Online edition at scribd.com/smdailyjournal
• Emailed documents are preferred:
letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a
month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and
perspectives are those of the individual writer and do
not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal
staff.

Correction Policy

The Daily Journal corrects its errors.
If you question the accuracy of any article in the Daily
Journal, please contact the editor at
news@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.

A former Assembly candidate, Jonathan Madison work ed as
professional policy staff for the U.S. House of
Representativ es, Committee on Financial Serv ices, for two
y ears. Jonathan currently work s as a law clerk at Fried &
Williams, LLP during his second y ear of law school.
Jonathan can be reached at jmadison@friedwilliams.com.

10

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Europe stocks lower, Asia up on Japan recession end
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON — European stocks edged lower
on Monday as investors were skeptical that
Greece and its European creditors would find
a quick deal to solve the country’s debt
problems. Asian stocks, however, closed
higher after Japan emerged from recession.
KEEPING SCORE: Germany’s DAX fell
0. 4 percent to close at 10, 923. 23 and
France’s CAC 40 dropped 0.2 percent to
4,751.95. Britain’s FTSE 100 inched down
0.2 percent to 6,857.05. In Asia, Tokyo’s
Nikkei 225 jumped 0. 5 percent to
18,004.77 and the Shanghai Composite
Index added 0.6 percent to 3,222.36. Hong
Kong’s Hang Seng gained 0.2 percent to
24,726.50. Wall Street is closed for a public holiday.
GREEK TENSIONS: Eurozone finance
ministers meet Monday to consider
Greece’s proposal for short-term “bridge
financing” without the onerous terms previously imposed on the country until a
longer-term solution to Greece’s crushing
debt is found. Investors hope an agreement
will be reached to avoid Greece’s exit from
the euro. Germany’s finance minister on
Monday said a quick deal on Monday is
unlikely. That pushed Athens’ stock index
down almost 4 percent.
JAPAN REBOUND: Asia was buoyed

by news Japan emerged from recession last
quarter, even though growth fell short of
many forecasters’ expectations. Data on
Monday showed the world’s third-largest
economy grew at a 2.2 percent annualized
rate in the three months ending in October,
boosted by exports and public spending.
Growth for 2014 was flat and real wages
fell 0.1 percent. Private investment was
anemic, suggesting that businesses and
households still are cautious. Japan’s
economy slipped into recession last year
after the government increased sales tax in
April.
THE QUOTE: “The fact that the economic growth started stabilizing should be reassuring to both the government and the Bank
of Japan,” said economist Yoshiro Sato of
Credit Agricole-CIB in a report. “That said,
the level of real GDP is still far below that
before the consumption tax hike and that
will require continued efforts made by the
government side in terms of structural
reforms.”
ENERGY: U.S. benchmark crude was up
22 cents at $53.00 per barrel in electronic
trading on the New York Mercantile
Exchange. The contract gained $1.57 on
Friday to close at $52.78.
CURRENCIES: The dollar dropped to
118.48 yen from 118.76 yen late Friday.
The euro was steady at $1.1390.

JetBlue’s CEO tries to appease
passengers and Wall Street
By Scott Mayerowitz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Robin Hayes, the new CEO
of JetBlue Airways, is balancing between
passengers and Wall Street.
As he takes control of the New York-based
airline Monday, Hayes faces a difficult task:
increase profits without destroying the culture that has made JetBlue stand out from
other U.S. airlines.
JetBlue, after all, was the first carrier to
give passengers free live TV at each seat and
is still known for its friendly employees.
For years, the airline has resisted charging
for a first checked bag and boasted the most
generous legroom in the industry. But,
while the airline remained profitable, it
lagged behind competitors. Wall Street
demanded change.
To appease investors, Hayes recently
announced that JetBlue will add a fee this
spring for the first checked suitcase — a
move estimated to bring in an extra $200

million annually by 2017. It will also add
15 more seats on most of its jets. That
should increase the profit per flight, but
passengers will lose some personal space.
To the airline’s fans, those were jarring
decisions. Hayes stayed up until 3 a.m. personally answering the flood of emails.
“People are so passionate about the
JetBlue brand and the JetBlue story. They are
very protective of it,” Hayes says. “I see
that as a good thing.”
Hayes, 48, was chosen in September to
replace outgoing CEO Dave Barger. He is
more receptive to investors than Barger, but
JetBlue prides itself on doing right by workers and passengers. So, following the lead
of his predecessors, Hayes flies to Orlando,
Florida every two weeks to welcome new
hires at the airline’s orientation and training program. And while he’s cramming
more seats into planes, the passengers sitting in them will be getting larger TV
screens and almost three times as many
channels.

REUTERS

A man holding his mobile phone walks past an electronic board showing the stock market
indices of various countries outside a brokerage in Tokyo, Japan.

Hackers’ $1B bank theft
may impact consumers
By Josh Boak
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The hacker gang that
looted as much as $1 billion worldwide
from banks was unusual: It stole directly
from the banks, instead of ripping off their
customers.
But this was hardly a bit of Robin Hood
banditry that spared innocent account holders. Security experts say consumers still
need to keep a close eye on their checking
and savings, as epic computer breaches
such as this theft — documented in a report
issued Monday — are becoming all too
common.
“Customers are still at risk,” said Sergey
Golovanov, a researcher at the Russian
cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab that
released the report. “Criminals had access
to all banking infrastructure, so they were
able to get any data about customers.”
Doug Johnson, senior vice president at
the American Bankers Association, said
there’s no evidence that any U.S. bank has
been a victim of this particular breach.
Still, the report found that some of the proceeds were deposited with banks in China
and the United States.
The hacks detailed in the report, which
was presented at a security conference in
Cancun, Mexico, are the latest twist on data
breaches that have struck not just banks but
the health insurer Anthem and major retailers such as Target and Home Depot. And just

like those thefts, experts say there are simple protections that consumers can take.
For starters, most American bank customers are insured against theft by the
Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. The insurance applies to any sum up to $250,000 in
checking, a savings account or a certificate
of deposit at a U.S. bank.
Still, more people have become vigilant
about monitoring their transactions and
responding to alerts from their banks if a
charge or withdrawal appears to be suspicious.
“We all look at our bank statements a hell
of a lot more carefully than 20 years ago,”
said John Gunn, vice president of communications at VASCO Data Security, which provides authentication software for financial
institutions.
There are other simple moves that individuals can do to guard their financial data,
said Stu Sjouwerman, founder of the data
security firm KnowBe4.
Even if it appears to be from their bank,
people should never open email attachments that they didn’t request. Nor should
they click on links inside emails, but
instead type the name of their bank into the
Web browser address bar. And they should
only provide a Social Security number or
account information over the phone on
calls that they initiated.
“Those are the normal things you would
recommend consumers to use,” Sjouwerman
said.

Your investments shouldn’t be a

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HONOR ROLL: THE WEEK’S BEST PERFORMANCES BY SAN MATEO COUNTY PREP ATHLETES >> PAGE 12

<<< Page 15, Show dogs take
over Madison Square Garden
Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

Dragons anticipate good draw in Burlingame
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Yes, as a matter of fact, there is now a professional sports team in San Mateo County.
With Burlingame Dragons FC set to begin
its inaugural season at Burlingame High
School, the organization held a meet-andgreet with fans at the Slake Agency in downtown Burlingame Monday evening.
Dragons head coach Dana Taylor was hand
for a Q-and-A with San Jose Earthquakes
defenseman Jordan Stewart as well as to

Dana Taylor

field questions from fans.
With team officials on
hand decked out in a
regalia of emerald greenand-jet black — the
Dragons’ team colors —
the mission of bringing
a Player Development
League team to San
Mateo County is on the
verge of being accom-

plished.
According to Taylor, approximately 920

season tickets have already been purchased
for the regular season, which sees its
Southwestern Division home schedule open
May 23 against Fresno Fuego. The recently
refurbished football-and-soccer complex at
Burlingame High School seats upwards of
4,000 people; and Taylor is already thinking big after the team — as the San Jose
Earthquakes PDL 23U squad — played at Cal
State Stanislaus last year, where it drew
approximately 325 fans per game, according to Taylor.
“I think that should be the goal, is to go

Businger breaks loose
Athlete of the Week

By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Riding a three-game winning streak into last
Friday’s season finale wasn’t enough for Mills.
The Vikings new they needed to score a win over
archrival Capuchino to qualify for the Peninsula
Athletic League playoffs. Mills and Cap entered into
play tied for third place in the PAL North, one game
ahead of Carlmont. With four teams from the PAL
South qualifying, the winner was to gain thoroughfare
via a third-place finish while the loser would tie
Carlmont and be out of the playoff tourney, as both
Cap and Mills lost to the Scots earlier this season.
So, Mills’ star sophomore Aubrie Businger did what
great players do in big games — she went off. Scoring
29 points and grabbing 15 rebounds, Businger led
Mills to a 51-50 win.
“She was unbelievable,” Mills head coach Dave
Matsu said. “I’ve got to believe she’s one of the best
players in the league.”
A second-year varsity starter, Businger notched a
new career-high with her 29-point outburst. In fact, it
is the second highest point total the 5-10 center has
ever scored in an organized basketball game.
Her lifetime high?
A 32-point performance in a 32-30 overtime win to
claim the championship of the Millbrae School
District — in fourth grade at Greenhill Elementary
School.
Businger wasn’t able to score all of Mills’ points
last Friday as she did for Greenhill. Still, her performance was pretty special, although she didn’t realize
how special at the time, she said.
“I didn’t really think I had 29 points to be honest,”
Businger said. “I thought I only had 10 or 12 until
after when my dad told me.”
Family basketball is how Businger found her passion for the game. A good, old-fashioned regulation
court in her driveway is where she grew up playing
against her brother Daniel. Once the two reached high
school, Daniel went his own way, opting to pursue his
passion for drama. He was recently in Mills’ whimsical take on Shakespeare in the winter play, “Macbeth
Did It.”
Businger, however, dove headfirst into athletics. A
two-sport athlete, she also cracked the starting lineup
with the Mills varsity softball team as a freshman.
But it was on the basketball court where she was soon
to revolutionize the Vikings starting five, even after a

out and set a new attendance record as far as
the PDL goes,” Taylor said.
Taylor is entering his fourth year with the
organization. He has an extensive coaching
background in the collegiate ranks, having
served as an assistant at Creighton
University before moving to Oregon State
as head coach for 10 seasons.
“I’ve been all over the place,” Taylor said.
“I’ve been known for taking teams and
building teams.”

See DRAGONS, Page 12

Winter playoffs
open with PAL
hoops tourney

B

COURTESY OF JOE GIBBS

Sophomore Aubrie Businger led Mills to a 51-50 win over Capuchino last Friday to
See AOTW, Page 12 clinch a spot in the PAL tourney. Businger had 29 points and 15 rebounds in the game.

elieve it or not, the winter sports
season is rapidly coming to a
close as the postseason gets
underway for basketball, soccer and
wrestling.
While the Central Coast Section basketball and soccer tournaments won’t
begin until next week, Peninsula Athletic
League fans can get an early playoff fix
with the PAL basketball tournament this
week. Quarterfinal games tipoff
Wednesday, with the semifinals and finals
Friday and
Saturday, respectively, at Mills.
So, of course,
everyone will ask me
who will win. If
you’ve followed me
at all over the years,
I tend to stay away
from predicting winners. The last thing I
need is someone giving me grief because
I get them wrong.
What I will do, however, is sort of handicap the PAL boys’ and girls’ tournaments
and give a good idea of what to expect.
On the boys’ side, Half Moon Bay
would have been a prohibitive favorite,
but the Cougars were nicked Friday night
in a loss to Terra Nova that prevented
them from finishing the regular season
with an unblemished record and the outright PAL North championship, which
they shared with the Tigers. Now that the
Cougars have proved to be human, I
think it opens up the tournament for
some interesting matchups.
Remember, Half Moon Bay was on pace to
win last year’s tournament until the Cougars
were knocked off by Mills in the semis.
That being said, the Cougars are still
one of the teams to beat. There are few
teams in the PAL that can matchup with
their length. But they are vulnerable in

See LOUNGE, Page 14

Armstrong loses $10 million arbitration ruling
By Jim Vertuno
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

AUSTIN, Texas — An arbitration panel
ordered Lance Armstrong and Tailwind
Sports Corp. to pay $10 million in a fraud
dispute with a promotions company for
what it called an “unparalleled pageant of
international perjury, fraud and conspiracy”
that covered up his use of performanceenhancing drugs.
Dallas-based SCA Promotions announced
the 2-1 decision against the former cyclist
when its lawyers said Monday they had

asked Texas’ 116th Civil
District Court in Dallas
to confirm the arbitration ruling, dated Feb. 4.
The panel included a neutral chairman, who ruled
in favor of SCA, and one
person selected by each
side.
Tim Herman, a lawyer
Lance
for
Armstrong, insisted
Armstrong
the ruling is contrary to
Texas law and predicted it will be overturned
by a judge.

SCA paid Armstrong and Tailwind, the
since-dissolved team management company, about $12 million in bonuses during
Armstrong’s career, when he won seven
Tour de France titles. Those victories were
stripped after Armstrong and his U.S. Postal
Service teams were found to have used
banned performance-enhancing drugs.
SCA disputed the bonuses in arbitration in
2005, and the case produced the foundation
of the doping evidence later used against
him. Despite allegations of cheating,
Armstrong continued to deny doping and
the company settled with Armstrong and

paid him $7 million in 2006.
The company sued Armstrong to get its
money back after Armstrong’s cheating was
exposed by a report from the U.S. AntiDoping Agency and a televised confession
interview with Oprah Winfrey.
The case was sent back to the original
arbitration panel of independent chairman
Richard Faulkner, SCA selection Richard
Chernick and Armstrong pick Ted Lyon.
In the 2005 arbitration hearings,
Armstrong testified under oath that he did

See LANCE, Page 14

12

SPORTS

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

Former A’s great
Giambi bows out
after 20 seasons
By Tom Withers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND — Jason Giambi is retiring
after 20 seasons in the majors.
The 2000 AL MVP announced his decision
Monday in a statement that was first sent to
the New York Daily News. He ends his career
as one of 20 players in history with at least
400 home runs, 1, 400
RBIs, 1, 200 runs and
1, 300 walks. The 44year-old played for
Oakland, the New York
Yankees, Colorado and
Cleveland.
Following last season,
Giambi said he would disJason Giambi cuss with his family
whether to keep playing.
The longtime slugger appeared in just 26
games for the Indians in 2014.
A five-time All-Star and fearsome power
hitter, Giambi batted .277 in his career with
440 home runs and 1,441 RBIs. He had a
.399 on-base percentage and slugged .516.
The first baseman was also tarnished by
his involvement in the BALCO performance-enhancing drugs investigation. He
never publicly admitted using PEDs, but has
apologized for past actions.
“I want to thank the fans for being a part
of this incredible journey,” Giambi said in
his statement. “I especially want to thank
the fans that gave me a second chance to let
me show you the human being you see
today.”
Despite the PED scandal, Giambi
remained a popular and well-respected player in clubhouses around the majors — especially his own. Before joining the Indians
in 2013, he was a finalist for Colorado’s
managerial job.
Indians President Mark Shapiro tweeted,
“An honor to have had G in the Tribe. A generous, wise spirit with so much to offer. True
pro.”
In his statement, Giambi also thanked
everyone from his family and agents to the
media, his managers and coaches — even
the companies that supplied his baseball
equipment.
“Ever since I was 5 years old, all I ever
wanted to be was a Major League Baseball
player,” he said. “To the game of baseball: I
started playing you when I was a kid and I’m
leaving you a man. Thank you.”

R

ub e n Ro me ro , Cap uc h i n o
bo y s ’ s o ccer. The sophomore
striker scored both goals in the
Mustangs’ 2-2 with Aragon, which put a
serious crimp in the Dons’ PAL Ocean
Division title chances.
Brando n Mats uno , Mi l l s bo y s ’ bas ketbal l . Matsuno scored 14 points in a 5043 win over Sequoia which moved the
Vikings into first place in the PAL South.
The Vikings captured the PAL South title
Friday night with a 53-24 win over
Capuchino.
Co nno r Mo s es , Sacred Heart Prep
bo y s ’ bas ketbal l . Moses continues to
light it up for the Gators. He went for 20
points in a 60-46 win over King’s Academy
and followed that with a 23-point performance in a 64-57 win over rival Menlo
School.
Co rbi n Ko ch, Sacred Heart Prep
bo y s ’ bas ketbal l . Koch scored 15 points
in a 60-46 win over King’s Academy and
came back with 22 points in s 64-57 win

AOTW
Continued from page 11
freshman season in which her senior-heavy
team went 11-1 en route to a PAL South
Division co-championship.
“She was a huge part because she did all the
little things,” Matsu said. “She was asked to
score in key positions … she was taking on
18-year-olds when she was a 14-year-old. She
was an integral part of success last year.”
As a freshman, however, Businger had a far
different role than this year. Ranking fourth

DRAGONS
Continued from page 11
It is against some of those very college
teams against which the Dragons will cut
their teeth to open the training camp preseason. Although the team already has one
scrimmage under its belt, the exhibition
season officially starts March 5 at
University of Pacific. The first official
exhibition home game is slated for April 3
against Cal State Stanislaus.
The Dragons will also host local smallcollege programs, including the Division II

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Honor roll
over Menlo School.
Mo rg an To mberl i n, Hal f Mo o n Bay
g i rl s ’ b as k e t b al l . The senior sharpshooter scored 12 points in last Friday’s
56-40 win over rival Terra Nova. With the
Cougars holding just a 28-23 edge at halftime, Tomberlin caught fire to start the second half, hitting three 3-pointers in the
third quarter in which Half Moon Bay
outscored Terra Nova 18-4.
Ti m An de rs o n , Me n l o - At h e rt o n
bo y s ’ bas ketbal l . Anderson scored a
team-high 14 points in the Bears’ 56-34
win over Woodside.
Bri anna Rey no l ds , Arag o n g i rl s ’
bas ketbal l . Reynolds poured in 24 points
in a 55-47 win over Carlmont.
Auro ra Lo pez, Wo o ds i de g i rl s ’ bas ketbal l . Lopez scored a game-high 16
points in the Wildcats’ 61-32 loss to
Menlo-Atherton.

Bi l l y Mas o n, Arag o n bo y s ’ bas ketbal l . Mason led all scorers with 24 points
in the Dons’ 57-53 win over rival Hillsdale.
Mari o Ro dri g uez, Menl o -Atherto n
b o y s ’ s o c c e r. Rodriguez scored three
times in the Bears’ 6-1 rout of Sequoia.
Mi a S h e n k , S ac re d He art Pre p
g i rl s ’ s o ccer. Shenk scored four goals and
had an assist in a pair of wins for the firstplace Gators. She had a goal and an assist in
a 4-1 win over Menlo School and followed
that with a hat trick in an 8-1 win over Notre
Dame-SJ.
Eri c Dal e, Terra No v a bo y s ’ bas ketbal l . While the senior only scored two
points last Friday night, his bucket proved
the game-winner shot in a 46-45 victory
over archrival Half Moon Bay. Dale has
played sparingly this season, having
entered the game with 22 points in 22
games. But his jumper from just inside the
3-point arc was the backbreaker in Half
Moon Bay’s first loss of the season.

on the Vikings in scoring, she had one main
job. And she knew well what that job was —
rebounding. She went on to lead Mills in the
category with just shy of 200 rebounds on the
2013-14 season.
“Last year I didn’t get to touch the ball a
lot,” Businger said. “But this year they’re
looking for me every time we go down the
court.”
This season, Businger averaged a doubledouble throughout the regular season with
13.5 points per game and 10.7 rebounds a
game. The scary part is she has two years to
grow, both as a player and in stature.
“I bet by the time the time she graduates
she’ll be 6 feet,” Matsu said.

With Wednesday’s PAL tourney opener at
Half Moon Bay, Matsu — who has gone to
the Central Coast Section playoffs in each of
his nine years at Mills — said his team is
amped for the postseason.

Notre Dame de Namur squad April 10 and the
NAIA Menlo College squad April 18. Taylor
said he parsed together an exhibition schedule with the intent of his team encountered
varying styles of play.
“I’m looking for different kinds of looks
that will then simulate what we’re going to
see with the different types of teams,”
Taylor said. “Some teams are very slow,
methodical with their buildup. Other teams
are just in your face. So, that’s why I scheduled the games.”
With that, the final exhibition game
against Stanford May 9 at Burlingame was
intentionally configured to lead into the
regular season, Taylor said.
“We’re going to open up at Fresno and

they get a huge crowd,” Taylor said. “So, I
hope they’re busting down the gate to get
all the people in there so it really replicates
what we’re going to feel in there.”
The Dragons have yet to announce their
roster, but Taylor said five players from last
year’s squad are expected to return this season. Fifteen new players are available to
commit, Taylor said. While some PDL teams
carry upwards of 40 players, Taylor said he
prefers to trim the Dragons roster to no
more than 27 players.
When asked about potential on-field tactical strategies, Taylor tended towards the
whimsical.
“I’m going to put 11 guys out on the pitch
— that much I know for sure,” he said.

“They’re very excited,” he said. “Especially
after winning a close and hard-fought game
Friday night.”
Businger played it cool though, because
down-to-earth is just more her style.
“It’s just another game,” Businger said.
“You just have to go out there and play. It
doesn’t matter who you’re going to play. You
just have to go out there and play hard.”

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

13

Steady Snedeker sees a payoff Stadium project
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PEBBLE BEACH — Brandt Snedeker finds
something that works and sticks with it.
He picked up a putter in 2005 on the
Nationwide Tour and it has been with him
since, except for a short separation last summer when the putts stopped falling. Snedeker,
like most golfers, felt as if he needed to teach
it a lesson and try something new. Actually,
he wanted to teach “her” a lesson. And how
did he choose the gender?
“She’s done pretty well over the last nine
years, so I feel like it’s a marriage at this
point,” he said.
His driver is made by a company that seems
to promote something new every other
month, and yet Snedeker is still using one
made in 2010. In this era of technology, that
practically makes it a relic. And those irons?
He’s been using those since before Jordan
Spieth came out on tour.
The equipment editor for Golf Digest figured out the resale value for the putter and the
driver combined would be $34.
“That wouldn’t shock me,” Snedeker said.
“If you see any more, I’m willing to buy them
for that.”
That shouldn’t be a problem for Snedeker,
who used them all quite handily and set the
tournament scoring record for the second time
in three years when he won the AT&T Pebble
Beach National Pro-Am on Sunday. The victory was worth just over $1.2 million.
It was valuable in so many other ways.
For starters, it made him relevant again, a
term Snedeker used when he realized at the
start of the year he was no longer eligible for
the events that attract the world’s best play-

ers. The seventh career
victory got him into the
Masters and the PGA
Championship, and by
moving up to a No. 31
world ranking, he can
count on the four World
Golf
Championships,
along with starting next
year in Kapalua.
Brandt
More than that, howevSnedeker
er, it justified a decision
last summer to get away from something that
had been working well.
He changed coaches.
Snedeker had been with Todd Anderson
since the end of 2005 — about as long as he’s
had that putter — and he won six PGA Tour
events and over $20 million in earnings,
which doesn’t include the $10 million bonus
from his FedEx Cup title in 2012 right before
he played in his first Ryder Cup. Golf can get
stale, however, and it was a big move for
Snedeker to seek out Butch Harmon a week
before the U.S. Open.
“A class act,” Harmon said Sunday night.
“It’s fun working with him. He has a quick
wit, which fits with me. And he works hard.
He was really good at one time and he got
lost. I helped him find his way. Sometimes
it’s more than just the X’s and O’s of the
swing.”
Results were far from immediate. Snedeker
had his worst year on tour and for the first
time didn’t make it beyond the second FedEx
Cup playoff event. Tom Watson wanted him
on the Ryder Cup team for his putting, but
Snedeker played his way out of the conversation.
But he kept working away, never losing

hope he would turn it around. The payoff was
a week at Pebble Beach that was close to perfect, and not just the weather. Snedeker made
one bogey in 72 holes. When he wasn’t at his
best, he figured out how to manage.
“He did a great job of helping me understand
how I swing the golf club, what I need to do to
be successful,” Snedeker said. “The great
thing about Butch is he’s not technical at all.
He instills confidence in you when you don’t
even realize he’s doing it. We might have a
three-hour practice session and he might say
one thing about my swing and 15 things
about the mental side of it, what you should
be thinking in certain situations.”
Harmon treated Snedeker like any other of
his clients. There were a few technical issues
— his swing was getting out of position and
too long at the top — but the goal was for
Snedeker to understand the swing and how to
fix it.
The other message from Harmon was to
develop a safe shot when the swing doesn’t
feel right. For Snedeker, that was teeing the
ball lower and getting on top of the ball
sooner, a shot that helped him on the back
nine when he seized control and wanted to
keep it.
Harmon loves the old-school work ethic of
Snedeker. He also loves the refreshing pace
with which he plays the game. Snedeker talks
fast and walks even faster. He gives his hips a
quick swivel as he sets up over the ball —
maybe that activates his glutes — and pulls
the trigger. Standing over putts, he keeps his
eye on the hole as he takes five or six short,
repetitive practice strokes, and then he steps
over the ball and gives it a pop.
That part about him never seems to change.
And it appears to be working again.

Study: educated youth football coaches can cut injuries
By Michael Marot
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

INDIANAPOLIS — A new study shows
young football players are less likely to get
hurt or sustain head injuries when playing
for coaches who have been trained in teaching proper tackling fundamentals.
Last fall, researchers at the Indianapolisbased Datalys Center for Sports Injury
Research and Prevention collected data from
2,108 football players ages 5 to 15. The
organization monitored injuries of 100
teams in 10 youth leagues and four states.
The data showed players who competed
for coaches with training in USA Football’s
“Heads-Up Football” program are better
protected than those who did not.
USA Football, the sport’s national gov-

erning body, commissioned the study.
The data show that
players in Heads-Up
leagues were 34 percent
less likely to get a concussion in practice, 29
percent less likely to get
a concussion in a game
Tom Dompier and could greatly reduce
the amount of significant
head impacts each season, perhaps by an
average of 90 fewer hits per season.
Dr. Tom Dompier, the president of Datalys
and the study’s chief researcher, believes the
information is so convincing, he’s putting it
to use in his own household. The full results
are expected to be released later Monday.
“My son is 6 and he played (flag) football

last year and probably will this year. If he
does play tackle football next year, it will
be under two conditions. One is whether we
can find equipment that fits and the second
condition is that the league will have to go
through Heads-Up Football,” he told The
Associated Press. “After going through
these three years of study, I believe that
coaching education should be mandatory.”
Datalys had previously collected data
from about 4,000 youth players in 2012 and
2013. The three-year totals show that 2.8
percent of players ages 5 to 15 were actually diagnosed with concussions and that
only one player in the 5 to 7-year-old age
group actually sustained a concussion during that span.

See YOUTH, Page 16

gave over $100K
to local officials
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — The development company that is moving quickly on a plan to
build a stadium that could host a Southern
California NFL team has given more than
$118,000 in campaign contributions to officials in the city where it would be located.
Campaign finance forms show the bulk of
the money went to Inglewood Mayor James
T. Butts Jr., a major supporter of the stadium
plan, the Los Angeles Times reported
Monday (http://lat.ms/1ziNcDW ).
San Francisco-based Hollywood Park
Land Co. is developing the proposed
80,000-seat stadium on the site of the former Hollywood Park horse racing track. St.
Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke has been a
partner in the company since last year.
The contributions came during four different campaigns starting in 2006, well before
the recent stadium proposal, though the
group has long planned a retail and residential development on the site. The rest of the
donations went to a pair of city councilmen.
The plan has been moving quickly since it
was proposed in January.
On Thursday, election officials verified
that enough petition signatures had been
gathered for the stadium plan to go before
voters. The vote has not scheduled but could
come this month. It would allow the developers to avoid potentially thorny environmental reviews that could extend for months
or years.
Butts said the contributions have not
influenced the speed of the project.
“Won’t it be unusual if somebody who had
so many projects in a community, that they
won’t want to exercise their free speech to
try and ensure that people are in government
that have good governing sense and business skills?” Butts told the Times. “I would
find that unusual if they didn’t.”
Chris Meany, who is part of the development project, said, “It’s normal and customary for big property owners to be supportive
of the city.”
Meanwhile, the San Diego Chargers on
Monday issued a stern warning to their own
City Hall as they look to replace their aging
Qualcomm Stadium.
At t o rn ey Mark Fab i an i , wh o ’s h an dling the team’s stadium push, said there
might not be a publicly acceptable solution to replace aging Qualcomm, and the
team is keeping “a close eye on developments in LA. ”

14

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

SPORTS

Love to return as
Ryder Cup captain

LOUNGE

By Doug Ferguson

the backcourt, which is where a lot of
other teams excel.
Half Moon Bay opens the tournament against Menlo-Atherton, the
fourth-place team out of the PAL
South, with a potential semifinal
matchup against Sequoia.
Mills, the No. 1 seed from the PAL
South, features arguably one of the
best all-around players in the PAL in
forward/guard Marquis Adkins. Adkins
can fill the stat sheet and when things
get tough, look for Adkins to be the
triggerman to the Vikings’ offense.
Mills opens the tournament against
Westmoor.
If you go strictly by the chalk,
Mills and Half Moon Bay should meet
in the championship game. But the
chalk seldom holds and don’t be surprised to see just about anyone in the
finals. Even if Mills does get by
Westmoor, the Vikings would face
either defending champ Burlingame or
PAL North co-champion Terra Nova.
Neither of those teams will be an easy
out.
Half Moon Bay, if it wins, would be
looking at a semifinal matchup
against Sequoia or Jefferson. I’m
guessing no one wants to face the
Cherokees and their outside-inside
combo of 6-6 guard Chris Bene and 6-

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Davis Love III is getting another shot as
U.S. captain in the Ryder Cup.
Two people familiar with the decision told The Associated
Press on Monday night that the PGA of America has selected
Love as captain for the 2016 matches at
Hazeltine. They spoke on condition of
anonymity because it has not been
announced.
Golf Channel first reported that Love will
be the next captain.
He is to be introduced on Feb. 24, when
the Honda Classic is held at PGA headquarters in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida.
Love led the Americans to a 10-6 lead at
Davis Love III
Medinah in 2012 until Ian Poulter and
Europe staged an improbable rally and matched the greatest
comeback in Ryder Cup history.
This will be the second straight Ryder Cup that the U.S. gets
a repeat captain, and it didn’t go so well the previous time. Tom
Watson, at 65, was the oldest Ryder Cup captain and returned
after a 21-year absence.

Continued from page 11

LANCE
Continued from page 11
not use performance-enhancing drugs.
“Perjury must never be profitable,”
the majority wrote in the new decision. “Tailwind Sports Corp. and
Lance Armstrong have justly earned
wide public condemnation. That is an
inadequate deterrent.
Deception
demands real, meaningful sanctions.”
SCA President and founder Bob
Hamman praised the ruling.
“It is hard to describe how much
harm Lance Armstrong’s web of lies
caused SCA but this is a good first start
toward repairing that damage, ”
Hamman said.

THE DAILY JOURNAL
4 freshman center Ziggy Lauese. Half
Moon Bay might be one of the few
teams who can legitimately matchup
up with the Cherokees and if a Half
Moon Bay-Sequoia semifinal does
materialize, it could be one of the
most fun games of the tournament.
On the girls’ side, defending tournament champion Westmoor has to be
the odds-on favorite to repeat. The
Rams have won back-to-back PAL
North titles and have arguably the
best player in the league in points
guard Yazmeen Goo, who helped lead
the Rams to an undefeated run in
league play.
Westmoor opens the tournament
against Carlmont.
After Westmoor, it’s kind of a toss
up. If you’re looking for a team out of
the PAL South, Menlo-Atherton and
Hillsdale, which finished 1-2 in the
PAL South standings, respectively,
both have a legitimate shot to
advance to the finals.
The Knights, however, will have a
task in the first round facing Terra
Nova, which had won the previous
four PAL tournament titles before
Westmoor won in 2014.
Menlo-Atherton appears to have
the best shot at meeting the Rams in
the finals. The Bears may be the deepest team in the league and have the
outside-inside game to make some
noise. The post combination of Greer
Hoyem and Ofa Sili make the Bears a
nightmare to guard and they have a
bevy of guards who all average around
eight to 10 points a game.
Armstrong argued his original settlement could not be overturned under
state law. The arbitration majority said
the $10 million was a penalty for
Armstrong’s lying and efforts to
intimidate or coerce witnesses in the
previous case.
“This award is unprecedented, ”
Herman said.
Herman noted Lyon’s dissent said
the panel was not deceived in the original settlement when it signed off on a
voluntary agreement entered by SCA.
“There is no Texas case or statute
that allows for this type of sanctions
motion nine years after the award was
given,” Lyon wrote in his dissent.
Lyon’s dissent also attacked SCA,
writing that in 2005 the arbitration
panel had found the company to have
engaged in selling insurance in Texas

The sleeper in the tournament is
probably Mills, which has arguably
the best 1-2 punch in the PAL in post
player Julia Gibbs and guard Aubrie
Businger. Businger averages a doubledouble and she had her two best game
of the season last week, combining to
score 47 points, including 29 in an
overtime win over Capuchino,  and
pulled down 28 rebounds. If the
Vikings can get a consistent third
option, don’t be surprised to see them
in the finals.
***
Earlier this season, Serra coach
Chuck Rapp reached the 300-win
plateau. Friday, another area coach
reached a milestone. Terra Nova coach
Kenny Milch picked up the 200th win
of his coaching career when his
Tigers upset Half Moon Bay on a lastsecond shot to claim a share of the
PAL North title, along with the
Cougars.
It was only appropriate his 200th
win came against Half Moon Bay,
considering the first 133 wins of his
career came during his eight-year stint
with the Cougars. He then moved up
the coast to take over the Terra Nova
program and over the last five years
has won 67 games.

Nathan Mollat can reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
344-5200 ext. 117. You can follow him on
Twitter@CheckkThissOutt.

without a license, which could have
exposed it to more than $22 million in
damages under Armstrong’s original
claims.
“No party in this case came here
with clean hands,” Lyon wrote.
“The final decision by the panel
reminds me about the ‘do right rule.’ It
doesn’t matter what the law is, let’s
just do what is right,” Lyon wrote.
“Arbitrators, like judges, don’t have
that luxury, and the Panel exceeded its
authority by indulging itself here.”
Armstrong also is being sued by the
federal government and former teammate Floyd Landis in a whistleblower
fraud action over his team’s sponsorship contract with the Postal Service.
That case is not set to go to trial
before 2016.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

15

Pups on parade at Westminster dog show
By Ben Walker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — True to his breed, Matisse
the Portuguese water dog likes to play in the
koi fish pond. He enjoys going on long
bicycle runs, chewing Benny Bully’s liver
treats and falling asleep on his back.
Pretty standard stuff for a lot of pooches.
Oh, he also got a holiday card from the
White House.
So perhaps it was only fitting Monday
that when the Westminster Kennel Club dog
show started on Presidents Day, the Portie
who’s a cousin to Obama family pet Sunny
was the early favorite.
“He’s a real dog. He likes to play, he likes
to get dirty,” co-owner Milan Lint said. “He
just cleans up really well.”
At 3 1/2 years old, Matisse indeed has
cleaned up. This is the 400th event he’s
entered — he’s won best in show 238 times,
among the most in canine history.
“Spectacular dog, ” praised popular
Westminster television host David Frei.
On a frigid day in New York, Matisse got
to rest as many of the 2,711 dogs in 192
breeds and varieties stepped into the judging ring at Piers 92 and 94, the exhibition
space stretching into the icy Hudson River.
A shih tzu called Rocket co-owned by
famed and infamous heiress Patty Hearst
won the toy group Monday night at
Madison Square Garden. Swagger the old
English sheepdog, who finished second at
Westminster in 2013, took the herding
group.
Crowd-pleasing beagle Miss P was the
best hound and Flame the standard poodle
won in the nonsporting category.
Matisse is in the working group, which
he’s won the past two years at Westminster.
The sporting, working and terrier winners
will be selected Tuesday night, with retired

MIKE SEGAR/REUTERS

Swagger, an Old English Sheepdog, walks with his co-owner and handler Colton Johnson during
Monday’s judging in the Herding Group at the 139th Westminster Kennel Club's Dog Show.
California trial-court judge David Merriam
choosing the best in show right before 11
p.m.
“At this point, we’re just focused on getting him to the ring healthy and happy,”
Lint said. “The results are the results.”
Matisse definitely knows his way around
the ring. The nation’s top-winning show
dog in 2014 likes to entertain his fans. He

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often gets into the “downward dog” yoga
position, stretching his back, as he
approaches the judge.
He has that “hard to identify quality, that
je ne sais quoi,” Lint said.
Lint also was one of the breeders for
Sunny, who in 2013 joined another Portie
named Bo as a pet for President Barack
Obama and his family.

Sunny and Matisse have never met. Not
yet, anyway. But who knows? A few months
after Uno the beagle won Westminster in
2008, he visited President George W. Bush
at the White House.
With a black, curly coat and a spirited
temperament, Matisse mirrors the standards
for an ideal Portuguese water dog. His hair is
done in a traditional lion clip for the breed,
with the muzzle and hindquarters trimmed
close.
Officially, he’s GCh — grand champion,
in dog parlance — Claircreek Impression De
Mattise. Co-owner Donna Gottdenker, an
art lover, named him for famed French artist
Henri Matisse. Peggy Helming is the third
co-owner,
having
co-owned 2004
Westminster
winner
Josh
the
Newfoundland.
Even though the No. 1-rated show dog
wins less than half the time at the Garden,
the math for Matisse is formidable.
Lint, who works in the financial world,
keeps a spreadsheet that documents
Matisse’s previous 399 career shows: 396
wins in the breed round, 332 victories in the
group competition.
“There are certainly characteristics of the
individual exhibit that have driven him to
this degree of winning,” Lint said. “It doesn’t defy the imagination or explanation, but
those are very impressive totals.”
Living in Chesapeake City, Maryland,
and guided by expert handler Michael Scott,
Matisse could easily break the best in show
record of 275 wins by Mystique, a German
shepherd that competed into the mid-1990s.
Lint, however, said that’s not going to
happen. After Tuesday, the plans are to enter
Matisse in just a few more shows before
retiring.
“We’re not striving to meet or break that
record,” he said. “I’m a firm believer you
leave a party before a party leaves you.”

16

SPORTS

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

YOUTH
Continued from page 11
But the focus of the newest study
was to determine whether coaching education could provide a safer
environment on the field.
Roughly two-thirds of the players who were monitored played for
coaches who had been certified
undergone training with USA
Football’s program.
Seventy-two of the players, ages
9 to 15, also had their helmets fitted with devices to measure the
impact of hits. Following each
practice or game, independent
trainers tracked the information to
determine how many significant
blows to the head each player took.
The study found that the 38 players who participated in Heads-Up
leagues had an average of 2.5 fewer
impacts per practice of at least 10
G-forces. Over a 12-week season
containing three practices per
week, researchers determined that
was about 90 fewer significant hits
per season than those in leagues
that did not undergo training.
The results also showed those
who played for the certified coaches were 76 percent less likely to
get injured and 57 percent less
likely to sustain injuries that kept
them out of action at least 24
hours. Ninety percent of those
players also went uninjured,
according to the study.
“In my own mind, I think coach
education is important, and I think
the data collected shows that it’s
important,” Dompier said. “I don’t
want to promote USA Football
over someone else’s program. But
I think it’s important coaches
receive some training in proper
tackling and equipment fitting.”
Dompier noted that other variables could have been a factor in
the results. He said the study did
not determine which helmets were
being used by the leagues and
acknowledged that independent
doctors confirmed all concussion
diagnoses.

Yankees to retire numbers of
Pettitte, Posada and Williams
NEW YORK — The Yankees are
retiring the uniform numbers of Andy
Pettitte, Jorge Posada and Bernie
Williams and will honor the trio with
plaques in Monument Park this season along with Willie Randolph.
Pettitte (46), Posada (20) and
Williams (51) will raise the Yankees’

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Pts
78
76
72
64
60
54
51
35

GF
150
191
160
147
135
155
160
104

GA
123
159
141
145
153
158
175
193

Pts
75
73
73
70
58
51
51
47

GF
184
174
161
168
151
142
124
126

GA
162
136
141
145
162
170
154
150

Central Division
GP W L OT
Nashville
56 38 12 6
St. Louis
56 37 15 4
Chicago
57 35 18 4
Winnipeg 59 30 19 10
Minnesota 56 28 21 7
Dallas
56 26 22 8
Colorado 57 24 22 11

Pts
82
78
74
70
63
60
59

GF
170
178
172
165
155
175
149

GA
131
137
131
157
152
179
161

Pacific Division
GP W L OT
Anaheim 57 35 15 7
Vancouver 56 32 21 3
Calgary
57 32 22 3
Sharks
58 29 21 8
Los Angeles 56 26 18 12
Arizona
58 20 31 7
Edmonton 58 16 32 10

Pts
77
67
67
66
64
47
42

GF
169
158
166
164
155
131
135

GA
160
147
147
165
150
194
196

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Monday’s Games
Winnipeg 5, Edmonton 4, SO
N.Y. Rangers 6, N.Y. Islanders 5
Carolina 6, Ottawa 3
Montreal 2, Detroit 0
Colorado 5, Arizona 2
Calgary 4, Boston 3, OT
Vancouver 3, Minnesota 2
Los Angeles 3, Tampa Bay 2
Tuesday’s Games
Columbus at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Washington at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Carolina, 4 p.m.
Buffalo at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m.
Florida at Toronto, 4:30 p.m.
Dallas at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
San Jose at Nashville, 5 p.m.

MLB brief

on Aug. 22, followed by Pettitte’s
the next day.

total of retired numbers to 20. The
Yankees also are expected to at some
point retire Derek Jeter’s No. 2, their
last single digit number in use.
Williams will be honored before
the May 24 game against Texas and
Randolph as part of Old Timers’ Day
before the June 20 game against
Detroit. Posada’s ceremony will be

Williams joined Jeter as part of
the group that won four World
Series titles in a five-year span from
1996-2000, and Posada, Pettitte
and Jeter won five titles in all.

Berra and Bill Dickey (8), Roger
Maris (9), Phil Rizzuto (10),
Thurman Munson (15), Whitey
Ford (16), Don Mattingly (23),
Elston Howard (32), Casey Stengel
(37), Mariano Rivera (42), Reggie
Jackson (44) and Ron Guidry (49).

Their numbers join those of Billy
Martin (1), Babe Ruth (3), Lou
Gehrig (4), Joe DiMaggio (5), Joe
Torre (6), Mickey Mantle (7), Yogi

Randolph was a part of championship teams in 1977 and ‘78, is a
former Yankees’ co-captain and was
a coach for 11 seasons.

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
Toronto
36
Brooklyn
21
Boston
20
Philadelphia
12
New York
10
Southeast Division
Atlanta
43
Washington
33
Charlotte
22
Miami
22
Orlando
17
Central Division
Chicago
34
Cleveland
33
Milwaukee
30
Detroit
21
Indiana
21

L
17
31
31
41
43

Pct
.679
.404
.392
.226
.189

GB

14 1/2
15
24
26

11
21
30
30
39

.796
.611
.423
.423
.304


10
20
20
27v

20
22
23
33
33

.630
.600
.566
.389
.389


1 1/2
3 1/2
13
13

Pct
.736
.679
.655
.642
.509

GB

3
4
5
12

.679
.528
.377
.358
.208


8
16
17
25

.824
.648
.537
.346
.245


8 1/2
14 1/2
24 1/2
30

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Memphis
39
14
Houston
36
17
Dallas
36
19
San Antonio
34
19
New Orleans
27
26
Northwest Division
Portland
36
17
Oklahoma City
28
25
Denver
20
33
Utah
19
34
Minnesota
11
42
Pacific Division
Warriors
42
9
L.A. Clippers
35
19
Phoenix
29
25
Sacramento
18
34
L.A. Lakers
13
40
Sunday’s Games
West 163, East 158
Monday’s Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday’s Games
No games scheduled

Exp. 2/28/15

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NBA GLANCE

NHL GLANCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT
Montreal 56 37 15 4
Tampa Bay 59 35 18 6
Detroit
55 31 14 10
Boston
56 28 20 8
Florida
55 24 19 12
Ottawa
55 22 23 10
Toronto
57 23 29 5
Buffalo
56 16 37 3
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT
N.Y. Islanders57 37 19 1
N.Y. Rangers 55 34 16 5
Pittsburgh 56 32 15 9
Washington 57 30 17 10
Philadelphia 56 24 22 10
Columbus 54 24 27 3
New Jersey 56 21 26 9
Carolina
55 20 28 7

THE DAILY JOURNAL

TUESDAY
Girls’ soccer
Notre Dame-Belmont at Capuchino, Terra Nova at
Mills, Jefferson at El Camino, Half Moon Bay at
Aragon, 3 p.m.; San Mateo at Carlmont, Burlingame
at Woodside, Hillsdale at Menlo-Atherton, 4 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Sacred Heart Prep at Castilleja, 6:30 p.m.; Notre
Dame-Belmont at Valley Christian, 7:30 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
Menlo School at Crystal Springs, 6:30 p.m.
College softball
San Mateo at De Anza, 3 p.m.
College baseball
San Mateo at Marin, 2 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Boys’ soccer
Capuchino at Mills, 3 p.m.; Serra at St. Ignatius, 3:15
p.m.; El Camino at Half Moon Bay, South City at Carlmont, Woodside at Sequoia, Burlingame at
Menlo-Atherton, 4 p.m.
Girls’ soccer
St. Ignatius at Notre Dame-Belmont, 3:15 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
PAL tournament
Carlmont at Westmoor,Terra Nova at Hillsdale, Mills
at Half Moon Bay, TBA at Menlo-Atherton, 7 p.m.
Menlo School at Pinewood, 8 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
PAL tournament
Menlo-Atherton at Half Moon Bay, Jefferson at Sequoia, Burlingam at Terra Nova,Westmoor at Mills,
7 p.m.
Sacred Heart Prep at Pinewood, 7 p.m.; Serra at St.
Ignatius, 7:30 p.m.
Women’s college basketball
San Francisco at San Mateo, 5:30 p.m.; Skyline at
San Jose, 7 p.m.
Men’s college basketball
Skyline at Foothill, 5 p.m.; San Francisco at Canada,
7 p.m.
THURSDAY
Girls’ soccer
Sequoia at El Camino,Terra Nova at Jefferson, South
City at Mills, Menlo-Atherton at Woodside, San

Mateo at Burlingame, Carlmont at Half Moon Bay,
4 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
Crystal Springs at Pinewood, 5:30 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Crystal Springs at Mercy-Burlingame, 6 p.m.
College softball
Ohlone at San Mateo, 3 p.m.
College baseball
Skyline at Mesa College-San Diego, San Mateo at
Gavilan, 2 p.m.
FRIDAY
Girls’ soccer
Aragon at Hillsdale, 6 p.m.
Boys’ soccer
Woodside at Menlo-Atherton, Carlmont at Sequoia,
El Camino at South City, Half Moon Bay at
Burlingame, 4 p.m.; Aragon at Hillsdale, 7:30 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
PAL tournament semifinals, 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. at
Mills
Notre Dame-SJ at Sacred Heart Prep, 5 p.m.; Notre
Dame-Belmont at Presentation, 7:30 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
PAL tournament semifinals, 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
at Mills
Eastside Prep at Sacred Heart Prep, Pinewood at
Menlo School, 6:30 p.m.
Women’s college basketball
San Jose at San Mateo, 7 p.m.
Men’s college basketball
Foothill at Canada, 7 p.m.
College baseball
Skyline at Mesa College-San Diego, 2 p.m.
SATURDAY
Girls’ basketball
PAL tournament championship game, 6 p.m. at
Mills
Boys’ basketball
PAL tournament championship game, 7:45 p.m. at
Mills
Valley Christian at Serra, 6:30 p.m.
College softball
Cosumnes River at San Mateo, 10 a.m.; Fresno at
San Mateo, 2 p.m.

HEALTH

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

17

Liberia schools reopen after six-month Ebola closure
By Jonathan Paye-Layleh
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MONROVIA,
Liberia

Students in Liberia began returning to the classroom Monday after
a six-month closure during the
Ebola epidemic that left thousands
dead, lining up in their uniforms
to have their temperatures taken
before they could enter school
gates.
Pupils who trickled in to Saint
Michael High School on the outskirts of the capital also washed
their hands with chlorinated water
before going inside.
“I feel happy to come to school
today because for so long I have
not seen my friends, ” Albert
Kollie, 18, told the Associated
Press. “I am very happy to be
counted among the living and I
pray that Ebola be eradicated from
this country.”
Many students said they had
grown tired of sitting at home, and
at least one principal said teenage
pregnancy had spiked during the
six-month school gap. A few,
though, remained a bit fearful
about returning even though there
are just a handful of Ebola cases
left in the country that once saw
100 new patients a week.

REUTERS

Children sit in class in Monrovia, Liberia.
“We will be afraid to touch each
other in class, some colleagues
will be afraid to come around,”
high school junior Eric Blackie
said. “But we cannot just be sitting home.”

Liberia has seen the highest
death toll from the Ebola epidemic, with 3,800 killed. In neighboring Guinea where the outbreak
began, schools already have
reopened though many fearful par-

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ents have kept their children
home. In Sierra Leone, where disease transmission is now the
highest, officials hope to reopen
schools by the end of March.
Deputy Education Minister

Remses Kumbuyah said more than
5, 000 kits were distributed to
schools that included thermometers and chlorine for hand-washing.
“We are asking all the school
administrators to ensure that a
classroom should not have more
than 45 or 50 students.”
Overcrowding is a major problem in Liberia’s schools, where as
many as 100 pupils may be in a
single classroom. Since Ebola is
spread through direct contact with
bodily fluids, administrators want
to minimize the potential spread.
Health officials have warned that a
single new case could trigger a
whole new cluster of infections.
Nearly 9,200 people have died
since the first Ebola deaths in rural
Guinea in December 2013. The
disease ravaged through Liberia,
Guinea and Sierra Leone - all countries with weak health systems
that were ill-prepared for such an
epidemic.
In Sierra Leone on Monday, the
government promised a full investigation after an internal audit
found that nearly one-third of the
money it received to fight Ebola
was used without saving the necessary receipts and invoices to justify the spending.

18

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

HEALTH

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Schools start treating e-cigarettes as drug paraphernalia
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RICHMOND, Va. — Some schools are
getting tougher on e-cigarettes, even punishing possession of the devices more
harshly than regular cigarettes.
The devices, which heat a nicotine solution to create a vapor instead of burning
tobacco, have passed traditional smokes in
popularity among teenagers. Schools are
clamping down because e-cigarettes, sometimes also known as vaporizers, can also be

RENT
Continued from page 1
afford to pay high wages.
“Rent keeps going up, but salaries are
not,” said Paige Scott, a Redwood City
resident for seven years. Scott works at a
nonprofit making $30,000 a year and says
she has not been able to find affordable
housing in the area. “It’s impossible to
find housing unless you are a top earner. I
work here. I can’t live here.”
“The situation leads people to stay in
dangerous or unfortunate conditions
because they feel like if they speak up,

HOSPITALS
Continued from page 1
keep the financially-strapped hospitals
open for only five years. Officials with
Prime have said existing services will be
maintained at the hospitals and have promised to spend $150 million on capital
improvements over the next three years and
protect 7,600 jobs at the acquisitions.
Seton is Daly City’s largest employer
with 1,200 workers.
If it closes, however, the ripple effect
would be disastrous and would be felt by
many more thousands of people, said Daly
City Councilman David Canepa.
Up to 150,000 north county residents

used for illegal substances like marijuana.
Most schools have folded e-cigarettes
into their anti-tobacco policies, which typically punish students with detention, a letter home and sometimes a tobacco education class.
But other schools in states including
North Carolina, New Jersey, Washington
and Connecticut, are grouping the devices
in with bongs and pipes, meaning students
could face long suspensions and required
drug tests and have possession of drug para-

phernalia marked on their school record.
“Our goal is to reduce access and discourage use on campus,” said Sarah D’Annolfo,
dean of students at The Taft School in
Watertown, Connecticut. The co-ed boarding school amended its policy this school
year to have e-cigarettes fall under its drug
and alcohol policy. A disciplinary committee made up of faculty and students evaluate
violations case-by-case, but they could
result in a weeklong suspension and a mark
on their record rather than a chat with the

dean and school doctor and parental notification.
“It definitely sparks conversation within
the school community about e-cigarette use
and the possible dangers and the possible
benefits,” D’Annolfo said. “That conversation alone is a hugely important learning
opportunity.”
According to an annual government survey of more than 41,000 students, e-cigarettes have surpassed traditional smoking
in popularity among teens.

their landlord might retaliate by raising
rent,” Scott said, but Reddy said that renting in Redwood City is not all bad.
“We have a lot of really good landlords,
and rent stabilization will not affect them
at all,” Reddy said.
Lorena Milgarejo, who attended the
march with her daughter, saw her late husband fight the rent control battle in San
Francisco and feels it can have an positive
effect on the community.
“What happens to a family, to little
kids, when mom and dad have to live in
another city to work?” Milgarejo asked.
“The cost of rent is tearing families
apart.”
Redwood City is in the process of adding
large numbers of rental units, with new

developments leasing on Main Street,
Veterans Boulevard and El Camino Real
among them. Developments in the harbor
and marina areas are also in the works. The
Housing Leadership Council has been
integral in the inclusion of low-income
units in those developments.
The Lane on the Boulevard apartments
on El Camino, one of the city’s newer residential developments, has 141 apartments. Only five of those units are lowincome, however, and those are categorized as median-income housing, meaning
a single renter cannot earn more than
$63,350 per year. As of January, the Lane
on the Boulevard, which charges $2,600
for a one-bedroom unit, reported a 53.5
percent vacancy rate.

“It’s important to look deeper when you
see that something is labeled as affordable
housing,” Reddy said. “You have to dig
and find out what category it is, and what
that means. Someone near that upper level
of income certainly doesn’t have as much
to worry about as someone at the bottom.”
“We’re going to do this, ” Milgarejo
said. “It’s tipping. It’s going to take time,
but it’s going to happen.”
Amid the familiar protest chants of “sí,
se puede,” Reddy declared, “this is what it
looks like when we stand up.”

would be without a local emergency room if
it closes, Canepa said.
“Our residents would have to go to San
Francisco General,” Canepa said.
Seton should remain a full-service acutecare hospital and the deal with Prime should
be approved as soon as possible, he said.
Seton Coastside is a skilled-nursing facility with an emergency room. The nearest
emergency room for coastside residents is
40 minutes away, nurses argue.
Seton Coastside is full of underserved
patients that can’t take care of themselves,
Amor wrote in the statement.
“We don’t have enough of these beds in
the county. Where will they go?
Without these hospitals there will be a huge
health care crisis. When hospitals die, people die too,” Amor wrote.
Nurses at the Daughters of Charity came

up with a set of  guidelines to protect the
hospitals after it became clear they would be
sold.
The conditions are:
• Operate all DCHS hospitals as acute care
facilities;
• Maintain all existing hospital services;
•  Give reasonable assurances against a
short-term bankruptcy;

• Keep all promises made to retirees; and
•  Honor caregivers’ right to collectively
bargain for their mutual aid and patient protection. 
Of interested buyers, only Prime satisfied
these conditions, according to the nurses.

The Planning Commission will discuss
the rent control issue at 7 p.m., Tuesday
night, City Hall, 1017 Middlefield Road,
Redwood City.

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HEALTH

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

19

Few ruleson teacher
vaccinations amid
measles outbreak
By Christine Armario
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — While much of
the attention in the ongoing
measles outbreak has focused on
student vaccination requirements
and exemptions, less attention
has been paid to another group in
the nation’s classrooms: Teachers
and staff members, who, by and
large, are not required to be vaccinated.
In most states, there is no law
dictating which vaccines teachers
and school staff workers are
required to get. Some states provide a list of recommended vaccines, but there is no requirement
or follow-up for teachers to
receive them.
So when a measles case surfaced
at a California high school, it was
easy for officials to review student
records, but there were no immunization records on file for
employees.
That meant all 24 teachers and
staff exposed to the employee
with measles had to prove their
immunity — records that, for
most, were decades old.
The issue has surfaced from time
to time in state legislatures and is
likely to be raised again in
response to the latest outbreak,
which originated at Disneyland in
December and has spread to a half
dozen states and Mexico. Most of
those who fell ill were not vaccinated. As of Friday, public health
officials said 114 people had contracted measles.
“I was definitely shocked,” Rep.
Joanna Cole, a Democrat in the
Vermont Legislature, said when

she learned in 2012 that there were
no teacher vaccination requirements in her state. There are still
no requirements today. “I guess we
all just assumed that they would
have them.”
Cole and other legislators and
parents across the U.S. believe the
blanket presumption that teachers
are up to date on their vaccines
should be re-examined. They note
that most of those sickened in the
current outbreak are adults, and
that schools are one of the top
places for the spread of communicable disease.
“I will be surprised if we don’t
see some changes in the next year
to year and a half,” said Kristen
Amundson, executive director of
the National Association of
School Boards of Education.
Already, some states are considering measles legislation. In
Vermont, Democratic Rep. George
Till says legislators will try this
year to eliminate philosophical
exemptions for students and
require that teachers be up to date
on the same vaccines students
must receive.
“If we’re trying to limit the
spread in school, why just students?” Till said. A similar bill he
introduced in 2012 was defeated
amid strong opposition from antivaccine groups, and he expects
another battle.
In Colorado, pro-vaccination
groups have been pushing the
Department of Human Services to
require vaccinations for workers at
child care facilities, another area
with uneven employee immunization standards. Measles cases
have been confirmed at day care

REUTERS

Eighty-six percent of scientists say childhood vaccines such as the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine
should be mandatory, compared to 68 percent of the general public.
facilities in Chicago and Santa
Monica, California.
Barbara Loe Fisher, director of
the National Vaccine Information
Center, a Virginia-based nonprofit
that favors letting parents decide
whether to vaccinate, said the discussion on vaccination requirements has started to expand from
schoolchildren to certain adult
professions. She said her organization has a number of concerns
about requiring teacher vaccinations, including safety and job
protection for those who cannot
or choose not to be immunized.
“I think at the end of the day, the
most important principle to protect is the right to make an
informed voluntary decision, and

that includes teachers,” she said.
At Vista Murrieta High School
in California’s Riverside County,
a middle class community between
Los Angeles and San Diego, all
teachers and staff who had been
exposed to the measles were able
to return to work within one to
three days. Teachers who were
born before 1957 were immediately excused, assuming they had
either had gotten measles as a
child or been exposed to the disease.
Kathy Ericson, president of the
Murrieta Teachers Association,
said the instructors were willing to
do “whatever needs to be done” to
protect students. But she stopped
short of saying whether vaccina-

tion or proof of immunization
should be required for employment.
“Most of us don’t have our shot
records,” she said. “It would be a
hard thing to go back and prove.”
Several parents with students in
Murrieta Valley schools said they
believed it was important for
teachers to show proof of immunity or get vaccinated to protect
their children and others too
young or vulnerable to get the
vaccines themselves.
“It is everyone’s responsibility
to keep students healthy and safe,”
said Sherrie Zettlemoyer, the
mother of two elementary-school
students. “I believe if you can be
vaccinated you should.”

20

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

ALLVERS
Continued from page 1

WEEKENED JOURNAL
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com

Nath is the founder of Allvers, a
website which offers users the opportunity to find goods online, relying
on a wider list of suppliers than
Amazon without the clutter of searches from Google.
Shoppers can browse a variety of
items they are interested in, such as
cars, clothes or cutlery, define the
design of the items by color, designer
or material, and then let the site run a
search from all applicable retailers
such as Sears, Amazon, Macy’s or any
other shops offering the items
online.
The goal of the site is to synthesize
and simplify the shopping experience
for users, who are solely interested in
finding the best deals available, and
do not care to be at the mercy of one
search engine or online shop, Nath
said.
The site is in its beta stage of development and there are still kinks to
work out but Nath is pleased with the
progress of the site, which he began
developing with his father almost two
years ago.
Nath’s father, Naren, is the chief
financial
officer
of
Wayfare
International, a San Mateo-based
online advertising company.
And though Nath has relied on technology borrowed from his father’s
company to power his searches, he
said the idea for Allvers is all his own,
and that he has creative independence

in directing the company.
He appreciates the guidance that his
father provides but also enjoys having the freedom to take the company
in his own direction.
“It’s been great, I have so much to
learn from him about how to run a
business,” Nath said of working with
his father. “He gave me a lot of really
useful advice, but at the same time he
let me do what I wanted instead of
micro managing. He let me do it by
myself.”
He hopes to continue developing
the site, and start increasing traffic,
which ideally will provide an opportunity to get feedback from shoppers
on how to improve.
He also envisions adding a social
media component to the site, which
would give it the ability to crowdsource good deals from users.
But for now, Nath said he is dedicated to developing his skills as an
entrepreneur, which is easier in this
region than others due to the prominence of innovation and business in
San Mateo County.
And given the access that he has to
resources that others may not, Nath
said it is his responsibility to make
the most out of his opportunity.
“A lot of people here are so ambitious to be successful, which I really
love, ” he said. “But there are not
many 15-year-olds that have these
kinds of resources, so that has really

BAN

attorney’s office are working with
other nearby cities to determine
whether adopting common policy
would make for more efficient regulation, but should a regional response
not develop quickly, the city could
move ahead with its own policy,
according to the report.
“Burlingame may go ahead with its
own regulations in a timely manner to
ensure that legitimate businesses are
not unduly delayed in opening in the
city,” according to the report.
Burlingame is preparing to overhaul
its General Plan, the governing document which guides many of its land use
regulations. In this process, city officials are planning to develop clearer
policy on marijuana dispensaries.
But until the city is able to fully
engage in developing an ordinance on
marijuana dispensaries, it is best there
be a period during which the businesses should not be able to open in
Burlingame, according to the report.
“The proposed moratorium would
allow at least initial work to begin on
the General Plan update, so that any
regulation of marijuana-related uses in
the city could be brought in line with
the information being gathered as part

Continued from page 1
implement a ban for as long as 10
months to review the policy surrounding massage parlors and marijuana dispensaries, which could give the city
the time necessary to negotiate the difference in state and national legislation surrounding the businesses.
But according to Kane’s report, it is
unlikely that Burlingame would need
all the time the urgency moratorium
would allow.
Burlingame is working with nearby
agencies, such as the San Mateo
County Board of Supervisors and surrounding cities, in an effort to develop
policies that are consistent on massage parlors across the region, according to the report.
Supervisor Adrienne Tissier encouraged Burlingame to adopt a version of
the county’s massage parlor regulation
ordinance, as it has been successful in
stamping out illegitimate businesses
in unincorporated parts of the county,
according to the report.
Kane and other members of the city

inspired me. As someone who has all
this privilege, I feel the need to do
something with it. I’m just really
eager to make my mark now.”
Yet despite this grandiose vision,
Nath said he still wants to save time
to be a teenager. As an avid tennis
player and sushi lover who enjoys
math and science classes in school
while developing a stock portfolio,
he said he wants to maintain a broad
base of interests, rather than letting
Allvers consume all his time.
“I’m totally fine doing stuff like
this for the rest of my life,” he said of
building the company. “But at the
same time, I’m into other stuff, so
maybe in a year or two I can decide
what I really want to do.”
Nath is ramping up his search for
colleges and is developing interest in
which universities he might like to
attend. Attending Stanford University
is his dream but he might consider
going to a school on the East Coast as
well.
Though he is committed to getting
Allvers off the ground, he is interested in maintaining a balanced lifestyle
with school and friends.
“It’s tough, but I think academics
and grades are the prime objective. I
don’t want to slip there at all. I think
making good decisions with my time
is crucial, ” he said. “That means
being OK with staying home some
weekends and being dedicated to this
project taking off and getting it to go
places.”

austin@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
of the long-range planning efforts currently underway, ” according to the
report.
Last month, the council asked the
city staff to investigate a total ban on
all marijuana-related establishments
in Burlingame. A full inspection into
what rights the city has in banning the
businesses will be provided to council
prior to the end of the moratorium so
officials can decide whether it is better
to move ahead with a ban, or address
the issue through general plan amendments.
The report notes residents who have
legally obtained the right to smoke
marijuana under Proposition 215 will
not be impacted by the city’s moratorium, should it be adopted.
“It does not affect individuals possessing a valid prescription, or health
care facilities that provide in-patient
or residential care,” according to the
report.
The City Council meets 7 p. m. ,
Tuesday, City Hall, 501 Primrose
Road, Burlingame.

austin@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
TUESDAY, FEB. 17
Samaritan House Breast Care
Clinic. Innovative Breast Cancer
Outreach Program will receive recognition and grant from the Avon
Breast Health Outreach Program. 1
p.m. to 2 p.m. Samaritan House Breast
Care Clinic, 19 W. 39th Ave., San
Mateo. For more information call
Samantha Albright at (212) 614-5072.
Mardi Gras Celebration. 3:30 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. For
more
information
email
perez@smcl.org.
Taste of New Orleans: Jambalaya
demo and tasting program. 6 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m. Belmont Public Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Paws for Tales. 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Belmont Public Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Pet
assisted therapy for reluctant readers.
Zenith New Orleans Jazz Band. 7:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Belmont Public
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 18
Job Search Review Panel. 10 a.m. to
noon. Foster city Community Center,
1000 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. For
more information email ronvisconti@sbcglobal.net.
Computer Coach: Facebook. 10:30
a.m. to noon. Belmont Public Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admission, but lunch is $17. For more information call 430-6500 or visit sanmateoprofessionalalliance.com.
Off the Grid. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. 650 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. Off the Grid: Foster
City will provide Foster City locals and
commuters an array of reasonable
yet high-quality dining options, live
music and various activities for all to
enjoy. For more information email
joanna@offthegridsf.com.
Financial Planning in the Library. 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. San Bruno Library, 701
W. Angus Ave., San Bruno. Schedule
your individual 20-minute appointment by calling 616-7078 or emailing
sbpl@plsinfo.org. For more information email leew@plsinfo.org.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: Why,
God? When Personal Tragedy
Doesn’t Make Sense. 6:30 p.m.
Bethany Lutheran Church,1095
Cloud Ave., Menlo Park. An hour-long
conversation exploring the search for
answers
following
personal
tragedies. For more information call
854-5897.
Needles and Hooks — Knitting and
Crocheting Club. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. Belmont Library. For more information visit www.belmont@smcl.org.
Mystery Book Club. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San
Carlos.
Open Mic. 7:30 p.m. Reach and Teach,
144 W. 25th Ave., San Mateo. Share
your writing or hear something new.
Seats are limited. Free. For more information email jgerkman@pacbell.net.
THURSDAY, FEB. 19
AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Free
Tax Preparation. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. San
Carlos Adult Community Center, 601
Chestnut St., San Carlos. Tax preparation available every Thursday until
April 10 for low to moderate income
tax payers with special attention to
those age 60 or older. Free. To make
an appointment call 802-4384.
Quilt, Craft and Sewing Festival. 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. San Mateo County
Event Center, Fiesta Hall, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. There will
be supply exhibits, workshops and
seminars. Runs through Feb. 21. $10
parking, free admission. For more
information go to www.quiltcraftsew.com.
Free Blood Pressure Workshop.
10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Spring
Road, San Bruno. For more information call Mary Tessier at 616-7150.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: Why,
God? When Personal Tragedy
Doesn’t Make Sense. 9:15 a.m.
Bethany Lutheran Church,1095
Cloud Ave, Menlo Park. An hour-long
conversation exploring the search for
answers
following
personal
tragedies. For more information call
854-5897.
AARP Chapter 139 Meeting. Noon.
Beresford Recreation Center, 2720
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. For
more information call Barbara
Vollendorf at 345-5001.
Rotary Club of Half Moon Bay presents guest speaker Ginger
Minoletti, owner of Bay World

Travel. 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Portuguese Community Center, 724
Kelly St., Half Moon Bay. Minoletti will
speak about the religious and cultural aspects of her trip to Morocco. For
more information visit rotaryofhalfmoonbay.com.
Movies for School Age Children:
‘Planes — Fire and Rescue.’ 3:30
p.m. San Mateo Public Library, Oak
Room. 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo. For
more information and to register call
522-7838.
Author Talk: Marie Mutsuki
Mockett. 6 p.m. South San Francisco
Public Library, 840 W. Orange Ave.,
South San Francisco. Discussion and
signing of Marie’s new book ‘Where
the Dead Pause and Japanese Say
Goodbye,’ a memoir about grief, consolation and her travels to the radiation zone near the Fukushima Dalichi
Nuclear Power Plant.
FRIDAY, FEB. 20
San Mateo Sunrise Rotary Club
presents guest speaker Dr. Ian
Tong. 7:30 a.m. Crystal Springs Golf
Course, 6650 Golf Course Drive,
Burlingame. Fee is $15, breakfast
included. To RSVP call 515-5891.
Pick of the Litter donation day. 9
a.m. to 11 a.m. Coyote Point Parking
Lot. Drop off gently used items for
resale.
American Red Cross Blood Drive. 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Municipal Services
Building, 33 Arroyo Drive, South San
Francisco. Visit redcrossblood.org or
call (800) RED-CROSS ((800) 7332767) to make an appointment or for
more information.
Tribute to California Senator Jerry
Hill. Noon. San Mateo Marriott, 1700
Amphlett Blvd., San Mateo.
Fundraising luncheon. For more
information and to RSVP call 3425853.
Black History Month 2015: Eyes on
the Prize Series — Fighting Back.
12:10 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. CSM College
Center Building 10, Room 180 1700
W. Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo.
Cooking with Chef Ava. 4 p.m. South
San Francisco Main Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco. Call
829-3860 for more information.
‘Impressionism Today’ Opening
Reception. 5:30 p.m. The Studio
Shop,
244
Primrose
Road,
Burlingame. Exhibit features artists
Dominique Caron, Ken Christensen,
John Karl Claes and Tom Soltesz. The
exhibit examines artistic influences of
the past through the lens of contemporary artists. For more information
email julie@thestudioshop.com.
Peninsula Rose Society Meeting.
7:30 p.m. Redwood City Veterans
Memorial Senior Center, 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City. There
will be a slide show of 2014 activities
and a question and answer session
conducted by the consulting rosarians. For more information visit peninsularosesociety.org or call Jerry
Georgette at 465-3967.
Coastal Repertory Theatre presents: ‘I Love You, You’re Perfect,
Now Change.’ 8 p.m. Coastal
Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main St., Half
Moon Bay. Runs through March 1.
Tickets range from $27 to $45. For
more information and to purchase
tickets call 569-3266 or visit coastalrep.com.
SATURDAY, FEB. 21
Planning Your College Future. 9
a.m. to noon. Cañada College,
Building Nine Student Services
Financial Literacy Lab 9-123, 4200
Farm Hill Blvd., Redwood City. For
more information call 306-3174.
PHS/SPCA Volunteer Orientation. 9
a.m. to 11 a.m. Center for
Compassion, 1450 Rollins Road,
Burlingame. Call 340-7022 for more
information.
Women on Writing: WOW! Voices
Now. 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Skyline
College, Student and Community
Center, Building Six, Room 6202, 3300
College Drive, San Bruno. There will
be poetry and prose readings and a
Q&A with two featured authors,
Natalie Baszile and Eileen Malone.
Free. Continental breakfast will be
served. For more information or to
RSVP contact mcclungk@smccd.edu.
African-American History Month
Celebration. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Ravenswood Open Space Preserve,
East Palo Alto. Learn about AfricanAmericans’ rich history in conservation; discover birds, bugs and baylands; make some fun crafts; and
meet a Midpen ranger. Special guests
include the California Buffalo Soldiers
Association;
Sen. Jerry
Hill;
Assemblyman
Rich
Gordon;
Supervisor Warren Slocum; and East
Palo Alto Mayor Lisa YarbroughGauthier. Free. For more information
call 691-1200 or go to openspace.org.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT®

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

21

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Bumps against
5 Beauty pack
8 Ill-mannered ones
12 — vera
13 Had a meal
14 Eurasian range
15 Online sites (2 wds.)
17 Genuine
18 — now or never!
19 Between coasts
21 Twinkle
24 Farm crops
25 Flee hastily
26 Hard sells, maybe
30 No future — —
32 Blow it
33 Deli order (2 wds.)
37 Greek letter
38 Louis XIV, e.g.
39 Lather
40 Dribble
43 Collide with
44 Soup du —
46 Prices

GET FUZZY®

48
50
51
52
57
58
59
60
61
62

Dry red wine
Brother’s title
Movie lioness
Excited
Schedule opening
Grassy field
White-tailed sea eagle
Sharpen
Lease
Deli loaves

DOWN
1 Mandible
2 Pub pint
3 Thieve
4 Old photo color
5 Sporty wheels
6 Pass near Pikes Peak
7 He loved Lucy
8 Proves more durable
9 Assortment
10 Satyrs
11 Travel on snow
16 They need a PIN
20 Goalie’s org.

21
22
23
27
28
29
31
34
35
36
41
42
44
45
47
48
49
50
53
54
55
56

Smooth-tongued
Rustic road
Throw off heat
Machu Picchu locale
Press
Ambler or Clapton
Organize, in a way
Sighs of delight
Trot or gallop
— out (withdraws)
El Dorado loot
Pantyhose shade
Wiggly dessert (hyph.)
Welles or Bean
Cowboy flick
Screen
Long-legged
Like a pancake
Charge
Endeavor
Pilot’s dir.
Legal matter

2-17-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2015
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Stay in the
background, where you can watch and learn.
Adopting a bold stance will not be to your advantage,
but knowing where you stand through observation
will give you the upper hand.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — You will have an
incredible impact on others. Discuss your intentions
and map out your plans. Your contribution to a favored
cause will result in added respect and recognition.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — If change is
required, you should take action. Waiting
for someone else to make a move will waste

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

MONDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

valuable time. You have the know-how, so stop
procrastinating and step up to the plate.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Have fun by becoming
involved in creative activities. Include the youngsters
in your life and it will bring you closer together. A little
can go a long way, so you shouldn’t go overboard.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Your ideas won’t go far
if you keep them bottled up. Share your thoughts and
take part in events. The more people you meet, the
more allies and support you will recruit.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Keep a close watch
on your wallet. If someone comes to you with a tale
of woe, help out with suggestions or advice and keep
your money safe and secure.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — It is time to step back

2-17-15

Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

and re-evaluate a current partnership. Staying
involved with someone for the wrong reasons will
not bring good results. Discuss your feelings, and
make changes.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — The extra effort needed
to maintain a healthy lifestyle will pay off. If you slip,
don’t beat yourself up. The important thing is to keep
striving to reach your goal.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — It’s hard to get
serious about your future if you remain stuck in the
same routine and habits. Shake off the cobwebs
and get down to business.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Question your
commitment to someone or something. It’s not fair to
lead someone on or to put in half the effort if you have

lost interest. Be true to yourself and what you want.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Making extra
time for the people who count in your life will be
appreciated. Negotiations will prove to be fruitful.
Strive to excel personally and professionally.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Handling
finances for other people will be risky and
thankless. Without the proper precautions, you
will end up facing some serious losses. Consult a
professional and avoid being blamed.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

22

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

104 Training

110 Employment

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

CAREGIVERS

INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND
NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR
Ivalua Inc seeks Info Systems & Network
Administrator to evaluate user needs,
system functionality & implement goals
regarding product and technology. Location: Redwood City, CA. Mail résumé to
Ms. Lelievre. Ivalua,702 Marshall
St.#520, Redwood City, CA 94063.

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

110 Employment
HOTEL -

IMMEDIATE OPENING
• Housekeepers PT / FT
• Front desk PT / FT / Temp
* Night time shifts available
Los Prados Hotel
2940 S. Norfolk St.
San Mateo
(650)341-3300

Call
(650)777-9000
ENGINEERING Inovant, LLC, a Visa Inc. company, currently has openings in our Foster City,
California location for:
- Sr. Software Engineers (Android Developer – Digital and Mobile) (Job# 150815)
to secure the data on the mobile devices,
specifically on Android OS, providing data encryption and leveraging application
sandboxing to secure data access. Work
closely with UX, product management,
and other teams to conceive, design and
create unique payment capabilities on
the mobile device.
- Sr. Staff QA Engineers (Job# 150819)
to perform hands-on testing on Unix, Linux, and MVS platform. Create, maintain, and execute automated regression
test suites. Develop and maintain test
plans, testing strategies, test cases, test
data, matrices, and other QA related
documentation.
Apply online at www.visa.com and reference Job#. EOE

110 Employment

127 Elderly Care

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

LEAD DATABASE Programmer– NexB,
Inc. Job Site: San Carlos, CA. Responsible for creating advanced Web data mining system of open Web data from multiple APIs and web sites. Send resumes
to Attn: HR – NexB, Inc., 735 Industrial
Road, Suite #101, San Carlos, CA
94070.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

TECHNOLOGY Electronic Arts, Inc. has job opening for
multiple open positions in Redwood City,
CA. For more info and to apply, go to
careers.ea.com. Open positions include:
·
Data Warehouse Engineer: Develop and support moving huge volume of
data after significant cleansing, transformation and processing.
·
Software Engineer III: Develop online service for EA's digital platform, including identity management, commerce
transaction.
·
Software Design Engineer III: Design and implement new functionalities of
EA’s mobile platform.
·
Research Engineer: Create game
prototypes for emerging hardware devices and platforms.
·
Senior Systems Engineer: Build
and maintain a Linux infrastructure that
utilizes both cloud based and physical
servers.
·
Software Engineer in Test: Apply
specialized knowledge of the design, development and deployment of current
and legacy generation EA-specific
eCommerce platform features, technologies and tools.
·
Senior Product Manager: Facilitate
and manage project requirements / solution analysis and design work across
multiple business partners.
·
Software Engineer III: Design architecture spec and implement new functionalities of EA’s e-commerce platform.
·
Senior Research Software Engineer: Help define and build a unified data
platform across EA, spanning 20+ game
studios as data sources.

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.

Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.

203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 263712
The following person is doing business
as: Sword and Rose Press, 1221 Academy Avenue, BELMONT, CA, 94002.
Registered Owner: Delores Homisak,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Delores Homisak/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/21/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/27/15, 02/03/15, 02/10/15, 02/17/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263462
The following person is doing business
as: Ng New Gen Co., 1874 35th Ave,
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94122. Registered owners: Katherine Su and Vincent
Ng, 1320 Tuolumne Rd, Millbrae 94030 .
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Katherine Su /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/02/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/03/15, 02/10/15, 02/17/15, 02/24/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263852
The following person is doing business
as: CRR Consulting, 209 Lomitas Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
Registered owner: Mark Whitney Stephens, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Mark Whitney Stephens /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/02/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/03/15, 02/10/15, 02/17/15, 02/24/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263830
The following person is doing business
as: Bourbon St., 1377 Wayne Way, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403. Registered owner:
Shawn Chiasson, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Shawn Chiasson /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/30/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/03/15, 02/10/15, 02/17/15, 02/24/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263834
The following person is doing business
as: Horita Consulting, 2165 Queens
Lane, SAN MATEO, CA 94402. Registered owner: Glenn Neil Horita, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Glenn Horita /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/30/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/03/15, 02/10/15, 02/17/15, 02/24/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263733
The following person is doing business
as: Arch Gate Properties, Inc., 2150 Vista Del Mar, SAN MATEO, CA 94404.
Registered owner: Arch Gate Properties,
Inc., Inc., CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Craig Funcke /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/22/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/03/15, 02/10/15, 02/17/15, 02/24/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263851
The following person is doing business
as: LA PERLA MARKET, 224 LUX AVE
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
Registered owners: Florentino Huerta
and Daniela Huerta, 515 Linden Ave,
South San Francisco CA 94080. The
business is conducted by a Married Couple . The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Florentino Huerta /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/2/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/03/15, 02/10/15, 02/17/15, 02/24/15).

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263935
The following person is doing business
as: 1. Arbor Vitae Holistics, 2) Symphany, 405 Cypress Ave, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066. Registered Owner: Maple Molina,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Maple Molina/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/06/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/10/15, 02/17/15, 02/24/15, 03/03/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #264033
The following person is doing business
as: Healthy Nail, 333 E. 4th Ave, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401. Registered Owner:
1. Mayling Lee, 1240 Culet Ranch Rd,
Danville, CA 94506 2. Eachan Lee,
same address. The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 2/16/15
/s/Mayling Lee/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/13/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/17/15, 02/24/15, 03/03/15, 03/10/15)

quest for Special Notice form is available
from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner: John Garner,
Garner Law Office, PO Box 908, WILLOWS, CA 95988 Dated: Jan. 29, 2015
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on February 7, 10, 17, 2015.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-263857
The following person is doing business
as: 1) See To It 2) C2it Health, 296 Santa Monica Avenue, MENLO PARK, CA
94025. Registered Owner: Considered
Care, Inc., CA. The business is conducted by an Corporation. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A
/s/ Jennifer Brokaw/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/02/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/10/15, 02/17/15, 02/24/15, 03/03/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-263650
The following person is doing business
as: Daddyo’s Hoppin’ Habanero Jelly,
1549 Cottage Grove Ave, SAN MATEO,
CA 94401. Registered Owner: James
Marc Williams, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on 9-27-2014
/s/James Marc Williams/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/15/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/10/15, 02/17/15, 02/24/15, 03/03/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-263779
The following person is doing business
as: Kimby Accessories and more, 217
Maple Ave, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080. Registered Owner: Erika
Tamayo, 134 N. Spruce Ave, South San
Francisco, CA 94080. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Erika Tamayo /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/26/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/10/15, 02/17/15, 02/24/15, 03/03/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263698
The following person is doing business
as: Branch Metrics, 1007 Florence Ln,
Apt 4, MENLO PARK, CA, 94025. Registered Owner: Pawprint Labs, Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
6/10/2014
/s/ Michael Molinet/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/21/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/10/15, 02/17/15, 02/24/15, 03/03/15).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263738
The following person is doing business
as: Hy-Tech Construction, 550 Marine
View Ave., Suite G, BELMONT, CA
94002. Registered Owner: Raymond Richard Petrin, 102 Palm Ave., San Carlos,
CA 94070.The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Raymond R. Petrin/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/06/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/10/15, 02/17/15, 02/24/15, 03/03/15).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-264035
The following person is doing business
as: Burlingame Properties, 205 Park
Road, Suite 220, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 Registered Owner: Raziel Ungar,
208 Burlingame Ave, Burlingame, CA
94010. The business is conducted by an
individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Raziel Ungar/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/13/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/17/15, 02/24/15, 03/03/15, 03/10/15)
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Rafael De Leon Diaz
Case Number: 125335
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Rafael De Leon Diaz,
aka Rafael De Leon A Petition for Probate has been filed by Carlos De Leon
in the Superior Court of California, County of San Mateo. The Petition for Probate requests that Carlos De Leon be
appointed as personal representative to
administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: April 01, 2015 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of the
petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the
hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within the later of either (1) four months
from the date of first issuance of letters
to a general personal representative, as
defined in section 58(b) of the California
Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the
date of mailing or personal delivery to
you of a notice under section 9052 of the
California Probate Code. Other California
statutes and legal authority may affect
your rights as a creditor. You may want
to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine
the file kept by the court. If you are a
person interested in the estate, you may
file with the court a Request for Special
Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an
inventory and appraisal of estate assets
or of any petition or account as provided
in Probate Code section 1250. A Re-

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

23

210 Lost & Found
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.

296 Appliances

298 Collectibles

303 Electronics

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

HOME THEATER, surround sound system. Harman Kardon amplifier tuner and
6 speakers, NEW. $400/obo. Call
(650)345-5502

CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One
pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

FRIDGE, MINI, unopened, plugs, cord,
can use for warmer also $40, (650) 5789208

TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good condition, $10. each, (650)571-5899

FRUIT PRESS, unopened, sturdy, make
baby food, ricer, fruit sauces, $20.00,
(650) 578 9208
PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400

WW1

$12.,

JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861

PRINTER DELL946, perfect, new black
ink inst, new color ink never installed,
$75. 650-591-0063

WHIRLPOOL DEHUMIDIFIER. Almost
new. located coastside. $75 650-8676042.

$25 OBO. Star Wars, new Battle Droid
figures, all four variations.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.

TUNER AMPS, 3, Technics SA-GX100,
Quadraflex 767, Pioneer VSX-3300. All
for $99. (650)591-8062

WHIRLPOOL REAR tub assembly for a
front
loading
washing
machine,
$200/obo. (650)591-2227

PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$49 (650)591-9769

WHIRLPOOL shock absorber for front
loading washing machine, $30/obo.
(650)591-2227

WESTINGHOUSE 32” Flatscreen TV,
model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available **SOLD**

SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35. (650)558-8142

304 Furniture

297 Bicycles

STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545

GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hardly Used $80 (650)293-7313

302 Antiques

BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safely.$99 650-375-1414

1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

298 Collectibles

BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

PANASONIC STEREO color TV 36"
ex/con/ $30 (650)992-4544

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

$40.,

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

Books

299 Computers

LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587

300 Toys

SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR(415)346-6038

16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502

TRANSFORMERS SDCC Shockwave
Lab Beast Hunters, $75 OBO Dan 650303-3568 lv msg

KENWOOD STEREO Receiver/cassette
deck/CD,3 speakers box ex/con. $60
(650)992-4544

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1980 SYLVANIA 24" console television
operational with floor cabinet in excellent
condition. FREE. (650) 676-0974.

73 HAPPY Meal toys. 1990's vintage, in
the
original
unopened
packages.
$60.(650)596-0513
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $60. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002

CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

made in Spain

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347

2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edison Mazda Lamps. Both still working $50 (650)-762-6048

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

295 Art

ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858

ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648

COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

DRESSER, OLD four drawer, painted
wod cottage pine chest of drawers. Solid
and tight. Carved wood handles. 40”
wide x 35.5” high x 17.5” deep. $65. Call
or text (207)329-2853. San Carlos.

BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

MICKEY MINI Mouse Vintage 1997 Lenox Christmas plate Gold Trim, Still in
Box $65. (650)438-7345

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

296 Appliances

NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260

303 Electronics

ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169

RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621

OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260

46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

NASCAR BOOKS - 1998 - 2007 Annuals, 50th anniversary, and more. $75.
(650)345-9595

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021

Very

EXECUTIVE DESK 60”, cherry wood,
excellent condition. $275 (650)212-7151

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767

EXECUTIVE DESK Chair, upholstered,
adjustable height, excellent condition,
$150 (650)212-7151

COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with
DVD and VHS Flat Screen Remote 06
$40: (650)580-6324

FADED GOLD antique framed mirror,
25in x 33in— $15 Cell number:
(650)580-6324

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

GRACO 40" x28" x 28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City

BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATER System" KLH"digital
DVD/CD/MP3.Player
6
speakers
ex.$100. (650)992-4544
INFINITY FLOOR speakers ( a pair) in
good condition $ 60. (650)756-9516. Daly City.

HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mattress (twin size) in great condition. Includes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with additional 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.

24

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015
304 Furniture

304 Furniture

306 Housewares

308 Tools

312 Pets & Animals

INTAGE ART-DECO style wood chair,
carved back & legs, tapestry seat, $50.
650-861-0088.

TABLE, WHITE, sturdy wood, tile top,
35" square. $35. (650)861-0088

ONE CUP Coffee Maker office, apt, dorm
??? Only $9 650-595-3933

BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260

WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300
(650)245-4084

SKI EQUIPMENT PACKAGE $35. Skis,
poles, boots, jacket. Youth or petite
woman, 4'8"-5'3". (650)630-2329

310 Misc. For Sale

PET FURNITURE covers. 1 standard
couch 2 lounge chairs. Like new $70
OBO (650)343-4461

TENNIS RACQUETS $20 each. Call
650-341-2679

10 VIDEOTAPES(3 unused) - $3
each/$20 all. Call 574-3229 after 10 am.

315 Wanted to Buy

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
OVAL LIVING room cocktail table. Wood
with glass 48x28x18. Retail $250.
$75 OBO (650)343-4461
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROUND BEVELED Mirror 22"
hangs, perfect $29, 650-595-3933

dia,

SINGLE BED with 3 drawer wood
frame,exc condition $99. 650-756-9516
Daly City.

TORCHIERE $35. (650) 631-6505

UPHOLSTERED SIDE office chairs (2).
3ft X 2ft, $85 each, (650)212-7151

SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858

VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648

307 Jewelry & Clothing

WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

AMETHYST RING Matching earings in
14k gold setting. $165. (650)200-9730

WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent condition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65.00 (650)504-6058

WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
WOOD ROCKING chair with foam and
foot rest; swivels; very comfortable and
relaxing. $45 (650)580-6324

WOOD ROCKING chair with foam and
foot rest; swivels; very comfortable and
relaxing. $45 (650)580-6324

306 Housewares
8 SKEWERS, unopened, for fondue,
roasting marshmallows, or fruit, ($7.00)
(650) 578 9208
BOXED RED & gold lg serving bowl
18inches - $65 (650) 741-9060 SB

SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274

COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037

STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves
42" x 21" x 17" exc cond $30. (650)7569516

HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30 OBO
(650) 995-0012

TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141

NEW PORTABLE electric fan wind machine, round, adjustable— $15
Cell phone: (650)580-6324

308 Tools

HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720

BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269

KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037

CIRCULAR SAW heavy duty" Craftman"
new in box $45.00- D.C. (650)992-4544

LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10 "x
10", cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229

CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer. Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517

DOWN
1 Do as directed
2 Toy with a spool
3 Deleted, with
“out”

OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PATTERN- MAKING KIT with 5 curved
plastic rulers. $60. Call 574-3229 after
10 am.
PROCRASTINATION CURE - 6 audiocassette course by Nightingale- Conant.
$30. Call 574-3229 after 10 am
SEWING MACHINE Kenmore, blonde
cabinet, $25 (650)355-2167
STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167

DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373

ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

SAW WITH Scabbard 10 pt. fine steel
only $15 650-595-3933

VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720

TOOL BOX Set"Snap-On"on rollers19
drawers 34x56 ex/con.$700.00 (650)9924544

VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517

WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
4 Louisiana music
style
5 Olympics fig.
6 French monarch
7 One below birdie
8 Specialized,
committee-wise
9 Bit of pasta
10 Frying liquid
11 NBC show since
1975, briefly
12 Barely manage,
with “out”
13 Ukr. or Lith., once
19 Feels remorse
over
21 Bochco legal
series
24 Forearm bone
25 Some DVD
players
26 Sinuous swimmer
27 Less cowardly
28 Insurgent group
29 ’50s fourwheeled flop
30 16th-century
Spanish fleet
31 Hoi __: the
masses
33 Heroic Schindler
35 Giants Hall of
Famer Mel
36 Brewers Hall of
Famer Robin

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
HANGING WHITE silk flower decoration
$25 each - 650-341-2679

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Command from a
bailiff
5 Circle calculation
9 They smell
14 Like Mini Coopers
15 Pond croaker
16 Swine squeals
17 Gave the onceover
18 Particularly
welcome casino
visitor
20 Alpine song
22 Ear-splitting
23 Court case that
generates a
media frenzy,
say
30 Handsome god
32 Get really angry
33 Granada gold
34 Irritate
37 “CSI” facilities
38 Tee sizes, for
short
39 “Nice job!” ... and,
in another sense,
a hint about the
first words of 18-,
23-, 52- and 60Across
42 Geese formation
43 Leafy veggie
baked for chips
45 Bitten by bees
46 Angled pipe
fitting
47 Handsome god
50 __ Raiders:
consumer
advocates
52 Abe Lincoln
nickname
55 Principal role
56 Diet food phrase
60 Irritate to the
breaking point
66 Shredded
67 Construction
beam fastener
68 Former South
Korean leader
Syngman __
69 Golf club used for
chipping
70 Blissful settings
71 Jedi guru
72 Small change

ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542

VAN GOGH “Vase of White Roses”
wood and glass frame. 24” x 30”. $70.
(650)298-8546. p.m. only please

WHITE CABINETS (2) - each has a
drawer & 1 door with 2 shelves.
36x21x18. $25 each. (650)867-3257

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

40 Pest in a swarm
41 Utah city near
the Golden
Spike
44 Photo blowup:
Abbr.
48 Sea spots?
49 Blueprint detail,
for short
51 Sexy
53 Cable Guy of
comedy
54 The Gem State

57 Warning from a
driver?
58 Elvis __ Presley
59 No-frills shelter
60 Hip-hop Dr.
61 Free (of)
62 “__ changed my
mind”
63 Caracas’ country,
to the IOC
64 Athens : omega ::
London : __
65 Assenting vote

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

WROUGHT IRON Plant/Curio stand, 5
platforms, 5’ high x 1.5’ wide. Beautiful
designer style, good condition. $25.
(650)588-1946. San Bruno

311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR nylon string excellent condition w/case $95. (650)5765026
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
CYMBAL-ZILDJIAN 22” ride symbal.
Good shape. $140. 650-369-8013
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

xwordeditor@aol.com

By Gail Grabowski and Bruce Venzke
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

02/17/15

02/17/15

WE BUY

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

316 Clothes

318 Sports Equipment
$99

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804
TWO SOCCER balls -- $10.00 each
(hardly used) (650)341-5347
TWO SPOTTING Scopes, Simmons and
Baraska, $80 for both (650)579-0933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

321 Hunting/Fishing

ALPINESTAR JEANS Tags Attached
Twin Stitched Knee Protection Never
used Blue/Grey Sz34 $65 (650)357-7484

HUNTING
CLUB
Membership
$2,600.Camanche Hills Hunting Preserve, Ione CA. Pheasants, Ducks, Chukar and sporting clay range. Excludes
annual dues and bird card. Call 209-3041975.

DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484

322 Garage Sales

MAN'S BLACK Shoes 9D tassel slipons,
Excel $15, 560-595-3933
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl, like new
$40 obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

317 Building Materials
2 MULTI-BROWN granite counter tops
4ft x 2ft each $100 for both. (650)6785133
32 PAVING/EDGING bricks, 12” x 5”x1”
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955
CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $69
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

318 Sports Equipment
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.
(650)637-0930
CASINO CHIP Display. Frame and ready
to hang, $99.00 or best offer.
650.315.3240
G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$15.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260
NORDIC TRACK AEROBIC EXERCISER -$45. (650)630-2329

335 Rugs
AREA RUG 2X3 $15. (650) 631-6505

PERSIAN RUGS

Sarouk*Kerman*Tabriz
All colors, sizes, designs,
Rugs for every room

Harry Kourian
650-242-6591

340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598

345 Medical Equipment
BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.

THE DAILY JOURNAL
345 Medical Equipment
INVACARE ADJUSTABLE hospital bed,
good condition. $500. (415)516-4964

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015
620 Automobiles

379 Open Houses

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS

Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.

List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto

Call (650)344-5200

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

380 Real Estate Services

CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.

HOMES & PROPERTIES

DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.

Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.

HONDA ‘93 LX SD all power, complete,
runs. $2,500 OBO, (650)481-5296

BELMONT – 1 BR, 2 BR, and 3BR
apartments No Smoking No Pets
(650)591-4046

FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,999 /OBO (650)364-1374

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
ROOMS FOR RENT
BURLINGAME HOTEL
Close to Public Transport.
Shared & Private Bathroom
Weekly No Pet
$200 + Tax shared per week
$300 + Tax Pvt Bathroom per week
Cable TV, wifi. micro, freeze
287 Lorton Ave Burlingame
(650)344-6666

620 Automobiles
'06 MERCEDES AMG CL-63.. slate
gray, great condition, 1 owner, complete
dealer maintenance records available.
8,000 miles of factory warranty left. car
can be seen in Fremont...Best offer. Call
(408)888-9171
or
email:
nakad30970@aol.com
‘08 BMW 528i, beige, great condition,
complete dealer maintenance. Car can
be seen in Foster City. (650)349-6969
1978 CLASSIC Mercedes Benz, 240D,
136k miles, 2nd owner, all scheduled
maintenance & records available. Good
condition. All original. Always garaged.
New tires. 4 speed manual. Runs &
drives great. Sunroof. Clean interior.
Good leather and carpets. AM/FM radio.
$4500. Call (650)375-1929
BMW ‘06 325i, black on black, very
clean, 124K miles, $10,000 Call
(650)302-5523.
BMW ‘07 750i, silver, black interior, 87K
miles, clean title, clean car, everything
great. $17,000. (650)302-5523.

CAR TOW chain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
NEW Z Snow Cables for 14" & 15"
wheels, $29 650-595-3933

Cabinetry

Concrete

SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TONNEAU COVER Brand new factory,
hard, folding, vinyl. Fits 2014 Sierra 6.6
$475 (650)515-5379

680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

t
Free showroom
design consultation & quote
t
BELOW HOME
DEPOT PRICES
t
PLEASE VISIT

bestbuycabinets.com
or call

650-294-3360
Cleaning

Rambo
Concrete
Works
by Greenstarr

WALKWAYSs$RIVEWAYSs0ATIOS
#OLOREDs!GGREGATEs2ETAINING
WALLSs3TAMPED#ONCRETE
3WIMMING0OOL2EMOVAL

630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

other services at Yardboss.net

TOM (650) 834-2365

635 Vans

Licensed Bonded & Insured

‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374

License#752250 Since 1985

640 Motorcycles/Scooters

Construction

1964 HARLEY DAVIDSON FHL Panhead (motor only) 84 stoker. Complete
rebuild. Many new parts.Never run. Call
for details. $6,000. Jim (650) 293-7568
1966 CHEVELLE 396 motor. Standardbore block. Standard domed pistons,
rods, crank cam only. 360 HP, code
T0228EJ $600, (650)293-7568
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003

650 RVs
COLEMAN LARAMIE
pop-up camper, Excellent Condition,
$2,250. Call (415)515-6072

670 Auto Parts
1961-63 OLDS F-85 Engine plus many
heads, cranks, Int., Manifold & Carbs. All
$500 (650)348-1449
2006 CADILLAC Brake rotors, 4 available, $15 each (650)340-1225
2006 CADILLAC CTS-V Factory service
manuals, volumes 1 thru 3, $100
(650)340-1225
4 TIRES sizes-275-60-R17 and 275-60R16 for $100/For All. (650)678-5133
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283

Construction

RADIAL TIRE Hankook 235/75/15 NEVER USED, retail $125.00 yours for ONLY $75.00 650-799-0303

625 Classic Cars

440 Apartments

470 Rooms

670 Auto Parts
BORLA CAT-BACK exhaust system, ‘92
to ‘96 Corvette LT-1, $600/obo.
olivermp2@gmail.com, (650)333-4949

MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461

90 MASERATI, 2 Door hard top and convertible. New paint Runs good. $4500
(650)245-4084

25

Decks & Fences

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

Electricians

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

650-322-9288

Concrete

A.S.P. CONCRETE
LANDSCAPING

• All kinds of concrete
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Roofing • Fencing
•New Lawns

for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

Gardening

(650)544-1435 • (650)834-4495

CALL NOW FOR
SPRING LAWN
MAINTENANCE

AAA CONCRETE DESIGN

Sprinklers and irrigation
Lawn Aeration
Pressure washing, rock gardens,
and lots more!

Free Estimates

Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

(650)533-0187

Flooring

Lic# 947476

Flamingo’s Flooring

ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

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t1IBSNBDJTUTPO%VUZ 

 

SHOP
AT HOME

WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.

CARPET
LUXURY VINYL TILE
SHEET VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
Contact us for a
FREE In-Home
Estimate

650-655-6600

info@flamingosflooring.com
www.flamingosflooring.com
We carry all major brands! 

8FTU5)"WF
/FBS&M$BNJOP

4BO.BUFP

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

Housecleaning

Handy Help

CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING & WINDOWS

HONEST HANDYMAN

Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)278-0157
Lic#1211534

Gutters

O.K.’S RAINGUTTER

New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY

(650)556-9780
OSCAR
GUTTER CLEANING

• Gutters & Downspout Repair
• Roofing Repair
• Screening & Seeling
Free Estimates

(650)669-1453
Lic# 910421

ROLANDO’S
GUTTER CLEANING
My specialty is power
washing and rain gutter
cleaning. Call me at
(650) 283-9449

Hauling

Painting

JON LA MOTTE

Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766

(650)740-8602
The Village
Handyman

• Fences • Tree Trimming
• Decks • Concrete Work
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling
Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Free Estimates

(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170

HANDYMAN

Electrical and
General home repair
(650)341-0100
(408)761-0071
License 619908

• Granite Install • Kitchens
• Decks
• Bathrooms
• Tile Repair
• Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates

Lic #514269

Lic.# 955492

(650)368-8861

(650)784-3079

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

Window Washing

Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

WINDOW

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting

WASHING

(415)971-8763

Call Joe

Tile

CUBIAS TILE

PAINTING

Lic. #479564

(650)701-6072
Lic# 979435

Hauling
AAA RATED!

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

$40 & UP
HAUL

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

MAURICIO

Roofing

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t )BOEZNBO 4FSWJDF

TAPIA

Commercial & Residential
- Hauling
- Demolition
- Concrete Services:
- Sidewalk
- Driveways
- Fences

ROOFING
Family business, serving the
Peninsula for over 30 years
Dry Rot, Gutters & Down Spout Repair

(650)341-7482

FULLY INSURED / LICENSED & BONDED

(650) 367-8795

Handy Help
CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES

Plumbing

CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

SAN MATEO

HAULING
$25 and up!
(415)850-2471

- Basement
& Lot Cleaning
- Yard Clean Ups
- Yard Landscaping
- Rubbish Removal

– SERVING THE PENINSULA –

- Power Wash
- Tree Service
- Clean Ups

PLEASE CALL OR TEXT

Mauricio Batista 415-286-8601
Landscaping

GET YOUR LAWN
READY FOR SPRING
Call us for our spring yard
maintenance special and get
your home looking beautiful!
Sprinklers, Irrigation, Rock
Gardens and Lawn Aeration!

LICENSE # 729271

Plumbing
CLEAN DRAINS PLUMBING
$89 TO CLEAN ANY

CLOGGED DRAIN! SEWER PIPES
Installation of Water Heaters,
Faucets, Toilets, Sinks, Gas, Water &
Sewer Lines. Trenchless
Replacement.

(650)461-0326
Lic.# 983312

Tree Service

Hillside Tree

Service

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming

MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

TAPIAROOFING.NET

Pruning

• Shaping
• Large

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Painting

CORDERO PAINTING
Commercial & Residential
Exterior & Interior
Free Estimates

(650)372-8361
Lic # 35740 Insured

Call Luis (650) 704-9635

Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

27

Attorneys

Food

Furniture

Health & Medical

Legal Services

Massage Therapy

Law Office of Jason Honaker

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F

Bedroom Express

LEGAL

HEALING MASSAGE

DOCUMENTS PLUS

Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050

2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

Food

CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

www.steelheadbrewery.com

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com

RENDEZ VOUS
CAFE
Tea, espresso, Duvel, Ballast
Point Sculpin and other beers
today

106 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR

Lunch• Dinner• Wknd Breakfast
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit

(650)372-0888

184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

CALIFORNIA

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

(650)591-3900

Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

Health & Medical

BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

Financial
RETIREMENT
PLAN ANALYSIS

401(k) & IRA & 403(b)
(650)458-0312
New Stage Investment Group
Hans Reese is a Registered Representative with, and securities offered
through, LPL Financial,
Member FINRA/SIPC

UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

(650) 295-6123

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking

Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

unitedamericanbank.com

1221 Chess Drive Foster City

Where Dreams Begin

EYE EXAMINATIONS

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE

Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com

Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental

Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

Housing

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)

Please call to RSVP

(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com

(650)574-2087

legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA

Marketing

GROW

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

Insurance

BLUE SHIELD OF
CALIFORNIA

www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Massage Therapy

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $24.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

(650)389-2468

10 am to 9 pm
New Masseuses
every two weeks

2305-A Carlos St.
Alongside Highway 1

Moss Beach
(Cash Only)

Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS

We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
All Credit Accepted
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker
CA Bureau of Real Estate#746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268

Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

CARE ON CALL
24/7 Care Provider
www.mycareoncall.com
(650)276-0270
1818 Gilbreth Rd., Ste 127
Burlingame
CNA, HHA & Companion Help

Tax Preparation
FULL BODY MASSAGE

$48

Belbien Day Spa

1204 West Hillsdale Blvd.
SAN MATEO
(650)403-1400

QUALITY,
FAST
Tax Returns
starting at:

$50

Jie`s Income Tax

1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 350
San Mateo, CA 94402
Office:650-274-0968
Cell:650-492-1273

Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

Wills & Trusts
ESTATE PLANNING
TrustandEstatePlan.com

San Mateo Office
1(844)687-3782
Complete Estate Plans
Starting at $399

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tuesday • Feb. 17, 2015

Rosaia’s

Fine Jewelers Providing

We Buy

Service

Buy&Sell We Offer
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Secure on-site parking
Security guard on-site

$4.9

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state of the art Thermo
Scientfic Precious Metal
Analyzer
Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday: 11am to 6pm
Thursday: 12pm to 6pm, Saturday: 10am to 5pm
577 Laurel Street (Nr. San Carlos Ave.) San Carlos

650.593.7400

Your full service fine jewelry store

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