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PURIM ARRIVES WEDNESDAY NIGHT pages 3, 28, 43, 44

THE SWEET SOUNDS OF TZIPPOREI SHALOM page 8


GETTING READY FOR THE ISRAEL FILM FESTIVAL page 12
SPECIAL ROCKLAND COUNTY COVERAGE page 20
FEBRUARY 27, 2015
VOL. LXXXIV NO. 23 $1.00

NORTH JERSEY

84

2015

JSTANDARD.COM

Celebrating
Moriah
Englewood school
marks semicentennial
page 32

IN THIS ISSUE

OurChildren
Our
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Finding Your Pediatrician

Camps Galore
Purim Food & Fun
Supplement to The Jewish Standard March 2015

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2 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015

Jewish Slandered
A PURIM NEWS PARODY BY LARRY YUDELSON

Kosher restaurants
no longer kosher?
The Rabbinical Council of Bergen
County Etc. (RCBCE) will oppose
the opening of any more kosher
restaurants in Teaneck, to give a
chance for the towns supply of Orthodox synagogues to catch up.
We have more than 20 kosher
restaurants in this town, yet fewer
than 20 frum synagogues, said
Rabbi Ploni Almoni. Thats just not
seemly. Its a shanda for the goyim,
to be brutally honest.
Even if you count the Shabbos minyan in the apartments, the
breakaway Shabbos minyan in the
other apartments, the minyan that
was accidentally locked into the
apartments storage room six years
ago and is presumed dead, and the
permanent floating crap game and
pick-up mincha in the back room
of Lous Dry Cleaners, theres still
more food than prayer, the RCBCE
official continued. That will not do.
As the Torah says: Man cannot
live on sushi alone.
The RCBCE will implement its
new policy in a multipronged approach.

Christie resists calls


to cancel Knesset speech
New Jersey Governor Chris Christie
wont back down from his planned address to the Israeli Knesset.
The speech has sparked controversy, since in a breach of diplomatic
etiquette he neglected to notify Israeli
officials of his plans to speak before he
circulated a YouTube video announcing
the speech and set an intern to work
hacking the Knessets Google Calendar
to make room for his talk.
Some have questioned the propriety of Governor Christie addressing
the Knesset at this time, coming as it
does a scant 11 months before the Iowa
caucuses.
But Christie insisted that Israel needs
to hear the warnings that only he can
bring about the danger posed to Israels
security by the Port Authority.

Nobody knows better than I that the


P. A. harbors criminals, Christie said.
And yet America wants Israel to reopen negotiations with the P.A.?
Christie said he also wanted to share
the secrets of his success in fighting
terrorism.
I closed that terror tunnel down. I
did it. I really did it, he said, referring
to the multibillion dollar ARC tunnel
project, which, he asserted, would have
enabled terrorists to cross under the
Hudson without lengthy delays.
Meanwhile, one of Christies harshest
critics is said to be planning an Israel
trip of her own.
I understand that in Israeli politics,
the sky is the limit for Jewish grandmothers, State Senator Loretta Weinberg said.

ON THE COVER: Children in Moriahs early childhood program have fun in one
of the schools outdoor playgrounds.

Candlelighting: Friday, February 27, 5:27 p.m.


Shabbat ends: Saturday, February 28, 6:27 p.m.

First, it will extend indefinitely


its policy of refusing to certify new
restaurants. That worked so well
with the Teaneck Cathouse, he
said, noting that since the restaurant opened without RCBCE supervision, it is so packed that theres
no room for people to go there.
Second, the RCBCE will launch a
campaign to increase the number of Orthodox synagogues in
Teaneck.
There has been only one
synagogue zoning issue before the
town council this year, said the
RCBCE spokesrabbi. Our neighbors will think we are no longer
devoted to God, God forbid.
Thirdly, it is investigating the
possibility of dual-use zoning for
kosher eating establishments.
Why shouldnt kosher restaurants be zoned as synagogues, if
customers are praying before and
after meals? And for that matter, why bother acquiring a costly
liquor license when you can just
designate a kiddush club?

New ISIS fatwa bans attacks


on synagogues for fear they will
lead to mixed dancing
Last weekends Ring of Peace
around Oslos main synagogue
brought a policy shift from an unexpected quarter.
No more attacks on synagogues,
no more, said a very disturbed ISIS
cleric, visibly shocked by the pictures of Muslim teens holding hands
in a symbolic move to protect the
synagogue.
Look at them. They are holding
hands. We have caused the youth of
Islam to sin!
What will be next? Mixed dancing? Allah forbid! he exclaimed.
The cleric, who is responsible for
operative planning for international
terror, said that perhaps it is time to
shift to infrastructure attacks.
If we could interfere with the abil-

ity of the infidels to transport people


and goods through busy cities. he
mused.
Perhaps our next target should be
the mules of America.

PUBLISHERS STATEMENT: (USPS 275-700 ISN 0021-6747) is


published weekly on Fridays with an additional edition every
October, by the New Jersey Jewish Media Group, 1086 Teaneck
Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666. Periodicals postage paid at Hackensack,
NJ and additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
New Jersey Jewish Media Group, 1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ
07666. Subscription price is $30.00 per year. Out-of-state subscriptions are $45.00, Foreign countries subscriptions are $75.00.
The appearance of an advertisement in The Jewish Standard does
not constitute a kashrut endorsement. The publishing of a paid
political advertisement does not constitute an endorsement of any
candidate political party or political position by the newspaper or
any employees.
The Jewish Standard assumes no responsibility to return unsolicited editorial or graphic materials. All rights in letters and unsolicited
editorial, and graphic material will be treated as unconditionally
assigned for publication and copyright purposes and subject to
JEWISH STANDARDs unrestricted right to edit and to comment
editorially. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without
written permission from the publisher. 2015

CONTENTS
NOSHES ...................................................4
ROCKLAND .........................................20
OPINION ............................................... 26
COVER STORY .................................... 32
TORAH COMMENTARY ...................46
CROSSWORD PUZZLE .................... 47
ARTS & CULTURE ..............................48
CALENDAR ..........................................49
GALLERY .............................................. 52
OBITUARIES ........................................ 53
CLASSIFIEDS ...................................... 54
REAL ESTATE...................................... 56

JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015 3

Noshes

Jerusalem Mayor Pulls a Cory Booker,


Helps Stop an Attack
ABC News headline, after Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat and his bodyguard jumped
from their car to capture a terrorist stabbing an Israeli near City Hall

POST-OSCAR:

Moore to premiere
in a darker satire
Map to the Stars,
a dark satire about
Hollywood, is
opening on Friday,
February 27; it is written
by BRUCE WAGNER, 60,
and directed by veteran
DAVID CRONENBERG,
71. The complex plot
focuses on the plight of a
former child star (Evan
Bird) and an aging
actress (Julianne Moore)
whose career is in
decline. Moore won a
best actress award for
her performance at the
2014 Cannes Film
Festival, and last week
she won the best actress
Oscar as well for her
performance as an
Alzheimers sufferer in
Still Alice. While
Cronenberg isnt a
household name, he has
a very long and praised
body of work ,and just
about everyone has seen
at least a few of his films.
Of his more recent work, I
thought that two Cronenberg films that starred
Viggo Mortensen were
particularly dramatically
compelling, if quite
violent. They are A
History of Violence
(2005) and Eastern
Promises (2007).
As everyone
knows by now,
PATRICIA ARQUETTE, 46, won the
best supporting actress
Oscar for Boyhood.
What I also know is that
she and Laurence
Fishburne are the only
stars of a CSI series to
have received an Oscar
nomination. Arquette,
who won an Emmy for

best actress for playing


the title character in a
long-running series,
Medium, returns to TV
as the star of the newest
entry in the CSI TV
franchise: CSI Cyber.
Heres part of the official
description: An FBI team
of cyber crime investigators, headed by Special
Agent Avery Ryan
(Arquette), works to
solve cases involving the
dark net and deep web.
Avery, a cyber-psychologist, is in charge of the
Cyber Crime Division at
Quantico, Virginia. The
team she leads is tasked
with solving Internet-related murders, cybertheft, hacking, sex
offenses and blackmail.
(Starts on CBS on
Thursday, March 5, at 10
p.m.)
Arquettes decision to
return to TV wasnt that
surprising, despite her
Oscar win. First of all,
there is always a shortage of good roles for
actors of either gender
approaching 50 and, sad
to say, women have more
difficulty with that than
their male colleagues.
Second, Arquette has
a 12-year-old daughter.
TV work in Los Angeles,
where she lives, means
regular hours and very
little far-away location
shooting as is the case
with many films.
Battle Creek, a
police drama
with wry comedy
premieres on CBS on
March 1 (10PM). Its set in
Battle Creek, Michigan,
the home of Kelloggs

Bruce Wagner

David Cronenberg

Jason Isaacs and Alison Sudol in Dig.

Get the Jewish guy


for the Irish role
Patricia Arquette

David Shore

(but isnt filmed there).


The basic plot: the FBI
sets up a field office
across the hall from the
bare-bones Battle Creek
police department and is
tasked with aiding local
law enforcement. The FBI
has money and tons of
gizmos, while the locals
dont even have working
tasers. Josh Duhamel
plays an FBI agent, and
Dean Winters plays a
gruff but sharp Battle
Creek police detective
who works with the FBI.
The shows quirky humor
is exemplified by these
advance plot nuggets:
the citys mayor is a
dead-ringer for Torontos
wacky ex-mayor, Rob
Ford, and, in the second
episode, the police have
to deal with a criminal

cartel selling stolen


maple syrup.
The co-creator of the
series is the hot Vince
Gilligan (creator of Breaking Bad), who wrote the
Battle Creek pilot 12
years ago. His Breaking
Bad success got CBS to
put Battle Creek on the
schedule and the studio
brought in DAVID SHORE,
55, the creator of House,
to update the pilot and
help write new episodes.
I raised the child that Gilligan birthed, Shore said.
Big-time movie director BRYAN SINGER, 49
(X-Men) produces and
directed the pilot. Shore,
by the way, comes from a
religious Canadian family.
His twin younger brothers are both Aish HaTorah
N.B.
(Orthodox) rabbis.

A 10-part USA network miniseries, Dig, also starts


on March 5 at 10 p.m. Much of the series is set in
Israel and the pilot was filmed there. Heres the official description: When Peter Connelly, an FBI agent
recently stationed in Jerusalem, begins investigating
the murder of a young American, he realizes that he
has uncovered an ancient international conspiracy
that threatens to change the course of human history.
Certain that the dangerous prophecy is nearing fruition, Connelly must race against the clock to unravel its
mystery.
He is supposed to be an Irish American. So, of
course, they went out and cast a British Jew, JASON
ISAACS, 51, to play him. Actually, Isaacs has played a
lot of American roles and he can do a credible American accent. He probably still is best known for playing Lucius Malfoy in the Harry Potter movies. (Anne
Heche co-stars as Connellys boss.)
N.B.

California-based Nate Bloom can be reached at


Middleoftheroad1@aol.com

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201.820.3907

ISRAEL FILM

SATURDAY, MARCH 7 | OPENING NIGHT HILL START


TENAFLY CINEMA 4 | 1 WEST RAILROAD AVENUE, TENAFLY
Doors open 8:30 pm | Screening begins 9:00 pm | 90 minutes | Director: Oren Stern | Hebrew with subtitles
ADMISSION TICKETS $25 | includes lm and dessert reception to follow at Tavlin, 7 West Railroad Avenue, Tenay
Israeli comedic genius, Shlomo Bar-Aba stars in this dramedy about a man whose middle-class family is on the verge of
falling apart. A strict parent, he must deal with a mild-mannered son, an unmarried
daughter, a wife in a coma, a wedding, and all that goes with it, including hot tempers,
Bring a can of food
love, passion, and a road test! Some scenes contain nudity.
for our communitywide food drive.

SUNDAY, MARCH 8 IS THAT YOU?

Bring a can of food


for our communitywide food drive.

STARPLEX LUXURY CINEMAS 12 | 75 CHALLENGER ROAD, RIDGEFIELD PARK


7:00 pm | 81 minutes | Director: Dani Menkin | English and Hebrew with subtitles
ADMISSION TICKETS $10 | At The Door $12
Sixty year-old Ronnie travels to the United States in search of his long-lost love, Rachel. He meets up with Myla, a lm
student, whos fascinated by what he intends to do. She follows him on his journey, and makes a documentary about
his search. Is That You was nominated at the 2014 Ophir Awards (Israel Academy) for Best Picture.
Discussion following the lm with actress Suzanne Sadler who plays Rachel in Is That You.

TUESDAY, MARCH 10 SUPER WOMEN


WAYNE YMCA | 1 PIKE DRIVE, WAYNE
7:00 pm | 80 minutes | Director: Yael Kipper and Ronen Zaretzky

Bring a can of food


for our communitywide food drive.

| Hebrew and Russian with subtitles

ADMISSION TICKETS $10 | At The Door $12


This is a story of ve cashiers, most of whom are Russian, who work the same shift in a Tel Aviv supermarket. The lm
follows their relationships, the mutual support and solidarity they show for each other when dealing with management
and customers, as well as the difculties they face making a living, and doing what they can do to better their lives.

Discussion following the lm with Boris Fishman, author of A Replacement Life.


Presented in Partnership with COJECO (Council of Jewish migr Community Organizations)

THURSDAY, MARCH 12 CUPCAKES


KOLO KLUB | 1422 GRAND STREET, HOBOKEN
7:30 pm | 90 minutes | Director: Eytan Fox | English, Hebrew and French with subtitles

Bring a can of food


for our communitywide food drive.

ADMISSION TICKETS $12 | At The Door $15


Cupcakes is a feel-good musical comedy about a group of neighbors who get together to watch Universong, a
ctional take-off on a Eurovision contest. They are less than impressed by the ofcial Israeli entry. Believing they
can do better, and as a diversion from their otherwise boring and stressed-out lives, the friends create a song and
record it on one of their cell phones. Unexpectedly, it becomes Israels entry for the contest. The lm is a celebration
of music, friendship, love and free spirit. Cupcakes was the winner, Audience Award for Best Comedy, at the 2014
Los Angeles Jewish Film Festival.

VISIT WWW.JFNNJ.ORG/FILMFESTIVAL
PLEASE BE SURE TO PRINT AND BRING YOUR EMAIL CONFIRMATION. IT IS YOUR TICKET.
Tickets are going fast. Order online Now! Walk-ins may be turned away due to ticket availability. Check the website for updates.

6 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015

FESTIVAL

MARCH 7-22, 2015


201.820.3907

SUNDAY, MARCH 15 THE GREEN PRINCE


KAPLEN JCC ON THE PALISADES | 411 EAST CLINTON AVENUE, TENAFLY
7:00 pm | 100 minutes | Director: Nadav Schirman | English and Hebrew with subtitles
ADMISSION TICKETS $10 Kaplen JCC members | $12 non-members | At The Door $15
This real-life thriller tells the story of one of Israels most prized intelligence sources, Mosab Hassan Youssef, the son
of top Hamas leader Sheikh Hassan Youssef. For over a decade Mosab, code name, The Green Prince was the number
one source for the Shin Bet, Israels secret security service. The Green Prince is a gripping account of terror, betrayal,
friendship, and impossible choices.

Discussion following the lm with counterterrorism expert Olivier Guitta, Managing Director at
GlobalStrat, an international security and geopolitical risk consultancy rm.

MONDAY, MARCH 16 HILL START


RAMSEY THEATRE | 125 SOUTH MAIN STREET, RAMSEY
7:00 pm | 90 minutes | Director: Oren Stern | Hebrew with subtitles
ADMISSION TICKETS $10 | At The Door $12
Israeli comedy-genius, Shlomo Bar-Aba stars in this dramedy about a man whose middle-class family is on the verge
of falling apart. A strict parent, he must deal with a mild-mannered son, an unmarried daughter, a wife in a coma, a
wedding, and all that goes with it, including hot tempers, love, passion, and a road test! Some scenes contain nudity.
Discussion following the lm with George Robinson, lm critic at the Jewish Week
Presented in Partnership with Barnert Temple, Franklin Lakes

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18 GETT


TEANECK CINEMAS | 503 CEDAR LANE, TEANECK
7:00 pm | 115 minutes | Hebrew, Arabic & French with Subtitles | Directors: Ronit Elkabetz, Shlomi Elkabetz
ADMISSION TICKETS $10 |At The Door $12
This drama, set in an Israeli rabbinic court, illustrates the struggle facing women seeking religious divorce. The story
unfolds over a period of ve years, during which Viviane Amsalem and her lawyer, Carmel Ben-Tovim, try every possible
legal maneuver to persuade the court to compel her stubborn husband, Elisha Amsalem, to grant her a gett.
Discussion after the lm with Rabbi Jeremy Stern, Executive Director, Organization for the Resolution of Agunot.
Presented by Jewish Federations Circle of Partners and in Partnership with Congregation Rinat Yisrael, Teaneck

SUNDAY, MARCH 22 ZERO MOTIVATION


KAPLEN JCC ON THE PALISADES | 411 EAST CLINTON AVENUE, TENAFLY
7:00 pm | 100 minutes | Director: Talya Lavie | Hebrew with subtitles
ADMISSION TICKETS $10 Kaplen JCC members | $12 non-members | At The Door $12
The HR ofce at a remote IDF base in the desert serves as the setting for this movie. Zero Motivation, the biggest Israeli
box-ofce smash of the year, involves a group of young women biding their time, pushing paper, and playing computer
games. They spend their time counting down the minutes until they can return to civilian life. This dark comedy focuses
on their boredom, their clashing personalities, as well as their commitment to friendship, love, and country. Some scenes
contain violence and nudity. Discussion following the lm with Bur Ashrov, Captain (res.), IDF Spokespersons Unit
Leslie Billet, Chair | Dana Adler, Lauri Bader, Martin Cohen, Suzette Diamond,
Susan Erdfarb, David Jacobowitz, Sue Ann Levin, Film Festival Advisory Committee

MARC
7-22, H
2015

JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015 7

Local
Sounds of joy
Childrens choir ranked number one by congregation
Lois Goldrich

erhaps if Tzipporei Shaloms


music were to be reviewed by
a professional critic, the word
wow might not find its way
into the finished product. But to the congregants of Congregation Beth Sholom in
Teaneck home to the childrens choir
the word seems just about right.
It was the top-rated program in two
synagogue surveys, said Ronit Hanan, the
shuls musical director, who co-founded
and co-directs the group with congregant
Adina Avery-Grossman.
The a capella singing group has
appeared with Safam, recorded a selection on a CD with the noted chazzan Netanel Hershtik, sung with Neil Sedaka, and
joined with the synagogues adult choir,
Tavim, on special occasions, most recently
at CBSs recent Shabbaton. They also participate in an annual community-wide
junior choir festival together with choirs
from local Reform congregations.
But most performances are for its own
congregation, at the conclusion of Shabbat
services.
Now composed of some 30 youngsters
in first through sixth grades, the choir
began with seven children. Four of them
were the two directors own kids.
They practice every Saturday morning
and, according to their parents, theyre
determined to get to shul on time. She
wants to leave early for shul, which gets
us to shul earlier, noted Rabbi Rachel
Kahn-Troster, mother of first-grader Liora
Palavin. And parent Aviv Efrat drives all
the way from Montvale so that sixth-grade
daughter Chantal can get to rehearsal.
Shes been doing it for a couple of
years and really enjoying it, he said. Its
the reason we are members. Its pretty
impressive the way our child is guiding us

Tzipporei Shalom sings in the 2014 junior choir festival at Temple Avodat Shalom in River Edge.

into shul.
Both parents and choir members credit
directors Hanan and Avery-Grossman with
the groups success. And not only do they
make beautiful music, the singers by
their own report are having fun.
The directors both daughters of cantors didnt meet until they came to
Teaneck, despite the fact that they grew
up living some 10 minutes apart.
Ronit Hanan is a trained cantor but does
not hold that position in the Teaneck congregation. They created a position for me
as music director, she said. There are so
many phenomenally talented people here
and they havent had a cantor and didnt

want someone to take over and lead services every week. I lead sometimes, but
its still largely lay-led. Members really feel
engaged and involved.
As part of her job, Ms. Hanan helps
interested members learn how to lead services and hone their skills. Im able to be
an enabler, she said. She also helps lead
High Holiday services and conducts the
Bergen County chapter of HaZamir: The
International Jewish High School Choir.
Neither director remembers exactly
how and when Tzipporei Shalom was created, but Ms. Hanan thinks it was 1997 or
1998, when my daughter was in second
grade. A congregant approached us, and

From left, Tziporrei Shalom performs at the junior choir festival in 2013 and 2014. In 2013, Adina Avery-Gross and Ronit
Hanan, standing facing the children, lead; in 2014, that is Ms. Hanan conducting.
8 Jewish Standard FEBRUARY 27, 2015

said there was a little down time when the


children were not in services. Maybe, she
said, we could start a childrens choir.
It took two minutes to say yes. Were
both daughters of cantors and we have a
large and eclectic Jewish music repertoire
and musical training.
Ms. Hanan said that in many Conservative synagogues, a childrens choir will
do musical selections as part of the service. Its the culture of our shul not to have
that during services. They just come up
and perform a few songs at the end of the
service.
The music they sing includes many
Israeli and chasidic pieces, but they are
not necessarily liturgical, she said. In
addition, we try to punctuate each year
now with something really special.
In 2013, the group made a recording of
its greatest hits. Some 10 years ago, the
synagogue had a musical celebration
including Tzipporei Shalom, and invited
the late singer/songwriter Debbie Friedman to join them.
Last year we were guest performers
with Safam, and this year the older kids
sang with Cantor Netanel Hershtik, Ms.
Hanan said. He wanted a childrens choir
to sing a Meir Finkelstein piece on his new
album. They recorded at Avatar Studios in
Manhattan.
The young singers may participate in the
choir starting in first grade, and can stay

Local
as long as they want, usually until sixth or seventh
grade. There are no auditions.
Anybody who likes to sing and can get to shul on
time is welcome, Ms. Hanan said, adding that by
seventh grade, the youngsters are busy with bnai
mitzvah, and by the time theyre in eighth grade they
can audition for HaZamir. The Bergen County chapter
of HaZamir, which has about 30 members this year,
meets at CBS.
The singers different ages do not affect the music,
Ms. Hanan said. Everyone will join in on the chorus,
but a small ensemble will do the wordier verses. In
addition, the older children may serve as section leaders and may even come up and conduct if the group is
singing a three-part round.
Neither director anticipated the choirs huge
success.
We had no idea, Ms. Hanan said. It was just an
experience for kids on a Shabbat morning. But it
worked so well that it became a holistic part of the
synagogue.
It became an important part of the childrens education as well, she added. We teach them Hebrew, Jewish culture, and musical terminology. They know the
meaning of an upbeat and a downbeat, a crescendo
and a diminuendo, legato and staccato. They also
learn about working together, teamwork, and blending as a group.
Ms. Hanan and Ms. Avery-Grossman choose the
music.
We keep our eyes and ears open, Ms. Hanan said.
When they hear something that might work, she often
transcribes and notates the piece before teaching it to
the children.
Tzipporei Shalom is precious to Ms. Hanan. I call
it Kvelling 101, she said. I get a huge kick out of the
kids, and I learn from them. The enjoyment goes both
ways. I adore sharing the joy of Jewish music with the
next generation. When the group exploded, it was just
the icing on the cake.
Ms. Avery-Grossman, a partner in the trademark
licensing agency Brandgenuity, notes that while
she and Ms. Hanan had never met before moving to
Teaneck, we grew up on parallel planes. The legend
goes that my dad recommended her dad for a cantorial position.
Echoing Ms. Hanans statement that the two had no
grand plan, she explained the way the group grew.
From a core group of about seven children, we grew
to 12 to 15, and by our fifth or sixth year had a critical
mass of 20. Now it fluctuates between 25 and 40.
Ms. Avery-Grossman said that there are many reasons for the groups success.
We dont just teach Hebrew songs, she said. They
sing in multiple languages, which is intriguing to them.
Theyve sung in Yiddish, Zulu, Hebrew, Lugandan,
and Ladino. Theyre challenged in new ways. We treat
them like musical professionals, make the music serious. They understand that they cant start singing
without a note and a count. Members are also taught
how to stand, how to use their voices like color, how
to present, and how to [achieve] dynamics. Were trying to make music.
She and Ms. Hanan work well together.
There has never been a competition about how
this is run. We bring different skills to the party. Ronit
has the musical training and skills. I studied voice but
I dont play the piano or have a degree. Im more irreverent, Ronit is more professional. We dont compete
for airtime.
As cantors daughters, she said, Its hard to be a

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With a massive fan base, more than 20 million views on YouTube, numerous TV appearances and proven
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and inspired hundreds of audiences worldwide. Using nothing more than the unadulterated human voice,
a clean-cut presentation and a little Jewish humor, this unique group of singers
is able to connect with fans of all backgrounds and ages.
Purchase tickets online at jccotp.org/maccabeats or call Judi at 201.408.1450
GENERAL ADMISSION: $18 MEMBERS, $20 NONMEMBERS
PREFERRED SEATING: $30 MEMBERS, $36 NONMEMBERS
This concert has been generously underwritten by an anonymous donor. All proceeds benefit programs for senior adult services at the JCC.
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Jewish standard FeBrUarY 27, 2015 9

Local

Affordable BRCA screening


available for all Ashkenazi Jews
MIRYAM Z. WAHRMAN, PH.D.

new program at Yeshiva Universitys Albert Einstein College of


Medicine and Montefiore Health
System in the Bronx is offering
affordable genetic testing for the Ashkenazi
Jewish BRCA cancer mutations.
Anyone who is of Ashkenazi Jewish
descent, with at least one Ashkenazi Jewish
grandparent, is eligible for the testing for a
modest fee of $100.
For many years the recommendations to
test for the gene were based on family or
personal history of breast or ovarian cancer. But a research study recently revealed
that in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, the
risk of harboring BRCA cancer genes is high
whether or not there is a family history of
breast and ovarian cancer.
One in forty Ashkenazi Jews carry
genetic glitches in their BRCA1 or BRCA2

never developed the disease,


screening, emphasizing that
he said, still, I could be at
finding out if the mutation
high risk. Mr. Lander said his
is present gives the opportunity to reduce risk and to
colleagues at Montefiore who
detect cancers early, while
attend genetics conferences
they still are treatable. The
have heard speculations that
World Health Organization
within ten years every baby
has established criteria for
will have its entire genome
population screening: That
sequenced that is, there
these cancers pose a seriwill be full genetic discloChani Wiesman
ous health burden, that
sure. How much is too much
there is reliable informaknowledge? Mr. Lander pontion that these mutations raise the risk of
dered. Were not here to tell you what
cancer, and that effective interventions
to do, but we are making it available and
exist. Because BRCA fulfills these criteaffordable for those who want to be tested.
ria, authors Mary Claire-King (who discovChani Wiesman is one of the genetic
ered the BRCA genes), Ephrat Levy-Lahad,
counselors working at the program. She
and Amnon Lahad conclude in their JAMA
reported that this type of program has been
Viewpoint piece, Women do not benefit
established in Canada, Israel, and most
by practices that protect them from inforrecently England. The Einstein/Montefiore
mation regarding their own health. They
program differs from the others in that the
should have the choice to learn if they carry
other countries have socialized health care,
so their testing is free, rather than subsidized. She said that even the $100 charge
may be a barrier for prospective patients. In
Toronto, Ms. Wiesman reported, they had
two to three thousand responses within a
few days of opening. The response rate at
the Bronx-based program so far has been
more modest.
BRCA testing for the three Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA mutations can cost up to $600 for
an uninsured person. If you have any family history, the insurance company will pay
an actionable mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2.
for the testing, said Peggy Cottrell, a genetic
counselor at Holy Name Medical Center in
( JAMA is the Journal of the American Medical Association.)
Teaneck. Talking about testing all Ashkenazi Jews, she noted that there are defiThe new Einstein/Montefiore program,
nitely people out there who would worry
which is supported by donations from New
about this and want to find out if theyre at
York real-estate financier Michael Stoler, is
risk, but its not something that I would tell
being run by the Program for Jewish Genetic
people they should or shouldnt do. Ms.
Health. Bruce Lander, the programs executive director, said that one of our mantras
Cottrell reported that Dr. Mary Claire King
is knowledge is power. He said that it is
has recommended BRCA testing for the
important to have access to information to
entire general population. That is more
protect you, and to protect your children.
controversial, Ms. Cottrell said. Some in
Mr. Lander, 44, a father of three who lives
the scientific community disagreed with
in New City, N.Y., is considering having the
her, because the cost would outweigh the
genetic testing himself. He explained that
benefit. Since there could be many BRCA
his grandfather had cancer when he was
mutations in the more diverse general
50. Although Landers mother and aunt
population, the cost of screening for all the

Women do not benefit by practices


that protect them from information
regarding their own health. They should
have the choice to learn if they carry an
actionable mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2.
genes that elevate the risk of breast and
ovarian cancer to as high as 80 percent
by the time they are 80 years old. In fact,
the landmark study of randomly selected
Ashkenazi Jewish men in Israel found
that 51 percent of familiesharboring
BRCA1 or BRCA1 mutations had little or
no history of relevant cancer.
Efrat Gabai-Kapara and the 15 co-authors
who published this report in the prestigious
journal PNAS Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences recommended that
all Ashkenazi Jews above the age of 25 be
screened for these mutations, regardless of
family history of cancer.
An op-ed written by three of the coauthors presents the argument for genetic

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versions of the gene can be significantly


more expensive. In the Ashkenazi Jewish
lineage there are only three main versions
of BRCA mutated genes three founder
genes that increase the risk of cancer, and
which were passed down from generation
to generation for hundreds of years. In the
Jewish community there is a higher chance
of finding [the genes] with less cost, Ms.
Cottrell said.
Anyone of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, 25
years old or older, who wants to be tested
for the Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2
mutations can go to the programs website,
at brcacommunitystudy.einstein.yu.edu,
and apply to be tested. The family history
questionnaire helps to evaluate who is in
the high-risk category, based on incidence
and types of cancer in the family, as defined
by National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. The NCCN guideline defines
as at high risk anyone who is an Ashkenazi
Jew with at least one family member, a first
or second degree relative, who has had
breast or ovarian cancer at any age. First
or second degree relatives include mother,
sister, aunt, grandmother, daughter, and
grandchild. Those judged to be high risk are
offered comprehensive one-on-one genetic
counseling and testing.
On the other hand, applicants who do
not have family history of relevant cancers,
and are rated as low risk, are invited to
attend a free group genetic counseling session where they will learn about the genetic
foundations for cancer and how hereditary
breast and ovarian cancer are transmitted.
In Israel and Canada they did not do group
counseling for the low risk patients, they
handed out materials, Ms. Wiesman said.
We think people need to be prepared to
learn the information.
The group counseling session is an
opportunity to educate patients. For
instance, they are told that most of the
time cancer does not have a hereditary
basis, that the BRCA mutations are rare in
the general population but more common
in Ashkenazi Jews, and that if someone
tests positive for a mutation there is a 50
percent chance of passing it to offspring.
There is also a 50 percent chance for a sibling of a person with the mutation to test
positive for it. Some families without a lot
of cancer cases in their family may have
the BRCA mutation, Ms. Wiesman said.
The test is done using a saliva sample,

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Local
and anyone who tests positive for a BRCA mutation is
brought in for one-on-one counseling. The program will
recommend specialists to follow up, and to develop a
plan that will be best for each person.
It is important to note that the prognosis for people
with BRCA mutations varies widely, Ms. Wiesman said.
If there are five women with BRCA mutations, one or
two may develop breast cancer and the others may be
in their eighties without cancer. How, she asked rhetorically, can it be that there are such differences between
cases? There are researchers out there trying to answer
that question.
About 5 to 10 percent of responders so far have been
men. Men with BRCA mutations also have a higher risk
of breast and other cancers, and can pass down the gene
to their children.
From my perspective, creating more awareness in
the Ashkenazi Jewish population will bring in people
who are in fact high risk, Ms. Wiesman said. In the last
few weeks, 80 percent of people who signed up were
high risk, based on NCCN guidelines. We ask ourselves,
why havent they come in sooner? Some have very significant family histories of breast cancer.
Ms. Wiesman, 30, who lives in Riverdale, N.Y., and is
the mother of a 4-month-old son, said that she herself is
not from a high risk family, so she has decided not to get
tested at this point. I feel like I do not need to know right
now, she said. Even though I advocate for the ability for
people to do testing in my own work, personally I am not
an information seeker in that way. During my pregnancy,
I didnt opt to do every genetic test out there.
The benefit of the genetic counseling process in lowrisk patients is that you dont have to get the test, she
noted. I have plenty of patients who meet with me and
decide that now is not the right time. The one thing
important for the community to recognize is that people who come from high-risk families, once they turn
25, if they dont want to get testing, thats fine. But they
should get screening as if they are at high risk. And the
insurance companies should cover high-risk screening. We treat people as if theyre positive until proven
otherwise.
Ms. Wiesman noted that women who test positive can
reduce the risk by increased surveillance through mammograms and breast MRIs, and by risk-reducing surgeries. The NCCN guidelines for screening high-risk women
includes getting an annual mammogram or breast
MRI from the time they are between 25 and 29. After
they turn 30, recommendations include a semiannual
screening, alternating mammograms and breast MRIs,
every six months. In addition, high-risk women should
consider transvaginal ultrasound and CA125 blood tests
every six months. Those tests are designed to detect
ovarian cancer, although they have not been proven to
detect ovarian cancer at an early and treatable stage.
The decision of whether or not to get testing is made
by the patient, Ms. Wiesman said. I just want people
to get the right care.
The Program for Jewish Genetic Health runs screening programs to test for BRCA mutations as well as
Jewish genetic diseases that affect offspring, including
Tay-Sachs and Canavan disease. Informative websites
sponsored by the program include www.BRCAcommunity.com, and www.MyJewishGeneticHealth.com. For
more information go to www.einstein.yu.edu/centers/
jewish-genetic-health.
For testing, go to brcacommunitystudy.einstein.
yu.edu

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JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015 11

Local

Made in Israel, watched in Jersey


Jewish Federation to screen award-winning films across the area
MIRIAM RINN

he Jewish Federation of Northern New Jerseys seventeenth


Israel Film Festival is scheduled
March 7 to 22, when seven Israeli
films will be shown across the area.
Our connection to Israel is central to
who we are as a federation, the director of
marketing services, Miriam Allenson, said.
And a celebration of Israeli film is just one
way to express that reality.
The festival is screening films at venues
in different communities to make sure that
people all over northern New Jersey can
attend. Films are being shown from Tenafly
to Wayne to Ridgefield Park. We have a
very wide area that we cover, Ms. Allenson
said. Filmgoers can buy tickets online at
www.jfnnj.org/filmfestival. There might be
some available at the door, but patrons are
urged to buy tickets ahead of time.
The film selection committee chose
movies that both confront important
issues and are excellent films, according
to Danit Sibovits, director of the Center
for Israel Engagement. One of the goals is
to show the country as it is now, she said.
Its a way to truly engage people with
Israel. Accordingly, Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem is a powerful indictment of
Israels divorce laws, with an extraordinary
performance from actress and filmmaker

Super Women

Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem


12 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015

Zero Motivation
Ronit Elkabetz. The film won best feature
at the 2014 Jerusalem Film Festival and was
an official selection at Cannes. Gett, like
so many other films in the festival, is being
shown in partnership with a synagogue or
community organization. In this case its
Teanecks Congregation Rinat Yisrael on
March 18. A discussion will follow the 7 p.m. screening at the
Teaneck Cinemas with Rabbi Jeremy Stern, executive director of
the Organization for the Resolution of Agunot.
Cupcakes, on the other hand,
is a lighthearted musical comedy
about a group of Tel Aviv friends
watching the kitschy Universong
(aka Eurovision) song contest.
Certain that they could do better,
they record a song on a cellphone,
and to their surprise, it becomes

Israels entry. The film won the audience


award for best comedy at the Los Angeles
Jewish Film Festival. Tickets to the March 12
screening in Hoboken include a drink and
of course cupcakes.
Commenting on the maturation of the
Israeli film industry, Ms. Sibovits said,
Israel has become a world leader in film
as well as so many other areas. To choose
a balanced and varied selection of films,
the committee began to screen films almost
a year ago, watching many more than the
final seven. They also formed partnerships
with community groups to enhance their
outreach, and for the first time the federation secured corporate sponsorships to
defray some of the cost.
One of those sponsors is the Israeli American Council, and many festival attendees are
Israeli immigrants who live in the area. We
are also working with the Russian community for one of the films, Super Women,
Ms. Sibovits said. This documentary focuses

Cupcakes

on several Russian-speaking cashiers at


an Israeli supermarket. Low skilled and
low paid, the women struggle to make
ends meet under the constant threat of
reduced hours. In addition to a portrait of
some Russian immigrants to Israel, Super
Women deals with a voracious economic
system that punishes people at the bottom.
That film is presented in partnership with
COJECO thats the Council of Jewish migr Community Organizations.
The festivals closing film, set for March
22, is Zero Motivation, a dark comedy about a group of young female army
recruits in a remote desert base. Irreverent and often outrageous, the movie is the
blockbuster of the year in Israel, according to Ms. Sibovits. To be a legitimate film
festival, we have to show the biggest Israeli
film, she said, whether it suits the politicalcorrectness needs of some viewers or not.
For more information, go to www.jfnnj.
org/filmfestival.

Local

Defending free speech


Local high school student pens
winning essay on campus rights
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
Winning a $10,000 college scholarship for a
days work is a pretty sweet deal.
But although Maayanot Yeshiva High
School for Girls junior Arianna Samet of
Teaneck didnt spend hours agonizing over
her prize-winning essay, the judges at FIRE
(thats the Foundation for Individual Rights
Education) clearly felt it stood out from
among 2,800 essays submitted by juniors
and seniors around the country on the
theme of censorship on college campuses.
According to its website, FIREs mission
is to defend and sustain individual rights
at Americas colleges and universities.
Arianna had never heard of FIRE until
she came across an ad about the essay
contest on a college-prep website recommended by the guidance department at
Maayanot.
While I was researching colleges it
came up, and I thought it would be interesting, she said. It didnt take me that
long to write the essay. I spent some time
thinking about how to approach it and
structure it, and then I wrote and sent it
in within the day.

It didnt take me
that long to write
the essay. I spent
some time
thinking about
how to approach
it and structure it.
ARIANNA SAMET

Did she show it to anyone else? I asked


my mother to read it to see if it was coherent, replied Arianna, who has not yet
taken the SAT exam and has not decided to
which colleges she will apply. But she hopes
to pursue a career connected with politics
and journalism.
Her essay, titled America is The Land of
the Free and the Home of the Brave. But
Are its Universities? begins by recounting how she first learned to appreciate the
value of free speech from her grandparents, who were Holocaust survivors. She
segues from that to examples of curtailed
free speech on college campuses, and concludes that college is a place for young
adults to discover themselves through
exposure to a diverse culture and opinion
pool. Freedom of speech is essential for
them to have this opportunity.

Arianna Samet

Maayanots principal, Rivka Kahan,


said, We are so proud of Ariannas work
for its intellectual rigor and insight, but
even more so because it demonstrates
her understanding of the intersection
between the personal and the intellectual, and her commitment to researching and taking a stand on the important
issues of our society.
The FIRE essay contest was not the
first that Arianna has won.
When she was a seventh-grader at
Manhattan Day School, one of her teachers promised extra credit to any student
willing to enter the Kaplun Foundations
Who is Your Hero? writing contest. Arianna took the bait, and won the $1,800
first prize for her essay about the good
works of Jodi Samuels, her former nextdoor neighbor on Manhattans Upper
West Side. This essay beat out more than
300 entries from all over the world.
Arianna claims that she does not write
often, but she is on the staff of several
Maayanot school publications, as well
as its debate and Model Congress teams.
And she was accepted into the New York
Jewish Weeks Write On For Israel twoyear advocacy-training program for high
school juniors and seniors.
Arianna is also co-president of MYPAC,
the schools political action committee
for Israel. We bring in speakers and
make people aware of how to advocate
for Israel, she said.
Now that she is familiar with FIREs
mission, Arianna believes that it is vital.
I think its very important to help instill
in the next generation the value of the
Constitution, she said.
Arianna and her parents and two
younger siblings moved to Teaneck last
October, and the family belongs to Congregation Bnai Yeshurun there.

Come Home
for the Holiday.
Have plans for Passover? Consider yourself invited to
Jewish Home Assisted Living, where you can spend the
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NOW ON STAGE

THiS
iS

Jewish Culture
Downtown

Dr. Azzan Yadin-Israel will link scripture and


Springsteen in his talk at Congregation Beth
Sholom.

Whos the boss


of the Bible?
Rutgers professor
an expert on the
interpretations of
Rabbi Akiva and
Bruce Springsteen

DISCUSSION SERIES

LARRY YUDELSON

AJC in Action:
The Future of European Jewry

r. Azzan Yadin-Israel, arguably


New Jerseys foremost expert
on the teachings of Rabbi
Akiva, is coming to Teaneck
Saturday night to speak about Bruce
Springsteen.
Dr. Yadin-Israel is an associate professor
at Rutgers, where he teaches Jewish studies
and classics. Late last year, Princeton University Press published his second book,
Scripture and Tradition: Rabbi Akiva and
the Triumph of Midrash.
But it is a 10-week freshman seminar on
God in the lyrics of Bruce Springsteen that
put him on the synagogue speaking circuit.
Rutgers asked Dr. Yadin-Israel for a
topic that would engage freshman, and
he remembered the good response he
had received for an article in the Jewish Review of Books on biblical and talmudic references in the lyrics of Hadag
Hanachash, an Israeli hip hop group. A
fan of Mr. Springsteens music since his
high school days in suburban Cleveland,
Dr. Yadin-Israel had been struck by how
often the New Jersey rocker mobilized
biblical images and discussed biblical themes. So he printed out the lyrics and started going over them with a

The Jewish Weeks Gary Rosenblatt will moderate a


groundbreaking series featuring AJC experts who will
provide in-depth, on-the ground insights into the new
reality confronting Jews across Europe and beyond.

With David Harris, AJC Executive Director


TUE | MAR 3 | 7 P.M.
With Simone Rodan-Benzaquen, Director, AJC Paris
WED | MAR 11 | 7 P.M.
With Deidre Berger, Director, AJC Berlin
WED | MAR 18 | 7 P.M.
Free. Donations welcome.

DISCUSSION
Anti-Semitism and
Political Extremism
in Hungary and Greece
SUN | MAR 15 | 2 P.M.
Free. Donations welcome.

WINE TASTING
The Covenant Kitchen:
Food and Wine for
the New Jewish Table
SUN | MAR 8 | 2:30 P.M.
$10, $7 students/seniors, $5 members
LoWER MANHATTAN | 646.437.4202 | oPEN SUNfRi
MoRE PRoGRAM & ExHiBiTioN iNfo @ WWW.MJHNyC.oRG
Public programs are made possible through a generous gift
from Mrs. Lily Safra.

When: 7:30-10:30 p.m.,


Saturday, February 28
Who: Dr. Azzan Yadin-Israel

Like us on Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard
14 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015

What: Finding Bruce in the Bible


Where: Congregation Beth Sholom,
354 Maitland Ave., Teaneck

highlighter, noting every biblical and


theological reference.
The students in his course, of course,
are not really of the generation that was
committed to Springsteen, Dr. YadinIsrael said. He graduated from high school
in 1985, perhaps at the peak moment of
Springsteens commercial success. He does
get some very serious Springsteen fans in
his course, he said, but other students are
just curious about this juxtaposition of a
rock singer and theology.
For the class, he provides his students
with lyrics to analyze and biblical sources
to read. If were reading Adam Raised a
Cain, Ill assign chapter four of Genesis,
he said. The class will read that, read
the song, and try to see what Springsteen is doing with the particular biblical
narrative.
Dr. Yadin-Israels appearance at
Teanecks Congregation Beth Sholom
on Saturday night is scheduled to last
three hours. Thats not long enough to go
through the syllabus for the whole seminar.
But it is enough time to explore what Dr.
Yadin-Israel sees as a very interesting arc
in Springsteens songwriting.
In his very earliest recordings, and also
some of his unrecorded songs, theres a
fairly ardent anti-religious, or at least antiCatholic, view, he said. Songs on Greetings from Asbury Park like Lost in the
Flood or Hard to be a Saint in the City
have aggressively negative religious images.
I dont know him, but it makes sense with
some of the things hes talked about in
interviews about having a very hard time
in Catholic school.
Two albums later, Born to Run, Mr.
Springsteens breakout hit album, is in
many ways the most theologically interesting album, because Springsteen really lays
out a kind of alternative this-worldly theology. He takes theological categories and
phrases and he removes them from their
traditional ecclesiastical context and he

Local
applies them to a kind of celebration of this
world, of the here-and-now.
So you find in Thunder Road the
singer exhorting Mary, who is kind of
reluctant to give herself over to a romantic
relationships, Weve got one last chance
to make it real / to trade in these wings on
some wheels. In the context of the song
it is clear that the singer is saying to the
woman, I cant offer you wings, were not
angels. Thats not going to happen, but
Ive got these wheels and Ive got this car
and we can go drive off.
Obviously thats a much less glamorous form of salvation, but it has the distinct
advantage of being real. Its something you
and I can reach for together. In that song
and that album, you get a very interesting
kind of alternative theology, a non-churchcentered theology about the here-and-now.
In his next album, Darkness on the Edge
of Town, however, Springsteen basically
changes his entire position. The album
deals to a great extant with the impossibility
of the kind of redemption he championed
in Born to Run.
More recently, in the last few albums
he seems to be drawing on the theological motifs much more comfortably, in a
kind of traditional sense. not reviving them
but using them in their traditional biblical

context in ways that just dont appear in his


earlier writings, Dr. Yadin-Israel said.
Im not suggesting this is the only prism
to read Springsteens writing, he continued. There are many songs that dont deal
with many of these themes.
As for his work on rabbinic texts Much
of what I do is much less accessible for the
broader audience, he said.
His focus is on tannaitic midrashim
works connecting the text of the Torah
to its halachic interpretation, containing
teachings of the same generations of rabbis
whose teachings are recorded in the better
known mishnah.
There were two main schools of interpretation in the second century C.E. Rabbi
Akivas and Rabbi Yishmaels. Each of Dr.
Yadin-Israels books deals with one of the
schools.
The new one, Scripture and Tradition,
examines the Sifra, a commentary on Leviticus attributed to Rabbi Akiva. Reviewing Dr.
Yadin-Israels book this week, the Talmud
Blog praised it as detailed and meticulous.
Dr. Yadin-Israel said he studied the
modes of interpretation that you find in
the Sifra. Rabbi Akiva is kind of famous as
a very free interpreter, who often learns a
tremendous number of rulings from a single
scriptural hint.

Bruce Springsteens lyrics form the basis for Dr.


Azzan Yadin-Israels Finding Bruce in the Bible
lecture.
My current book shows that its a much
more complicated situation. If you separate
the tannaitic sources from the later sources,
you find that Rabbi Akiva has been read
through a very specific prism by the later
rabbis that isnt really warranted.
Among other findings, he said that wellknown story of Rabbi Akiva as being a
poor, ignorant shepherd who did not begin
studying Torah until he turned 40 does not
appear in the sources from before the time

New Jersey yachad PreseNts

Six Steps TO
Successful
Financial
Planning

of the Talmud.
That is apparently a very late tradition
and that in and of itself is interesting, Dr.
Yadin-Israel said. There are a number of
earlier tannaitic sources that indicate that
Rabbi Akiva may have been a disciple of the
sages even his youth.
Or as Bruce Springsteen might have put
it: Maybe he was born to learn.

NJ Yac had
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1345 Queen Anne
Road, Teaneck, NJ
Refreshments will be served

RS V P:
njyachad@ou.org

Seminar addresses planning for two generations;


setting up special needs trusts; assuring families do not
get disqualified from state aid; guardianships and wills and estates.

Presenter

Mr. Bruce Maier


Financial Consultant, AXA Advisors

Yachad/NJCD is dedicated to enhancing


the life opportunities of individuals with disabilities,
ensuring their participation in the full spectrum of Jewish life.
Yachad is an Agency of the Orthodox Union

Tuesday, March 10, 2015 7:30-9 pm


JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015 15

Local
JFS of Clifton holds inaugural event

Get pampered for a cause

More than 400 people attended the Jewish Family Service of Clifton-Passaics inaugural breakfast at the Venetian in Garfield
on February 15. Rabbi Heshie Hirth, dean
of the Yeshiva Ktana of Passaic, was the
guest of honor. The Somaich Achim award
was presented to longtime JFS board member and Somaich Achim founder Alan
Gutmann.
Therapist/philanthropist Dr. Sandy
Rappaport was awarded the JFS Advocacy
award for her support of JFS clients and
staff. With her support, JFS announced
the dedication of the Dr. Sandy Rappaport
Trauma Center for Children and Families.

The Academies at Gerrard Berman Day


School will host its annual event at Neiman Marcus at the Westfield Garden
State Plaza in Paramus on Thursday,
March 19, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. All are
welcome to the Retirement and Recommitment party, which includes advice
about shoes, handbags, and cosmetics
by personal shopper Benji Meyerson.
Cosmeticians will be on hand to provide makeovers. In addition, there will
be a kosher supper in Neimans Rotunda
Lounge.
Natalie Haar and Leah Matsil are cochairing the evening. For information,
call Amy Silna Shafron at (201) 337-1111
or ashafron@gmail.com.

A video presentation featured community rabbis and heads of the local yeshivas
expressing their gratitude for JFS and the
positive impact it makes on the families
and yeshivot in the community. Programs
run by JFS in the Passaic-Clifton community include the community case management program, Somaich Achim; the vocational assistance program, Project Chizuk;
the domestic violence and sexual abuse
prevention program, Project Sarah, and
the Sequoia program for senior citizens,
as well as child, adult, and family counseling for individuals and groups.

Sarah Blecherman getting pampered


at last years event.
COURTESY GBDS

Project Sarah breakfast scheduled

Michael and Sharon


Glass

Sam and Ceil Heller

Rachel and Daniel Krich

Shomrei Torah dinner honorees


Congregation Shomrei Torah of Fair Lawn
will host its 40th annual dinner on Sunday,
March 15, at 5:30 p.m. Sharon and Michael
Glass, Ceil and Sam Heller, and Rachel and
Daniel Krich will be feted at the event.
Honorees Sharon and Michael Glass
have been involved in Shomrei Torah for
more than 30 years. Mr. Glass has held several positions in the mens club, chaired
many shul events, served as vice president
of the house/administration, and most
recently served a three-year term as president. Ms. Glass has been an active member of the sisterhood and has coordinated
many events.
Ceil and Sam Heller will receive the
David I. Goldberg Ohr Hachesed award.

In their 22 years in Fair Lawn, Mr. Heller


has been active as gabbai, coordinator of
Torah Tuesday classes, and an active member of the chevra kadisha committee. He
also coordinates minyanim and bikur cholim at the Daughters of Miriam Center in
Clifton, where he teaches a weekly Torah
class, and works with disabled adults who
live at J-ADD. Ms. Heller has been an active
member of the Sisterhood.
Rachel and Daniel Krich, newcomers to
Fair Lawn, have become involved at the
shul. Mr. Krich leads the Daf Yomi shiur
and Ms. Krich has been part of many sisterhood events. For information, call (201)
791-7910 or go to www.shomrei-torah.org.

Jewish disabilities meeting attracts


an overflow crowd at Kaplen JCC
More than 200 parents and caregivers for
people with special needs attended a conference, Navigating the System, at the
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly.
The program, organized as one of a series
of programs to mark Jewish Disabilities
Awareness Month, focused on gaining
access to specialized services for those
with disabilities in New Jersey. It was a collaboration between the JCC, J-ADD, Ohel
NJ, JFS of Clifton and Passaic, JFS of Bergen and North Hudson, JFS of North Jersey, Sinai Schools, the Jewish Federation
of Northern New Jersey, JESC, the YJCC of
16 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015

Bergen County, and Bright Path.


The forum began with a dvar Torah
by Dr. John Winer, executive director of
J-ADD, and a keynote address by Elizabeth M. Shea, assistant commissioner
of the state Division of Developmental
Disabilities.
Established in 2009, Jewish Disability
Awareness Month is a unified effort among
Jewish organizations worldwide to use
common programs to raise awareness and
foster inclusion of people with disabilities,
their families, and those who love them.

This years Project Sarah breakfast is set


for Sunday, March 15, at 9:30 a.m., at
Congregation Keter Torah in Teaneck.
Rabbi Shmuel Goldin will receive the
Rabbinical Support award and Rabbi
Jonathan Knapp and Yavneh Academy
are the Aleinu Hero award recipients.
Rivka Zauderer, Aliza Schachter, and
Rachel Wertenteil will get Volunteer

Recognition awards
The keynote speaker is Jill Starishevsky, an assistant district attorney in
the Bronx who specializes in prosecuting child abuse and sex crimes. She is
the author of My Body Belongs To Me.
For information, go to www.projectsarah.org or call (973) 777-7638.

Netivot Shalom will laud three


Congregation Netivot Shaloms
annual dinner is set for Saturday,
March 7, at 8 p.m., at Fair Lawn
Jewish Center/Congregation Bnai
Israel. Leah and Alex Moskovits
of Teaneck will receive the Sema
Heller Memorial Award and Fred
Schulman will be honored with the
Service Award.
Leah and Alex
Fred
Leah Moskovits, the librarian
Moskovits
Schulman
at the Torah Academy of Bergen
County for 15 years, has served on
Netivot Shaloms religious affairs,
rabbi search, and dinner committees,
and the yomim tovim. He also gives
and for the last four years she has been
shiurim.
on the shuls board. Alex Moskovits has
Underscoring this years theme, volbeen on the house committee and also is
unteerism, food and book drives will
on the board.
be held at the dinner. For information,
Fred Schulman has served as a gabbai
email elana.samad1@verizon.net.
and is a regular baal tefilla on Shabbat

Dinner supports NCSY programs


NCSY held its National Scholarship
Reception, supporting NCSY programs
and celebrating the 20th anniversary
of the Ben Zakkai Honor Society, at the
Museum of Jewish Heritage A Living
Memorial to the Holocaust. Among the
honorees were Dalia and Rabbi Dr. Matis
Shulman of Teaneck, who received
the Ezra Ben Zion Lightman Memorial
award, named after a beloved NCSY
adviser who died as a young man.

NCSY is the international youth movement of the Orthodox Union. Proceeds


from the dinner, which was first held
in 1995, provide scholarships for Jewish teenagers to attend NCSY summer
programs and other major events. The
evening was dedicated to the memory of
Rabbi Louis and Helen Ginsburg, one of
the founding families of NCSY.

350

sinGers

26

Cities

Countries

JoyFul Voice

choral f oundation
Matthew lazar Founder & director
presents

GAlA ConCert
Sunday, March 22, 2015 4 PM
Avery Fisher hAll lincoln Center
Kinor David Award

Dr. ruth K. Westheimer


GAlA ChAirs
Patti Askwith Kenner sherry and henry stein

tiCKets: $180, $100, $75, $60, $50


ViSit the AVery FiSher hAll Box oFFice lc.lincolncenter.org/ShowS/211975
or cAll centerchArge: 212-721-6500
SPonSorShiPS/Ad JournAl entrieS: wizAdJournAl.coM/hAzAMirgAlAconcert22/

info@zamirchoralfoundation.org (212) 870-3335

www.ZamirChoralFoundation.org
NJ Jewish Standard full pg ad.indd 1

uniteD stAtes
haZamir Baltimore
haZamir Bergen Cty
haZamir Boston
haZamir Brooklyn
haZamir Central Jersey
haZamir Cleveland
haZamir Columbus
haZamir Dallas
haZamir Hartford
haZamir Houston
haZamir Long Island
haZamir Los Angeles
haZamir Manhattan
haZamir Minneapolis-St.Paul
haZamir North Jersey
haZamir Philadelphia
haZamir Pittsburgh
haZamir Providence
haZamir Rockland
haZamir South Jersey
haZamir Westchester
isrAel
haZamir Ashkelon
haZamir Beit Shean
haZamir Jerusalem
haZamir Karmiel-Misgav
haZamir Kfar Saba

1:24 AM
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY2/22/15
27, 2015
17

Local

Sinai Schools celebration

Gross and
Schechter
Families

Where wii
you be foo
Pesach?
The Gross and Schechter families
invite you to celebrate Pesach 2015 in a
home away from home atmosphere. Come be
one of the family and not one of the crowd.

Tranquil gardens and ponds on 16 acres of property.


A large number of connecting guest rooms.
Guest rooms outtted with Hiltons renowned
Pillow Top Beds and plush duvet covers.
On premises tennis, volleyball and basketball courts
as well as a walking track and a nearby golf course.
Elegantly designed grand ballroom for your dining pleasure.
Heated indoor pool and jacuzzi.
Stimulating Scholar in Residence program including
Rabbi Dr. Jacob J. Schacter
Rabbi Dr. Gil Perl
Rabbi Yaakov Trump
Herb Keinon, Jerusalem Post Columnist
Nightly entertainment
Spectacular tea rooms
Professional day camp program

For more
information
contact
18 Jewish Standard FEBRUARY 27, 2015

On Sunday, February 8, the Sinai


Schools held its annual dinner. In front
of the packed room at the Teaneck Marriott at Glenpointe, the school honored some of the remarkable people
who help it flourish. Clockwise from
left, Michael Maron, CEO of Holy Name
Medical Center, receives an award from
Sinais board chair, Rabbi Mark Karasick;
Shelley Cohen speaks; Sinais founding
president, Leo Brandstatter, presents
an award to Shelley and Ruvan Cohen;
Sinais founding president, Rabbi

Wallace Greene, stands with Judy and


Nathan Rephan; Sinais dean, Rabbi Dr.
Yisrael Rothwachs is with Rabbi Brian
and Laurie Gopin; Sinais dean emeritus,
Laurette Rothwachs, gives an award to
Rabbi Shimson and Ashley Cohen, who
are surrounded by their four children,
and Dr. Elie and Nancy Elmann show
the award that Marcy Glicksman, Sinais
director at the Rosenbaum Yeshiva of
North Jersey, has just given them.
To learn more about Sinai Schools, go
to www.sinaischools.org

upcoMing aT

Kaplen

JCC on the Palisades


Rubach Family

STep righT up To The

Purim

Rubach Family Purim Carnival

Purim is a holiday of fun! Bring your children in their


favorite Purim costume and enjoy rides; inflatables;
crafts, games and prizes; character visits; cotton
candy and more. There will be a fabulous costume
parade at 2:45 pm.

Carnival!

Sun, Mar 1, 1-4 pm, Carnival opens at 12 noon for


families with children with special needs
Suggested entrance donation: $1 per person or
non-perishable food item to be donated to the
Center for Food Action.
Ride & game tickets: $25 for 30 tickets

Sun, Mar 1, 1-4 pM

Museum of the Moving Image


aSToria queenS

Join us for a trip to the countrys only museum


dedicated to the art, history, technique, and technology
of the moving image. After our docent led tour and
time on your own, we will lunch at Psaris, a well-known
local Greek restaurant. Trip includes bus to and from
the JCC, museum admission/tour, lunch and gratuities.
Call Kathy at 201.408.1454.
Space is limited. Registration ends Mar 26.
Wed, Apr 1, 9:15 am-4 pm $80/$95

Eye on Israeli Elections


a pre-elecTion foruM

The upcoming Israeli election is slated for


March 17th. Shahar Azani, Executive Director,
StandWithUs Northeast Region will moderate
a panel of three distinguished journalists
who will provide unique insights into Israeli
politics. Co-sponsored by the UJANNJ Jewish
Community Relations Council, StandWithUs,
and the Berit and Martin Bernstein Open
Forum Endowment Fund at the JCC. Please
RSVP to Esther at emazor@jccotp.org or
201.408.1456
Wed, Mar 11, 7:45 pm, Free and open to the
community

aquatics

American Red Cross


Lifeguard Training
age 15+

Learn the skills you need to work in water


safety as a lifeguard this summer. Course
includes CPR for the professional rescuer,
AED, First Aid and oxygen administration.
pre-requiSiTe SwiM TeST: Tue, Mar 17,
7:30 pm or Sun, Mar 22, 1 pm, $399/$499
Final class schedule will be given at swim test
preparaTion for SwiM TeST: Mon, Mar 2
or Tue, Mar 3, 7 pm, $10 JCC members only

Kaplen

music

Thurnauer Chamber Music Series


22nd SeaSon

Join us for a fun, interactive musical show for children


and adults ages 4-100+!
Travel Through TiMe

Witness the only living composer who still wears a


powdered wig, Wolfgang Amadeus Schmutzinberry,
as he travels through the story of music - from the
baroque period to the present (and all the delightful
categories in between). For more info or tickets call
201.408.1465 or email Thurnauer@jccotp.org
Sun, Mar 8, 2 pm, $8/$10

for
all

The Maccabeats

Come see the Maccabeats live in concert. Buy


your tickets now before they are gone! Purchase
tickets online at jccotp.org/maccabeats or call
Judi at 201.408.1450.
Sun, Mar 15, 2 pm, $18/$20
Preferred seating: $30/$36
To regiSTer or for More
info, viSiT

jccotp.org

or call 201.569.7900.

JCC on the Palisades Taub caMpuS | 411 e clinTon ave, Tenafly, nJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 27, 2015 19

Rockland
Rabbi Meir Soloveichik to speak
at Monsey Community Synagogue
The annual Israel and Pearl Stern Memorial LecRockland County, said Jules Stern, who has
ture will take place on Sunday, March 15, at 10:15
sponsored the lecture in memory of his parents
a.m., at the Community Synagogue of Monsey,
for the past 17 years. He is a dynamic speaker
89 W. Maple Ave., Monsey. A brunch will follow.
and a genuine authority. Its going to be a very
Rabbi Dr. Meir Soloveichik will speak on the
exciting morning, hearing his take on current
topic, Jews for George: What Americas first
events.
Jews teach us about Americans Today.
Rabbi Soloveichik has lectured throughout
Rabbi Soloveichik is the rabbi at Congregation
the United States, in Europe, and in Israel, to
Rabbi
Shearith Israel in Manhattan and the director of
both Jewish and non-Jewish audiences. He has
Dr. Meir
the Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought
discussed topics relating to Jewish theology,
Soloveichik
at Yeshiva University. In 2012 he gave the invobioethics, wartime ethics, and Jewish-Christian
cation at the opening session of the Republican
relations. His essays on these subjects have
National Convention.
appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Commentary, First
Im excited to be able to bring Rabbi Soloveichik to
Things, Azure, Tradition, and the Torah U-Madda Journal.

The Jewish future beyond Europe


With the backdrop of recent fatal attacks on
we must be motivated to stand together and to
Jews in Europe, the American Jewish Commitadvocate on behalf of our brothers and sisters,
tees executive director, David Harris, will tackle
no matter where they may be.
After Paris, Where Do We go From Here? on
The Holocaust Museum, along with The
Monday, March 16, at 7:30 p.m., at the OranRockland County Board of Rabbis, representgetown Jewish Center. The solidarity service and
ing communities throughout Rockland and Berlecture is sponsored by the Holocaust Museum
gen, invite you to come together for an inspiring
evening with one of the international leaders of
and Study Center and the Rockland County
David Harris
Board of Rabbis.
global Jewish advocacy, David Harris.
It seems that nearly every day, somewhere in
The synagogue is at 8 Independence Ave.,
the world, another incident surfaces to remind us of the
Orangeburg. RSVP to Andrea Winograd at awinograd@
precarious place we as Jews occupy on this globe, said
holocauststudies.org., or (845) 574-4099.
the announcement of the event. Now, as much as ever,

The Nanuet Hebrew Center in New


City will hold its 75th anniversary
journal event and brunch reception on Sunday, April 12, at 11 a.m.,
Linda Russin
at the Rockleigh. In addition to
celebrating the shuls history and
founding, and its longtime families, Linda Russin will
be honored with the Stanley Blumenthal Community
Service award. A journal will be published in conjunction with the event. For information, call (845) 7089181 or go to www.nanuethc.org.

The outlook on aging


David Saperstein, who wrote the
book that became the Academy
Award-winning film Cocoon, has
written several other novels, produced and directed many music
videos and commercials, composed more than 180 song lyrics,
David
and teaches at the Tisch School of
Saperstein
the Arts at NYU, will address the
question of Our Golden Years
What Will Life Be Like for Us in the 21st Century? at
brunch on Sunday, March 22, at 10 a.m., at the New
City Jersey Center, 47 Old Schoolhouse Rd. in New
City. The program costs $36.
The talk, the first author talks brunch to be
sponsored by Rockland Jewish Family Services, is
called Life Beyond Our Cocoons: Its Everything You
Dreamed of, and Nothing You Expected. For information or to register, call Jessica at (845) 354-2121.

Purim cards

A week for vaccinations


National Infant Immunization Week is coming up. Its
April 18 to 25. Before then, though, the Rockland County
Department of Health urges you to talk to your childrens
doctor to be sure that your youngsters are up to date on
all their vaccines.
You can protect your children from 14 serious diseases,
including pertussis (whooping cough) and measles, by
making sure they get the recommended vaccines by the
time they are 2.
From infants to older adults, timely immunizations are
one of the most important ways to protect yourself and
others from serious diseases and infections, said Dr. Patricia Schnabel Ruppert, Rockland Countys commissioner
of health.
Beside safeguarding the people who are vaccinated,

vaccination helps protect entire communities by preventing and reducing the spread of infectious diseases, such as
measles, she said. Vaccinations in the United States have
helped end many diseases, including polio, and have
greatly reduced the number of cases of mumps, measles,
whooping cough, and chicken pox.
A program called Vaccines for Children provides free or
low-cost vaccines for eligible children, 18 or younger. For
more information about the VFC program or childhood
vaccines, call Tatiana Dolinsky in the health department at
(845) 364-2662, or go to the American Academy of Pediatrics website, www.aap.org/immunization. For more information about the health departments immunization program, go to www.rocklandgov.com/departments/health/
programs-and-services/immunization-program/

L Shana
L Shana
Tovah!
Tovah!

Wishing you
a sweetyou
newa sweet
year. new year.
Wishing

Jamie and Steven Dranow Larry A. Model Harvey Schwartz


Jamie
and Steven
Dranow General
Larry A.Manager
Model Harvey Schwartz
L. Rosenthal,
Gregg Brunwasser
Michael
Gregg Brunwasser Michael L. Rosenthal, General Manager
As your local Dignity Memorial providers, we wish you
the best this Rosh Hashanah.

As your
local Dignity
Memorial
providers,
we wish you the best this Rosh Hashanah.
We reaffirm our
commitment
of service
to the
Jewish community.
We reaffirm our commitment of service to the Jewish community.
February 27....................................5:27 pm

Candlelighting

Hellman Memorial Chapels

Shul to celebrate

Hellman-Garlick Memorial Chapel

Hellman-Garlick
Memorial Chapel
Hellman
Memorial Chapels
March
..........................................5:35
pm
1300
Pleasantville
Briarcliff
Manor,
NY
15 State Street
Spring 6
Valley,
NYStreet
10977
Pleasantville
Rd. 10510
Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510
15 State
Spring
Valley,
NY 10977Rd. 1300
914-762-5501
845-356-8600
March
13 ........................................6:42
pm
914-762-5501
845-356-8600
Our affiliate
Jewish Memorials
of Rockland
a complete full
monument
and full
inscription
provider. and inscription provider.
Mach
20 Our
.........................................6:50
pm
affiliate
Jewish Memorials
ofservice
Rockland
a complete
service
monument
Large display on premises. 845-425-2256
Large display on premises. 845-425-2256

Hellman Memorial Chapels

15 State Street Spring Valley, NY 10977

845-356-8600

www.hellmanmemorialchapels.com
DignityMemorial.com www.hellmanmemorialchapels.com
DignityMemorial.com
www.jewishmemorialsofrockland.com
www.hellmanmemorial.com

20 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015

SCI #9a
JobHashanah
No 025012
ad 5
BVK SCI #9a JobBVK
No 025012
Rosh
adRosh
5 x Hashanah
5 8/18/05
V2x5
ir 8/18/05 V2 ir

Share your good wishes for the holiday by sending


Purim cards available from Rockland Jewish Family
Service. Ten cards with envelopes cost $18, and the
proceeds benefit the organizations programs. Those
include social skills programs for children and teens,
groups for people with Alzheimers disease and their
families, services for Holocaust survivors, counseling
for family issues, outreach programs for people with
special needs, a kosher food pantry, and counseling
for home-bound seniors.
To order cards, call Jessica at (845) 354-2121, ext. 177,
or stop at the office at 450 West Nyack Road, Suite 2,
West Nyack.

The good old Borscht Belt


New York City tour guide Marty Schneit will help
relive memories of the yearly trek up Old Route 17 to
the Catskills at a Spotlight on the Borscht Belt, sponsored by the Rockland section of the National Council
of Jewish Women. Take a nostalgia trip to the hotels
Grossingers, the Concord, and Kutchers. Remember
the comedians who made you laugh Red Buttons,
George Burns, Rodney Dangerfield, Sid Caesar, Henny
Youngman, Milton Berle, and more. And dont forget
the stop to fuel up the body and spirit along the way at
the Red Apple Rest on 17. To add to the fun, Mr. Schneit
will lead a Simon Sez routine with the group.
The talk is set for Wednesday, March 11, at 7:30 p.m.
at Temple Beth El, 415 Viola Road, Spring Valley. For
more information, go to www.ncjwrockland.org.

Rockland

Non-Orthodox
Rockland starts
to organize
Local liberal Jews are struggling
to create alternative to chasidic dominance
Uriel Heilman

New Square, an all-chasidic village in Rockland County, is one of many Orthodox


hamlets in the area whose rapid growth has helped fuel chasidic political power.
Uriel Heilman

ramaPO, n.Y. Between economic challenges and declining affiliation rates, it


has been a rough few years for the nonOrthodox Jewish community in Rockland
County.
Only about 30 miles north of midtown
Manhattan, Rockland has been named
New York States most fiscally stressed
area by the state comptroller for two
years in a row. Median home values are
still down about 18 percent from their prerecession peaks.
The Jewish federations donor base
is shrinking, the countys Reform and
Conservative synagogues have suffered

double-digit rates of membership loss


over the last decade, and Rocklands lone
non-Orthodox Jewish day school has only
about one-quarter of the number of students that its predecessor had in the early
2000s.
Of all the challenges, however, the most
difficult has been the increasingly vitriolic
climate in the county, many say.
At the center of the storm is Rockland
Countys large, well-established, and burgeoning charedi Orthodox presence, centered in places like Monsey, Spring Valley,
and the all-chasidic village of New Square.
Charedi Jews here are blamed for everything from gutting public school funding in
see rockland page 22

Great Day. Great Care.


Is there someone in your life whose health needs are making it difficult
for them to be safely alone during the day? We can help. At the Gallen
Adult Day Health Care Center, your loved one will enjoy a social environment
complete with engaging activities and nutritious meals, supported with
the medical services they need. We offer:
Care for seniors and adults
with disabilities
Door to door supervised
transportation
Nutritious breakfast,
lunch and snacks

Engaging activities designed to


maintain and support physical
and cognitive function
On-site medication supervision
and medical visits
Assistance with personal hygiene

Open to individuals with medical needs including Alzheimers Disease


and dementia, Parkinsons Disease and more

For more information, contact Joan DiPaola, RN Director at:


201-750-4238 or jdipaola@jewishhomeathome.org

A Member of The Jewish Home Family


10 Link Drive, Rockleigh, NJ 07647 www.jewishhomeathome.org
5/31/15

5/31/15

Now providing transportation to and from Rockland County!


Jewish standard FeBrUarY 27, 2015 21

Rockland
Rockland
from page 21

the East Ramapo Central School District, where the board


has a charedi majority, to taxing the countys finances and
infrastructure.
Over time, the rhetoric has become caustic in this county
of 320,000, an estimated one-third of whom are Jews. In
December, an Orthodox county legislator, Aron Wieder,
was mailed a photograph that superimposed his face on the
body of an ISIS prisoner about to be beheaded. A Facebook
page with nearly 5,000 likes dedicated to ending financial
abuse of Rockland by chasidic-Orthodox Community has
become a magnet for bigoted comments, with the Orthodox
derided as locust swarms of non-taxpaying looters and a
cancer.
Many of the charedims most strident opponents have
been non-Orthodox Jews. But for years, non-Orthodox
Jewish leaders largely stayed silent, caught in the middle
between their Orthodox coreligionists and their non-Jewish
neighbors.
Then, about a year ago, non-Orthodox leaders decided
it was time to take sides in the East Ramapo school board
fight. Many of them aligned themselves publicly with
their non-Jewish neighbors and began lobbying for state
intervention.
Meanwhile, the local federation and other non-Orthodox
Jewish community leaders have launched a campaign to bolster the image of Jewish life in Rockland County and reverse
the decline of its non-Orthodox Jewish institutions.
Were really trying to bring people to the county because
its a beautiful place to live, said Diane Sloyer, executive
director of the Jewish Federation of Rockland County, which
is funding many of the efforts from an annual budget of
about $1 million. Its not just the bad stuff you read about
in the papers.
Theres a lot of good here, but how are people supposed
to know?
In late 2013, Rabbi Adam Baldachin of the Montebello

22 Jewish Standard FEBRUARY 27, 2015

Jewish Center, which is Conservative, led a group of rabbis who joined with the local NAACP chapter and Christian and Muslim leaders to organize a counterweight to the
East Ramapo school board. The interfaith group, Rockland
Clergy for Social Justice, which now includes 11 Conservative and Reform rabbis from around the county, began
holding public events and lobbying the state government
in Albany to intervene with the school board. Retired
teachers from at least one synagogue are volunteering to
teach and help public school students in East Ramapo
the vast majority of those students are black or Latino.
(Between 1989 and 2009, the proportion of non-white students in East Ramapos public schools skyrocketed from
38 to 93 percent, a result of an influx of immigrants and
white flight from the district.)
We decided were going to stand with the public school
community, even if it seems like were standing up against
our fellow Jews, Rabbi Baldachin said.
The common consensus was we have to be able to hold
onto our Jewish values, which meant taking care of our
neighbors even if theyre not Jewish and upholding the
value of education, he continued. We believe its important even to air dirty laundry in the face of injustice.
For many years, the Jewish community in Rockland was
a typical New York suburban community, with a mix of religious denominations and only a tiny chasidic community.
But by the 1990s the Orthodox presence had grown so
large and politically powerful that open conflict had broken
out between the Orthodox and other residents, including
non-Orthodox Jews upset about their communities changing character and appearance. In 1991, residents of the
9,000-person village of Airmont seceded from the town of
Ramapo in a bid to keep out chasidim, redrawing zoning
laws to bar synagogue construction in residential neighborhoods. Meanwhile, the Orthodox carved out their own hamlets, altering zoning laws to accommodate their large families and build denser communities.
In 2005, a turning point arrived in East Ramapo when
Orthodox members became the majority on the local school

board even though they send their children to yeshivas. The charedi-controlled board made drastic cuts to
school budgets as the Great Recession set in. Parents
were outraged as school sports, drama, music, and
arts programs were cut. Two public school buildings
were sold to yeshivas, one at a cut-rate price that later
was annulled by the state education commissioner.
And the board replaced its longtime attorney with a
more expensive law firm, which had a history of protecting Orthodox private-school interests in another
New York district, on Long Island.
School board meetings devolved into rancorous
affairs. Critics charged the board with plundering
the public school system to benefit Orthodox privateschool families and keep school taxes low. (In New
York, private-school students are eligible for public
funding for such expenses as special-education services, transportation, and textbooks.)
Defenders of the charedim said the education cutbacks were a consequence of recession-plagued district budgets, noting cuts in neighboring school districts and charging critics with anti-Semitism.
Authorities recently began investigating the school
board. The state attorney general indicted a real estate
appraiser retained by the board after a public school
building he under-appraised, the Hillcrest Elementary
School, was sold by the board to a yeshiva for $3.1 million, some $2.6 million below market value. After the
state education commissioner annulled the initial sale,
the school was resold to the same yeshiva last year for
$4.9 million.
Last June, the state appointed a special fiscal monitor to review the school boards actions and make sure
it was properly managing and accounting for state and
federal funds received.
The school board president, Yehuda Weissmandl,
called the monitors appointment deeply offensive.
The serial critics of our Board openly contend
that the Boards actions are suspect merely because
a majority of our members are elected from the Districts Orthodox and chasidic communities, Weissmandl wrote in a letter to the state education commissioner. They assume based on our religion
alone that we have stolen from the very children
we were elected to serve. This is nothing but hateful
bigotry.
The Jews behind Rockland Clergy for Social Justice
cheered the monitors appointment but say they want
more: legislation to give the new monitor the power to
veto school board decisions in real time.
On Wednesday, the group held another news conference supporting such legislation and said they
would be traveling to Albany next week to lobby for
it. Last week, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he expects
the state legislature to pass an oversight bill sometime
between April and June.
The rabbis involved in the clergy group hope their
campaign will show local residents both Jews and
non-Jews that theres more than one kind of Jew in
Rockland County.
We want to put forward a more positive image of
what it means to be Jewish in Rockland, said Rabbi
Craig Scheff of the Orangetown Jewish Center, which
is Conservative. He is a member of the clergy group.
Were taking a proactive role in reshaping the role
between Jews and non-Jews in the community in
order to protect the image of the Jews in Rockland
County against what was being seen in the press all
the time.
That effort comes in tandem with the campaign
to bolster non-Orthodox Jewish life in Rockland. For
years, the countys non-Orthodox institutions in such

Rockland
places as Nyack, New City, Nanuet, Montebello, and
Orangetown have been on the decline. Rabbi Baldachins 175-member synagogue in Montebello had
lost about 100 families in the five years he Baldachin
arrived in late 2013, he says. The Reform movements
Temple Beth El in Spring Valley and Temple Beth
Torah in Nyack announced two weeks ago that they
would be merging.
Federation donors are disappearing, JCC membership growth is flat, and the countys only non-Orthodox day school, the Rockland Jewish Academy in West
Nyack, ends after fifth grade. Now in its third year, the
nondenominational Jewish community day school has
83 students, up from 64 in its first year.
Its predecessor, the Reuben Gittelman Hebrew Day
School in New City, which was Conservative and ran
through the eighth grade, closed in 2012 after its student population fell by more than half over the preceding decade, from 350 in 2002 to 150 in 2012. Gittlemans building was sold to an Orthodox school known
as Ashar.
There are some people who fear New City will one
day turn into Monsey, though Im not nervous about
that personally, said Wendy Cowen-Smith of New
City, who belongs to the Conservative synagogue in
Orangetown. Monsey is like another world. Its very
segregated. The fact that an Orthodox population took
over Gittelman was very painful.
I blame that on a lot of things: families changing,
values changing. I think its more a symbol of us weakening than them strengthening.
Last fall, the local federation hired two Jewish
researchers at New York University, Stuart Himmelfarb and David Elcott, to run a survey asking current and former non-Orthodox synagogue members
about their engagement in Jewish life or their lack
of engagement.
Conducted in December and January, the survey
found not just significant synagogue membership
declines none of the countys 11 non-Orthodox
synagogues are seeing robust growth but also that
many of those who have stayed as members are
thinking seriously about quitting their synagogues.
Mr. Himmelfarb and Dr. Elcott also found that synagogue leaders have a much rosier picture of what
is happening in their congregations than their own
congregants do.
People are voting with their feet, said Mr. Himmelfarb, a senior fellow at NYUs Wagner School of Public
Service and CEO of B3/The Jewish Boomer Platform, a
nonprofit dedicated to engaging baby boomers in Jewish life. What we hope is one of the outcomes of our
study is that synagogues look a little more creatively
and with a little more risk-taking at what they do.
Theres been some movement in that direction. The
Rockland County Board of Rabbis, which is made up
exclusively of non-Orthodox clergy, is using a $50,000
federation grant to pay a Washington-area messaging and branding firm, Beth Singer Design, to help
rebrand Jewish life in the county in an effort to engage
unaffiliated Jews. The firms first meeting on the project in Rockland is set for March.
A federation-funded group called Rockland Jewish
Initiative, founded in 2012, launched a program to
ease entry into synagogue life by offering synagogue
membership discounts of up to $500 for new members and running workshops for clergy and synagogue
lay leaders about how to get more people into their
synagogues.
We want to avoid a scenario where synagogues just
die out, said Barry Kanarek, director of the Rockland
see rockland page 24

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Jewish standard FeBrUarY 27, 2015 23

Rockland
rockland
From page 23

Jewish Initiative and also a cantor at the


Nanuet Hebrew Center, a local Conservative
synagogue.
For their part, non-Orthodox Jewish
leaders in the county insist theyre not

anti-Orthodox. The federation and the JCC


have Orthodox board members, Ms. Sloyer
notes, and there is plenty of interaction on
the individual level That includes encounters in the many kosher markets, shops,
and restaurants in the countys Orthodox
areas.

But with few exceptions the Orthodox dont really frequent the countys
non-Orthodox Jewish institutions, preferring to use their own social service
institutions, welfare networks, eldercare programs, and charities. That
leaves the federation to focus primarily

on non-Orthodox Jews.
Its not about us and them, Ms.
Sloyer said. Our agencies are not separating ourselves from that community.
But we all have a focus, and I just think
we have different missions.
JTa Wire Service

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Editorial
Big bucks but a pittance for lives

s we know from the news,


on Monday the families
of some of the victims of
six terror attacks in Jerusalem a decade or so ago won a big
judgment against the Palestine Liberation Organization and the Palestinian Authority.
Did we say big? Sometimes understatement is gratifying. The judgment,
ordered by a Brooklyn jury, was for
more than $218 million; the anti-terrorism act most likely will cause that
amount to be tripled. That would be
about $655 million.
That is an amount of money actually an amount of anything that most

has become a strong advocate for families affected by terrorism, and he has
forged a path through the often suffocating thick weeds in our judicial system, thwacking them out of the way as
he tackled and subdued such issues as
jurisdiction and political convenience.
The jury award is important because
in the early 21st century, the plaintiffs
alleged that the terrorists were either
financially or materially supported
by the Palestinian Authority of the
PLO, Mr. Flatow said. Although the
PLO (which is, Mr. Flatow said, an
umbrella name for a bunch of terrorist groups operating under its wings,
including Fatah, which is Abu Mazen,

I would turn to my senators


and congressmen and say
hey, the United States of
America gives the PA $400
million in aid. Take it out of
that money right now!
STEPHEN FLATOW

of us can neither visualize nor imagine.


(Although, strikingly, it is less than the
$1.3 billion Gov. Chris Christie has not
paid into the states pension fund. But
we digress.)
First, and overwhelmingly obviously, money, not even millions of dollars, is worth the price each family had
to pay. Money is not a replacement for
love; it cannot replace the nightmares
survivors have about how the people
they loved were slaughtered.
But still it is a lot of money an
amount that the families are unlikely
ever to see, at least before the infants
among them die of old age.
And yet, Stephen Flatow of West
Orange tells us, it is a step maybe a
baby step, but still a tiny motion in the
right direction.
Mr. Flatows daughter, Alisa, was
murdered in a bus bombing 20 years
ago, when she was 20. Since then, he

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and of course Abu Mazen is the


nom de guerre of Mahmoud Abbas,
esteemed president of the Palestinian
Authority) denied that claim, the
jury apparently agreed with the plaintiffs, Mr. Flatow said.
Mr. Flatow was at the beginning of
the chain that stretched from the Iranian governments financing of the
bomb that killed his daughter through
a large penalty the Iranian government owes but is unlikely to pay him
to the huge penalty a Manhattan jury
assessed against BNP Paribas last
summer.
The reason that someone brings a
lawsuit like this one against the PLO
and the PA is similar to my reason, he
said. It is to take these people out of
the terrorism business. If this verdict
stands, and if they collect it somehow,
it would give the PLO pause before
it continues to provide any support

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jstandard.com
26 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015

KEEPING THE FAITH

to groups under its wing who might


be considering any further terrorist
attacks.
It will not be easy. The next step
is to collect on their claims. You identify the assets that you can reach here
in the country. That is where the fun
will start, he said. I would turn to my
senators and congressmen and say
hey, the United States of America gives
the PA $400 million in aid. Take it out
of that money right now! But everything is politics.
The case against the PLO and the
PA should be a bit easier than his case
against Iran, though, he said, because
the Iranians claimed sovereign immunity and the sanctity of foreign government assets. Because Palestine is
not a sovereign state, that claim may
be harder to make. (Keep in mind that
Mr. Flatow is a lawyer.)
We are not lawyers. We understand that there are very good diplomatic reasons to maintain the sanctity of foreign government assets
and not monkey with other states
sovereign immunity. All that is very
sauce-for-goose-sauce-for-gander.
But we also understand the need
to fight the radical evil of bombing
buses, stoning infants, shelling civilians, kidnapping and shooting teenagers, and all the other barbaric ways
of killing people the PLOs associates
have dreamed up. (And that, of course,
pales by comparison with ISISs methods, but we will not go there. We cant
even.) We understand parents grief at
the death the willful, planned death
of their children.
We applaud the jury, we hope
that somehow the momentum
in the case continues and carries
through to real victory, we stand in
open-mouthed awe at Mr. Flatows
strength, resolve, and unmistakable goodness, and more than anything we hope that no family members ever again will have to pursue
foreign governments to avenge the
murder of their children.

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Taking the
measure of
the Pesach seder

ow that Purim is almost out of the way, we can


begin to concentrate on Pesach.
Toward the end of the seder, we recite the
words, chasal siddur pesach khilchato / the
seder has been accomplished according to its laws, precepts,
and customs.
We begin, therefore, by listing some of the items people
will need to prepare for the sedarim (thats seders in colloquial terms) in order that they truly be khilchato. These
are: a ruler, at least 18 inches long, that also measures in centimeters; a scientific calculator, or a slide rule, if you could
find one; a dark-colored Sharpie; enough one-ounce shot
glasses to cover all the guests at your seder, and a stopwatch.
Helpful hint: You might be
able to avoid most of these purchases if you can invite a math
geek and a spatial engineer to
help run the seder.
Next, measure the size of your
thumb (either one will do). Make
sure it is at least .90386 inches,
although .95834 inches is preferable. If your thumb does not
Shammai
measure up, make sure to add
Engelmayer
someone to your guest list who
has a properly sized thumb.
If you cannot find the right
thumb, do not feel left out. You can scramble up a substitute
by placing a large eggno other size will dointo a four-cup
measuring cup filled with three cups of water. Make sure the
water line is precisely at the three-cup mark before the egg
goes in. With a Sharpie, mark off the height of the water with
the egg in it, and record the difference on a piece of paper.
Remove the egg. Refer to the measurement you just
recorded, and pour just that amount into a smaller liquid
measuring cup. If the eggs displaced anywhere between 1.93
fluid ounces of water and 2.2 fluid ounces, it is the perfect
size.
Now we are ready for the seder. It begins by reciting the
kiddush over kosher wine. This is where the thumbs, or the
eggs, come in.
Each of the four cups of wine need to be the same size
Shammai Engelmayer is rabbi of Temple Israel Community
Center | Congregation Heichal Yisrael in Cliffside Park and
Temple Beth El of North Bergen.

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t
.

,
t

3
t

Opinion
about the water displacement of one and a half eggs. If
you are measuring by thumbs, the wine cup should measure two thumbs by two thumbs by 2.7 thumbs.
A shortcut would be to use wine cups that hold just
about 3 ounces of liquid.
Of course, this is a liberal measurement. There are
at least three different measurements, depending on
how certain a person wants to be to get it right: 3.3 fluid
ounces, 4.42 fluid ounces, and 5.27 fluid ounces.
Now here is the catch. This year, the first seder falls
on a Friday night. On an ordinary Shabbat, a Kiddush
cup should be at least 4.42 fluid ounces (although some
say 5.27 fluid ounces), and so this year, the first cup of
wine should also be either 4.42 fluid ounces or 5.27 fluid
ounces. That, of course, means that there has to be two
sets of Kiddush cups at the seder (the 3-ounce cup will
do for the other three cups) or just go with the higher
amount for all four cups.
It is time for the stopwatch. Each cup needs to be consumed, preferably in two or three swallows, depending
on your tradition, within two minutes (although some
say up to nine minutes).
Let us skip over matzah for now and check out our
needs for the maror, the bitter herb.
Different communities have different customs for
what to use as maror. The two most prevalent these days
are freshly grated raw horseradish and romaine lettuce.
Neither of these is particularly bitter, and the freshly
grated raw horseradish doubles as a way to instantly
clear up your sinuses even if you just inhale from a foot
or two away.
To fulfill this mitzvah, the minimum size is 26 cubic
centimeters. If you are using romaine lettuce, this is
where the ruler and the calculator come in. There are
large leaves and small leaves and medium leaves. Make
space on the table in front of you, lay out the lettuce,
and start measuring.
Because we are dealing with cubes, we have to measure length, width, and height. (Try not to measure in
cubic meters, because there are 1 million cubic centimeters in a cubic meter, and it may take all night to figure
out the amount of maror you need.)
Raw horseradish is much easier to figure out. This is
where the shot glasses come in. Grate the horseradish
and stuff the result into individual shot glasses. Make
each glass as stuffed as possible. Now get the stopwatch
out again. Eat the maror within two minutes.
Finally, we get to the matzah. The most lenient measurement for the motzi and for the afikoman is one each
that measures 7 inches by 6 1/2 inches. (Most boxed matzot are that size.) That is two whole matzot just for these
two parts of the seder. But after we make the motzi, we
also make a blessing on the eating of matzah, which
requires its own whole matzah. Fortunately, the matzah
needed for the Hillel sandwich need only be 7 inches
by 4 inches.
Back to the stopwatch: Eat each piece of matzah
within two minutes.
No matter how you slice it, that is about four matzot
per person. If you have 10 people at the table, you will
need three boxes of matzah each night just to fulfill the
ritual requirements.
Now we get to the four questions: Is this really what
Pesach is about? Shouldnt we be concentrating on why
we eat matzah and maror, rather than how much we eat
and how quickly? Is this what Moses meant when he
said the law is very near to you, in your mouth, and in
your heart, that you may do it? Is there any wonder so
many Jews think Judaism is a joke?
We have not even gotten to the food yet, or the cleaning. Tune in next time.

News from the Summit on Jewish Teens


The torch is passes on hopefully to a new generation

was privileged last week to revisit my past and to have


a glimpse at our Jewish future.
I traveled to Atlanta to participate in the Summit on
Jewish Teens, which took place in conjunction with the
annual international conventions of BBYO and NFTY. Even for
an eternal optimist, the positive energy from more than 3,000
teenagers from several Jewish youth groups, all together, gave
me an even stronger hope in our communal future.
As I walked around the convention floor observing these
proud, energetic Jewish teenagers, my thoughts drifted back
to my own term as international president of USY 36 years
ago. In the ballroom now, just as there were then, were
the future leaders of our Jewish community. I spent a few
moments speaking with the USYs president, Hailee Grey of
East Cobb, Georgia, and I was so impressed with her commitment and enthusiasm.
In many ways, the key challenge facing our community
today is our need to break down the organizational and
denominational silos that have built up over time. We have to
collaborate with one another to respect one another, to listen to one another, to work with
one another even as we pursue
our own communal passions and
interests. Dozens of teen leaders
from BBYO, NCSY, NFTY, USY,
and Young Judaea met together
to connect with one another and
to form a renewed Coalition of
Jewish Teens. (NCSY is Orthodox,
NFTY is Reform, USY is ConservaJeremy J.
tive, BBYO and Young Judaea are
Fingerman
pluralistic.) These leaders sought
common ground and stretched
beyond their own silos.
While the youth leaders met together to consider their
opportunities for collaboration, I participated in a gathering
of foundations, federations, and funders, all of whom share an
interest in securing our Jewish future through strong, vibrant
youth experiences. Many research studies conducted over the
years confirm that involvement in meaningful Jewish experiences during their teen years produce a far greater likelihood
of active, lifelong Jewish engagement for adults. While this
quantitative research is strikingly clear, I know this intuitively,
based on my own experiences as a teen, which happened
just what-feels-like-a-few-short-years ago. My summer camp
experiences at Camp Ramah in Wisconsin, matched with my
leadership roles in USY, gave me the tools, skills, and desire to
become even more active in Jewish life. And I witnessed this
all happening once again in Atlanta with another generation
of teens.
A central component of the summit was to gain an understanding of how teens think as they make sense of the role
Judaism plays in their lives. Each youth group president took
time to address our group and to share his or her hopes and
dreams for our collective future. We heard their reactions to
the social pressures of today (the enormous pressure to juggle
the many aspects of their lives, the dominating role of social
media, the heightened competition) and yet we were struck
by their incredible confidence and optimism.
We could learn much from todays teens.
One personal highlight from the convening was the chance
to learn from Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks. As one of our

Jeremy Fingerman meets with Hailee Grey at the


Summit of Jewish Teens in Atlanta.
generations great thought leaders, Rabbi Sacks modeled the
notion of learning from everyone. As he responded to a panel
of teen leaders, he reminded all of us to model an inclusive
environment and to recognize when were being exclusive. He
challenged us to incorporate the passions of teens in bringing
Judaism to life. He observed that Havdalah used to be a quick,
functional end to Shabbat; thanks to the teen environment
(summer camps and youth groups) Havdalah with music and
singing now has captured our joy and ruach and has helped
to elevate the entire Shabbat experience. Rabbi Sacks advocated that we redesign Jewish education by asking kids what
they want. Engage teens by firing them up and resourcing
them, he said.
The conversation about Israel gave me further cause for
hope. When asked about their connection to Israel, many
teens cited the defining role their own teen trip to Israel with
their peers had for them. They shared their comfort in traveling with teens with whom they already had a connection
through camp or other youth programs. This comfort allowed
for more honest and open communication and conversation
and allowed them to create an even stronger connection with
one another, and with Israel. I truly believe that teen travel
programs to Israel before reaching the college campus
require significantly more communal attention and support.
It is truly rare that Jewish communal leaders and teens get
to sit together to share and to discuss the challenges facing our
community today. I hope my colleagues and I all listened well
and will process what we heard. I hope we can remain open
to incorporating the insights and perspectives of our teens
today, and continue to encourage and support them to help
shape and run successful programs addressing their interests,
passions, and needs. And I hope we can all come together to
collaborate effectively with one another to address common
communal concerns. I do hope that any future gatherings will
expand to include some of the Zionist youth organizations
which were not represented, including Bnei Akiva, Habonim
Dror, and Hashomer Hatzair.
This meeting seems to have been a great start. I hope our
communal institutions and funders will continue to invest in
and support efforts at strengthening Jewish identity among
our teens, who clearly represent our Jewish future.
Jeremy J. Fingerman is the CEO of the Foundation for Jewish
Camp. He lives in Englewood with his family, where he is vice
president of Congregation Ahavath Torah. Write to him at
Jeremy@jewishcamp.org.

Opinions expressed in the op-ed and letters columns are not necessarily those of the Jewish Standard. The Jewish Standard
reserves the right to edit letters. Be sure to include your town. Email jstandardletters@gmail.com. Handwritten letters will
not be printed.
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015 27

Opinion

The end of the covenant almost


A look at transgression, anger, belief, and Purim

n an interesting note to one of the


major codes of Jewish law, called
the Tur, R. Moses Isserles, the great
defender of Ashkenazic Jewish practices, writes about some activities that
took place on Purim in his time.
Among these were cross-dressing,
young men stealing items from other
young men, wearing masks, and wearing
forms of clothing prohibited by the rabbis because they looked like shaatnez,
the mixture of wool and linen prohibited
by the Torah. None of these behaviors
would be permitted under normal circumstances. Cross-dressing is forbidden in
Deuteronomy 22:5. Stealing for any reason
is prohibited according to the plain meaning of the text of the Ten Commandments
and in the rabbinic interpretation of Leviticus 19:11. Wearing masks, depending what
they were depict, often repeated the crossdressing violation and occasionally worse.
The Jewish communities of the Middle
Ages usually were models of piety and
strict observance of Torah and rabbinic
law. For the Jews of the Middle Ages,
infringing those laws was socially unacPurim is celebrated in the streets of Jerusalem.
ceptable and frequently punishable in
the local bet din. Yet despite
After all, there was a covenant between
reservations about these
The rabbis tell us that in
them and God, and a covenant is a conpractices, Ashkenazic halaEsthers name lies a key to
tract. The way it should work is, If I keep
chists, including R. Issereles,
what is happening in the
my end of the bargain, you (or You) should
decided that now that we
Purim story: God is hiding
have seen that these prackeep Yours. And the Jews of the Middle
His face. In Hebrew this is
tices are widespread and
Ages in Ashkenaz were overwhelmingly
called hester panim, an obvino one objects to them, we
ous pun on the name Esther.
careful about upholding their end of the
ought to find halachic sources
The talmudic rabbis give
covenant, and they were hopeful and
various reasons why God
that support them. For these
patient about God upholding his.
Rabbi Dr.
was hiding his face at this
halachists, at least on Purim,
But then Purim would come. The AshMichael
kenazi Jews listening to the Megillah heard
particular moment in Jewthe voice of the people was
Chernick
ish history, but the rank and
in it their own story of attempts to make
the voice of God.
them extinct. They, like all who listened
file of Jews living in the AshIt was not clear to Ashkenazic rabbis what generated
kenazic areas of Central and
to the Megillah, found God missing on the
these antinomian behaviors, and it was only
Eastern Europe knew at least this: Reason
surface of its narrative. And perhaps they
with rather ingenious, often forced interor no reason, Gods hiding his face did not
were more than a little angry at the wonderful outcome that was the lot of Persian
pretations of normative halachah that they
always seem fair, at least not to them. Their
Jews long ago, but not theirs.
found ways to sanction a once-a-year susworld was filled with fear: When would the
pension of acceptable Jewish conduct. What
I believe that on Purim these Jews
next expulsion from the city or country of
is clear is that these behaviors came from
unconsciously acted out their anger by
their birth or business take place? Who
the grassroots and could not be suppressed.
transgressive and subversive behavior
would live or die or be beaten or, if he was
This strikes me as a good example of the
aimed at God, who seemed to hide his
lucky, just cursed or spat on or mocked on
folk unconscious being more sensitive to
face from them continuously. On the surGood Friday or Christmas night?
face, this was just Purim merry-making.
a theological quandary than those whose
Throughout the year, these Ashkenazic
More darkly, this suspension of normative
theologies were based on canonical texts
Jews consoled themselves with studying
covenantal behavior may have been dediand logic.
Torah and observing mitzvot, with the
cated to making God feel abandoned by
When we think deeply about Purim, its
comforting presence of Shabbat and the
his covenanted people as they sometimes
no fun until youve read the gantze Megiljoyful cycle of Yamim Tovim. They did
lah. Until the end, the Jewish people are
felt abandoned by God.
not fool themselves about their tragic history as they fasted during the year for the
threatened with annihilation because one
A little cross-dressing, a little thievery,
events that led to the destruction of the
highly placed official, Haman, is offended
hiding your ( Jewish) identity behind a
Temples and the end of Jewish autonomy
by one person, Mordechai, who happens
mask, and violating rabbinic prohibitions
in the Land of Israel. But just as they stayed
to be Jewish. The Jews seem utterly powwas the way to let off the steam of disappointment at being unredeemed. This folk
erless, and even Esther, who eventually
passive in their relations with the nasty
behavior said, Two can play the same
saves the day, initially refuses to use what
nobility and clergy who persecuted them,
influence she has to save her people. And
game. If you will not redeem and protect
they were passive with God as well, trusting that some day, like the day of Purim, he
where is God? Not to be found anywhere
us as you promised, we will show you what
would redeem them.
in the Purim narrative.
forsaking you might look like.
28 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

There is a Yiddish rhyme that children


used to recite on Purim: Haint iz Purim,
morgen iz ois, Today is Purim, tomorrow
its out. Ultimately, the Jews of Ashkenaz
knew that their lives would be meaningless without their foundation of Jewish
observance and belief. Like Abraham or
Job remonstrating with God, they spoke
their minds and acted out to protest their
situation one day a year. But the next day
Purim iz ois, and you have to make up
your mind about whether a mask is your
identity or whether it is just a mask.
Most Jews in the Middle Ages, whether
Ashkenazic or Sephardic, chose their
unmasked Jewish identity, with all the
joys, sorrows, and dangers that the identity included. It is because of their dedication, their faith, and ultimately their covenantal loyalty that we are still here. And
there is reason to rejoice in that!
Purim sameah! A joyous Purim to one
and all!
Professor Michael Chernick of Teaneck
holds the Deutsch Family Chair in Jewish
Jurisprudence and Social Justice at the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion in New York; his area of expertise
is the Talmud. Professor Chernick received
his doctorate from the Bernard Revel
Graduate School and rabbinic ordination
from R. Isaac Elchanan Theological
Seminary, both affiliates of Yeshiva
University. He has written extensively about
Jewish law and lore and has lectured on
these topics in the United States, Europe,
and Israel.

Opinion

Im not the judge and jury

aving just read


judged differently depending on which set of rules the
an article prejudges lived by marriage is
dicting that Bill
forever vs. standing up for
Clintons licentious behavior would be the
herself, by divorcing or otherwise shaming him.
downfall of Hilarys 2016
Color me exhausted.
presidential dreams, I find
Why are we so hung up on
myself wondering why.
the rules? Who follows them
Ive felt this way before. I
Lisa Harris
all the time, anyway? Why
was overseas when Bill was
Glass
are some rules accepted
impeached for the events
as the rules? (I mean, if its
surrounding his Monica
not illegal, why do we allow
Lewinsky dalliance. I distinctly remember the disdain with which
other peoples opinions to govern our
local and international media regarded
behaviors?) Would we follow these rules if
the farce, as the affront to our American/
we werent afraid of the consequences of
Christian sensibilities played out across
getting caught breaking them?
the globe. At the time I thought, Isnt this
Lets ask Bill Clinton, Newt Gingrich,
Hilarys problem? Moreover, if this kept
Jim Bakker, Jimmy Swaggart, Francois
the Commander in Chief of the free world
Mitterand, and Francois Hollande. They
happy and relaxed, then it was fine with
are all compelling. All charming. Clearly,
me.
all comfortable with the abuse (or use)
Bill Clinton was slaughtered in the papers
of that power vis-a-vis women. By taking
for thinking he could live outside the rules.
advantage of women. For me, though, this
Hilary was simultaneously lambasted and
demands a question, Is there something
lauded for standing by her man. She was
about people who are driven to success at

the highest levels that correlates to rule


breaking?
We value drive. We push to be better
and stronger. We relentlessly question if
we are having the most impact we can be
have whatever arena in which we exercise our talents. And why? It is demanded
of us by voters, constituents, customers,
bosses The list goes on. Is it any wonder
that it leaks into every corner of our lives?
Can you live in the greater world and
seek to achieve great things without ending up at the crossroads of This is everything and Is this all there is?
I find myself in middle age with more
questions than ever. Except for one. I
know that I am not judge and jury. That
I am not the arbiter of what is right and
what is wrong. It is not for me to completely restrict nor loosen how or why
people do as they do. There is room in my
head to allow for people to make choices.
I accept that not everything is my business
and that I dont always have the need or
right to know. I respect that there are facets of everyones life and background that

create who they are, how the act, and how


they react.
I will measure performance based upon
expectations and outcomes. I will make
my decisions based on that compass and
not by focusing on unrelated matters.
Im enjoying this middle-aged temperament. It has made me a better observer
and listener. A more measured former of
opinion.
As a person with influence in the circles
within which I travel, it makes me more
valuable, more unbiased, more capable
of transcendental leadership. Ironically, it
does make me less tolerant of one thing.
Narrow-mindedness.
Perhaps I am the arbiter of that. I can
live with it. As for Bill, I still think hes Hilarys problem. I hope the political pundits
will leave him out of it.
Lisa Harris Glass is the managing director
of community planning and impact at the
Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey
and has worked in the Jewish communal
world for more than two decades.

To speak or not to speak


A plea to Obama to let Bibi talk and to listen

controversial
topic in the news
is whether or
not Israeli Prime
Minister Netanyahu should
give his planned speech on
Iran to Congress.
It is important first to
acknowledge how far we
Dr. Ben
have come in limiting Iran
Chouake
economically. The Iranian
currency has plummeted, its
exports and GDP have suffered, and its currency reserves are dangerously close to default.
Congress deserves credit, but so does
the Obama administration. This president
embraced the Iran sanctions legislation
passed during his first term in office, and
worked with other countries to make it
effective. No other president has enforced
sanctions against Iran as competently as
President Barack Obama. By contrast, during the eight-year presidency of George W.
Bush, not a single Iran sanctions bill even
got to the floor for a vote, despite President Bushs well-known affection for Israel
Iran is an expansionist terrorist state,
with proxies in Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, and
Yemen. Even thought it is crippled economically, it is advancing its WMD program and has managed to support the
wars in Syria and Yemen. A faulty agreement with Iran would undo all our hard

work, and likely result in


even more aggressive behavior throughout the region.
Since the P5+1 negotiations
with Iran began about 2 years
ago, the Obama administration has taken great pains
to squelch any opposition
to their sole jurisdiction and
management of these negotiations. They have chastised
members of Congress who
support additional sanctions,
accusing them of pushing America to war.
Of course, the opposite is true. If the negotiations are progressing after almost two
years of Iranian stalling, it is because a
more damaging sanctions bill just passed
the Senate Banking Committee, 18-4.
As it has excluded Congress, the administration largely has shut Israel out of the
negotiations process.
We implore the leaders in Washington
to remember the stakes. Iran has stated
its goal the destruction of America and
Israel repeatedly and in certain terms.
For Israel, the threat is very palpable. With
just one bomb, Iran can do to the Jews in
12 minutes what Hitler did in 12 years. The
most devoted and knowledgeable strategists on this issue are our Israeli counterparts, who understand that only a zero
enrichment agreement is verifiable.
The P5+1 negotiations with Iran are

scheduled to produce a political agreement, similar to a letter of intent, on


March 24. This is why PM Netanyahu
believes he must speak out now against
the dangers of a faulty agreement.
Rescheduling this after the Israeli election may be too late.
We believe it would improve the outcome for President Obama to be inclusive, so the Israeli leadership can have
more input into the agreement. The
House speakers invitation to Netanyahu
to address Congress, and the speechs
timing, close to the Israeli election, may
break typical protocol, but there are
life-threatening issues at stake. While it
is heartbreaking that some members of
Congress with whom the pro-Israel community has had deep friendships plan
to miss the prime ministers speech, we
hope and expect that most members of
Congress will attend. We likewise would
ask the president to consider meeting
with the prime minister. By meeting
now with the prime minister, President
Obama will elevate the presidents office
and enhance the administrations bargaining position with Iran.
Netanyahus upcoming address to Congress is not about insulting the honorable
president. No Israeli leader would do
that gratuitously. It is about a desperate
Israel trying to save itself and the world
from Iranian terror and its messianic

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin


Netanyahu addresses the Conference
of Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations in Jerusalem on
February 16. 
MIRIAM ALSTER/FLASH 90

ambitions. The Israeli prime minister will


travel 6,000 miles to be heard, and the
March 24 P5+1 negotiations deadline with
Iran makes this time of the essence.
We would ask the president and all
members of Congress to take a few minutes to show solidarity with our trusted
ally in this perilous time.
Dr. Ben Chouake of Englewood is the
national president of Norpac

JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015 29

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Letters
Naming terror

Lee Lasher hit the nail on the head in his


call for moral clarity on the issue of terrorism (To end terrorism, start with moral
clarity, February 6). I would add that the
commonplace phrase war on terror is
like saying war on bullets. Terrorism is
a weapon, not an enemy. As Lasher says,
how can we overcome this enemy if we
refuse even to name it?
David E. Cohen
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and here.
The poverty line in Israel is defined
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Because this number rises as the average income rises, it is not the best measure of the economy. Israels per capita
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The average income of the bottom quintile is a better measure of how a nations
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Letters
construction. The law of supply and demand explains how
homes become unaffordable when policies prevent home
construction.
The Shulchan Aruch teaches that priority for charity
goes to the neediest, Jews, Israelis, and ones neighbors.
Therefore, it is appropriate to look at the lack of affordable
housing in Bergen County. Establishing a household here
is so expensive that the OU is urging members to move to
Houston, where life is more affordable. Young adults of all
strips delay marriage and home ownership because homes
in Bergen County are out of their reach. Here, as in Israel,
restrictions on home construction artificially raise the cost
of homes. I implore Rabbi Borovitz and my fellow readers to
loosen these restrictions so that our children and our neighbors can achieve the American dream of home ownership.
Joseph Dunsay
River Edge

I want a Jewish president!

Re two articles in the February 20 story, When rabbis wont


speak about Israel and Town tackles decline in civility, I
have several thoughts.
Firstly, I feel that Israel and Jews everywhere have enough
critics without the American Jewish communities which
include the rabbis and their congregations adding to it. Even
so, rabbis certainly should address issues and promote dialogue. They should encourage civil discourse even if there is
disagreement and rabbis must insist on civility.
Secondly, the Jewish communities should strike back,
verbally and in print, at anti-Semitic and anti-Israel policies,

respectfully but not timidly. There are so many Jewish organizations, but none speaks out strongly to the general public
(i.e. the mainstream media) when it comes to anti-Israel policies. There seems to be a fear of being perceived as not being
objective.
Should that be our concern when Israels very existence is
being threatened?
And finally, why dont we promote the idea of a Jewish president? We have had a Catholic president and an
African-American president. There is the possibility of
a female and/or Hispanic president. Why not a Jewish
president?
Susan Ebenstein
Fair Lawn

Where are Israeli goods?

Tu BShvat, a minor holiday celebrating the fruits of Israel,


came and went. Did any of us make an effort to buy imported
foods from Israel? Kosher supermarkets from Teaneck to Monsey had none. Sure, I was able to buy dates, figs, and pomegranates, but they were from Turkey and Greece. Some of us
were worried about the Torah laws of shmittah and terumah
and other laws, but isnt there anything we can buy to support Israel?
Last Sunday, I went to a giant supermarket chain store
Pathmark to buy Shabbat candles. The two large brands
there, Manischewitz and Rokeach, were manufactured in
China. How sad.
Martin Polack
Teaneck

Hearing an unfiltered Netanyahu

I have just read the February 23, 2015 letter sent to Prime Minister Netanyahu, inviting him to speak at a closed-door meeting with Democratic senators sent by Senators Durbin and
Feinstein. The letter complains that the invitation to speak
at a joint session of Congress was damaging to the bipartisan
support that Israel enjoys.
I find this ironic, since I have not read of Republican
requests for Democrats not to attend but have read of Democrats calling for their members not to boycott but to find
something else to do instead of attending. There also are
reports that members of the Black Congressional Caucus were
specifically requested to absent themselves.
There are those attempting to make it a racial issue by
claiming that the prime minister of Israel is dissing the black
president of the United States by presenting his interpretation
of what should be done about the Iranian march to nuclear
weapons.
I would suggest that Netanyahu agree to a meeting with
Democrats after his speech to the Congress but request that it
be on the record, if not an open meeting. What would they be
afraid of coming out in the open?
It seems the only split between the U.S. and Israel is
between Obama and his administration but not between
members of Congress or the American people.
I hope that the Netanyahu speech will be broadcast live by
the television and radio media in the United States, so that we
can hear what he has to say without any editing.
Howard Cohn
New Milford

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Our
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Supplement to The Jewish Standard March 2015

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Pregnancy Rites Around the World. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11


How different Jewish women mark their expectancy

Non-Toxic Feed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Giving your baby the healthiest start

Find the Right Camp for the Right Child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13


How to select the best summer option

Ah-Choo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Spring allergies and how to deal

NJ Ballet Romeo & Juliet

Camp listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Places to send your children

Listen Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
How to get children to pay attention to you

Purim Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Hamentaschen cookies

Purim Crafts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Place setting and finger food

Simchas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

sponsored by Wilmington Trust, An M&T Company

Friday March 27th 8pm

May 3rd 1pm & 4pm

Russian National Ballets Swan Lake


sponsored by Wilmington Trust, An M&T Company

Curious George

Saturday May 9th 8pm

May 13th 4pm

Milestones

Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Your children in action

Top Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Picks for March

Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Great things to do this month

Babies at Englewood Hospital. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27


New labor and delivery unit opens

ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

AOC-4

musings from the editor


W

hen Yehuda was just a


few weeks old he was
born in late August I
remember taking him for a stroll
outside. Here we were. Brand new
mother. Brand new baby. It wasnt
his first outing on the busy streets,
but there hadnt been many. It was
exciting. People stopping to peer
inside the Snap n Go stroller-car
seat that he was comfortably and
safely riding, as I pushed him with
the pride of a new mother.
On the street, I met a woman I
knew, who has since become a dear
friend. She was a mother of five children, all of whom were older than
Yehuda.

She took a look at my infant son


and was shocked. To me, he looked
great.
To her, he looked like he was
melting in the heat.
Yes, we were having an Indian
summer, but how did I know not to
wrap Yehuda in a blanket and socks
and top his little head with the blue
and white striped knit hat that the
hospital fashions all little infants
with?
Heidi, hes way overdressed!
my friend exclaimed. Hes going to
become overheated!
And with that, she started to
strip away at the layers that new
mama dressed new Yehuda in to
protect him? Ah, new motherhood.
When ignorance is not bliss.
Roughly eighteen months later,
Shaina joined our family.
She was born in mid-March,
a most mercurial weather month,
and this year, the lion wasnt turning into a lamb so fast. The chill of
winter was still clinging. That year,
I recall, we had an early Pesach. In
my wisdom, we decided to forego
the tradition of spending the holiday with my brother, sister-in-law,
and their four children because
new Shaina was too new and not
yet inoculated. So we spent the holi-

day with our own family, but after


much conference with others decided it was okay to attend a communal seder with the new baby. She
was secure in that same Snap n Go
stroller that Yehuda used, with a net
atop, and far away from the crowd
that was in attendance at the seder.
A few days later, with Yehuda
sniffling, Shaina came down with a
fever. A slight fever. But the pediatrician said that she had to go back
into the hospital to be checked. I
knew in my mothers heart of hearts
that this was a garden-variety cold,
but I had to take her back into the
hospital, where a slew of tests had
to be done.
Was it her runny-nosed toddler
brother or was it her appearance at
the communal seder that caused
Shaina to get sick? She was back
in the hospital, and I was beside
myself.
New motherhood. When ignorance is not bliss.
Those episodes, thankfully,
were few and far between.
I learned how to dress the children appropriately for the weather
and to expose them to enough
germs, and shield them from
enough germs, for them to grow up
hearty and healthy.

MissionStatement

OurChildren
James L. Janoff

Natalie Jay

Robert Chananie

Peggy Elias
George Kroll
Karen Nathanson
Janice Rosen
Brenda Sutcliffe

Publisher

Business Manager

Heidi Mae Bratt

Editor

Deborah Herman

AdvisoryBoard

Art Director

Marketing and Communications Specialist

Michelle Brauntuch, MS,CCLS

Barry Weissman, MD

Child Life Specialist, Englewood Hospital, Englewood

Pediatrician, Hackensack and Wyckoff

Hope Eliasof

Cheryl Wylen

Howard Prager, DC, DACBSP

Holistic Chiropractor, Oakland

4 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

Advertising Director

Contributing Writers
Rachel Harkham
Slovie Jungreis-Wolff
Denise Morrison Yearian

Account Executives

Jane Calem Rosen

Psychologist, Teaneck

Marriage and Family Therapist, Midland Park

Cheers,

About

About Our Children is designed to help Jewish families in our area live healthy, positive lives that make the most of
the resources available to them. By providing useful, current, accurate information, the publication aims to guide parents to essential information on faith, education, the arts, events, and child-raising in short, everything that todays
Jewish family, babies to grandparents, needs to live life to the fullest in northern New Jersey and Rockland County.

Dr. Annette Berger, Psy.D.

Now, I jokingly say that Im the


shortest one in the family.
Its a clich when they say that
there is no instruction manual for
a new mother. And I was hardly in
a village doesnt it take one? But
I found my substitutes. I found
women who were like mothers,
and women who were like sisters,
and friends and men and a community of people to help me with my
children.
No, I didnt know how to dress
them, exactly.
And I didnt know exactly how
to protect them from the perils of a
common cold.
But I did know then and now
how to love them deeply, and hopefully I know how to do my best. As
for all those lessons, well, maybe I
can do better next go round.

Director of Adult Programs and Cultural Arts


YM-YWHA of North Jersey, Wayne

About Our Children is published 11 times a year by the New Jersey/Rockland Jewish Media Group,
1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666; telephone: 201-837-8818; fax: 201-833-4959.;
e-mail: AboutOC@aol.com.

Dont Miss About Our Children in April


Published on March 27, 2015

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ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

AOC-6
OurChildren
About

Looking for Dr. Right


for You and Your Baby
H E I D I M A E B RAT T

he three As are qualities that parents look for in a pediatrician, that


is affability, ability, and availability. Choosing a pediatrician for you and
your child is one of your most important
long-term investments. Medical care is a
partnership between parents and pediatricians so its an important decision.
A parent can expect to be in the pediatricians office at least 15 times during the first five years of a childs life, depending on the childs health care needs.
So given that this will be a frequent and
sometimes intense relationship, finding
the right match is important.
Before even interviewing medical
professionals, experts say, do some of
your own soul searching. What qualities
do you need in your childs doctor? Are
you a new parent without a lot of experience with the usual childhood development quirks and the common childhood
illnesses? As a new parent do you lack
confidence and believe you need a pediatrician who will be very involved in your

family, will help you understand normal


growth and development, and will competently manage your childs health
care? Are you a worrier who needs an
empathetic listener to seriously address
your concerns? Are you evaluating various parenting styles and need a doctor
who will help you formulate a parenting
philosophy? Or are you a veteran parent
already rooted in your parenting philosophy and style who simply needs a
like-minded pediatrician? Does distance
matter? Are you willing to drive farther
for higher quality, or do you rely on public transportation and therefore need a
doctors office close to your home or
workplace and easily accessible by bus
or subway?
Also consider, do you or your child
have special needs? For example, if your
child has a chronic illness, such as diabetes, you would be choosing a pediatrician with expertise in that illness. If you
are a first-time mother and are adamant
about breastfeeding your baby, obviously choosing a pediatrician who is
breastfeeding-friendly would be in your

best interest. Or do you or your child


have special communication needs?
Dr. Larry Stiefel of Tenafly Pediatricians in Paramus advises that parents
meet with doctors during prenatal visits to scope out the lay of the land in
the doctors office and with the potential physicians. Its important, Dr. Stiefel says, to see where the doctor is in
terms of philosophy in so far as issues
such as prescribing antibiotics, vaccinations not that they wont give vaccinations, but perhaps they would on a
different schedule toilet training and
other developmental issues.
You want to be able to feel that this
is a place and a doctor that I can trust to
bring my child to for the next 20 years,
Dr. Stiefel says.
To get started, getting references
from friends and other doctors is a good
place to begin. Its also important to
see if the practice accepts the familys
insurance. The office needs to feel comfortable and clean. Is there a separate
wating areas for youngsters that are
sick and those that are well, so as not to

spread illness?
The doctors availability, office
hours, overnight calls and weekends.
Is the doctor on call or is there a nurse.
How quickly can you expect to get a call
back?
What are the office hours?
Also consider the doctors philosophy. Remember, the goal of your interview is to decide whether this pediatrician is the right match for your family.
Its important when choosing a pediatrician to pick one who agrees with or at
least supports your basic parenting philosophy. Its important when choosing a
pediatrician to find someone who gives
you the impression of really wanting to
make a difference in your life and your
childs life.
Then finally, you can trust yourself.
Youve made it this far and made many
good decisions in your life. Within a few
minutes, you should get a gut feeling
about whether or not this doctor is Dr.
Right for your family.
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of About Our
Children.

Start Looking for a Doc Early, Advises Dr. Oz


H E I D I M A E B RAT T

es Americas doctora
cardiothoracic surgeon,
author, television personality and longtime Bergen
County resident Dr. Mehmet
Oz.
About
Our
Children
reached out to the Emmy award
winning, Harvard educated, father of four to ask him how parents should best choose their
pediatrician.
About Our Children: How
does a parent-to-be find a
pediatrician?
Dr. Mehmet Oz: The best
place to start is to ask people
you trust. Get recommendations from friends and family
members who share your values. One of their doctors may
be a good fit for you, too. Your
obstetrician is another good
person to ask for recommendations. You can also call local
practices or the department of
pediatrics at a nearby hospital
to find a pediatrician who is ac-

6 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

cepting new patients.


About Our Children: What
do the letters FAAP mean following a doctors name, and
how important is it that the
doctor is board certified?
Dr. Mehmet Oz: FAAP
stands for Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. If
you see these letters after your
doctors name, you know that
she is a member of this organization and is board-certified
in pediatrics. If you do not see
these letters, she still may be
board-certified, just make sure
to ask!
About Our Children: What
about choosing a family practice physician instead of a
pediatrician?
Dr. Mehmet Oz: You can
trust both family practice physicians and pediatricians in the
care of your new baby. A family
doctor can continue to care for
your child through adulthood,
while a pediatrician specializes
only in kids and young adults
up to age 21. The most impor-

tant thing is that you find a doctor that makes you feel comfortable and whose style works
for you.
About Our Children: When
a prospective parent meets the
doctor, what are the most important questions to ask?
Dr. Mehmet Oz: Coming to

your appointment with questions prepared is one of the best


things you can do. Take it one
step further and actually write
your questions down so you
dont forget any of them in the
moment. Here are a few to keep
in mind. Will I be able to schedule appointments with you for

both well and sick visits?


Who will see my child if you
are not available? If I call with
and cannot speak with you,
who will handle my concerns?
Where would I bring my child
in an emergency or after hours?
About Our Children: What
is most important to tell the
doctor about yourself and your
family?
Dr. Mehmet Oz: In addition
to sharing information about
your babys birth with your
prospective doctor, also be
sure to tell her about your family health history.
About
Our
Children:
Would you like to add anything
else?
Dr. Mehmet Oz: Start looking for a doctor early. It is very
important to have a good relationship with your childs doctor, so keep looking if you dont
think the first doctors you meet
are right for your family. Its
okay to be picky!
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of
About Our Children.

AOC-7

Baby Maya, Bergenfield, NJ. One day old.

What if

a hospital, understanding that having a baby is no walk in the park, completely


transformed the experience for everyone? Introducing the new Family Birth Place
a state-of-the-art maternity center with the aesthetics and accommodations of a luxury
hotel to match our award-winning medical excellence.* At Englewood Hospital and
Medical Center we start each day questioning the status quo, asking What if
and then innovating to make it happen. Because we want to be
your hospital for life.

*Healthgrades Maternity Care Excellence Award for the10th Year in Row (2005-2014)

ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

AOC-8
Proper Nutrition and Exercise Helps the Nine Months
DENISE MORRISON YEARIAN

creasingly uncomfortable, tiring even


harmful.
By the beginning of the second trimester, women should avoid supine and
inverse positions as these can restrict
the babys blood flow, says certified
Pilates instructor Mara Raskin. During this time the hormone Relaxin also
kicks in, making ligament looser and
joints more vulnerable to injury. And as
the belly expands, the bodys center of

any pregnant women know that


maintaining a moderate exercise
routine and a nutritionally sound
diet provide both short- and long-term
benefits to the mother and baby. But
routines and regimens that may be helpful during one stage of gestation may be
detrimental during another.
Thats what Hunter Clarke-Fields
found. Before becoming pregnant with
her second child, she led an active lifestyle. But when nausea and fatigue set in
during the first trimester, she was forced
to419curtail
her workouts.
Somewhere
Park Avenue
South, 13th Floor,
New York, NY 10016 Exercising
212-213-8840
Fax 212-447-7734
at least 30 minutes each
around 13 weeks I started feeling better,
day provides women with uncompliso I eased back into my yogawhich I
cated pregnancies with a variety of
had
to: stopped altogetherand brought
FAx # benefits. Before engaging in exercise,
my cardio exercises up to speed, she
consult your physician.
says, now 26 weeks pregnant.
+Reduces backaches, constipation,
From:
iSSue DAte:
Although nausea and fatigue may
bloating and swelling.
compromise womens exercise routines
+May help prevent or treat gestational
early on, these side effects usually subdiabetes.
side by the second trimester. As the fetus grows, however, mothers may find
+Increases energy.
certain positions and movements in-

gravity shifts and can cause stress on


the lower back and pelvic muscles, she
says.
At this point Raskin suggests women
focus on the upper and mid back, shoulders and chest muscles. This will support their shifting weight, help maintain
posture and strengthen the muscles that
support the spine, she says. Women
should also strengthen the pelvic floor
muscles by drawing them in and up with

Kegal exercises.
Rose Willard does this. Now 14
weeks pregnant, the personal trainer
has altered her routine to prepare for
the road ahead. I start with a five-minute warm up on the elliptical trainer,
followed by weight trainingusing less
weights and more repetitions than beforeto strengthen both my upper and
lower body, she says. I then do transverse abdominal exercises to stabilize
my spine and end with another fifteen
minutes of cardio, making sure my heart
rate doesnt exceed the recommended
140 beats per minute. To strengthen the
pelvic floor and PC muscles, I also do Kegal exercises.
These days Clark-Fields is focusing
more on back and abdominal muscles to
ease back pain and prepare for labor. In
addition to the back and ab equipment
I use at the gym, I do a lot of balancing
poses and planks to strengthen my abs
and back. I also do cat stretches, downward dogs and some gentle side-to-side

419 Park Avenue South, 13th Floor, New York, NY 10016 212-213-8840 Fax 212-447-7734
to:

ProoF
From:

FAx #

ProoF
iSSue
DAte:

Benefits of prenatal exercise


+Improves your mood.

Please call or fax your comments and/or oK.

SigNAture oF APProvAl:

Please call or fax your comments and/or oK.

+Improves posture.

+Promotes muscle tone, strength and


endurance.
+Help you sleep better.
+May improve you ability to cope with
the pain of labor.
+May make it easier to return to your
pre-pregnancy shape.

SigNAture oF APProvAl:

Proper continued on page 27

Checkup Party!
s

C
C
J
Y

Checkup Party!

Sunday,
September
Sunday,
March7,15,2008,
8:508:50
amAM
to 1topm1 PM
64 kids, 8 hygienists, 4 doctors,
1 magician, tons of giveaways!

unty
o
C
n
e
g
r
Be

r
e
d
n
Ki amp!
C

Also at
the YJCC:

S P O RT S
CA M P S !

for Nursery
through
Middle
Schoolers

Sunday, September 7, 2008, 8:50 AM to 1 PM


64 kids, 8 hygienists, 4 doctors,
NCE
E
I
R
E
XP 4s
1 magician, tons of giveaways!
E
P
CAM
ND
If you have
been to ourParties
office, you always
have seen the
Checkup
fillcollages
up of
happy facesearly,
of Checkup
Parties
past.
so call today to make
Checkupsure
Partiesyour
always family
fill up early,issonot
call today
make
lefttoout.
sure your family is not left out.
See our video on YouTube!

E A L 2 s, 3 s A
R
A
If you have been to our office, you have
R the collages of nts
FOseen
l Eve

Teaneck Dentist
Drs. Bloch, Gertler and Frohlich
General Dentistry
100 State St., Teaneck, NJ 07666
www.teaneckdentist.com

happy faces of Checkup Parties past.


ecia
s
ks & Sp
e
e
Lesson
W
e
m
i
m
w
e
S
h
T so call today&to
door
Checkup Parties always fill up early,
un Inmake nies,
F
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t
a
Like us on
or W
g, Po
Outdo
Cookin re
sure your family is not left out.
,
c
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s
u
Mo
ym, M
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Dont miss it! call today! 201-837-3000

8 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

Art &
Nature,
d
nclude
I
h
c
n
d
u
L
Require
t
o
N
p
i
ersh
C Memb

Teaneck Dentist
Drs. Bloch, Gertler
YJC and Frohlich
General Dentistry
KinderCamp Director:
Wendy
Fox,
ext. 5820,
100 State St., Teaneck,
NJwfox@yjcc.org
07666
605 PASCACK ROAD TOWNSHIP OF WASHINGTON, NEW JERSEY
www.teaneckdentist.com
(201) 666-6610 WWW.YJCC.ORG

Pro

AOC-9

Holy Name Medical Center

Welcoming babies
into the world
since 1925.

Holy Names BirthPlace offers hotel-like accommodations


and amenities, supported by advanced monitoring and
infant care technology. With our team of board-certified
obstetrician/gynecologists, neonatologists, perinatologists,
anesthesiologists, pediatricians and Magnet awardwinning
nurses, youre in good handsand so is your baby.
For more information, call 877-HOLY-NAME (465-9626)
or visit holyname.org/birthplace.

718 Teaneck Road Teaneck, NJ 07666

One of the countrys best birthing hospitals:


Private LDRP suites
Dedicated Magnet awardwinning nursing staff for labor
and delivery, postpartum, and special care nursery
24-hour access to board-certified anesthesiologists,
ob/gyns, pediatricians and neonatologists
Intermediate level II special care nursery
Maternal-fetal medicine program and perinatal
high-risk services
Genetic counseling
Central fetal monitoring and maternal monitoring
Education classes, support groups and infant care hotline
State-of-the-art electronic security system
Participant in National Cord Blood Stem Cell Program
(umbilical cord blood storage for future lifesaving
interventions)
Sabbath elevator
Sabbath room for family overnight stays
Sabbath lounge with kosher snacks
ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

AOC-10

Oh, Baby, Baby


H E I D I M A E B RAT T
We know that your baby is way cuter than
anything that you can buy him or her. But still,
we got a kick out of some of these items that
are too cute for words.

Infant goodies at Marcias Attic For Kids


in Englewood include a selection of super soft cardigans and blankets made
cozy yarn for infants, bibs with fun say-

ings, burpee blankets in great patterns,


cashmere blend hoodies and the cutest
shoe-looking socks. Marcias Attic for
Kids in Englewood. www.marciasatticforkids.com.
At CarlyzCraze in Teaneck, your
little one may not say too much yet, so
you can let the onesie do the talking. The
fashion emporium carries a wide variety
of Sara Kety Baby and Kids Funny Onezees. CarlyzCraze, in Teaneck. www.car-

gos on clothing and other items and


games galore. Teaneck General Store in
Teaneck. www.teaneckgeneralstore.com
Yarndezvous offers scrumptious
yarns and patterns to handcraft baby
clothes, accessories, toys, and blankets. They carry a large selection of
natural fibers and hand-dyed yarns.
Stop in for personalized instruction and
classes. Yarnezvous in Teaneck. www.
yarndezvous.com.

lyzcraze.com.
Now this one is a keeper. These
delicate infant kippahs are designed
for a brit milah or a baby boy at temple
services. Hand crocheted they include
strings that tie to keep them in place.
The Tallis Lady, in Glen Rock. www.thetallislady.com.
Teaneck General Store offers gifts
and toys for little ones and big ones.
They have playful Hebrew Teaneck lo-

10
4
6

7
8

7
12

13
1 The Tallis Lady
2, 9, 10, 12 Marcias Attic for Kids
3, 6, 7, 15 Teaneck General Store
4, 7, 8, 13 Yarndezvous
5, 10, 11, Carlyz Craze

11

Gifts and Toys for Baby and Mom


be adorable
marcia's attic for kids
29 n. dean street englewood, nj
201-894-5701

10 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

Knit Babys First Heirloom

Where Knitters and Crocheters


Meet Their Favorite Yarns

495 Cedar Lane, Teaneck (201) 357-4710


SUN, TUES, THURS, FRI, SAT & 10-5
MON 12-8 WED 10-9

at Loris
Yarn Dezvous

Unique Gifts and Toys


for Baby and Mom
592a Cedar Lane Teaneck
201-530-5046 www.teaneckgeneralstore.com

AOC-11
OurChildren
How Jewish Pregnancies Are Celebrated around the World
About

MICHELE KLEIN

shkenazi Jews in the shtetl believed that proud


talk when a pregnancy was barely established
would invite catastrophe. Like other Jews, they
feared the evil eye, expecting it to do harm when their
affairs were prospering.
In contrast, Sephardic Jews have often celebrated
a first pregnancy. This celebration has been named
kortadura de fashadura (in Judeo-Spanish) or tekti a
el-gdaouere (in Judeo-Arabic), meaning the cutting
of the swaddling clothes. The ceremonial cutting of
a cloth to make the babys first costume, which is the
same for a girl or a boy, is an old Sephardic custom still
continued by some Jews in Istanbul.
When a Jewish woman reaches the fifth month of
her first pregnancy, her family invites all her female
relatives and in-laws, as well as friends and neighbors.
Liqueurs and chocolates, tea, cakes, and sugared almonds are set out on the best china, on hand-embroidered tablecloths. The cloth is of excellent quality and
traditionally comes from the expectant womans dowry.
A relative who herself is a mother and whose own parents are still alive good omen for long life receives
the honor of making the first cut in the cloth. At the
moment of the cut, the pregnant woman throws white
sugared almonds on the cloth, to symbolize the sweet
and prosperous future she wishes for her child.

Algeria and Morocco


Sephardic Jews in Algeria and Morocco celebrated the
cutting of the first layette when a woman was in the last
trimester of her first pregnancy. The pregnant womans
parents provided lengths of cloth on a copper tray covered with a silk scarf. In Algeria, the person who made
the first cut was similarly a woman whose parents were
still alive and who clearly lived in a happy home. In Morocco, the midwife cut the cloth into swaddling clothes
in the presence of women friends and relatives who offered their good wishes and shared tea and cakes.

the first day of the new moon, a day when women have
abstained from heavy work, as a good time for a pregnancy ritual at home. In this ceremony, she recited
benedictions over candles and had a challah and sweet
wine as well as special blessings for the occasion, just
as in other Jewish celebrations. She also incorporated
symbolism into the celebration, with motifs of fertility
and birth.
For most Jewish women outside the Orthodox tradition, childbearing is no longer a foregone conclusion,
but is now a particular stage in life, reached after con-

scious decision making. In such a ceremony, a woman


acknowledges her responsibility for creating a new life,
prepares herself to accept her new role, and commits
herself to fulfilling it within the framework of Judaism,
just as she may have done at her wedding or at her bat
mitzvah.
Reproduced from A Time to Be Born: Customs and
Folklore of Jewish Birth by Michele Klein by permission
of the University of Nebraska Press. Copyright 1998 by
Michele Klein. Published by the Jewish Publication Society,
Philadelphia.

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Kurdistan
Jewish women in Amadiya, Kurdistan, in the early
20th century, also celebrated a first pregnancy. When
a young woman was certain that she had conceived,
she went to her fathers house, where her mother and
female relatives sewed clothes for the expected baby.
They bestowed the honor of making the sheets for the
cradle on an old woman who had delivered many babies. The women invited musicians, sang and danced,
and offered the mother-to-be tidbits of advice about
childbearing. In the evening, they prepared a feast for
the men in the husbands house.

Yemen and Aden


Jews in Yemen and Aden prepared clothes for the newborn in the seventh month of a womans pregnancy, but
without ceremony. It was customary to conceal pregnancy from the public eye for as long as possible, and
each woman sewed what she would need for her own
baby.

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Modern Traditions
Unlike the bat mitzvah at puberty and the wedding,
which both mark a change in status; no Jewish ritual
marks the new role of becoming a mother. Some women
have sought to create a new ceremony, in the style of
a Jewish ritual, to express their feelings of spirituality
and Jewish identity at this milestone in their lives.
For example, one woman chose Rosh Chodesh,

montclair.edu/gifted

ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015 11

AOC-12
OurChildren
About

Serving Up
the Non-Toxic Feed to Your Baby
JE N N I F E R E D E N

f you ask me what I remember most vividly from the


first few months of months of each of my four childrens lives, Id love to be able to tell you that I recall
the supple feel of their new, smooth skin, their big blue
eyes staring at me in fresh, daily wonder and the peaceful, almost imperceptible way their tiny backs rose and
settled as they slept.
Id like to tell you all of that, but, in truth, what is
sharpest in my mind to this very day is the aroundthe-clock nursing, the constant hovering over a stove
watching bottles and breast pump parts bob around in

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12 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

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hot water, the desperate freezer searches for bags of


stored breast milk.
Feeding babies is a full-time job and it requires physical and mental stamina. And, unless youre straight-up
breastfeeding 100 percent of the time, it also requires
some non-toxic know-how. Dont be concerned if the
following is all news to you; any step you take going
forward will benefit your baby in very important ways.
So, without further ado because, in about 10 minutes, someones going to be wailing for liquid eats an
informative and practical guide to safely feeding your
soft skinned, wide-eyed, little one.
Choosing a safe baby bottle has become a loaded
issue, what with myriad conversations about how plastics pollute our bodies and the world. The big topic for
a long time was BPA Bisphenol A a known endocrine disruptor. Found in the bodies of 98 percent of
Americans, its a worrisome synthetic chemical thats
tough to avoid.
Most baby bottles havent been made with BPA for
some years and the U.S. government officially banned
BPA from bottles in 2012. So, problem solved? Not so
fast. There have been quite a few studies done about
regrettable substitutions, chemicals that have replaced BPA but have either little health data or similarly concerning data, as well as reports, including this
one from Mother Jones, which indicate that many other
plastics, including the so called safe plastics, leach
synthetic estrogens, which can affect many aspects of
development.
Whats a new mama to do? Two words: Go glass.
And two more words: Go Stainless. Glass and stainless
steel are as safe as you can get and the baby market
is crawling with brands that make this an easy buy.
Born Free, Weego Baby and Lifefactory are just some
of the companies that offer glass bottles wrapped in
silicone sleeves. These bottles can last a long time, but
should be checked regularly for chips or cracks. Klean
Kanteens child line, Kid Kanteen, makes stainless steel
bottles, as does organickidz. Silicone nipples should
top them all off.
What about what you put in those bottles? If youre
buying powdered or concentrated formula for regular
use or supplementation, you have to mix it with water,
but these days, options for water types flood our lives.
Its a good idea to talk to your childs pediatrician early
on to get information about your local water quality
and whats normally recommended in your area.
According to the CDC, cold tap water, run for several minutes first, can be used to make infant formula, but
because of concerns about mild fluorosis (white spots
on permanent teeth), babies who are fed formula exclusively should have their formula alternately mixed with
fluoride-free bottled water, often labeled as de-ionized,
purified, demineralized, or distilled. A good option is
Gerber Pure Water.
In addition, The American Academy of Pediatrics
more conservatively recommends that sterile water be
used for infant formula, at least for the first few months,
which often means boiling water for no more than one
minute and letting it sit for thirty seconds before use.
In either of the above cases, tap water should be
filtered, especially for infants. Brita makes effective carbon filters, which are appropriate for many water supplies, and now offers stainless steel pitchers as well.

GE also makes carbon filters, including faucet mount


and under-sink filters, as well as reverse osmosis filtration systems which are important for certain water
sources. For more detailed information, check out the
Environmental Working Groups Water Filter Buying
Guide, which provides information about specific contaminants and the filters best suited to reduce those
contaminants.
Nursing moms have a few choices of their own to
make. While milk straight from the breast is best in
terms of vitamins, bacteria-killing properties and fat
content, expressed milk has a place in our busy lives.
Two popular breast pump companies, Medela and Hygeia, make BPA-free breast pumps and accessories. Hygeia prides itself on its eco friendly breast pumps that
can be reused or recycled. Medela has responded to
the call for plastic-free products by offering up certain
glass pump parts, as well as glass bottles for pumping
and storage.
And, speaking of storage, because breast milk can
last in the refrigerator for five to eight days and in the
back of a self-contained freezer for three to six months,
both are good options for keeping milk on hand. Years
ago, my freezer was filled with BPA-free plastic storage
bags from Medela, but, if I was pumping away today, Id
more often use glass bottles or glass storage containers, like these from weangreen.com.
When thawing and warming breast milk, avoid the
microwave, as it can heat the milk unevenly and pull
out nutrients. Bags of breast milk should be thawed
overnight in the fridge, transferred to a non-toxic bottle, and then held under warm water. Glass bottles and
containers can also be put in the fridge or placed directly from the freezer into a bowl of warm water.
While the cycle of feeding/pumping/storing might
have you running for a bed as soon as baby conks out,
theres still one more thing you have to do: clean it all
up. If you live in an area with a safe water supply, you
only need to sterilize your bottles and breast pump
parts before the first use, by boiling them for five minutes in a pot of water or running them through an entire
dishwasher cycle on the top rack. After that, however,
you can regularly clean all the supplies in warm water
with a non-toxic dish soap. My favorite is Better Lifes
Dish it Out, but any mild plant-based soap that is free
from synthetic chemicals will do the trick.
Jennifer Eden is a mother of four, a green living advocate
and a home detox expert. This story was adapted from a
blog on her website, www.jenerationeden.com.

AOC-13*
Pick the Right Camp
for the Right Child
DENISE MORRISON YEARIAN

ummer day camp is a place where


children can learn new skills, acquire new interests and make new
friends. But there is no one-size-fits-all
camp. To find the right day camp for
your child consider these tips.

Consider your child


Talk it over and narrow the options
based on your childs interests and
needs. Find out what he wants from the
experience and together make a list of
things he might like to do. Also consider
his developmental needs. Is he ready for
an all-day program? Would he be more
comfortable in an intimate versus large
group setting? If your child likes sports
but has shown some interest in drama
or art, encourage him to step out of his
comfort zone. It may just spark a new
passion.

Gather information
Attend camp fairs, or pick up a local
camp guide copy. Circle programs of interest then comparison shop. Call each
prospective camp to inquire about philosophy, daily schedule and other topics important to you. Invest this time up
front and you may find a camp to stay
with for several years.

Traditional or specialty
When choosing between a traditional
versus specialty program, consider this
rule of thumb: The younger the child,
the more varied the activities should
be. Children between the ages of 7 and
11 thrive in a setting where they can
sample a variety of subjects. As their attention span develops, they may want to
focus on a single activity. If you go with a
specialty camp, find out how intense the
program is.

Look at location
Find a camp close to your job or home
to shorten travel time and allow quick
access to your child in an emergency.
Convenience, however, shouldnt be
the primary factor. Balance your decision with what the camp has to offer. If
your child really wants to participate in
a given camp, consider your willingness
to drive out of the way. Or see if theres a
neighbor you can carpool with.

Ponder program length


Program length should be viewed in light
of the family and childs needs. If your
schedule dictates him having to stay a
full day ask about before- and after-care.
If hes younger, find out about naps or
quiet times. Its also important to find

If youre
under
its FREE
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out who runs the before- and after-care


program. Is it the same staff your child
has all day? What activities will he be engaged in during this time?

Scout out schedules


Before enrolling, ask about the daily
schedule. What themes and related activities are planned? Will there be field
trips or special guests coming in to keep
camp exciting and extend theme-based
learning? Will your camper receive any
reading, writing or math experiences?
Done properly, kids can enjoy games
and activities that keep those academic
skills sharp. Also look at resources the
camp has to offer and inquire how often
your child will participate in them.

Open Weekends and Evening Appointments Available

Ask about staff


Find out how staff and counselors are
chosen, their experience, background,
age and training, as well as counselorto-camper ratio. The American Camping
Associations day camp recommendations are 1-6 for ages 4 to 5, 1-8 for ages
6 to 8, 1-10 for ages 9 to 14 and 1-12 for
ages 15 to 17. Also ask how counselors are screened and what background
checks are done.

All new
experience!

Consider costs
Compare program costs and find out
what the fees actually cover. Some camps
include field trips, materials, meals and
t-shirts into their initial fee; with others
its an add-on. Also find out the camps
refund policy and rules regarding transfer of weeks if your plans change or your
child gets sick. If the camp is out of your
price range, is a scholarship or financial
assistance available?

Explore open houses


Visiting an open house can get children
acclimated to the environment and give
you a better perspective of the staff, facilities and activities. Is the staff smiling
and friendly? Do they immediately bond
with the children? Are the facilities well
maintained, clean, and free of safety
hazards?

Peruse policies
Eliminate future problems by reviewing
the camps policies and procedures before you sign up. You dont want to learn
after the fact that your child cant turn
on his cell phone or that drop-off and
pick-up policies differ from what you
thought. Share pertinent information
with your child too, so there are no surprises on his end.
Denise Morrison Yearian is a former editor
of two parenting magazines and the mother
of three children.

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ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015 13

AOC-14
OurChildren
About

AstHMA Allergy AnD


IMMunology CAre

Ah-Choo!

Ziv M. Harish MD
Board Certified in Adult and Pediatrics
Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
200 Engle Street, Suite 18 Englewood, NJ

201-871-7475
www.drharish.yourmd.com

Think Spring

Debora K. Geller, M.D.


Pediatric and Adult Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

Environmental Food Allergy Testing


Immunotherapy (Allergy shots)
Complete Asthma Care Same Day Appointments
Voted Castle Connolly Top Doctor
NJ Monthly Top Doctor - 2014
Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Top Doctors for Children - 2014

Medical excellence with a personal touch


466 Old Hook Rd., Suite 24E, Emerson, NJ 201-265-7515
www.bergenallergydoctor.com

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Open 365 days a year
In-office labs for immediate results
Call our main office to schedule a
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Meet a physician and the staff!
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Offices in Tenafly, Fort Lee, Paramus,


Oakland, Clifton, and Park Ridge
201-569-2400 www.tenaflypediatrics.com

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14 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

Spring into Allergy Attack Season


H E I D I M A E B RAT T

easonal allergies for children are


nothing to sneeze at.
While the spring season offers
the opportunity for the great outdoors,
a time when children can finally go out
and play and families can breathe the
fresh air, its onset also means sneezing, coughing, itchy and watery eyes for
about 1 in 5 children who suffer from
seasonal allergies.
We consulted some medical experts
to ask them how to navigate the allergy
season. Dr. Debora Geller is a pediatric
and adult allergist and immunologist in
Emerson, Dr. Ziv Harish is an allergist
and immunologist in Englewood and Dr.
Marjorie Slankard is the director of Allergy & Immunology at The Valley Hospital
in Ridgewood.
About Our Children: How does a
parent know the difference between a
cold and allergies?
Dr. Ziv Harish: Allergic symptoms
are characterized by itchiness, nasal
and or eye itchiness, whereas with a
cold there is frequently fever associated
with it. Also, children who have allergies,
their symptoms will recur with exposure
to allergens such as pets and pollen.
Colds usually occur in the winter when
many classmates in the winter when
many classmates are also afflicted with
similar symptoms.
About Our Children: What are the
best treatments for allergies?
Dr. Debora Geller: There are very
good over-the-counter as well as prescription medications available for allergies. Antihistamines both oral, intranasal and ocular work very well. Nasal
steroids are very good especially for
those with more severe symptoms. Allergy shots are very effective for those
who are not well controlled with allergy
medication.
About Our Children: Is there any
way to prevent a bad allergy attack?
Dr. Majorie Slankard: Preventing
an allergy attack by avoiding and limiting exposure is the best way to head
off a bad episode. Keep windows and
doors closed and use air conditioning
to filter out pollen. Pollen is sticky and
will adhere to skin and clothes so bathe
and shampoo your childs hair before
bedtime. Limit outdoor activities when
pollen is at its peak, usually 6 to 10 a.m.
with a smaller peak from 4 to 7 p.m. Have
your child wear sunglasses and a hat
when out of doors.
About Our Children: Can allergies
in children be outgrown?
Dr. Ziv Harish: 20 to 30 percent of
children with environmental allergies

may outgrow them or experience a decrease in the severity of symptoms by


age 20 to 30. Regarding food allergies, 80
percent of children with allergy to milk
and eggs outgrow these allergies by age
15, however, only about 20 percent outgrow allergy to peanuts in their lifetime.
About Our Children: Have there
been any breakthrough in treatments for
children?
Dr. Debora Geller: For the treatment of environmental allergies medications that are available are pretty much
the same antihistamines, steroids, leukotriene modifiers such as montelukast
and allergy immunotherapy. Most recently sublingual immunotherapy has
become available for grass and ragweed
allergy for those individuals not interested or able to pursue subcutaneous
immunotherapy or allergy shots. With
sublingual immunotherapy a daily tablet is taken prior to the onset of grass
and or ragweed allergy season to modify symptoms. Unfortunately we do not
have a tablet available for tree allergy,
which is the main pollen group causing
spring symptoms in our area. There is
always new research going on for the
treatment of food allergies at this point
avoidance and the availability of Epinephrine containing devices is what we
can recommend for those known to have
life threatening food allergies.
About Our Children: Is there anything else youd like to add?
Dr. Marjorie Slankard: There are
several foods; especially fruits and vegetables that cross-react with certain pollens. The most common is for the child
(or adult) with birch tree pollen allergy,
in which 20 percent of individuals will
become allergic.
To cross-reacting fruits and vegetables, mostly the pitted fruits (apples,
peaches, etc.), but also almond and
hazelnuts. The allergy shots may also
help with this according to several
publications.
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor
of About Our Children.

AOC-15
OurChildren
About

About Our Childrens Guide to Summer Camps


DAY CAMPS
All About Me, Inc.

555 Palisade Ave., Cliffside Park, NJ


225 Edgewater Road, Cliffside Park, NJ
5 Legion Drive, Cresskill, NJ
19 Emerson Plaza East, Emerson, NJ
201-945-0266, 201-945-0234, 201-569-9112, 201634-8622
Ages: Up to 9 years old
Session dates: June 22 Sept. 4, 2015
All About Me Summer Camp offers an extensive variety of
fun to its campers. From arts & crafts to T-shirt making,
color war, daily picnics and ceramics, children will never
be bored. Come join us for our Friday theme parties. All
About Me know how to have fun in the sun with our sprinklers. We also offer sign language and movement, music
class, gym and yoga. Please see our ad on page 18.

trips, special visitors, swimming, arts & crafts, cooking,


music & movement, Shabbat parties, sports, science &
special events. Large outdoor facilities with in-ground
pool, lunch picnic area, sandbox, tricycles, jungle gyms
and grassy sports area. Please see our ad on page 19.

The Neil Klatskin Day Camp

Kaplen JCC on the Palisades


411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenafly, NJ
Phone: 201-567-8963
or nkdc@jccotp.org.
Ages: 3 11
Dates: Mon Fri, June 29 Aug 21, 9 a.m. 4 p.m.
(shorter days available for preschoolers; extended care
available)

Camp Tours and Info


Sessions for Parents

Camp Gan Israel

315 N. Main Street


New City, NY
Phone: 845-634-0951
Fax: 845-634-7704
www.cgirockland.org
Ages: 3 12
Sessions: June 29 24; July 27 August 20, 2015
Give your child the summer of a lifetime at Camp Gan
Israel. Warm and professional staff. Swim instruction in
our beautiful heated outdoor pool. Exciting trips, sports,
and imagination lab, game room, baking, and more. Airconditioned facility. Indoor gym. A trusted name in Jewish camping. Please see our ad on page 18.

Mini Camp Day for


Prospective Campers
Meet Our Outstanding
Staff
Enjoy a BBQ Lunch

Camp Kookooskoos

Teaneck Community Education Center


201 Fycke Ln.
Teaneck, NJ
Phone 201-833-5514
Fax 201-837-9468
www.teaneckschools.org
Grades K-8
June 29 August 7
Counselor to Camper Ratio K-4 1:6
Counselor to Camper Ratio Grades 5-8 1:5
Our goal is to provide a summer experience that offers
enrichment, personal growth, and fun in a safe, nurturing environment. Swimming, sports, theater, dance, special events, trips. Extended day available. Kosher available. See our ad on page 16.

Camp Veritans

225 Pompton Road


Haledon, NJ
Phone: 973-956-1220
Fax: 973-956-5751
www.campveritans.com
Ages/Grade: 4 Years 10th grade
Dates: June 20 August 21
Counselor to Camper Ratio: 1:5
Camp Veritans, a Jewish day camp located in Haledon, is
a camp for children entering pre-K through 10th grade. We
offer a variety of fantastic activities on our beautiful 64
acre campus including Red Cross swim instruction, amazing sports, creative arts, ropes/challenge course, in addition to daily hot kosher catered lunches, transportation
and so much more. Specialized Trip & Travel program for
8th and 9th graders and a comprehensive CIT program for
our 10th graders. Please see our ad on page 16.

Gan Yaldenu & Gan Yaldenu Tots

85 Copley Avenue
Teaneck, NJ
160 Woodbine Street
Bergeneld, NJ
Phone: 201-801-0291, 201-385-7500
www.ganyaldenu.com & www.ganyaldenutots.com
Grades/Ages 2 5 yrs. & 0 5 yrs.
Dates: June 29th August 21
Counselor to camper ratio: 1 to 5
8-week program with extended hours and extended
weeks available. Weekly themes, which include field

Be a Ramahnik for a Day!


For prospective campers and families
interested in Kayitz 2016

Camper 2016 Day

Sunday, July 12, 2015


11:00 am - 1:30 pm

Register online
www.ramahberkshires.org/camper2016
Call
201-871-7262
(Before June 15th)
or

845-832-6622
(Starting June 16th)
info@ramahberkshires.org

ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015 15

AOC-16
OurChildren
About

Kosher
Lunch &
Snacks
Available

Camp Kookooskoos
June 29-August 7

2015

THOMAS JEFFERSON MIDDLE SCHOOL

8:30am to 4:30pm
Extended hours available!

Registration now open!


Contact us by phone or email
Call 201-833-5514
fhadnot@teaneckschools.org

NKDC offers a summer of adventure and


nonstop fun. Our beautiful 21-acre campus in Tenafly and 600-acre campus in
Alpine provide the perfect backdrop for
your camper to enjoy the outdoors, learn
new skills, make new friends and explore
their personal interests. With dynamic,
age-appropriate programming including
sports, Red Cross instructional and recreational swim, art, drama, music, Judaic
programming, fun theme days and much
more, your camper will be sure to have
an incredible summer to remember. JCC
membership required.

Camp Dream Street:

The Pearl Seiden Summer Program


for Children with Cancer and other
Blood Disorders
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Phone: Contact Lisa at 201-408-1455
or lrobins@jccotp.org.
Ages: 4 14
Dates: Mon Fri, Aug 24 28,
9:30 a.m. 3 p.m.
A special free camp experience serving
the social needs of children with cancer
and other blood disorders. Activities include arts and crafts, sports, dance, nature, krav maga, baking, music, swimming
and entertainment. Round-trip transportation, light breakfast and a delicious
lunch are provided each day. Siblings are
invited to participate. Sponsored by the
Dream Street Foundation, Childrens Hospital of New York Presbyterian, Tomorrows Childrens Institute of Hackensack
University Medical Center, St. Josephs
Children Hospital, Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades, Beatman Foundation, Pearls
Girls, Teen Philanthropy Institute, Team
Ko-Jo the Kollender and Rubach Families, Jennas Rainbow Foundation, and RD
Legal Funding, LLC.

Kindercamp at the Bergen County


YJCC

605 Pascack Road


Township of Washington, NJ
Phone: 201-666-6610
Fax: 201-664-7518
www.yjcc.org
Grades/Ages served: Ages 2, 3, 4
Dates: June 29-August 21, 4-, 6-, and
8-week sessions
Counselor to Camper Ratio:
Varies by age
Ongoing registration
Its a real camp experience for nursery
school-age children. Kindercamp includes theme weeks like beach party,
pirates and rock-n-roll, special events including animal visits and a magician, outdoor water fun and indoor swim lessons,
gym, music, ponies, nature, art and more.
Lunch is included; YJCC membership not
required. For information, contact Wendy Fox, Kindercamp director, at 201-6666610, ext. 5820, wfox@yjcc.org. Please see
our ad on page 13.

SLEEP-AWAY CAMPS
Camp Ramah

P.O. Box 515


Wingdale, NY
845-832-6622; 201-871-7262
www.ramahberkshires.org
Camp Ramah in the Berkshires, located in
Duchess County, N.Y., provides transformative summer experiences for Jewish
youth grades 4 through 11. Its 200- acre

16 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

site boasts a beautiful lake and first-class


sport facilities. The Ramah experience is
rich and varied, combining creative and
stimulating programming in arts, athletics, music, outdoor adventure and informal Jewish education. Children are able
to grow and learn in a nurturing Jewish
environment surrounded by life-long
friends and spirited role models. Camp
Ramah in the Berkshires is infused with
traditions and values of Conservative
Judaism and celebrating its 52nd year.
Please see our ad on page 15.

PROGRAMS FOR TEENS


Teen Adventures Travel Camp
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenafly, NJ
Phone: 201-408-1470
Grades: 7 10, June 29 July 31
An exciting five-week program for teens
that features daily trips to amusement
parks, beaches, baseball games, trips
into Manhattan and more! This summer,
the program will feature two community
service days every week, a two-night trip
to Hershey Park, and an amazing extended trip to Orlando, Florida. Contact Alexis at 201-408-1470 or arobins@jccotp.org.

ENRICHMENT CAMPS
Big Time Sports Broadcasting Camp

1420 Walnut Street, Suite 605


Philadelphia, PA
Phone: 800-319-0884
www.playbyplaycamps.com
Boys & Girls Ages 10 18
The Sports Broadcasting Camp is located
on the campus of Montclair State College
in Montclair this summer is celebrating
its 10th year. Learn from the pros. Meet
sports celebrities; make play-by-play,
sports anchor, and reporting tapes. Participate in mock sports talk radio and
PTI-style shows, and much more. Please
see our ad on page 19.

Fashion KO-Lab

15 Leroy St. #9
New York, NY
917-509-6181
www.fashionko-lab.com
Ages: 10 18
Sessions in New York: June 29 July 3;
July 6 July 10; July 13 July 17.
Counselor to camper ratio: 1 to 5
Fashion KO-Lab is a teen fashion day
camp. We offer weeklong sessions starting June 29 through August 7. Our camps
are located in New York City and Los
Angeles. During the week, campers will
be taught by industry leaders how to
create their identity, tell their story, and
create a line and/or blog of their dreams.
Throughout the week, campers are working on their own projects. At the end of
each five-day camp, campers will present their finished projects to the class,
parents, and media. Please see our ad on
page 15.

Explorers-STEM Middle School


Academic Camp

Ramapo College
505 Ramapo Valley Road
Mahwah, NJ
Phone: 201-684-7370
Fax: 201-684-7277
www.ramapo.edu/ramapocamps
Grades: Entering 7th and 8th grades;
entering 6th grades by recommendation
only

AOC-17

Sessions: Session 1 from July 6 17;


Session 2 from July 20 31, Session 3
from August 3 14
Program focuses on STEM (Science,
Technology, Engineering, Mathematics)
learning activities such as robotics, rocketry, and virtual science labs. For entering 7th and 8th graders, explore STEM
topics that advance problem-solving,
critical thinking, and teamwork abilities.
Please see our ad on page 19.

International Chess Academy

9-10 Saddle River Road


Fair Lawn, NJ
Phone: 201-797-0330
185 Court St.
Teaneck, NJ
Phone: 201-833-1741
www.icanj.net
Ages: 6 16
Summer Day Camp: Accepting registration. Learn to play chess, one of the
worlds oldest and most popular games.
We offer private, group, and after-school
lessons. Students of all levels are welcome, from beginner to master. We host
world-renowned international coaches
and our students have qualified for the
World Youth Championships. With lessons 6 days a week in two locations. See
website www.icanj.net for schedule and
pricing. Please see our ad on page 17.

International Ivy

11 Locations in North Jersey


Paramus, Oakland, Ringwood
Phone: 855-678-6335
www.iisummer.com
Weekly sessions: full day or half day
Ages: 5 14
Summer Enrichment Program. International Ivy offers creative, hands-on and
intellectually stimulating learning experiences during the summer. Summer is
a great time to explore, meander, stretch
the imagination and lose oneself in doing something fun. Our ultimate goal is
to help our students find their passion.
Once they find it, they are self-motivated
to learn and explore further. We offer
classes across many disciplines to satisfy the diverse interests and talents of the
children we serve. There are more than
fifty classes to choose from in technology, science, performing arts, visual arts,
math, business, sports, recreation and
even construction. Please see our ad on
page 18.

Montclair State University

Gifted and Talented Summer Camp


1 Normal Ave.
Montclair, NJ
Phone: 973-655-4104
Fax: 973-655-7895
www.Montclair.edu/gifted
Ages: Students who have completed
K-11
Counselor to Camper Ratio: 1:10
Sessions I: June 29 July 17, 2015
(no class July 3)
Session II: July 20 August 7, 2015
The summer program provides highachieving students, in grades 1 11, the
opportunity to immerse themselves in
an educational environment focusing on
mathematics, science, technology, fine
and performing arts, English and the humanities, as well as enjoying activities
such as swimming and tennis. The summer course schedule and application will
be available in February. Registration
deadline for Session I: May 17; Session II
is June 14. Please see our ad on page 11.

Ramapo College Summer Academic &


Life Skills Camps for H.S. Students

Ramapo College
505 Ramapo Valley Road
Mahwah, NJ
Phone: 201-684-7370
Fax: 684-7277
www.ramapo.edu/ramapocamps
Grades: 9th 12th
Session: Varying July August dates
Ramapo College Summer Academic &
Life Skills Camps for H.S. Students entering grades 9-12 offers Band & Choir
Camp, CompTIA A+, Financial Literacy/
Stock Market Trading, Game Design, and
Self Defense. Plus, Princeton Review SAT
Prep Plus College Immersion for entering
11th 12th graders. Please see our ad on
page 19.

185 Court Street Teaneck, NJ 201-833-1741


9-10 Saddle River Road, Fair Lawn, NJ 201-797-0330
www.icanj.net chessdirector@icanj.net

One of the worlds oldest an most popular games!


At the ICA, we offer private, group,
and after-school lessons. Students
of all levels are welcome, from
beginner to master. We host
world-renowned international
coaches and our students have
qualified for the World Youth
Championships! With lessons
6 days a week in two locations.

ARTS, PERFORMANCE AND


MUSIC CAMPS

CHESS SUMMER DAY CAMP


June 22 thru August 28 (10 weeks)

Art for Learning, LLC

Englewood area, NJ
artforlearning@yahoo.com
http://www.artforlearning.com/
201-503-9796
Art grades 1-10
Fashion grades 4-11
Teen Travel grades 7-11
Weekly Programs: June 29August 28
Programs include various age appropriate levels of Impressionist, Modern, Colonial and Victorian Art. Other programs
are taught for specific age groups, like Art
of China and Japan, Mosaic and Glass Art,
Princess Experience. All art programs
are taught based on history and sociology, music and poetry of time is sometimes introduced. Excerpts from books
are required for the Jewish Immigrant
Experience, and Greek and Roman Art,
which are based on Percy Jackson and
the Lightning Thief book. Younger kids
programs focus on dinosaurs and fish,
African zoo animals and farm animals.
Each art program includes two trips to
related venues like the Metropolitan Museum followed by art lessons in Central
Park, Victorian mansions, Ellis Island,
etc. Fashion programs begin from design
concept through retail, with trips to the
garment district showrooms, meetings
with fashion designers, marketing, and
merchandising experts, lectures at FIT,
and more. Kids have the chance to create
fashion-related artwork and products.
Teen Travel includes five days of visits
to NBC Studios, Empire State Building
Skyride, Brooklyn Bridge, South Street
Seaport, Madame Tussauds, and more!
Discount offered for early enrollment.

(sign up for any number of weeks)

Open to kids from age 6 to 16


Our goal is to foster an environment of learning and fun
We promise a 5:1 student-teacher ratio
Prizes and trophies for tournaments and competitions
Camp T-shirts and FUN!!!
Full day also includes:
Creative art projects Guitar, Piano and Drum lessons
Student band performs once a week

See website www.icanj.net for schedule and pricing.

REGISTERING NOW
FOR ALL SESSIONS

Art of Excellence Studio

Artist, Rina Goldhagen


Dates: July and August
Ages 7 Adult
201-248-4779
www.artofexcellencestudio.com
Themed Arts and Crafts camps available
in July and August. You can email inquiries to artofexcellencestudio@gmail.com.
Ongoing lessons and portfolio classes
available. Unlock your creative self with
classes in drawing and watercolor. Please
see our ad on page 12.

1 Depot Square, Englewood, NJ


education@bergenpac.org
(201) 482-8194
*Tuition Includes Lunch & Snacks
**After Camp Care Available For Fee

First Session

JULY 6 - 24, 2015


Second Session

AUGUST 3 - 21, 2015


ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015 17

AOC-18
OurChildren
About

Bounce U

NOW CELEBRATING 25 YEARS!

Infants Toddlers Pre-K


4 Extended Hours
4 Reasonably Priced
4 Dynamic Curriculum
4 Creative Art, Music and
Gymnastics Sessions
4 Certified Teachers
Now Registering for Summer Camp Ages 2-9
FOUR LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER!
225 Edgewater Rd, Cliffside Park
555 Palisade Ave, Cliffside Park
(201) 945-0234
(201) 945-0266
19 Emerson Plaza East, Emerson
5 Legion Dr, Cresskill
(201) 634-8622
(201) 569-9112

About
Our
Childrens
Guide to
Summer
Camps

Cresskill Performing Arts


BSD

HURRY!
SPECIAL
DISCOUNTED
RATES UNTIL
MARCH 30TH!

70 Eisenhower Drive
Paramus, NJ 07652
201-843-5880
www.bounceU.com/paramus
Create and Bounce Art Camp
Date: July 7 thru August 27, 2015
Time: 9 a.m. 3 p.m.
A little bit of exercise goes a long way toward inspiring your artists minds. BounceUs Create and Bounce program gives
kids a chance to enjoy physical activity
and creative time in equal doses, offering
an experience thats healthy, mentally engaging and seriously fun. Complete with
lunch, snacks, and games, its a one-of-akind camp experience theyll never forget. Please see our ad on page 13.

Give Your
Child the
Summer of a
Lifetime!

CAMP GAN ISRAEL


OF ROCKLAND

For Jewish Boys & Girls Ages 3 - 12


JUNE 29 - AUGUST 20
Warm and Professional Staff!
Twice Daily Swim & Instruction
in our Heated Pool!
Exciting Trips, Sports, Imagination
Lab, Gymnastics, Karate and More!
Air-Conditioned facility, Indoor Gym!

315 North Main Street in New City, NY


For more info visit www.cgirockland.org or call 845.634.0951
A Trusted Name in Jewish Camping

300 Knickerbocker Road, Suite 1100


Cresskill, NJ
Phone: 201-390-7513
and 201-266-8830
www.cresskillperformingarts.com
Ages: Toddlers-adults (studio)
Ages: 3-teens (camp programs)
April Break Performing Arts Mini Camp
April 6 10. Half and full day camp available. Dancing, Acting, Singing, Art/Crafts,
Yoga and more. Be productive, busy,
happy and challenged during the school
break! Our expanded program includes
Once Upon a Time (reading readiness/
crafts class for age 4 7) and Kids Concoctions to Make and Take (designer crafts
for age 8 and up). Activities include ballet,
jazz, tap, modern, hip-hop, theater dance,
voice/musical theater, acting, improv,
fencing (sword fighting), choreography, on
camera workshop and more! Cresskill Performing Arts teachers are extraordinary:
on staff at top NYC studios; nominated
for VMA awards, and in Cirque shows!
Camp runs from June 29 through August
28, 2015. Register for one week, two, or all
summer; we have camp for ages 3 through
teens. Early drop-off and late pick-up helps
working parents. Fencing Camp will be
two weeks this summer the week of June
29 and the week of August 24. Beginners
as well as more experienced fencers will
get stronger and try all the weapons in
our popular fencing experience! And our
Creative Legos Workshops return for the
month of July, for age 5 10. Please see our
ad on page 12 .

Center Stage Musical

Theater Camp
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Phone: Contact Deb at 201-408-1492
or droberts@jccotp.org.
Grades: 4 9
Of Princes, Beasts and Beauties Beauty
and the Beast & Snow White are woven
into a very funny version of Rogers and
Hammersteins Cinderella Mon.-Fri., June
29-July 17, 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m., Show:
Thur., 7/16, 5:15 p.m. Orientation/Placement day: Sun, June 28. An excellent opportunity for students of all levels to experience the fun of performing at a very
high level. Ends with a Broadway style
musical with sets, costumes, challenging
dialogue, big musical numbers and solos
for those who would like them. In the final gala production Of Princes, Beasts
and Beauties the stories are intertwined
so that the dwarfs work in the Beasts
minds. Snow Whites family, Belles town
and her castle friends all dance at Cinderellas Ball. Daily schedule includes work-

18 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

shops in acting, improvisation, stage


combat, movement, singing, and end-ofthe-day swim. Drama camp is available
to members of all ages and nonmembers
ages 10 and up. Contact Deb at 201-4081492 or droberts@jccotp.org.

BergenPAC-JCC Summer
Performance Intensive

Joseph A. Baker, director


Phone: 201-408-1492
Ages: 9 17
Mon-Fri, July 6 2 4,
9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
NYC Performance: July 23,
BergenPACs Cabaret Space and/or
JCCs Eric Brown Theater Performance:
July 24
An exciting program for intermediateadvanced students that culminates in at
least two performances. Professional skill
development in singing, acting, sketch
comedy and movement. This cabaretstyle performance features favorite numbers from Broadway musicals, sketch
comedy, short scenes and popular rock
songs as well as new pieces. Mr. Baker
will bring in other Broadway colleagues
as guest instructors. Students will be
bussed to the JCC at 3:20 p.m. to swim
in the outdoor pool. Joseph A. Baker is a
successful Broadway music director and
accompanist. Drama camp is available
to members of all ages and nonmembers
ages 10 and up. Interview/Audition required. Extended day optional. Contact
Deb at 201-408-1492 or droberts@jccotp.
org.

Summer Dance Intensive

Kaplen JCC on the Palisades


411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Ages: 6-16
Dates: Mon-Thurs, Aug 17-27,
10:30 a.m. 3 p.m.
Performance: Thurs, Aug 27, 5:30 p.m.
Four days a week of dance technique in
Ballet, Tap, and Jazz as well as an elective
such as Hip Hop, Lyrical, Modern, Musical Theatre, and Acrobatics. Improve
your skill level, build strength, and gain
more flexibility while having a great time!
All instructors are experienced choreographers and teachers. Early morning and
extended day available upon request.
Dance Camp is available to members of
all ages and nonmembers ages 11+. Contact Allyson at 201-408-1495 or acarolan@
jccotp.org.

Musical Explorers Summer Camp

Kaplen JCC on the Palisades


411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Phone: 201-408-1465
Ages: 3 5, Aug 24 28,
9:15 a.m. 3 p.m.
Summer is a time to create, explore and
play. Children in our camp will become
music investigators, discovering and
building different instruments, learning
to play the drums, singing their favorite
songs, and using movement and games
as a tool to learn to read music! In addition to all of our musical discoveries,
our young explorers will enjoy the water
park and playground! Extended care is
available. Contact the music school at
201.408.1465 or Thurnauer@jccotp.org.

The Performing Arts School


Summer Camp
1 Depot Square
Englewood, NJ
Phone: 201-482-8194

AOC-19
OurChildren
About

Fax: 201-482-8391
bergenPAC.org/summer
Ages: 5 12
Dates: July 6 July 24 and
Aug. 3 Aug. 21
Counselor to camper ratio: 5:1
Deadline for registration: May 31
Theater games, music, dance, arts &
crafts, with a final showcase on the bergenPAC main stage. Every child will feel
like a star. Please see our ad on page 17

Thurnauer Chamber Music Camp

Kaplen JCC on the Palisades


411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Phone: 201-408-1465
Ages 8 18
Dates: June 29 July 10,
9:15 a.m. 3 p.m.
Chamber Music Camp brings together talented young musicians and an acclaimed
faculty of artists and educators to experience the joys of ensemble playing
in an atmosphere of success and enjoyment. The camp accepts a select group
of string players and pianists based on
auditions, interviews and recommendations. 1 and 2-week options available.
Contact the music school at 201-408-1465
or Thurnauer@jccotp.org.

FluteStars Camp

Kaplen JCC on the Palisades


411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
Noelle Perrin, Director
Call for dates, times and fees
FluteStars is a two-day workshop for intermediate and advanced flutists, which
includes master class-style lessons, private practice time, and small and large
ensemble rehearsals with an emphasis on
developing musical expression, beautiful
tone and refined technique. The rehearsal
schedule is mixed with free time for socializing and recreation. This exciting workshop culminates with a final concert in
which flutists perform their polished solos
on stage for family and friends. Audition is
required. All applicants must present one
solo piece of their choice performed from
memory. Auditions may be scheduled individually with camp director at flutestars@
aol.com.

SPECIAL NEEDS
SUMMER PROGRAMS
Neil Klatskin Day Camp Tikvah
Program

Kaplen JCC on the Palisades


411 E. Clinton Ave.
Tenafly, NJ
201-567-8963
Ages: 5 15
Dates: June 29 Aug 21,
9 a.m. 4 p.m. (extended care available)
Children with special needs participate in
a diverse full-day program including academic remediation, adaptive physical education, arts & crafts, drama, Red Cross
instructional and recreational swim, Judaic programming, music, theme days,
live entertainment, extended nights,
carnivals, playground time, Shabbat
and more. Group sizes range from 3 to 6
campers and are staffed by a minimum of
two caring and qualified counselors. All
prospective campers must receive an intake interview. Contact the camp office at
201-567-8963 or nkdc@jccotp.org.

Camp Haverim

Kaplen JCC on the Palisades


411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenafly, NJ
Phone: 201-408-1489
Ages: 3 21
Dates: Aug 10 21, 9 a.m. 2: 45 p.m.
Camp Haverim is a two-week camp designed for children and teens with autism
and other cognitive and developmental
delays, with sufficient communication
and self-help skills, and attend 11 months
of special schooling. Campers participate
in social skills activities, swimming and
water park activities, sports, yoga and
adaptive physical education, academic
enrichment, music and movement, art,
and therapy dogs. Space is limited. Group
sizes are between 4-8 campers. Priority
is given to returning campers, Special
Services program participants and JCC
members. Intake interview required.
Contact Shelley at 201-408-1489 or slevy@
jccotp.org.

On Our Own

Kaplen JCC on the Palisades


411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenafly, NJ
Phone: 201-408-1489
Ages: 15 30
Dates: June 29 Aug 7,
9:30 a.m. 2: 30 p.m.
This program is six-week life-skills, vocational and recreational program for teens
and young adults with intellectual and
developmental delays, including autism,
with self-help skills to independently
participate within a 1:3 staffing ratio. Activities include work experiences, weekly
trips, swim, gym, music and dance. Doorto door transportation is available within
a 15-mile radius in Bergen County only.
Intake interview required. Contact Shelley at 201-408-1489 or slevy@jccotp.org.

SPORTS PROGRAMS/CAMPS
Ice Vault Skating Arena

10 Nevins Drive
Wayne, NJ
Phone: 973-628-1500
www.icevault.com
The Ice Vault has various activities for
kids of all ages. Public sessions, hockey
clinics, hockey teams, figure skating, freestyle, Learn to Skate programs. Birthday parties are also available. Please
check website for camp information.

Sports Camps
at the Bergen County YJCC

605 Pascack Road


Township of Washington
Phone: 201-666-6610
Fax: 201-664-7518
www.yjcc.org
Grades/Ages served: Nursery schoolthrough middle school age
Session dates: June August,
by the week
Cost varies by program
Ongoing registration
Summer starts with sports camps for ages
2 5 in June, where the focus is hand-eye
coordination, working together and lots
of fun. In July and August, elementaryand middle school-age kids can participate in one-week sessions of basketball
camp and soccer camp. Sports camps
are under the guidance of Jenny Jurjevic,
YJCC Sports and Recreation Director. For
more information, contact Jenny at 201666-6610, ext. 5790, jjurjevic@yjcc.org.
Please see our ad on page 8.

GA N

REGIS

YA L DE N U
GREAT NEWS!!
EXTENDING
OUR PROGRAM
IN BERGENFIELD
to PRE-K
STARTING
SEPTEMBER

TER NOW

SUMMER CAMP & SEPTEMBER


Focus on Child Development
Licensed Staff
Large Outdoor Facilities

Providing continuous learning & developmental


activities throughout the summer with lots of fun!
Call for an appointment to visit us!
INFANTS & TODDLERS AND NURSERY CLASSES
Newborn to 5
2 to 5
160 Woodbine St. Bergenfield 85 Copley Ave. Teaneck
201-385-7500
201-801-0291
www.ganyaldenutots.com
www.ganyaldenu.com

Choose one of Ramapo Colleges

Summer Youth Programs


For Middle School and High School Students

Ramapo ExploRERs-sTEm middlE school acadEmic camp


3 Sessions: July 617 July 2031 Aug 314

3-D Animation & Programming


Cells, Genes & Adaptations
CSI: Crime Science Investigation
Energize Your Math
Olympic Robotics

Robotics Rumble
Robots on the Move
Science Meets Art
Science of Flight
Virtual Science Lab

FoR high school sTUdEnTs


Band & Choir Camp
July 1324

SAT Prep
July 1323 or Aug 1020

CompTIA A+ Camp
Aug 37

Self Defense Mini-Camp


July 617

Game Design for Teens


July 617 or July 27Aug 7

Stock Market Trading


July 1317 or Aug 37

Register online for Upcoming information sessions!


www.ramapo.edu/ramapocamps or call 201-684-7370
A Top Pick by U.S. News & World Report,
The Princeton Review and Kiplingers

New Jerseys Public


Liberal Arts College

OF NEW JERSEY

505 Ramapo Valley Road Mahwah, NJ

SPORTS BROADCASTING CAMP!


is back for our 10th year

July7 6-10, 2015


4

Boys & Girls 10-18


Day/Overnight
options available

Learn from the Pros


Meet sports celebrities
Make play-by-play &
reporting tapes
Make sports anchor tapes from
a TV studio and much more!

Nations
#1 Sports
Broadcasting
Camp!

For more info call


800.319.0884 or visit
www.playbyplaycamps.com
Facebook.com/sportsbroadcastingcamps
Youtube.com/sportsbroadcastcamp
ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015 19

AOC-20*
OurChildren
About

How to Get Your Children


to Listen to You
S LOV I E JU N G R E I S - WO L F F

o you feel like youre talking to the wall when you


speak to your children? How many times do you
have to tell your children something before you
get them to listen to you?
When parents repeat the same thing over and
over each day pick up your laundry, dont leave
your shoes in middle of the hallway, do your homework! stop bothering your sister or get into bed
now! its no wonder you experience a sense of defeat. Children tune us out. Teens and pre-teens test
limits. And parents dont like dealing with the consequences, the discipline, and the negative emotions.
Were stressed and tired, and think its simpler to
just let things slide, forgetting that these issues will
only grow larger. How can we be more effective in our
parenting?
Here are five keys to create better listening in your
home:

1. Dont be afraid that your children wont


like you.
When we fear our childrens anger and tantrums we
hold back on discipline. The result is that our words are
not taken seriously. Seeing unhappy children can make
us feel unsuccessful as parents. We give in because we
are afraid that our children wont like us or that they
will voice opinions about us that are too painful to hear.
Wanting happy homes and happy children, we surrender. Instead of showing firmness, parents grow soft and
respond to a child with Okay, five more minutes, one
more cookie Our children have learned that with
the right tone, tantrum, or pleading they win. Their
silent treatment, tears and whining break our resolve.
Of course they wont listen. Why should they? We have
failed to communicate respect for our words. Toughen
up. Stop being afraid that your kids wont like you.
Theyll come to respect you.

2. Act. Dont React.


How often do problems occur because we were not
specific with our children or ignored a situation that
got out of hand? When children understand what is
expected from them we avoid confrontations and feeling as if we are not being listened to. For example: a
grandmother I know told me that she was worried sick
waiting up for her teenaged grandson who was staying
with her on vacation in Florida. The moment he came
home at 1 a.m. she screamed at him, called his parents
and gave him a stiff punishment. When questioned, the
grandmother informed me that all she had said to her
grandson before he left was, Dont come home too
late.
To this teen, no rules were broken; 1 a.m. is a normal time to return.
How much pain would have been avoided if the
adults in this family would have acted by setting clear
limits and times instead of reacting to this boys late
return? If only the rules would have been clearly explained beforehand, confrontation and feelings of being
ignored would never have occurred.

20 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

3. Dont Pyramid Parent

5. Get Rid of the Distractions

Allowing a child to perceive that it is him plus one parent against another parent is called pyramid parenting. One parent should never be thought of as the opposing figure. When mother and father are not on the
same side and one becomes allied with the child, both
parents lose. The child observes division. He translates
this as weakness. Respect and honor for parents become diminished as the child plays one parent against
the other. Neither parent will be effective because the
child knows that there will be discussions and even arguments when discipline comes into the picture. Parents who do not display a united front teach children
that it is possible to divide and conquer. Children who
recognize that their parents make decisions in harmony will realize that it is unthinkable to go against one
parents wishes or words and find support from an opposing parent.

If we are speaking to our children while having one eye


on the screen in front of us, we fail to convey that we
are serious about our relationship with them. I was
recently asked: if you had one piece of parenting advice to give, what would it be? I replied, Get off your
phone. Look around. What do you see? I watch as families believe that they are spending quality time together
but in reality everyone is either texting or checking Instagram. We have lost a vital connection with our loved
ones, especially our children.
After watching us speak to them with half an ear
and half an eye they have come to realize that we are
distracted parents. Our bodies may be present but our
minds are absent. We are missing out and there is no
way to make up for all the time and opportunity that
have passed us by. When our sons and daughters see
that they are indeed being looked at and heard, our
relationship with them will reach a whole new level.
For our words to be listened to, we must try to build
a connection. Until we do, fathers, mothers, sons, and
daughters, will be sitting next to one another but living
worlds apart.
We have the ability to raise children who listen to
our words. Parents who display a united front, are clear
and consistent, and show children that they are a priority will forge a relationship based on respect and deep
love. The time to start is now.

4. Say What You Mean and Mean What You Say


Some parents spend half their life saying: If you push
your brother one more time If you talk like that to
me again but nothing changes. The child just does
the same action again because he knows that we simply give empty threats. True, some parents blow up,
scream, yell, and get enraged. So what? Losing it does
not mean that we are being effective. After a while, parents get tuned out. If you keep dealing with the same
issue over and over again it is time to address it. Not
by losing control. We cannot parent out of rage. Rather, we must think about effective discipline and follow
through on our words. Mothers and fathers who lack
consistency are perceived as weak.

Slovie Jungreis Wolff is a parenting coach and educator and


the author of Raising a Child with Soul (St. Martins Press).

Reprinted with permission of Aish.com

AOC-21*

Its a Cookie! Its a Hamantaschen! Its Purim!


RAC H E L H A R K H A M

amantaschen are to Purim


as latkes are to Chanukah and pumpkin pie is to
Thanksgiving. That is to say it is
a flavorful and beloved part of
the celebrations. Preparing, eating, and gifting hamantaschen are a fun
and traditional part of the Purim festivities for many Jewish-American families.
People wax enthusiastically about their
favorite fillings; a great-aunts great
recipe; which ones are the best to buy
and from where. For the baking-inclined,
both nouveau and established foodie
websites devote space to both traditional, and new-fangled versions such as:
Vanilla Sugar Cookies
(Makes 20 to 22 sandwich
cookies)
2 cups all-purpose flour
teaspoon baking powder
teaspoon salt
cup butter, room temperature
1 cup confectioners sugar
1 large egg
1 tablespoon + 1 tablespoon milk
1. Preheat oven to 350F.
Prepare baking sheets. In
a medium sized bowl whisk together flour,
baking powder, and salt. Set aside.
2. In a large bowl beat together butter and
sugar until fluffy. Add in egg and beat on
medium speed.
3. Gradually, add half of the flour mixture
to the butter mixture. With a spatula scrape
the sides of the bowl. Once well incorporated, add the second half of the flour mixture
and mix well.
4. Pour vanilla-milk mixture into the batter, and mix low speed until a thick batter
results.
5. Divide dough in half and wrap each portion
in plastic and refrigerate for an hour or two.
Once you are ready to bake cookies:
6. Take dough out of the fridge and let it sit
for approximately 20 minutes, or until pliable.
7. Remove the plastic wrap. You can divide
dough in half if you feel its too unwieldy.
And then you can either place the dough
between two sheets of parchment paper
and roll it out without having to flour the
surface and tools. Or if you prefer to dust
counter and tools with flour and roll dough
out to a " thickness.
8. To shape cookies: A triangle mold works
very well, or you can cut the dough with a
sharp knife (see picture below). The dough
tends to be a little sticky, so make sure you
have a metal spatula in order to move the
triangles from the workspace to the baking
pans.

tie-dye and cappuccino, to name


just a couple.
But heres my guilty confession: I dont like hamantaschen.
Strange for an enthusiastic sweet
tooth with a particular appreciation for baked goods. For years I
set about to change my mind by
devising all kinds of fantastical
fillings like cheesecake and pecan pie.
Or converting them from a sweet treat
to a savory appetizer (blue cheese and
onion) or a yummy pizza snack. But now
I realize its not me, its hamantaschen.
The hamantaschens main concern
is its triangular shape, which mocks
the villain Hamans three-cornered hat
(sometimes derision tastes good). The
filling is almost an afterthought, and
9.Once you have all your
dough triangles, with a
sharp-tipped knife cut a
small triangle out of the
center of half your cookies.
10.The cookies wont
spread much but leave a
little room between each
on the baking sheet. Bake
in preheated oven for 10-12
minutes. Remove from oven
and let cool.

there is never enough of it. After making


a few batches I realized that the attaining and maintaining the dough triangle is
not so easy. There are bakers who pinch
and bakers who fold, but I always felt
there was some luck involved in keeping
hamantaschen sides neatly together.
I began to think about hamantaschen a few days before Valentines
Day, while I was enjoying a thick layer of
chocolate ganache sandwiched between
two heart shaped sugar cookies. If only
Hamantaschen could be so scrumptious!
But hold on a sec, if I could bake triangle
shaped cookies, and then make or buy
my favorite type of filling or jam and
spread it on the bottom of one triangle
cookie and then affix another triangle
cookie (one with a triangle window cut

out of the center) on top, wouldnt I have


a hamantaschen? But this one doesnt
need to be molded, and that has sweet
and wondrous filling with every bite!
Hamantaschen Sandwich Cookies
sound a lot more delicious than Deconstructed Hamantaschen, but these cookies feature the most important features
of a Hamantaschen (shape, look, and
filling) and eliminates its shortcomings.
Youre only limited by imagination when
it comes to flavors and decorations.
Below I offer recipes for a vanilla sugar
cookie dough, and a chocolate option.
For the fillings: chocolate ganache and a
peanut butter cream filling. Feel free to
swap it out for a more traditional jam,
or for the panoply of exotic spreads or
home-style frostings available out there.

saucepan and heat cream until bubbling


around the edges. Stir in chocolate chips
until melted, thick, and smooth.

1. In a medium sized bowl beat together


peanut butter and butter, and then mix in
the confectioners sugar until a thick consistency results.

Peanut Butter Filling


Makes approximately 1 cup
1 cup smooth peanut butter
3 tablespoons butter, room temperature
2/3 cup confectioners sugar

Rachel Harkham is a food writer, recipe


developer, cookbook author and chocolatier.
She lives in Rockland County with her family.

Dark Cocoa Sugar Cookies


(Makes 32 to 35 Cookie Sandwiches)
2 cups all-purpose flour
cup cocoa powder
1 /4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 cup butter
1 cup confectioners sugar
2 large eggs
1 tablespoon instant coffee dissolved into 4
tablespoons hot water
1. Preheat oven to 350F. Prepare baking
sheets. Whisk together flour, cocoa powder,
salt, and baking powder in a medium sized
bowl, and set aside.
2. In a large bowl, medium speed cream
together butter and powdered sugar. Add
eggs one at a time, beating after each addition until well incorporated.
3. Gradually add the cocoa-flour mixture
in two allotments. Scraping down the sides
with a spatula in order to mix in all the dry
ingredients.
4. Pour in coffee, mix until batter is thick
and smooth.
5. Divide into two discs and wrap each in
plastic. Place in fridge for an hour or two.
(Refer above for steps 6-10)

www.tofutti.com

Chocolate Ganache
(Makes 1 cup)
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 (10 ounce) bag of chocolate chips (semisweet, milk or dark)
1. Pour heavy cream into a medium sized
ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015 21

AOC-22*
OurChildren
About

Homemade Crafts and Cuisine


Are Perfect for Purim
R I V K Y KO E N I G

here is nothing, absolutely nothing quite like Purim. Its the Jewish
holiday of happiness and rejoicing.
We celebrate Esther and Mordechais
victory over Haman and all the seem-

ingly hidden miracles that occurred to


save the Jews of Persia, and ensure our
peoples victory over evil throughout
the ages.
Purim is a jam-packed holiday made
for friendship and good cheer that starts
with the reading of the Megillah the

scroll relaying the Purim story. Then


its on to more revelry with mishloach
manot gifts of food exchanged,
matanot levyonim charity for the
poor, and a blowout dinner the seudat
mitzvah to end the day.
You can tie the dress-up or masquer-

If you like, you can decorate


the crown with glittering glue,
sequins, and or rhinestones. Let
dry. Use the marker to write your
guests name on the crown.

The party food should be as


much fun to look at as it is to
eat. So make it miniature. Serve
bite-sized food with decorative
toothpicks, eliminating the need
for forks and knives. Trays of
mini beef burgers, franks in blankets, knishes, mini egg rolls and
burekas are some fun finger food
that will make it all fabulous. Try
a Purim pop as a fun dessert.

Tape elastic to the back of the


crown, 1/2-inch from each end.

Estimated time:10 minutes


Mask Place Card

Crown Napkin Ring


What you will need:
Scissors
Pencil
Metallic cardstock
Glittering glue, sequins, rhinestones, optional
Cellophane tape
3-inch strip narrow elastic

How to do it:
For each crown napkin ring, draw
a mini crown.
Trace the crown on the back of
the cardstock and cut out.

What you will need:


Scissors
Pencil
Metallic cardstock
Metallic paint marker
Cellophane tape
Small skewers
How to do it:
For each place card: Draw a
mask.
Trace the mask onto the back of
the cardstock and cut out.
Use the paint marker to personalize with your guests name.
Turn over and tape the top of the
skewer to the side of the mask.

Estimated time:10 minutes

ade theme into your Purim meal, seudat,


by using royal napkin rings and dramatic
place cards at each place setting. When
you set your table, make it say you with
these crafty napkin rings and mask place
cards.

Mini Beef Burger

Purim Masquerade Party


Separate from the seudat mitzvah, you can host a Purim party.
Invite your friends over for an
exciting, lively party filled with
music, dancing and good cheer.
Purim night after the Megillah
reading is a great time, but if that
doesnt work for you, then any
day or night close to Purim is a
good time for everyone to gather
together into the Purim spirit.

Purim Pops
These cookie pops are so much fun to
decorate. All your friends will get a kick
out of your cute creations.

What you will need:


Cookie sheets
Parchment paper
Cookie sticks or lollipop sticks
Wire rack
Small bowls
Spatula
Ingredients
1 package or roll frozen sugar cookie dough
(or make your favorite slice-and-bake
cookie dough)

What you will need:


Large bowl
Measuring spoons
Spatula or mixing spoon
Broiler pan or grill pan
Slotted spoon

the ingredients into the large bowl.


Use the spatula or your hands to
mix the ground beef with the sauce
and salt and pepper.
Roll the mixture into 12 2-inch
balls, then flatten to 1/2-inch thick
patties and place them 1-inch apart
onto a broiler pan.
Place them into the oven set on
broil. (Or, coat a grill pan with a thin
coat of oil and place grill pan over
high heat. Use a slotted spoon to
slide the burger onto the preheated
grill pan.)
Broil or grill the burger for 3 - 5
minutes (If using a grill pan, after 2
minutes flip burgers over to grill the
other side.)

Ingredients
1 pound ground beef
1 tablespoons barbeque sauce
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 dozen cocktail or dinner rolls
optional garnishes, cherry tomato,
pickle lettuce
How to do it:
Preheat the oven to broil. Place all

Remove from the oven and use a


slotted spoon to transfer the burgers to a platter.
Place the burgers into mini rolls
and garnish with a slice of cherry
tomato, pickle or lettuce.

Estimated prep time:15 minutes


Cook time: 5 minutes
Yield:12 burgers

Decorations such as: cereal, mini chocolate chips, red hots, candy corn, colored
sprinkles, silver dragees, nuts, jelly beans,
hamentaschen, gum balls.
1 container dairy or pareve vanilla frosting

Take cookie pops out of the oven and place


on a wire rack to cool.

How to do it:

Use a spatula to spread vanilla icing on each


cookie pop. Put an extra blob of icing on
the top as the base for a hamentasch hat, if
desired. Decorate the pops in any way that
you wish with the suggested elements.

Take the cookie dough out of freezer and


let defrost for 15 minutes. Preheat the oven
to 350 F. Line cookie sheets with parchment paper.
Slice the cookie dough into 1/2-inch thick
circles and place them 1-inch apart on
the cookie sheets. Insert a cookie stick
into each dough circle. Bake the cookies
according to the directions on the package.

Place the decorating candies and cereal


into small bowls.

Estimated prep time:15 minutes


Bake time: approximately12 minutes
Cooling time: 30 minutes
Yield will vary

Reproduced from Crafting Jewish by Rivky Koenig with permission of the copyright holders,
ArtScroll / Mesorah Publications, Ltd.

22 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

AOC-23*

Simchas
Birth

PETER JAXON RONAY


Peter Jaxon Ronay was born
on February 8, 2015, to
Danielle and Scott Ronay of
Rockaway. He is the grandson of Suzanne Ronay of
Oradell, nephew of Melissa
Ronay, and great-grandson
of the late Shirley and Irving
Greenblatt of Fort Lee,
formerly of Teaneck. Peter
Jaxon, who is named for his
paternal grandfather, Peter
Ronay, weighed 6 pounds, 11
ounces, and was 22 inches
long.

Bnai mitzvah
THOMAS COHEN
Thomas Cohen, son of
Jennifer Krevitt and Jay
Cohen and brother of
Nicholas celebrated becoming a bar mitzvah on Jan. 31
at Temple Sinai of Bergen
County in Tenafly. As a
mitzvah project, he raised
money and volunteered at
Charity:Water, a non-profit
organization bringing clean
and safe drinking water to
people in developing nations.

JOSH DAVANZO

JACOB MCGUIRE

Josh DAvanzo, son of Jill


and Lou DAvanzo of Franklin
Lakes and brother of Jack
and Alexa, celebrated
becoming a bar mitzvah on
Feb. 7 at Temple Beth Rishon
in Wyckoff.

Jacob McGuire, son of James


McGuire and Sarah Monchar
of Teaneck and brother of
Alexander and Daniella,
celebrated becoming a bar
mitzvah on Jan. 24 at Cong.
Beth Sholom in Teaneck.

BENJAMIN FINK

ELI PASTERNAK

Benjamin Fink son of Leslie


and Seth Fink and brother
of Leah and Sarah celebrated becoming a bar
mitzvah on Jan. 10 at Temple
Sinai of Bergen County in
Tenafly. Ben volunteered
for Challenger Soccer as his
mitzvah project.

Eli Hayden Pasternak, son of


Stephanie Sauer Pasternak
and Jonathan Pasternak
and brother of Hannah and
Jonah, celebrated becoming a bar mitzvah on Jan. 17
at Temple Sinai of Bergen
County in Tenafly. As a
mitzvah project, he participated in the Jeans for Teens
campaign in conjunction
with Aeropostale. The store
distributes donated jeans to
teens in local shelters.

OLIVIA PINCUS

JULIA HABER
Julia Haber, daughter of
Erica and Howard Haber of
Woodcliff Lake and sister of
Lindsay, celebrated becoming a bat mitzvah on Feb. 7
at Temple Emanuel of the
Pascack Valley in Woodcliff
Lake.

NOAH SHAFRON

TYLER CORSON
Tyler Corson, son of Risa and
Michael Corson of Closter,
celebrated becoming a bar
mitzvah on Jan. 31 at Temple
Beth El of Northern Valley in
Closter.

Olivia Pincus, daughter of


Jennifer Low Sauer and
Rennie Pincus of Ramsey,
and sister of Gabriel, 9, celebrated becoming a bat mitzvah on Jan. 24 at Barnert
Temple in Franklin Lakes.

JACOB KREBS
Jacob Krebs, son of Debra
and Daniel Krebs, stepson
of Ilyse Krebs, and brother
of Abby, celebrated becoming a bar mitzvah on Feb. 7
at Temple Beth Sholom of
Fair Lawn. His grandparents
are Margot and Leon Krebs
and Phyllis and Dr. Lawrence
Miller.

Noah Brandt Shafron, son of


Amy and Jason Shafron, and
brother of Ezra, celebrated
becoming a bar mitzvah on
Feb. 7 at Barnert Temple in
Franklin Lakes. Noah attends
Eisenhower Middle School
in Wyckoff. As a mitzvah
project, Noah raised funds to
improve a residential facility
for individuals with developmental disabilities. His grandparents are Iris Gibney and
Martin Shafron and Joan and
Dan Silna, a former president of Jewish Federation of
Northern New Jersey.

Taste of
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-Songs,
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preparing
and
,
KAYLA SIEFKEN
Children
will
learn
about
PASSOVER
-Children
will
learn
about
PASSOVER
-tasting
special
Passover
foods
and
tasting
special
Passover
foods
and
much more!much m
stories
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preparing and
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and
,Passover
Deborah Siefken,
celebrated
tasting
special
foods
and
much
more!
tasting
special
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foods
and
much
more!
space
inspace
thisfree
freeinclass.
registration
fee.
becoming a bat mitzvah on LimitedLimited
Limited
this$18
free
class.
$18
registration
space
in this
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$18
registration
fee.
tasting special Passover foods and much more!
Feb. 21 at the Fair Lawn

Limited space in this Limited


free Limited
class.
$18
registration
space
in this
free class. $18fee.
registration fee.
space
in this
free
class. $18
registration fee.

Jewish Center/Congregation
Bnai Israel.

Limited space in this free class. $18 registration fee.

RSVP to Marcia Kagedan


201-262-7733 or edudirector@jccparamus.org
RSVP to
Marcia Kagedan
Jewish
Community
Center
or edudirector@jccparamus.org
201-262-7733
of Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah
RSVP
toconservative
Marcia Kagedan
Jewish
Community
Center
A full
service
congregation
ofboth
Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah
with
traditional
and egalitarian
services.
RSVP
to Marcia
Kagedan
or
edudirector@jccparamus.org
201-262-7733
RSVP
to Marcia
Kagedan
A full
service
conservative
304
East
Midland
Avenue, congregation
Paramus, NJ
or
edudirector@jccparamus.org
201-262-7733
Jewish
Community
Center
with201-262-7733
both
traditional
and egalitarian
services.
or edudirector@jccparamus.org
Marcia Kagedan
Community
Center
304Jewish
East Midland
Avenue, Paramus,
of Paramus/Congregation
Beth NJ
Tikvah

RSVP to Marcia Kagedan


201-262-7733 or edudirector@jccparamus.org
ALEXA WEISS

RSVP to

Jewish
Community
Center
201-262-7733 or edudirector@jccparamus.org
RSVP
toconservative
Marcia
Kagedan
Paramus/Congregation
Beth
Tikvah
Aoffull
service
congregation
of
Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah
A fullCenter
service
conservative congregation
Jewish 201-262-7733
Community
or edudirector@jccparamus.org
with both
traditional
and egalitarian services.
ATikvah
full and
service
conservative
with both
traditional
egalitarian
services. congregation
of Paramus/Congregation
Beth
304 East
Midland
Avenue,Center
Paramus, NJ
Jewish
Community
304
East
Midland
Avenue,
Paramus,
with
both
traditional
andNJ
egalitarian services.
A full service conservative
congregation
of Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah
304
East Midland
Avenue, Paramus, NJ
with both traditional and
egalitarian
services.
A full
service
conservative
congregation
304 East Midlandwith
Avenue,
Paramus, NJ
both traditional
and egalitarian services.
Send
us
your
simchas!
304 East Midland Avenue, Paramus, NJ

We welcome simcha announcements for births and b'nai mitzvah. Announcements


are subject to editing. There is a $10 charge for photos. Photos must be separate jpg
files and high res.

RYAN WEISS
Alexa Weiss and Ryan Weiss,
twin children of Louise and
Peter Weiss, and siblings to
Matthew and Dylan, celebrated becoming bnai mitzvah
on Jan. 24 at Temple Sinai
of Bergen County in Tenafly.
Their grandparents are
Kenneth and Christel Marks.
As a mitzvah project, the
twins raised money for the
One Family Funds Twinning
program. The charity helps
children in Israel whose families have been affected by
terror, to celebrate their own
bnai mitzvah.

Send to pr@jewishmediagroup.com or mail to NJ Jewish Media Group, ATT:


Simchas
1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666
If a photograph is to be returned, include a SASE.
Information, call (201) 837-8818.

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Abbie@AbbieSophia.com
www.AbbieSophia.com
614-302-3111

real
genuine
you

AbbieSophiaPhotography
Portraits//Events//Lifestyle

ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015 23

AOC-24

Gallery
1

1. Students at the Academies at Gerrard


Berman Day School (GBDS) in Oakland
raised money for the Heart Association
through their annual JUMP FOR HEART
Day. Students from Kindergarten
through 8th grade donated funds,
jumped rope for cardiovascular health,
and learned how to remain heart
healthy.

3. The JCC Dance Company at the


Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly
recently attended master classes with
the famous New York City Rockettes,
where they had the incredible
opportunity to meet the dancers, take
part in a question and answer session,
and even enjoy a tour of Radio City.
What a treat!

5. Students at the Jewish Community


Center of Paramus/CBT Hebrew
School participated in elective classes.
These children are researching Israeli
Innovations such as Drip Irrigation,
Water-Gen (making water out of the
atmosphere), ReWalk (bionic walking
system) and Mobileye (keeping you safe
on the roads).

2. The Jewish National Funds Blue Box


Bob recently visited with students from
kindergarten through 3rd grade at the
Temple Emeth Religious School.

4. TABC in Teaneck captures New York


City Junior Varsity Championship in the
National History Bowl for second year
in a row.

6. Kindergarten students a Lubavitch on


the Palisades in Tenafly ran a bake sale
to culminate units about the rain forest
and money and learn about endangered
species of animals. The children also
baked assorted treats, created menus;

24 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

signs and a rain forest exhibit and held a


bake sale for parents.
7. Bergen County YJCC Nursery School
makes learning fun. As part of the prereading curriculum to prepare them
for kindergarten, the 4-year-olds,
clip boards in hand, went on a word
search around the building, looking for
sight words and writing them down.
Registration is now underway.
8. Glen Rock Jewish Center Nursery
School children welcome Shabbat on a
recent Friday evening.

AOC-25
OurChildren
About

TopChoices
CO M P I L E D BY H E I D I M A E B RAT T

M A R C H 2 0 15

Summer Intensive
at International Ivy
International Ivy, a new summer enrichment program for students ages 5 to 14, offers
enrichment in 50 different disciplines. International Ivy has 11 locations in Bergen County,
including Paramus, Oakland and Ringwood. Our ultimate goal is to help our students find
their passion, says International Ivy founder Lily Wong. Once they find it, they are selfmotivated to learn and explore further. Sessions start June 29 and run through Aug. 14.
Classes are offered in a variety of disciplines, including technology, science, performing
arts, math, visual arts, robotics and more. For more information, International Ivy, 855678-6335, www.iisummer.com.

Art for Learning


Promises Lots of Color
Sheryl Intrator Urman, founder and director of Englewood based Art for
Learning, is marking her 18th year leading youngsters on intellectual, cultural
and artistic journeys in her summer programs, which takes youngsters from
1st to 11th grades into the worlds of princesses, colonists, fashion, impressionist artists, New York City, and so much more. Art for Learning has a menu
of 26 different art classes and seven different fashion programs in which
youngsters, learn, travel to the New York City great museums, draw, paint and
create wonderful works of art as they learn about a topic in deep, creative
and hands-on way. For more information, Art for Learning, 201-503-9796,
www.artforlearning.com.

Fancy Nancy
Enlivens Englewood
The Paper Bag Players
Workshop and Show
The Paper Bag Players celebrates its 56th year by bringing its original, contemporary musical theater to The Jewish Museum on Sunday, March 15 with Hot Feet, a
theater performance at 2 p.m., and Become a Paper Bag Player, a special behindthe-scenes workshop at 10:30 a.m. Hot Feet is a fast-paced, interactive performance
for children ages 3 through 8. In the workshop Become a Paper Bag Player, children
ages 6 to 10 will meet members of the Paper Bag Players and learn how to make
theater from everyday life with the help of creative ideas and a little bit of paper. For
tickets, The Jewish Museum,1109 Fifth Ave., Manhattan. 212-423-3200, www.
thejewishmuseum.org.

Fancy Nancy The Musical,


based on the New York
Times bestseller, will play
on Sunday, March 8 for
two performances at 1 and
4 p.m. at bergenPAC in
Englewood. The story follows
Nancy and friends, Bree,
Rhonda, Wanda, and Lionel,
who are going to be performing in their first show. Nancy
is positive, thats fancy for
100 percent sure, that she
and Bree will be picked as mermaids, a coveted role. When another girl wins the
part, Nancy is stuck playing a dull tree. Can Nancy bring fancy flair to her role?
Check it out. bergenPAC, 30 North Van Brunt St., Englewood, 201-227-1030,
www.ticketmaster.com, www.bergenpac.org.

ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015 25

AOC-26

The Good Life With Kids

M A R C H

To Our Readers: To Our Readers: This calendar is a day-by-day schedule of events. Although all information is as timely as we can make it, its a
good idea to call to verify details before you go.

DaybyDay
Sunday, March 1
Pre-Purim Party with the Friendship Circle:
The Friendship Circle of Passaic County presents
a pre-Purim party with pizza, a Mad Science
show and more. 1:30 to 2:45. 482 Brook
Ave., Passaic (in rear of Chai Tots pre-school).
$10 per family. For ages 3 and older. RSVP to
fcpassaiccounty@yahoo.com or 763-228-8570.
Purim at Temple Emeth: Carnival from 10 a.m.
to noon. Temple Emeth, 1666 Windsor Road,
Teaneck. 201-833-1322. Purim Megillah Reading
on Wednesday, March 4 at 7 p.m.
Purim Carnival Temple Beth El: Temple Beth El
invites the community at 11:15 am to join them
for an Awesome Purim Carnival Games, Food
and New Surprises. Temple Beth El is located at
221 Schraalenburgh Rd., Closter. 201-768-5112.
Peter Pan Jr.: Peter Pan Jr. will be performed
by more than 50 area children at the Wayne
YMCAs Rosen Performing Arts Center at 2 p.m.
Produced in partnership with Pushcart Players.
The Y is located at 1 Pike Drive, Wayne. 973595-0100.

Tuesday, March 3
What is Cord Blood Banking?: The Valley
Hospitals Center for Family Education is offering a What is Cord Blood Banking? held 6:15
to 7:15 p.m., at the Destination Maternitys
Learning Studio, 35 Plaza on Westbound Route
4, Paramus. To register, 201-291-6151, www.
ValleyHealth.com/FamilyEducation.
Outsmarting Autism: Author Patricia Lemer
who wrote Outsmarting Autism: will speak at the
Bergen County YJCC at 7 p.m. Free and open to
the public. The YJCC is located at 605 Pascack
Road, Township of Washington. 201-666-6610,
ext. 5810, gwellington@yjcc.org.

Wednesday, March 4
Temple Avodat Shalom Purim Shpiel: Garden
Shushan Plaza: The Musical will be presented
at 7 p.m. Megillah reading preceding and
hamantashen will be served afterward. Temple
Avodat Shalom, 385 Howland Ave., River Edge.
201-489-2463
Purim at Temple Beth Sholom: Temple Beth
Sholom of Fair Lawn invites the community to
join in their Purim celebration filled with inspiration, merriment and fun! Festivities begin with the
Megillah reading at 7 p.m. Temple Beth Sholom
40-25 Fair Lawn Avenue (corner of Saddle River
Road). 201-797-9321.
Grand Purim Bash at Lubavitch on the
Palisades: Megillah reading at 6:30 p.m. with
second reading at 9:30 p.m. And also Thursday,
8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. On Thursday, Purim in
France with French cuisine, French wines and
more. Chabad House, 11 Harold St., Tenafly. www.
chabadlubavich.org 201-871-1152.
Wild West Purim Carnival: Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack Valley host a family fun Purim
day with at 4:30 p.m. family megillah reading
and Purim carnival featuring games, rides and
food. At 7 p.m. there will be a traditional Wild
West Megillah Reading. Temple Emanuel of the

26 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

OurChildren
About

To Add Your Event to Our Calendar


Send it to:
Calendar Editor
About Our Children
New Jersey/Rockland Jewish Media Group
1086 Teaneck Road
Teaneck, NJ 0766 AboutOCaol.com
or fax it to: 201-833-4959
Deadline for April issue (published March 27):
Tuesday, March 17

Road, Wayne. Buffet dinner. 973-694 6274,


email chanig@optonline.net or www.Jewishwayne.
com.
The Paper Bag Players: Theater workshop and
performance at The Jewish Museum. Theater performance at 2 p.m. Workshop at 10:30 a.m The
Jewish Museum, 1109 Fifth Ave., Manhattan. 212423-3200, www.thejewishmuseum.org.

Pascack Valley, 87 Overlook


Drive, Woodcliff Lake, 201391-0801, www.tepv.org.
Purim in Glen Rock: Celebrate
here. Childrens Purim service
from 6 to 7 p.m. Megillah
reading, costume parade and
more. Full Megillah reading 7
p.m. Glen Rock Jewish Center,
682 Harristown, Road, Glen
Rock. 201-652-0745.

Thursday, March 19

Friday, March 6
Yoga for Teens and Young
Adults: Body Positive Yoga for
teens and young adults will
provide tools to help young
participants value their bodies and transform negative
See Saturday, March 28.
thinking to positive beliefs.
5 to 6 p.m. Pandora Healing
Center, 274 Lafayette Ave.,
Hawthorne. Register email carolyn1bryan@gmail.
Happiest Baby on the Block: The Valley Hospital
com
Center for Family Education is offering The
Shabbat in Closter: Temple Beth El invites the
Happiest Baby on the Block. Learn techniques of
community to join them for a Shabbat Evening
world-renowned pediatrician, Dr. Harvey Karp. At
Service at 7:30 p.m. Service is led by Cantor
7:30 p.m. Dorothy B. Kraft Center, 15 Essex Road,
Rica Timman. Temple Beth El is located at 221
Paramus www.ValleyHealth.com/FamilyEducation,
Schraalenburgh Rd., Closter. 201-768-5112.
201-291-6151.
Challah playgroup in New Milford: Shalom
Baby holds playgroups for children newborn to
Purim Party at the Wayne Y: Young families are
age 3 and their parents. Each playgroup has a
welcome to this free event from 10 a.m. to noon.
theme related to holidays, Jewish values, and topArts and crafts, games, dancing and a costume
ics on parenting and early childhood education.
parade. The Y at 1 Pike Drive, Wayne. 973-595Playgroups are free and open to all. RSVP not
0100.
required. Solomon Schechter of Bergen County,
Purim Carnival in Glen Rock: Games, prizes,
275 McKinley Ave., New Milford. http://www.jfnnj.
balloons. Fun for everyone. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Glen
org/shalombaby or JessicaK@jfnnj.org.
Rock Jewish Center, 682 Harristown, Road, Glen
Rock. 201-652-0745
Pop Ups Perform: The kids indie rock duo The
Gail Sheehy Speaks: JCC University presents
Pop Ups will perform a concert for families at The
journalist and author Gail Sheehy will discuss
Jewish Museum 11:30 a.m. The Jewish Museum,
her new memoir, Daring: My Passages at 1 p.m.
1109 Fifth Ave., Manhattan. 212-423-3200, www.
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades, 411 E. Clinton Ave.,
thejewishmuseum.org.
Tenafly. 201-408-1409, www.jccotp.org.
Games at Teaneck General Store: Attention all
gamers, problem solvers and kids from 3 to 93.
Aretha Franklin Sings: The Queen of Soul perJoin game maven Leora Verbit from 4 to 6 p.m.
forms at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center
at the Teaneck General Store for fun and what
at 8 p.m. NJPAC, One Center Street, Newark,
else? Games. 502A Cedar Lane, Teaneck. 201888-466-5722, www.njpac.org.
530-5046.
Tween Scene at the Y: The Bergen County YJCC
Fancy Nancy The Musical: Based on the New
invites tweens ages 10, 11 and 12 to come to the
York Times bestseller, the show follows Nancy
YJCC to use the pool and gym, play games in
and her friends. Performances at 1 and 4 p.m.
the lounge, watch a movie, enjoy a snack, dance
bergenPAC, 30 North Van Brunt St., Englewood.
to a DJ or just hang around with friends, all fully
201-227-1030, www.ticketmaster.com or www.
supervised by YJCC staff. From 8 to 10 p.m. 605
bergenpac.org.
Pascack Road, Township of Washington. 201666-6610, ext. 5830 or mcompa@yjcc.org.
Gluten-Free Baking: Baking expert Galit Aboodi
will lead a baking class featuring recipes sure to
Glen Rock Jewish Center Film Series: Showing
become family favorites. Menu will feature several
of The Sturgeon Queens a documentary of the
s desserts. 7 p.m. Call Judy at 201-408-1457 or
famed Lower East Side fish emporium Russ &
Michele at 201-408-1496 to register. Kaplen JCC
Daughters. 3:30 p.m. Glen Rock Jewish Center,
on the Palisades, 411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenafly.
682 Harristown Road, Glen Rock. 201-652Grandparents Class: The Valley Hospital Center
6624, office@grjc.org.
for Family Education is offering a Grandparents
Film and food at Chabad: Join the Chabad
Class from 7 to 10 p.m. in the Dorothy B.
Center in solidarity with Israeli solders for the
Kraft Center, 15 Essex Road, Paramus. www.
screening of Jerusalem Us new film Beneath the
ValleyHealth.com/FamilyEducation, 201-291-6151.
Helmet. 4:30 p.m. at Chabad Center, 194 Ratzer

Tuesday, March 10

Sunday, March 8

Thursday, March 12

Saturday, March 14

Monday, March 9

Sunday, March 15

Dr. Edward Hallowell Speaks: Jewish Family


Service of MetroWest NJ presents its Goldberg
Memorial Learning Disabilities Seminar. When
You Worry about the Child You Love featuring
Dr. Edward Hallowell, renowned psychiatrist and
ADHD expert to speak at 7 p.m. at Liberty Middle
School 1 Kelly Drive, West Orange. kcolchamiro@
jfsmetrowest.org, 973-765-9050.
Makeovers for a Cause: Academies at Gerrard
Berman Day School will be hosting its annual
event at Neiman Marcus, Garden State Plaza,
Paramus from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Retirement and
Recommitment party for shoes, handbags, and
cosmetics. Relax in Neimans hip Rotunda Lounge
and enjoy a kosher supper. $75 per person;
$325for a table of five Amy Silna Shafron 201337-1111 or ashafron@gmail.com,

Friday, March 20
Tot Shabbat in Franklin Lakes: Tot Shabbat and
Pizza Dinner at Barnert Temple at 5:30 p.m.
Barnert Temple, 747 Route 208 South, Franklin
Lakes. 201-848-1800, www.barnerttemple.org.

Tuesday, March 24
Temple Emeth Lecture: The History of the
Haggadah led by Rabbi Steven Sirbu from 8 to
9:15 p.m. Temple Emeth, 1666 Windsor Road,
Teaneck. 201-833-1322, www.emeth.org.

Friday, March 27
Tot Shabbat in Closter: Temple Beth El will hold
its monthly informal Tot Shabbat led by Rabbi
David S. Widzer and Cantor Rica Timman at 5:15
p.m. Tot Shabbat is open to all nursery school
age children and features song, stories, and crafts.
Open to everyone. Temple Beth El is located at
221 Schraalenburgh Rd., Closter. 201-768-5112.

Saturday, March 28
Sleeping Beauty Dreams: Marionetas de la
Esquina, a puppet theater company from Mexico,
presents the tale reimagined. 2 p.m. NJPAC, One
Center Street, Newark, 888-466-5722, www.
njpac.org.

Sunday, March 29
PassoverFrogs playgroup in River Edge: Shalom
Baby holds playgroups for children newborn to
age 3 and their parents. Each playgroup has a
theme related to holidays, Jewish values, and topics on parenting and early childhood education.
Playgroups are free and open to all. RSVP not
required. Temple Avodat Shalom, 385 Howland
Ave., River Edge. www.jfnnj.org/shalombaby or
JessicaK@jfnnj.org.

AOC-27
OurChildren
About

Englewood Hospital Unveils


New Labor and Delivery Unit
H E I D I M A E B RAT T

irthing mothers just


got a lift at Englewood
Hospital and Medical
Center.
Englewood Hospital and
Medical Center New Family Birth Place, located in
EHMCs main inpatient facility, boasts eight new labor
and delivery rooms equipped
with infant resuscitation stations, private bathrooms,
and 75 percent more space
than existing rooms. A triage area was
created to allow those rooms to remain
reserved for mothers in active labor. The
new space also includes a step-down
unit for antepartum and postpartum
monitoring of high- risk cases and two
operating rooms equipped with the latest technology.
The new labor and delivery unit
is part of Englewood Hospitals threepart overhaul of the Family Birth Place,
which began in the fall of 2013 when a
new Mother/Baby Unit was renovated,
explained Jackie Gonzalez, MSN, RNCMNN, director of patient care for Labor
and Delivery and Pediatrics.
She described the new labor and
delivery unit as aesthetically modern,
warm and comforting. Couples have de-

scribed it as soothing and spa-like, Gonzalez says.


To enhance family-centered maternity care, the Mother/Baby Unit offers 24
modern postpartum rooms with stateof-the-art bedside care technology, designed to better accommodate new parents and families with more space and
privacy.
Amenities include private bathrooms, room service, and sleeper sofas
for family and guests. A new well-baby
nursery offers advanced equipment and
security for newborns, providing new
mothers with peace of mind and time
to rest and recover if needed. A redesigned lactation center will provide an
enhanced experience for mothers who
choose to breastfeed.

Proper continued from page 8


twisting, she says. As the pregnancy
has progressed I just listen to my body,
and if an exercise doesnt feel right, I
dont do it.
Good idea, says Dr. Deborah Ehrenthal, an ob/gyn specialist. If youre
in doubt or feel discomfort, dont do
it. Most important, if you experience
bleeding or pain, stop and talk with
your doctor. It may be completely unrelated but it should be checked out,
she says.
During exercise wear loose, layered clothing and a supportive bra.
Sip on water to stay hydrated, and
precede and end your workouts with
a small protein-carbohydrate snack to
provide quick and long-lasting energy
and maintain muscle.
Thats what Willard does. Ill have
a natural peanut butter and jelly sandwich on whole grain bread about an
hour beforehand and a banana and
whey protein shake afterward, she
says. Ive also added 300 calories to
my diet per day and have increased
the frequency of my meals because Im
always hungry.
Emily Moore, prenatal nutrition educator, says small frequent meals are a
good remedy for morning sickness and
heartburn too. She advises women to
eat six meals every two to three hours
and consume fluids between meals,
rather than during. It may also be helpful eat before getting out of bed.

To avoid heartburn, dont lie


down immediately after eating, lay
with your head slightly elevated and
avoid caffeine, chocolate and highly
seasoned foods, says Moore. Another common complaint, constipation,
can be prevented by increasing highfiber foods and fluid intake and engaging in moderate exercise.
Moore believes good prenatal nutrition is paramount because it can
affect the childs metabolic and endocrine health throughout childhood and
into adulthood. She suggests choosing
whole grain products, fruits and vegetables for its fiber, vitamin, mineral
and antioxidant benefits, and low-fat
dairy products for its calcium content.
Likewise, meat and beans provide protein and iron, which are necessary to
healthy cell development and delivering oxygen to the baby.
Many women are concerned
about eating fish due to its mercury
content, but fish contains essential
Omega-3 fatty acids, DHA, which is
vital to brain, eye and central nervous system development, she says.
Rather than crossing fish off your list,
choose ones low in mercury and high
in Omega-3, such as flounder, herring,
fresh salmon, sardines, squid and fresh
water trout. Omega-3 fortified eggs are
a good option too.
Denise Morrison Yearian is the former editor of two parenting magazines and the
mother of three children.

PARTY

Maccabeats Performing at Kaplen JCC


The Maccabeats perform live at the
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades on Sunday,
March 15 at 2 p.m. With a huge fan base,
more than 20 million views on YouTube,
numerous TV appearances and proven
success with three albums, Yeshiva Universitys student vocal group, the Maccabeats, has entertained and inspired
hundreds of audiences worldwide. Using
nothing more than the unadulterated human voice, a clean-cut presentation and
a little Jewish humor, this unique group
of singers is able to connect with fans of
all backgrounds and ages.
The Maccabeats are a major icon
in the music world today and are writ-

ing songs that encourage young people


to embrace Jewish ideas and values,
says Senior Adult Director Judi Nahary.
We expect a huge turnout, and we are
so grateful for the support we received,
knowing that ticket sales will allow us to
provide invaluable programs for senior
adults in our community who are truly
in need.
Purchase tickets online at www.jccotp.org/maccabeats or call Judi at 201408-1450. Cost is $18 JCC members/$20
non-members. Preferred seating for
this one-time event is also available: $30
members/$36 non-members.

973-661-9368
ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015 27

AOC-28

first [ breath ]

You and your babys needs come first at The Valley Hospital. You put a lot of thought into planning the arrival of your little
one. By getting to know you, our medical team can center your pregnancy and babys birth on your needs. Whether youre
looking for a holistic birthing plan or advanced neonatal care, The Valley Hospital Center for Childbirths skilled doctors,
nurses, doulas and midwives are by your side from your first doctors visit to your childs first breath.

To experience The Center for Childbirth at The Valley Hospital,


visit ExperienceValleyChildbirth.com.
Follow us at ValleyHealth.com/SocialMedia.

28 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN MARCH 2015

A supplement to the Jewish stAndArd winter 2015

CELEBRATIONS

EVENTS

&

Photographed by Abbey Photographers

Sp e c t a c u l a r
Ba l l ro o m
R e n ov a t i o n
Reopening
March 2015

2014
READERS
CHOICE

Now Offering Off-Premise Catering

Places in the heart


Area venues draw wedding, bar-bat mitzvah, celebration and events crowds
hEIdI mae BraTT

hen I was still in college, I


got a job at a local catering
hall. It was at the Conservative temple in my Brooklyn
neighborhood. Temple Sholom of Flatbush by day was a synagogue that held
religious services and Hebrew school
classes. But by night, the grand room
was transformed into a disco-ball
sparkling, dance-floor gleaming event
space where celebrants feted the couple or person of honor as they wined
and dined. I worked there as a waitress,
ladling out steaming bowls of mushroom barley soup, plating thick slices of
medium rare prime rib French style
and folding and refolding napkins when
partygoers left their seats to shimmy to
the bands version of Celebration by
Cool & the Gang, a song that opened
every simcha.
I loved that job. It wasnt easy. I was
always on my feet. But it was always a
party.
Fast forward a decade and a half, and

my fianc Jeff and I were looking for a


venue to have our own wedding. We
looked here. We looked there. But we
wound up where I had started Temple
Sholom of Flatbush. There was a new

Shopping for a venue to hold


a wedding or another
celebration or milestone event
is part of the experience
culminating in the happy event.
glatt kosher caterer, a chef-businessman, who cradled all my concerns and
assured me he would tend to all the
details. The decision was made. Temple Sholom was close to home, pretty
and very familiar. Also, it was a place of
happy memories okay, so I was on the
sidelines as a waitress, but now I would

be out in front as a bride. Our wedding


was beautiful.
Shopping for a venue to hold a wedding or another celebration or milestone event is part of the experience
culminating in the happy event. Fortunately, there are so many venues
in this area. We asked some to
share what makes them a special
place to hold a special event.
Les Friedman, owner of
Northern Valley Affairs at
Temple Emanu-El in Closter,
is unveiling a floor-to-ceiling
refurbishment of its 7,800
square-foot ballroom, just in
time for the March 7 annual
dinner-dance for Temple Emanu-El. The room, with new
drapes, carpeting, and cherry
woodwork in a transitional
design, gives a lift to the 13-yearold building and shows people
a change. Its good to have a fresh
look, said Mr. Friedman, who co-

partners with manager, Marty Magged.


You have to keep competitive and on
top of the trends in food, dcor and service.
The dcor in the ballroom may be

S-4 Jewish Standard

WINTER 2015

new, but a piece of history lives inside


the sanctuary, which was designed with
a 90-year-old stained glass dome originating from the Brooklyn Jewish Center.
Also, Mr. Friedman said, the grounds
of the facility allow for ceremonies to
take place indoors or outdoors. Brides
love that indoor-outdoor space. For
autumn weddings we have heat lamps
that can warm and raise the temperature 20 degrees, an option for cocktails,
a hibachi station or a multitude of other
things.
The Pearl River Hilton in Pearl River,
N.Y., a family-owned and operated hotel
for three decades, has distinguished
itself for the past five years and been
recognized for Best Overall Service
of all Hiltons in the tri-state area. Most
recently it was recognized for Best
Overall Event Experience of all Hiltons
in the United States.
Owner and general manager William Maloney III said the venue prides
itself on hosting one wedding or bar/bat

mitzvah at a time, and because it is a


hotel, the convenience of booking some
of its 150 rooms is appealing to many of
its clients.
Pearl River Hilton has also just completed a refresh of its lobby, grand
ballroom and other banquet spaces.
The response so far has been fantastic, said Mr. Maloney. Our property
has a very traditional feel to it, from our
exterior to the architectural details within our hotel yet we have been successful in introducing interesting eclectic
design elements to keep our look fresh.
Gerry Burns, the catering manager
at Pearl River Hilton, which has the
capacity to host a 550-person wedding
party, said the facility is very fluent in
kosher and Orthodox weddings and bar
mitzvahs in which the hotel is transformed into Shabbat-observant weekends from the start of services on Friday
night throughout Saturday. The accommodations extend to having a Shabbat
elevator operator for guests who stay

where the story begins..

Meet with the areas trusted wedding professionals


to help create the wedding of your dreams!
Everything Bridal has been producing shows in the Tri-state for over 20 years!
Our goal is to provide brides, grooms, partners, their families & friends
a venue where local vendors can assist them in planning every detail of
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over to guards on the floors who help


the guests with entry into their rooms
which are locked electronically.
Mr. Maloney said that its restaurant,
Two Henrys, offers great dining options
for before or after the main reception.
Also, guests can enjoy Clearwater Tavern following the reception before easily
returning to their rooms.
At the Elan in Lodi, Lisa Ferrone, general manager, said that prospective clients love the convenience of packages
that are offered, which include leads
to a preferred list of DJs and photographers. The award-winning wedding
venue and banquet hall offers an intimate atmosphere with event spaces for
all kinds of events from weddings to
bar/ bat mitzvahs to sweet sixteen parties.
Ms. Ferrone said a popular highlight
at the Elan is the themed food stations.
Guests wander through a culinary globe
with prepared food from a Taste of Italy
to Latin victuals to brewery stations.

Other highlights, Ms. Ferrone said, are


the grand ballroom and another event
room which are equipped with mounted 65-inch and 55-inch screens for
video needs that guests might have, be
it a video montage or engagement photos and the like.
The Estate at Florentine Gardens,
located in a Georgian-style mansion
on four acres in River Vale, is a familyrun business that makes sure to host
only one wedding at a time. Its a nice
exclusive venue and we make sure that
it is the brides special day and exclusively yours, said Maria Daidone, who
works with her father Thomas Daidone
and sister, Amanda. One advantage
to having a family-run business, she
said, is that the owner is always here
on site.
The grand ballroom at The Estate at
Florentine Gardens accommodates 360
guests and is surrounded by floor-toceiling windows and features 25-footSee venues page 6

Enter to Win a
Two-Night Stay
For Two
at the

Two nights room and tax


any Friday, Saturday or Sunday
(based on availability)

and breakfast the following morning.

UPCOMING EVENTS
THURSDAY, MAR. 5th
FALKIRK ESTATE
CENTRAL VALLEY, NY

Winner will be chosen in a random drawing


from all entries received by March 20, 2015

THURSDAY, MAR. 12th


THE RIVERVIEW
HASTINGONHUDSON, NY

Name _________________________________________________________________

PRIZES
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EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS

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Street _________________________________________________________________
City/State/Zip ___________________________________________________________
Phone _________________________________________________________________
Email ___________________________________________________________
Mail to: Jewish Standard, 1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666
or fax to: 201-833-4959 by March 20, 2015.
*By entering this contest you agree to have your
name added to the Jewish Standard e-mail newsletter list.

Jewish Standard

S-5

S-6 Jewish Standard

WINTER 2015

Venues
from page 4

high ceilings, a stately mahogany fireplace, 10-foot crystal chandeliers, and a


Juliet balcony perfect for tossing of the
bouquet or for photo opportunities.
The gardens are also big and beautiful for a wedding, no matter what the
season, Ms. Daidone said.
Anthonys Pier 9 in New Windsor,
N.Y., has been one of the areas premier
glatt kosher catering halls since 1996.
For Orthodox weddings large and small,
the venue offers several separate rooms
for the smorgasbord and the grooms
tisch, an indoor tropical garden for the
chuppah, and a grand ballroom with
the capacity for up to 1,000 guests, in
addition to a yichud room for the bride
and groom.
While it has been the choice of many
Rockland County residents to hold their
weddings, clients have traveled from
around the tri-state area and Pennsylvania to have their simcha.
Were upstate and out of the city so
were not your ordinary banquet hall,
said Chip Olszewski, general manager
of Anthonys Pier 9. Its a very different feeling being up here, out of all the
hustle and bustle.
The facility offers one-stop shopping,
with pricing including the rental of the
hall and the catering all in one.

Another jazzy feature, Mr. Olszewski


said, is an elevator that comes out of the
floor on the stage in the ballroom. When
introducing the bride and groom, this
dramatic entrance adds a unique quality. Its cool. The elevator comes out
of the floor and up come the bride and
groom.
Like many of the other venues,
Teaneck Marriott at Glenpointe has
renovated its lobby and event spaces,
making it a sleek venue for weddings,
dinners, events and other gatherings.
Mitchell Heymann, director of sales
and marketing at Teaneck Marriott at
Glenpointe, said another plus is that the
venue is one of the more upscale hotels
in northern Jersey. If youre looking for
a full-service venue with a gym, a spa, a
restaurant, we do that all here.
Patrice Jungermann, the catering
sales manager at the Teaneck Marriott at Glenpointe, recalled a recent
Orthodox wedding where the bride and
groom were separated until the bedeken, the moment when the groom
veils the bride. The young man and his
friends had a nice long hallway to sing
and dance as they went up to the bride.
They enjoyed that.
For a Manhattan loft-like ambience
and new American cuisine, Park West
Loft in Ridgewood is a new event space.
It is so new, said chef/co-owner John
Halligan, that it is preparing for its first

EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS

wedding in May.
We thought the neighborhood
needed a place to throw parties, said
Mr. Halligan, who is the chef at the Park
West Tavern, located downstairs from
the loft. When the second floor, previously used for offices, became available, the owners transformed the 4,000
square feet into the loft.
We are calling it a special event
venue, Halligan said. The ambience is
very trendy, very cool.
Right in the heart of Teaneck, Shaarei Orah, The Sephardic Synagogue of
Teaneck on Essex Road in the Whittier
section of the West Englewood, offers a
centralized location for special events.
One of its many pluses, location, location, location. Its location makes it easy
for guests who are staying in town.
The synagogues social hall can
comfortably seat up to 100 people for
gatherings, simchas and other events.
Joel Mizrahi, president of Shaarei Orah
said, Shaarei Orah is a warm kehilla
(community) and its doors are open to
all to join us for tefila (services), events
or to utilize our social hall or other
facilities.
Many informal weddings take place
at the fine dining restaurant Chakra,
located in Paramus. The American
gourmet restaurant can accommodate
parties from 60 to 200 people, said Bill
Carlson, Chakras catering manager.

The Palisadium in Cliffside Park takes


full advantage of its location, said Yossi
Abadi, owner.
We have the most awesome view of
the New York City skyline right on the
Hudson River. Nothing beats that, said
Mr. Abadi.
In addition to the stunning and natural view, Mr. Abadi said that the chef
at the Palisadium remakes the entire
menu every six months, with innovative and interesting culinary treats. We
think theres no way that our chef is
going to up this one, but then he creates this new item. I think that looking and tasting is more than enough,
but we also have a great staff including
event coordinators that will assist a client early in the process to make things
easy.
Another great vista could be had at
the Metropolitan Room at the Newark
Club in Newark. The venue, located on
the 22nd floor atop One Newark Center, features a 6,000 square foot event
space and from that vantage point,
there is a dramatic southern, western
and northern view that includes Manhattan, said Brian Finneran, the executive director.
When it comes to The Rockleigh, in
Rockleigh, theres just one thing to say,
according to office manager, Cheryl
Konstandt. Theres no place like the
Rockleigh.

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S-7

Having an affair?

S-8 Jewish Standard

WINTER 2015

EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS

Lace embellishment and


sleeves add a vintage
elegance to this wedding dress, which is also
designed off the shoulder.

The Princess Bride


Wedding dresses are fuller, flowing and fairy tale pretty
ShARON Naylor

odays top wedding gown styles


have been described as light
and airy modern minimalist
and ethereal. But what exactly makes a wedding gown all of these
things?
Its a delicate design at the bodice as
opposed to the stiff, constructed bodice
style of years past and a fuller flowing
skirt, as opposed to the sleeker sheath
dresses of years past. Brides want their
wedding gowns to be fairy tale pretty, to
look stunning from all angles.
Diane Forden, editor-in-chief of
Bridal Guide magazine, says that wedding gowns for 2015 run the gamut
from classic ball gowns to short, flirty
dresses, romantic and vintage to citychic. Its up to the bride to decide what
dress looks and feels best on her. She
encourages brides to try on many different styles of dresses including ones they
dont think will look good on them to
find The One.
Here are some of the top trends in
wedding gown designs:

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Fuller SkirTS

2011, 2012,
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Think The Great Gatsby. Long, elegant
dresses with intricate beading reminiscent of the 1920s and 1930s are the
rage. Hand-sewn beading in masterful
artistry is a top look this year, making

the wedding gown even more special


to wear. Also included in this look are
sequins, tiny pearls and lace.

DroP-waiST DreSSeS
A dropped waist elongates the figure,
leading into a full skirt. This, especially,
is one of those gown styles to which Ms.
Forden referred. The dress might not
look that good on the hanger but is, in
fact, extremely flattering.
Lace sleeves
The Duchess of Cambridge set the
standard with her lace-sleeved wedding gown, and its a trend that has not
faded. In fact, lace is even more popular
now. Well see lace collars, especially,
for a regal wedding day look a la Kate
Middleton.

illuSioN SleeveS
Illusion material is a sheer fabric that
allows for a sense of being covered up,
but it is sheer, light, airy and delicate.
Illusion material is used for pretty cap
sleeves over the shoulder, and as the
material for the popular cape or jacket
trend seen on bridal fashion runways.
The bride, then, gets two looks for her
wedding gown, one with the illusion
jacket and one without.

oFF-The-ShoulDer SleeveS
The exposed shoulder is all the rage
in wedding gown styles, with the look
encompassing many styles from strapless to a dropped loop of fabric extendSee dresses page 10

The Event of a Lifetime

Jewish Standard

Celebrate your dreams


in our elegant ballroom
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S-9

S-10 Jewish Standard

WINTER 2015

dresses
from page 8

ing from each strap, revealing the shoulder. Off-the-shoulder sleeves are seen in
all manner of gown styles, from vintage
to modern to rustic.

Back DeTailS
An open back is one of the most popular looks for wedding gowns in 2015,
with the brides back framed by the
keyhole or portrait opening of the back
of the dress. Intricate, artistic lace often
surrounds the open back, adding soft-

ness and romance to what might be


considered an ultra-sexy show of skin.
Lace makes exposed backs look prettier
and more princess-like.

DreSSeS iN color
While white and ivory will always be
popular wedding gown colors, especially given how many different shades
of white and ivory there are. But todays
bride is open to a wedding dress in
color. She pays no mind to the symbolism of the white dress and instead
chooses her gown shade to comple-

T H A T

Look

EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS

ment her skin tone and meet her dream


dress vision. Top colors of wedding
dresses seen on the bridal fashion runways: blush colors of pink, pale blue,
lavender, gray, silver, tan, mauve and
mint green, for something different and
more personalized.

meTallicS
Gowns with sparkle are in, with perhaps
a shimmering wrap effect around the
hips, in material that glitters in the light,
making this more of a look for nighttime weddings. Top colors in metallics
are gold and copper, which are warmer
shades that work year-round.

croP DreSSeS
These two-piece dresses for the unconventional bride feature the brides
exposed belly, most often in a very subtle way, just for a glimpse of skin at the
mid-section, above a short or full skirt.
This is a top choice for destination weddings, as well.
Because vintage dress styles are in,
more brides are commissioning replicas
of their grandmothers or great-grandmothers wedding dresses, bringing in
vintage lace styles and that breathtaking
beadwork that the 1920s and 1930s are
known for.
From Creators.com

Sharon Naylor is the author of The Brides Guide to Freebies and three dozen additional wedding books.

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White is not the only color that brides are choosing to wear as they walk down the aisle, as
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This wedding dress has a major wow factor from


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S-11

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S-12 Jewish Standard

WINTER 2015

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EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS

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A winning suit, replete with vest, by Belvest, available at Vero Uomo in Englewood.

well Suited
Leaner silhouettes, bold colors and retro trends are the rage
hEIdI mae BraTT

www.jstandard.com

f clothes make the man, then todays


well-dressed man is a lean, clean,
sartorially sizzle machine with a look
that borrows the best of the past and
puts modern pizzazz into the present.
Local upscale mens fashion emporiums say that to be in the in fashionwise, a man cannot just shake the dust
off his two-piece pleated pant, full jacketed suit and strut his stuff. Men in their
20s, 30s and even into their 50s and
upward are sporting the hippest, most
happening looks, which have landed
here from the runways of Europe to the
shops in Bergen County and beyond.
And why not?
Men here care about the way they
look, and have the guidance of fashion
savvy experts to help them dress with
the best.
Rob Roselli, who works with his
father Mario Roselli, owner of Vero
Uomo in Englewood, said that true

to his fathers mission to carry unique


styles and give his customers a fashion
edge, men looking for style this season have some beautiful top-of-the line
handmade suits to make a statement at
any event, affair, or wedding.
The store carries some of the top
fashion designers and brands, including Pal Zileri, Belvest, and Tom Ford, to
name a few.
Those suits have slimmed down and
are now tight-fitting, lean silhouettes,
with trim pants that even come up
shorter than hems of yesterday, said Mr.
Roselli, who explained that Vero Uomo
means true man in Italian.
Remember John Travoltas iconic
white, three-piece suit that he sported
in the 1977 film, Saturday Night Fever?
Well, the vest is back. And so is the
three-piece suit.
The look has come full circle, said
See suITed page 14

S-14 Jewish Standard

WINTER 2015

Wedding and
Bar/Bat Mitzvah Invitations

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EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS

suited
from page 12

Mr. Roselli.
Diana Yomtobian, owner of Monte
Carlo in Westwood, said the doublebreasted look has lost its boxy appearance from the past and is now a fitted
look with closures of six, even eight buttons, as opposed to four-buttons.
They are absolutely gorgeous, said
Ms. Yomtobian. Its a fresh look with
something for everyone. A man cannot
go to a function looking like 10 years
ago.
Colors are also very big with suits
available in royal blue and other shades
rather than merely grey, blue and black,
she said.
And dont think that the snug look
is only meant for the young guy with a
34-inch waist and a six-pack.
While these men may have them custom-made, the big guys, such as the
football Super Bowl stars, were sporting
lean suits in an array of colors, such as
red, and fabrics, like velvet.
To set off the new look from the bottom up, Mr. Roselli said that wing-tip
shoes are very popular.
And add to that socks in a rainbow of
funky colors and wild patterns, which
are being worn by men who want to
express a little bit of personality when
the sock peeks out from under.
When it comes to their clothes or at
least their socks said Mr. Roselli, dont
think boys dont want to have fun, too.
Even the most conservative Wall
Street guy might be doing a black suit,
white shirt, red tie and then, those wild
patterned socks, he said.

This gray suit, available at Monte Carlo in Westwood, takes the classic version and updates it to
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Jewish Standard

S-15

S-16 Jewish Standard

WINTER 2015

EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS

milestone Birthday Bash


Mickey and Minnie join one mans family to celebrate the big 8-0
Ed SilBerFarB

he big 80th birthday was in the


not too distant future. My plan
was to go quietly into that ninth
decade, maybe a glass of scotch
and early to bed. My wife Sharon
thought otherwise.
Lets take the whole family to Disney
World, she effused.
By that you mean airfare, hotel, food
and theme park tickets for 11 people?
Right. We must start planning now.
Its just six months away.
Immediately three problems came
to mind: (1) the calendar, how to go
when its not too hot, too expensive, too
crowded, and the grandchildren are free
from school; (2) food that is certified
kosher not only by a mashgiach, but
also by my son, Yossie; (3) and, oh, yes,
money.
We ruled out July and August because
of Florida heat, vacation mobs and high
season expense. We finally settled on
June when the scorching weather and
massive crowds are just beginning and
the school absences would be minimized.
Our son, Jake, a Marine Corps reservist, was able to ease some of the pain by
getting military discounts for the hotel
and tickets to the theme parks.

The Silberfarb family celebrating Eds 80th birthday in Disney World.

Arranging meals for our kosher family was like planning the Allied invasion of North Africa. We agreed breakfast would be juice, cold cereal, fruit,
yogurt, milk and coffee in our rooms,
which would have refrigerators and coffee makers.
For lunch everyone would be on his
own, because we learned that each of
the theme parks had at least one eatery
that offered limited kosher food.
We would regroup for dinner, the one
time each day we would all be together.
Disney can provide full kosher meals on
request, and a great cloud of concern

was lifted when we learned that the Disney kosher caterer was a friend of Sharons nephew, Michael.
However, eating kosher food in a
non-kosher restaurant created the
wrong impression, said Yossie, so our
dinners together were either in secluded corners or, on two occasions, in elegant private rooms.
Our hotel would be the new Animal
Kingdom Lodge. Its vast interior was
fashioned like the headquarters of a
royal African chieftain. Carved pillars of
polished wood adorned the huge atrium. Tribal masks and other African-style

Devorah and Grandpa Ed at his 80th birthday in


Disney World.

decorations were throughout the lobby.


But the most dramatic sight was when
we entered our beautiful room. Outside
See bIrThday page 18

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S-18 Jewish Standard

WINTER 2015

birthday
from page 16

our windows were giraffes, zebras and


long-horned deer. Granddaughter Alina,
then age three, thought they were pictures until she saw them move.
Our first day we went to the Magic
Kingdom, the jewel of the Disney
crown, where Cinderellas castle looms
above and tourists swirl about to await
Peter Pans Wild Ride, to join Pirates of
the Caribbean and to learn that Its a
Small World After All.
Granddaughter Devorah, age 11,
announced that I was to be her escort
throughout Disney World. I was flattered until I learned that my movements would be restricted. She rejected
Splash Mountain where a harrowing
roller coaster ride ended in a cold-water
dunk, refreshing for a hot day. Instead
we experienced more sedate activities
like a concert by animated bears playing
country music instruments and singing
in a western drawl.
But nothing could match the charm
of the Disney light parade with floats
twinkling in phantasmagorical designs
down Main Street of the Magic Kingdom.

Overriding all was the birthday,


not only my 80th, but also nephew
Michaels 50th. He and his family and
Sharons sister, Joan, joined us for part
of our stay. Disney anointed me with
a saucer-size Mickey Mouse Happy
Birthday, Ed button that evoked greetings from all passersby. Loneliness was
never a problem when I wore it.
We ordered massive birthday cakes
with suitable decorations for each of the
four celebratory dinners, marking my
80th, Michaels 50th, grandson Naftalis
recent bar mitzvah and Devorahs forthcoming bat mitzvah.
Disneys newest theme park was the
Animal Kingdom, which we explored on
our second day. Featured was the Safari
Ride where a one-hour wait attested to
its popularity. We climbed aboard an
all-terrain vehicle with oversized wheels
and jungle markings. We rolled along
rutted roads, over shallow creeks and
through occasional swamps. Along the
way we saw herds of elephants, hippos taking mud baths, both black and
white rhinos, a lone cheetah, giraffes,
zebras and various species of grazing
African deer, while a narrator told us
about unseen animals hidden in the
deep brush.

EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS

A walking tour brought us past a


pompous-looking silver back gorilla
and a regal lion. Less exotic animals
were in a petting zoo where Alina fed
sheep and goats.
We devoted a day to EPCOT, known
to the cognoscenti as the Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow.
There one could learn, among myriad
other findings, the secrets of manufacturing a car in fact creating your own
virtual car, computerizing its design,
engine type, color and other details.
Then six of us Sharon, Jake, Naftali,
Devorah, Yehuda and I got in a simulated version of the car and went for a
hair-raising test drive.
Our main meal that day was in the
dramatic Seven Seas restaurant where
one entire wall was a tank with dazzling
coral reefs and tropical fish. Among the
scores of pictures from the trip is one
showing grandson Eli appearing to be
part of the seascape.
The EPCOT lagoon is surrounded
by pavilions of Mexico, Norway, China,
Germany, Italy, Japan, Morocco, France,
the United Kingdom, Canada and the
U.S. The nations strive to tell their story,
show off their spectacular scenery, offer
their exotic food and, not incidentally,

entice you to buy their unique, pricey


goods.
After sunset the EPCOT lagoon was
the scene of exciting fireworks, but
before sunset there was another activity. Yossie and Michael rounded up a
minyan for mincha behind the Canada
pavilion. There is, after all, a higher calling that surpasses even Disney World.
And why Disney World anyway, a
commercial complex, for an 80th birthday? It was, after all, a sentimental journey to a place we had visited 36 years
earlier. Yossie was three, Jake five, and
Disney World itself was only four years
old. I had seen Orlando in my distant
past when it was a land of lakes and
orange groves, later replaced by the
Magic Kingdom, the monorail and a
great man-made lagoon.
Now at age 80, in this fantasyland,
keeping pace with five lively grandchildren, there were still moments of nostalgia.
Ed Silberfarb was a reporter for the Bergen Record in New Jersey, then the New York Herald
Tribune where he was City Hall bureau chief.
Later, he was a public information officer for
the New York City Transit Authority and editor
of one of its employee publications.

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Bima

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Centerp

iece

Jewish Standard

matrimonial
money matters
Put financial issues on the table
before stepping down the aisle

arriage is a milestone in life, yet, many enter


into the next phase without asking their
spouse some vital questions about money. If
you are among the soon-to-be wed, consider
starting a conversation using the questions below.
Couples who plan their expenses ahead of time are
more likely to enjoy their earnings, and less likely to
need credit repair intervention.

meN, womeN aND weDDiNGS


Women erroneously are portrayed as the ones who go
over-the-top when it comes to spending on their big
day, but recent Harris Poll findings tell a different story.
The online study found that twice the number of men
said they would or did go into debt to pay for their
dream wedding.
The study also found that both men and women
valued financial responsibility. In fact, 91 percent indicated a preference for entering marriage debt-free as
opposed to having a dream wedding.
Marriage is a lifelong commitment built on trust,
clear communication and honesty, said John Heath,
directing attorney for Lexington Law. While some
may find financial discussions unnecessary, understanding each other intimately in terms of what you
both bring to the table be it wealth or debt will
strengthen your relationship and help to avoid potentially serious friction to your marriage down the road.

DiScuSSiNG moNey maTTerS


So how does one go into a marriage with a solid financial standing? Those soon-to-be-wed couples who
converse openly about their finances are more likely
to enjoy their big day with an understanding of their
mates views on money. The experts at Lexington Law
offer these questions every newly engaged couple
should ask before the big day:

1. how Do you view moNey?


This is a loaded question, but your fiancs answer
will help you understand their perspective and how it
aligns with yours. Here are a few conversation starters
on the subject:
How do you budget your money?
Are you meticulous about your bills and expenses,
or are you comfortable to just wing it?
Whats the most you would ever spend on a home,
car, piece of clothing, etc.?

2. how ShoulD we
BuDGeT For a Family?
Children are expensive, especially if you havent
planned for them. Talk to your partner about how
many children you would both like to have. Plan for
child living expenses and how they will impact your
budget, i.e. clothes, food, activities, medical expenses,
schooling, etc.

3. how ShoulD we
commuNicaTe aBouT moNey?
Some couples are content to let one person handle the
finances, and others like to split up the bills and share
household responsibilities. Regardless of what you

decide, it is important to have a plan in place before


getting married.

4. whaT ShoulD we Do wheN


we DiSaGree aBouT SPeNDiNG?
You and your spouse wont agree on everything. In fact,
you may completely disagree on how to spend, save,
and generally manage your money. The question is:
What should you do when these disagreements arise?
Avoiding the subject will put you at greater risk for
financial and marital trouble. Theres no easy answer
for this one, but presenting the topic during your conversation is a good start.

S-19

5. Do you have aNy DeBTS


ThaT i ShoulD Be aware oF?
Secrets are not the best addition to a marriage, especially when it comes to debt. Be sure you and your
soon-to-be put the credit cards on the table before
walking down the aisle. Marriage is a life partnership;
start by dealing with your debt together.
Youll head into your new life as a married couple
with ease when you have an open and honest dialog
about your financial situation. For more tips for managing your money, or your credit, visit www.LexingtonLaw.com.
Family Features

e Chef
Best 2011
KoLar
S-20 Jewish Standard

WINTER 2015

EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS

Getting married in a Flash

Pop-up weddings become popular for easy, breezy nuptials


KRISTEN caSTillo

he mood is light and fun, and


guests are arriving whenever
its convenient. They may think
theyre attending a barbecue or
maybe even your engagement party, but
what they dont know is the celebration
is actually a wedding.
Pop-up weddings, also known as
flash weddings, have been trending
lately with couples that want the party
without all the fuss.
Still, the seemingly impromptu weddings require quite a bit of planning and
a lot of secrecy. After all, no one except
the bride and groom, and a few select
others, know the event is a wedding.
In some cases, the bride or groom may
even be surprised, too, since sometimes
one would-be spouse surprises the
other with an unexpected ceremony.
It tends to be easier for couples to
plan a surprise wedding on their guests
than one half of the couple surprising
the other half, said wedding planner

Kia Martinson of ESTOccasions and


Engaged Connecticut. There is a lot
that goes into planning a wedding, and
having to keep that secret can be difficult.

how eaSy really?

The concept of a pop-up wedding may


seem fuss-free, but wedding experts disagree.
In my opinion, a flash or pop-up
wedding takes quite a bit of planning,
so its an ironically complicated spur-ofthe-moment wedding concept to pull
off, said Dorian Smith-Garcia, editorin-chief of The Anti Bridezilla, a luxury
bridal site, who explains that at the very
least youll need an officiant and a witness, while a flash-mob wedding may
require additional pre-planning and
rehearsals.
Still, its an option for brides and
grooms who dont want to plan and host
a more formal wedding.

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The concept of a pop-up wedding may seem fuss-free, but wedding experts say it takes a lot of work to
pull off.

Traditional wedding planning can be


exhausting for a couple, said Dezhda
Dee Gaubert, owner of No Worries
Event Planning, noting the pressure of

handling big-day details such as invitations and tracking down RSVPs.


By treating the event as something
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WINTER 2015

To be part of the next

Event &
Celebrations
Bar/Bat
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Brides
Magazine
Call us at

201-837-8818
Ask for our yearly Calendar
of Supplements

Pop-up Weddings
from page 20

more casual, the guests are more laid


back about the event, barely even connecting with the couple in the months
or days leading up to it, and thus, the
couple can relax and instead get excited
about the surprise, instead of stressed
about the lead-up to the actual wedding, she said.
Smith-Garcia agrees, explaining popup weddings are for couples looking for
a truly unconventional wedding.

The GueST liST


While weddings are all about the bride
and groom, their respective families
want to be a part of the celebration, too.
Some guests, including family members, are okay with flash weddings,
while others are not so enthusiastic.
Much like a destination wedding to
a far-flung spot that requires expensive travel plans, not everyone is up for
the concept of a pop-up wedding that
requires secretive planning and in some
cases subdued attire so you blend into
the crowd in a very public space, said
Smith-Garcia.
Be careful not to hurt family members feelings if possible, and share your
plans in advance with a family insider

EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS

for both the bride and groom.


My one big piece of advice is to let
someone on both sides of the family
know to make sure they are able to help
get the right people to the wedding,

hosting a pop-up wedding


may look fun and spontaneous,
but there is a lot that goes
into planning such an event,
especially if it is going to be at
an off-beat location.
said Martinson. You would hate someone important to miss it cause they
arent sure what is going on.

PlaNNiNG a PoP-uP ParTy


Dont be fooled into believing flash
weddings really happen spontaneously.
Hosting a pop-up wedding does take
work, especially if the ceremony is going
to be at an offbeat location.
For example, Gaubert plans weddings in Paris, where the legend is you
can literally organize your friends and

get married on the street.


Sometimes these on-the-fly weddings work, but not always. In various
metropolitan areas, you really need to
check first with the city to ensure there
arent any permits necessary or to
secure the necessary permit, she said.
If guests are invited, its essential
everyone arrive in time for the ceremony.
I recommend that couples say there
is a big announcement at a certain
time, said Gauber. Itll leave guests
guessing and ensures they arrive on
time.

BuDGeT
Think a pop-up wedding is budget
friendly? Maybe, maybe not.
Permits can be costly, as can some
of the other big-day logistics, such as
your clothing, food for the party, flowers, photography, videography and hiring a coordinator.
Much like a destination wedding,
there are hidden costs and hurdles that
need to be considered, said Smith-Garcia, noting that time spent planning the
wedding adds up, too.
You may find that you set yourself
up for more work than you expected.
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Cover Story

A school
grows in I
Englewood

Joanne Palmer

Moriah, first local


Jewish day school,
celebrates turning fifty

In a first-grade science class


last year, a student writes on
a smartboard as her teacher
and another student look on.
PHOTOS COURTESY THE MORIAH SCHOOL

32 Jewish Standard FEBRUARY 27, 2015

t was 1971, and Dr. Norman Sohn


was finishing his training in Boston. He and his wife, Judith,
were faced with a decision.
Where would they go next? Where
would they settle down?
As a newly fledged surgeon, the
world was open to him. He could get
a job almost anywhere. He was originally from Manhattan, and his wife
was from New Rochelle, so the New
York metropolitan area made sense
to them.
They knew they wanted a yeshiva
education for their children Dr. Sohn
had gone to the Rabbi Jacob Joseph
School on Henry Street in Manhattans

Lower East Side, a school that combined religious and secular studies in
a way that was progressive for its time
and they also wanted the luxury of
choice. They didnt want a one-school
city, as Hartford and even Boston were
at the time. What really attracted me
was the multiplicity of neighborhoods
that were hospitable to Orthodox people, Dr. Sohn said. But here there
were so many that if one didnt work
out, there was another.
Okay, so that narrowed their choice
to about six or seven counties in two
states. Now what?
We selected Englewood, Dr. Sohn
said. They made that decision in order
to send their children to the Moriah
School there.

Cover Story

Moriah celebrates its 50th anniversary


this year. It was created in the wake of the
great move to the suburbs that followed the
end of World War II. By the time its founders first broke ground, members of the
Orthodox community decided that they,
too, wanted to leave the dark, crowded
city for suburban blue skies, endless green
lawns, and enough space to make someone
moving from Washington Heights, say, feel
as if they were on the prairies, only prettier
and closer to kosher food.
Moriah is the spiritual grandparent
of the other day schools that sprung up
later to serve the Orthodox community it
attracted, magnet-like, to Bergen County.
Englewood was a new, young, vibrant
community, with a school that was less
than 10 years old at the time, Dr. Sohn
said. We liked Rabbi Swift that was
Rabbi Isaac Swift of Congregation Ahavath

Englewood
was a new,
young, vibrant
community, with
a school that was
less than 10 years
old at the time.
Torah, who had decided, years earlier,
that if his community was to flourish, it
needed a school, and whose shul housed
Moriah in its first years. And Rabbi Izzy
Grama Rabbi Israel Grama, that is, who
had gone from NCSY, where he was instrumental in building the Orthodox Unions
youth group, in Virginia, to become Moriahs founding headmaster was a very
nice man.
My wife was trained as an elementary
school teacher, and she was very oriented
to quality education, Dr. Sohn said. We
both felt that Moriah was a dynamic and
invigorating environment. We loved it.
(Readers, please note the word love. It
comes up often in this story, not about the
romance between two people but between
people and an institution.)
The shidduch between the Sohns and the
school, which goes from pre-kindergarten
through eighth grade, worked so well that
all three of the familys children graduated
from it, and all seven of their grandchildren

have studied there. (So far,two have graduated, and five are still there.)
Perhaps equally striking, the Sohns
younger son, Evan, who was in the class of
1981, now is the schools president.
Dr. Sohn tells a story about Evan to
illustrate Moriahs strengths. When Evan
was 5 years old, in kindergarten, they had
a talent show. So this little kid Evan
went into the principals office after the
show, and he said, Rabbi, you did a terrible thing. Everybody worked really
hard on their presentations, and you only
rewarded the winners.
But everybody worked hard, and they
all deserved commendations. And the
principal called up my wife and he said, I
have just been put down by a kindergarten
child and he was 100 percent correct.
And then they mimeographed
because that was what they used in those
days they mimeographed letters of commendation to all of the kids who were in
the talent show.
Evan Sohn said that it is not unusual for
people who have graduated from Moriah
to return to Bergen County as adults and
send their own children to their alma
mater. We have more than 60 alumni
parents, he said. I am not alone in that.
We started a program at graduation last
year, where alumni parents gave their kids
their diplomas. I think that we had 12 last
year, including one Moriah couple. Out of
the 150 or so staff members, 13 are alumni,
he added.
For me, its incredibly exciting to walk
the halls of the school I grew up in, he
said. I am now watching my children in
the school. We had a Shabbaton two weeks
ago at Ahavath Torah. It was amazing. Two
hundred children davening, leyning, leading the services. Its absolutely beautiful,
this connecting of the generations.
At the end of the day, nothing is more
important for us than the strength of our
Jewish community, and nothing is better
for its strength than creating great, strong
ties for our children. Theres nothing more
important for the survival and strength
of the Jewish people than having great
schools.
Shira Ashendorf of Teaneck, who now
has three children in Moriah and is on the
board of the parent association, graduated
from the school in 1979. The school was
vitally important in her development both
as a person and as a connected Jew, she
said. Because her father, Rabbi Neil Winkler, was the leader of the Young Israel of

Fourth-graders work on silent architectural structures this year.

Moriahs principal, Dr. Elliott Prager, greets students on the first day of school.
Jewish Standard FEBRUARY 27, 2015 33

Cover Story
Fort Lee, a town with a vibrant but small
Orthodox shul and little other Jewish
presence, much of her Shabbat social life
revolved around her school friends. Her
group is close now, as it was then, she said.
It just so happens that all of my Facebook
friends are Moriah friends.
The school recently dedicated the
library. It was so exciting! Ms. Ashendorf
said. I called it Facebook live. I got to see
all the people I connect with on Facebook
in person! We were running around like
little bat mitzvah kids, squealing and hugging each other.
We know all about each other, we know
about each others kids and what theyre
doing because of Facebook, but we got to
hug in person.
We will always be this close community. Not just people who happened to go
to the same school, but a community of
people who love each other, love Torah,
love the rebeyim who taught us.
I remember most of all when we would

Evan Sohn,
center, then a
Moriah student,
grew up to be
president of
its board.
PHoTo CoUrTeSY
Dr. norman SoHn

daven Hallel together. There were always


some of our classmates who would lead
it, and the tunes we used then are still the
tunes we use today. Theyre the tunes we
use at our seder table. Every time those
tunes come up in life, I picture myself
standing in the auditorium, and I can
see all my friends with me, the way they
looked then.

It was a very happy, comforting feeling


to go back there, because it was a good,
happy, wonderful time in my life.
In the late 1970s, despite its good start
and devoted parents and staff, Moriah was
foundering. It cycled through a few shortterm administrators. They werent working. It wasnt working. The school needed
help.

Dr. Kenneth Prager of Englewood


remembers those times. Moriah was on
the rocks then, he said. It was falling
apart, and parents were getting ready to
pull their kids out. Its future was on the
line. We had to find the right principal.
I was a young guy, I was only in the
community maybe 3 or 4 years, and I had
two little kids in the school, he continued. But I was very focused on Jewish
education, so when Gerald Wolf, who was
president at the time, called me and asked
me to chair the committee searching for
the next principal, I was surprised and
delighted at the chance to make a significant impact.
He and his committee interviewed a
number of candidates, he said. We were
underwhelmed.
For help, he turned to Rabbi J. Shelly
Applbaum, whom he had known as a
camp owner and director, as well as the
principal of the Kingsway Academy in Midwood, Brooklyn, the yeshiva at Kingsway

Rabbi Shelly Applbaum marches with the banner in a Salute to Israel parade in
Manhattan.
Moriahs 1983 championship basketball team.

Rabbi Applbaum gives first-graders their own siddurim in 1977.


34 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 27, 2015

Rabbi Applbaum looks at an unfurled sefer Torah with a group of young children.

Cover Story

In 1984, Moriah students marched in the Salute to Israel parade to celebrate


Israel at 36.

Last spring, early childhood students showed off what they made for Math Day.

Jewish Center, the shul where he had


grown up. He was a known quantity as
a principal, and his skills were clear, Dr.
Prager said. He was a superb administrator, had a keen eye for educational talent,
and he knew how to get things done.
So I called him up, and asked him for
his thoughts on the people we had interviewed. He was as unimpressed with them
as I had been. And I will never forget this
it was a Sunday afternoon, and I was
talking to him on the phone, and all of a
sudden I said to him, Shelly, would you be
interested in the job?
It just popped into my head. And he
said, You would have to ask your father.
Dr. Pragers father, Max, was president
of the shul. So I would be poaching, he
said. But he realized that Rabbi Applbaum
hadnt said no. I asked my father, and to
his credit, he said, Whatever Shelly thinks
is best for him is fine for me. Thats the
kind of guy my father was.
Some members of the committee worried that Rabbi Applbaum was perhaps too
much of a camp director to work out as a
school principal, but they were outvoted,
and the offer was made and accepted.
Rabbi Applbaum, a Brooklyn boy to the
depths of his being, moved with his family
to the suburbs, where he fell in love. With
Moriah.
Soon after he got to the school he held
a meeting, Dr. Prager said. It was in the
ym. The place was packed. He ran the

meeting, and it was clear that he was the


boss. It was clear that he had a plan, he
was experienced, he had what it took to
run the school. And the rest, as they say,
is history.
It was under his aegis that the school
ballooned from about 250 to 1,000 students. He undertook several major building plans, and he was as involved with the
plans as he was with the kids. And that
meant that he was very involved with
them.
He attracted wonderful teachers, and
the kids absolutely loved him. (That word
again.) He was a cigar-chomping guy. He
didnt look cuddly. But the kids loved to be
sent to his office.
His son, Allen Applbaum, who was 15
when he moved to Englewood with his
family too old to go to Moriah but young
enough to still be at home for those first
few years confirms the love that his
father felt for the school and for the students, and they for him. He knew every
single child by name, and always would
greet students as they came off the buses
in the morning and again when they left,
late in the afternoon.
My father had spent his whole career
in Brooklyn, and it was a huge thing in the
70s for my parents to move out of Brooklyn and go to Englewood, New Jersey. It
might have been Montana. It was all very
challenging for him.
His approach to education was unique

One of Moriahs fifth-grade classes in 1976.

in those days. He really looked at each kid


holistically, and very much separate from
the way their parents saw them. He saw
things the parents didnt necessarily want
to see.
He would advise the kids and their
parents and teachers in what was best for
each kid, with no agenda. There were kids
who were struggling with the dual curriculum, and there were no early intervention programs yet. He would advise
parents; hed say, I dont think the dual
curriculum is working. He would suggest
that some students not go on to a yeshiva
high school, although continuing to get a
Jewish education was profoundly important to them. It was controversial, but if
it wasnt the right fit, hed say so, Rabbi
Applbaums son said.
He worked on instinct, he continued.
It was all by gut. He didnt have a Ph.D. in
education. He loved the students. He knew
every single kid.
It was punishment to be sent to the

principals office, Mr. Applbaum said,


setting a scene which just about everyone
who knew Rabbi Applbaum also would
sketch. The kids really loved him. Theyd
talk to him.
He was not at all an animal lover. We
never had animals growing up. Never.
But he had an enormous fish tank put in
his office. When I first saw it, I was like,
This is a fish tank Why is it here?
But later I realized that it was for the kids.
Theyd talk about the fish, and it would
defuse the tension.
It was so incongruous. Fish! But it
wasnt about the fish, and it wasnt about
him. It was another way of connecting
with kids in a human way.
He believed that kids were pure, and
that instinctively they would do the right
thing if they were given the right path,
the right guidance, and the right teaching
style. Now that I have my own kids, and
Ive seen a lot of different education styles,
I see that it really was a very innocent pure
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 27, 2015 35

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Cover Story
love that he had for the students.
He really lived and breathed those students.
Rella Feldman of Teaneck was Moriahs president
from 1996 to 2000. She has five children, who each graduated from Moriah, and now she is the grandmother of
14; eight of them live in Israel, but the other six are at
Moriah.
My children range in age from 43 to 28, and all have
nothing but extremely fond memories of their time at
Moriah, and they all have friends from those days, she
said. Part of the job of an elementary school is to create
positive feelings, to form the groundwork and foundation for all education, especially Jewishly. We want to
give the kids a positive, warm, and fuzzy feeling. My kids
have that.
In this, as in so many other ways, Rabbi Applbaum
was key to that process. He had wanted to be an architect, but his parents convinced him that it would not be
a good job for an Orthodox Jew, because of Shabbes,
she said. It would be too hard for him to keep those 25
hours sacred because hed be pressured to work. So
he went to rabbinical school. But he was a natural
architect nonetheless, and his instinct for the practical
proved as useful to Moriah as his instinct for emotional
connection and educational innovation.
Ms. Feldman, like many longtime Moriah parents and
grandparents, has watched the school grow.
The schools neighborhood is very imposing.
The houses, set way back from the road, surrounded
by stately old trees, are huge, gorgeous, classic, wellmaintained, and old. It is a neighborhood of taste,
money, proportion, and gravitas.
Its not necessarily the neighborhood thats likely to
welcome a school children are noisy, and their buses
rumble and hoot and take up lots of space. But improbably enough, there Moriah sits, a school of about 1,000
children, behind an old house that once was home to
Alfred and Ethel Frisch, who were among the schools
founders.
The school started with five acres; as it expanded
another five were added, behind another house. Thats
to comply with the rules that say that a school is fine, as
long as it is not visible from the street. Thats why the
3493212-01
two houses remain they are the schools frontage on
napoli
3493212-01
the street.
5/17/13
napoli
The school itself unfurls from the center where it
subite
5/17/13
began,
canali/singer
subite with halls leading out in all directions. New wings
offer new opportunities. Rooms that once would have
canali/singer
carrol/BB
been painted a dull cream or tan or an insipid bile green
carrol/BB
now
are inbybright,
vivid colors. Tables and chairs come
This
ad is copyrighted
North
Jersey Media Group and may not
be with
reproduced
in any form, orso the room can be reconfigured easily,
wheels
This
ad
is
copyrighted
by
North
replicated in a similar version,
Jersey Media
Group
and
may not
without
approval
from
North
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tables
in the back are high, with high chairs,
be and
reproduced
in any form,
or
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Media
Group.
replicated in a similar version,
to approval
allowfromstudents
changes of angle and position. Light
without
North
Jersey Media Group.
floods in from all over.
Students regroup in various ways, aided by the cutting-edge technoloy and a grant from the Avi Chai
Foundation, the Kohelet Foundation, and the Affordable
Jewish Education Project, which help them afford all the
wonderful new stuff.
So what makes Moriah special? Evan Sohn, the president, answers the question. We have an incredibly educational program, with incredible support services, special services, and enrichment programs.
We have an incredible parent body. We have 390
families, and well over 250 parents volunteered for
something last year. And thats despite the fact that a
significant percent of our community are families with
two working parents.
We now have an afterschool program called Moriah
Plus, an afterschool program organized and run by parents. My fourth-grader is taking fencing at Moriah Plus.
Its amazing!

A student showed his feelings on Yom Haatzmaut


last year.

Another important Moriah initiative is its sensitivity


to tuition affordability, Mr. Sohn said. We are the only
school in North Jersey now that actually has a tuition
affordability program.
Tuition is based on your income and real estate taxes
and the number of kids you have in Moriah or a Jewish
high school.
We are the only ones to have this amazing program.
Imagine the sensitivity that its funders who are also
Englewood community leaders and the board had
in improving and pushing this plan. They realize that
sending a bill to someone who cant afford or cant quite
afford it, or making them go through a financial aid process, is disheartening at best, and can actively propel
families out of the system, leaving them angry, humiliated, and without access to the education they wish to
give their children.
What we do is based on third-party verification and
tax rolls, Mr. Sohn continued. Its not parents who are
looking at your tax return. Its seen by a non-parent. And
it is a simple formula. Here is your tax return, here is
your real estate tax bill and here is your tuition bill.
What an amazing thing.
So Moriah, it seems, is an amalgam of things. Just as
Rabbi Applbaum managed to combine the skills that
come from directing a camp, running a school, and running a construction site, the school combines generations of Jewish connections, up-to-date technoloy, timeless texts, and a 50-year-old love of a very specific Jewish
community to create a seamless Jewish education.
We look forward with curiosity and anticipation to the
next 50 years.
Who: the Moriah school in englewood
What: holds its annual dinner, at which it honors Michelle and evan sohn, along with 13 of its graduates
who work at the school in various capacities.
When: saturday, February 28, at 8:30 p.m.
Where: the hilton Meadowlands hotel in east rutherford
Why: not only to celebrate the last years accomplishments, and to raise funds to next year and
beyond, but also to celebrate the schools 50th anniversary
How: For information, call nila Lazarus at (201) 5670208 or go to www.themoriahdinner.org.

Opinion

A dream deal with Iran ... not

ove, as the song goes, is in the air. If the latest media reports are accurate, the United
States and the Iranian regime are closing in
rapidly on a deal over the mullahs nuclear
ambitions.
Admittedly, the source of this nugget of hope was
Joseph Cirincione a former Capitol Hill operative
who now serves as the president of the Ploughshares
Fund, a liberal foreign policy think tank, having gotten
there via the Center for American Progress, another
think tank that serves as a reliable echo chamber for
the Obama administrations edicts, both foreign and
domestic. Moreover, Cirincione was speaking to Laura
Rozen of the Mideast-focused website Al-Monitor;
Rozens writings on the Iran negotiations, remember,
have positively fizzed with enthusiasm for Obamas
outreach to the Tehran regime. (A decent reporter
would have pointed out that the concessions Obama is
making fly in the face of successive U.N. Security Council resolutions demanding a halt to Irans uranium
enrichment activities, and might have even dropped
in a line or two about the regimes abysmal human
The Iran nuclear programs heavy-water reactor at
rights record. But thats for another time.)
Arak.
NANKING2012 VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
The point is that theres some reason to take all this
glowing optimism with a pinch of salt, given where its
operations from Lebanon to Syria because it is owned
coming from. Still, its worth paying attention to what
by the Iranians. It means surrendering the suspects in
Cirincione had to say.
the 1994 bombing of the AMIA Jewish center in BueIf we get a deal that is close to the terms the adminnos Aires, in which 85 people were murdered, for trial.
istration has set out, and I believe we will, it is going
And if there is an Iranian connection to the recent
to be a very good deal, Cirincione told Rozen. One
death, in suspicious circumstances, of Argentine Spethat will surprise and please even many of the critics.
cial Prosecutor Alberto Nisman, who spent more than
Thats going to be one hell of a deal! Im a critic, and
a decade investigating the AMIA atrocity, then that
Im looking forward to being surprised and pleased.
also needs to be judged in a court of law.
Of course, the thing about a surprise is that you
Number four: Iran will recognize the right of Israel,
dont want to ruin it by telling the gift recipient what it
the Jewish state, to exist in peace and
is that theyre about to unwrap. So heres
security. It will pay reparations to the
my guess at the outcome that will make
families of those Israelis whove lost loved
us believe that Christmas (or Chanukah)
ones as a result of Iranian-backed terror.
has come early.
It will apologize for having turned HoloNumber one: Iran will sign an internacaust denial into a state doctrine. And it
tional agreement confirming its intent
will consign that doctrine to the trash can
not to develop nuclear weapons. Iran
of history, where it belongs.
will submit to a permanent International
Number five: Iran will announce
Atomic Energy Agency monitoring regiwithin a year free, internationally
men. Not a single centrifuge will spin
Ben Cohen
observed, multiparty elections. As part
without IAEA inspectors knowing about
of its preparation for that election, it will
it. The IAEA can enter Iranian nuclear
release all political prisoners, many of
facilities at will, without having to make
whom are held in the hell on earth that is Tehrans
prior arrangements, and will share intelligence and
Evin prison. It will permit freedom of speech in the
information immediately with Irans neighbors and
media, it will lift any bans in place on social media
with the U.N. Security Council. Any Iranian nuclear
platforms like Twitter and YouTube, and it will close
official engaged in suspect activity will be fired on the
down its repugnant English-language mouthpiece,
spot. In essence, Irans civilian nuclear program if it
Press TV. Finally, it will permit freedom of worship,
must have one will be under international trusteecurbing its persecution of Christians and Jews and endship, and no enrichment activities that could result in
ing its apartheid policies toward the Bahai minority.
weaponization will be permitted.
Nothing in the above list is inconsistent with the
Number two: From the beginning, Irans nuclear
principles of the U.N. Charter, which is based on the
program has involved concealed facilities, like the
twin importance of individual freedom and responsiFordow plant, which weve discovered despite the
ble, prudent, diplomatic state behavior. Hence, if the
regime, not because of it. Henceforth, there will be
deal we are supposedly about to get conforms to those
no more concealed facilities. Iran will be compelled to
principles, then hallelujah.
reveal any clandestine activity. If it refuses, then we hit
Somehow, though, Ive got a feeling that once we
the regime with biting sanctions immediately.
excitedly unwrap that gift box, well find that its
Number three: Iran will announce an end to its supJNS.ORG
empty.
port for rogue regimes and terrorist organizations.
That means no more backing for the vicious regime
Ben Cohen writes about Jewish affairs and Middle Eastern
of Bashar al-Assad in Syria. It means no more money,
politics for JNS.org, Commentary, the New York Post,
weapons, or political support for Hamas. It means disHaaretz, Jewish Ideas Daily, and many other publications.
banding Hezbollah, which has been able to expand its

Jewish World
BRIEF

Survey: More than half


of Jewish college students
report anti-Semitism
More than half of American Jewish college students
surveyed in a new national study said they have been
subjected to or have witnessed anti-Semitism on their
campuses.
The National Demographic Survey of American Jewish College Students jointly conducted by Trinity College and the Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights
Under Law found that among 1,157 self-identified Jewish
students at 55 campuses nationwide, 54 percent reported
instances of anti-Semitism on campus during the first six
months of the 2013-2014 academic year.
The survey revealed that high rates of anti-Semitism
extended beyond both schools with a history of that sentiment and students such as Orthodox Jewish men, who
are more easily identifiable as Jewish.
The patterns and high rates of anti-Semitism that were
reported were surprising, said Dr. Barry Kosmin, a professor of public policy at Trinity College. Rather than
being localized to a few campuses or restricted to politically active or religious students, this problem is widespread. Jewish students are subjected to both traditional
JNS.ORG
prejudice and the new political anti-Semitism.

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Jewish World

C O R P O R AT E A C C O U N T S

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has surrounded himself with foreign policy advisers who have worked for
his father and brother as he eyes a run for the presidency.
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WASHINGTON As clearly as Jeb Bush has said that


he does not want his foreign policy decisions assessed
against those of his brother or his father his choice
in advisers has only made things murkier.
Of 21 advisers to the former Florida governor and
putative presidential candidate named last week, only
two did not work for President George H.W. Bush from
1989 to 1993 or for George W. Bush from 2001 to 2009.
And one of those, former Secretary of State George
Schultz, was close to Bushs father when they both were
in the Reagan Cabinet.
And because the Georges Bush, father and son, have
such disparate records on the Middle East, pro-Israel
groups already are picking through the choices and trying to assess which way Jeb Bush leans.
His fathers [administration] was known as cooler
to Israel, his brothers as warmer, said Dov Zakheim,
who worked in the Reagan and George W. Bush
administrations.
Among the advisers are James Baker, the elder Bushs
secretary of state, who is known to have said F the
Jews when another Cabinet member suggested that the
Jewish vote should factor into a consideration of Israel
policy. Baker also openly taunted then-Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir with the White House phone number,
saying Shamir should call when the Israeli leader was
ready to talk peace.
Bakers protg under the elder Bush, Robert Zoellick,
also is an adviser, and like Baker is a leading thinker in
foreign policys realist school less likely than neoconservatives to push for transformation overseas.
Among George W. Bush presidency veterans are
John Hannah, an adviser to Vice President Dick Cheney

and part of a cohort within that administration considered closest to Israel, and Paul Wolfowitz, like Hannah
a prominent neoconservative thinker, and as deputy
defense secretary an architect of the Iraq War.
Two of his brothers top Jewish Cabinet officials,
Michael Chertoff, the former Homeland Security secretary, and Michael Mukasey, the ex-attorney general, also
are advising Jeb Bush.
Bushs frustration with the comparisons was evident
last week at his signature foreign policy rollout at the
Chicago Council on Foreign Affairs.
For the record, I love my brother, I love my dad, I love
my mother as well, hope thats OK, and I admire their service to the nation, he said. But I am my own man.
Bush also devoted a significant chunk of his speech to
praising Israel and criticizing President Barack Obama
for his foreign policy, particularly having to do with the
Iran nuclear talks now under way.
Nuclear weapons in Iran was once a unifying issue
within American foreign policy, said Bush, who also
noted that he had visited Israel five times. Leaders of
both parties agreed to it. When he launched his negotiations, President Obama said that that was the goal to
stop Irans nuclear program. Now we are told that the
goal has changed. The point of these negotiations is not
to solve the problem, it is to manage it.
Republicans and Israels government have criticized
the emerging deal for allowing Iran to maintain limited
uranium enrichment, which they say leaves Iran as a
threshold nuclear weapons state. Obama administration officials say there are other guarantees that will
keep Iran from acquiring a weapon.
As much as Bush focused his speech on Obama as the
template he wanted for favorable comparison, questions about whether he prefers his fathers policies or

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his brothers are not going away.


Any Republican candidate for president inevitably
would draw on experience garnered during the last two
GOP presidencies, but Mitt Romney and John McCain,
the 2012 and 2008 nominees, respectively, drew plenty
of foreign policy advisers from congressional staffers as
well as the punditocracy. The one Jeb Bush adviser not
aligned with either president is Lincoln Diaz Balart, a
former Cuban-American congressman from Florida. Of
the 21 advisers, 13 worked for George W. Bush, two for
his father, and four for both Bushes.
Regarding Israel, the starkest contrast between the
two presidents Bush has to do with Israels claims to
the West Bank. The elder Bush clashed publicly with
Israels government over settlement expansion. Meanwhile, in a 2004 letter to then-Prime Minister Ariel
Sharon, the younger Bush recognized some settlement enclaves as realities on the ground the first
U.S. recognition of any Israeli claim in the West Bank.
However, behind closed doors he continued to press
for an end to settlement expansion.
The broader contrast, and the one likelier to preoccupy Jeb Bush, has to do with Iraq. The elder Bush
waited until building as broad a coalition as possible
before engaging in a limited war with Iraq in 1991 after
the invasion of Kuwait by Iraqs leader, Saddam Hussein. The U.S.-led victory helped reinforce American
ascendancy in the post-Cold War period.
The younger Bush led a much smaller coalition invading Saddams Iraq in 2003, seeking broader outcomes,
including the installation of a pro-Western government.
Instead the invasion led to turmoil that still persists.
Whose path would Jeb Bush choose? His speech
in Chicago suggested that he was influenced by both
outlooks.
Like his brother, he appeared averse to engaging publicly in spats with allies like Israel. Bush was
appalled at the tit-for-tat vituperation that recently has
characterized the relationship between the Netanyahu
and Obama governments. Obamas administration, he
said, has lobbed insults at Prime Minister [Benjamin]
Netanyahu with incredible regularity.
Also, like his brother, he tended to cast alliances not
simply as a matter of shared interests but of emotional
investment.
In his five visits to Israel, Bush said, I have had the
incredible joy of seeing the spirit of Israel. He said
signing a Florida trade agreement with Israel was a
highlight of his governorship.
Yet there are signs, too, that Bush harbors the caution that characterized his fathers foreign policy.
If we want to build confidence and trust in the American position, we have to listen, he said, in what was
seen by some as an allusion to his brothers reluctance
to take counsel from American allies. The president
needs to set a stratey and be clear about it, not overcommit or overpromise, but always strive to deliver.
A more direct jab at his brother came in response
to a question about the value of advancing democracy
through elections something George W. Bush was
criticized for emphasizing at the expense of caution
and U.S. interests.
This is a problem of presidents past as well, in all
honesty, If you have an election, you are a democracy, he said. Hamas had an election, Hezbollah
competes. These groups are not supportive of democracy; they use the election process to take away freedom from people.
Notably, the elections that raised Hamas and Hezbollah to influence occurred on his brothers watch,
and in the Palestinian case, at his insistence.
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What is our fascination with villains?


EDMON J. RODMAN
LOS ANGELES Who is the Haman in
your life?
The person, who like the bad guy
in the Megillah Esther that we read on
Purim, schemes to bring you down.
When we get to the place in the Megillah where Haman is forced to lead Mordechai though the streets of Shushan,
saying, This is what is done for the man
whom the king desires to honor, might
we insert ourselves into an updated
version of the story, the way we do in a
video game? Imagining that a seriously
negative person in our life is pushing our
car down the street while we sit behind
the wheel and wave?
Not that your neighbor is Lord Voldemort or Dr. Moriarty, but what about
that boss who is omitting your name
from the organization chart? The relative
who always leaves you off the guest list?
That student spray-painting swastikas on
your sons fraternity house? Or just the
forever-interrupting Rachel from cardholder services?
If we could only rid ourselves of them,
then Oh, today would merry, merry be.
Or would it?
In the Purim story, we have sweet
Esther, wise Mordechai, and foolish
Ahashveras a pretty light cast of characters until the heavy, Haman, adds the
contrast of evil and stirs the action.
Beginning with childhood, we intuitively understand how boring fairy tales
would be without the witch. Once she
got to Oz, Dorothy would have no one to
resist surrendering to.
On Purim, Haman is the name we
are supposed to blot out, yet clearly his
name remains written in our minds.
Could it be that in our own life stories,
we need someone to mix it up with in

order to progress? Does that explain our


fascination, even attraction, to villains?
Pirkei Avot, Ethics of the Fathers,
tells us that the crown of a good name
is superior to all. So why do we seem so
at ease with those who wear a black hat
and I dont mean the charedim.
We hate what Gordon Gecko of Wall
Street stands for, but why do we know
what he had to say about greed? Is it
that we like to see the bad guy get his
comeuppance, or do we just like seeing him coming up? Either way, we
know that more than 10 million people
watched the series finale of Breaking
Bad, featuring the high school chemistry teacher turned methamphetaminedealing antihero Walter White.
In sports, when our teams archrival
comes to town, we get tickets to watch
our heroes trounce the villains. But as
we boo when their stars come to the
plate, make a late hit, or a flagrant foul,
we hate them while at the same time
understanding that without those bums,
the fun would fade.
In some of our favorite computer
games, like Grand Theft Auto, we
can even act out the ways of the villain.
Watching my adult sons play one day, I
was surprised to see how readily they
took on the role of the evil protagonist.
Trying it myself, driving my stolen car
down the streets of Santa Monica, I soon
became a regular Haman on Wheels,
threatening the extinction of an entire
population of pedestrians. Was that me
grinning as I accidentally backed up
over a man on the sidewalk?
In Jewish texts, beginning with the
snake in the Garden of Eden, we are
tempted by the promises of the villain.
At Passover, as we take a drop of wine
for each plague, the heart-hardened

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JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015 43

Purim

Shalakhmones a Purim story


SHOLEM ALEICHEM
TRANSLATED FROM YIDDISH
AND WITH AN AFTERWORD
BY CURT LEVIANT

which lay a fruit-cut. This


A shalakhmones has
small cake was impressed
been sent to you, said
with the shape of a tiny fish
Velvel, displaying a honey
filled with honeyed dough
cake he had in his hand.
crumbs. Next to it lay sevMay you enjoy Purim a
eral silver coins and a few
year from now, you and...
paper rubles. The chubby
Who is it from? asked
lad went right up to Mama
Mama, and stuck her hand
and in one breath rattled off
beneath her apron, looking for a coin.
his greeting as though it had
Well, actually, its from
been memorized by rote:
Happy holiday the
me. May you enjoy Purim,
rabbisentyou this shalyou... and he began
akhmones may youenjoycoughing. Pardon me...
Sholem Aleichem
Purim ayearfromnow you
for coming myself... got no
in 1907
n your husband n your
one to send... had a daughter but, alas, God preserve
children.
you... you remember Freydl, may she rest
The chubby lad palmed his tip and took
in peace...
off without a farewell because by mistake
Velvel the shamesh coughed for an
he had dashed it off upon entering.
entire minute and Mama quickly dug into
More people kept coming by. They
her pocket and removed a few coins that
brought various treats from the rabbinic
she put into his hand. She also offered him
judge, the cantor, the ritual slaughterers, the Torah scribe, the Talmud Torah
some cake and a couple of fruit-cuts. Velvel
teacher, the man who blew the shofar on
stuffed the cake and the fruit-cuts into his
Rosh Hashana, the butcher who specialbreast pocket, thanked her, and said:
ized in removing thigh veins, the reader
May you enjoy Purim a year from now,
of the Purim megillah, the Scroll of Esther,
you and your husband... and once again
and the water carrier and the bathhouse
began coughing.
attendant (the latter two also fancied
I looked at Mama and noticed a tear
themselves religious functionaries). After
standing in each of her beautiful eyes.
them came Velvel the shamesh himself,
Velvel and his Purim treat cast a momentary gloom over the holiday mood. But
hoarse and ailing he was asthmatic, poor
it did not last long. Immediately after his
man. He stood awhile at the door and,
departure other people arrived with more
hand to his chest, coughed his heart out.
Purim sweet platters, and Mama kept on
Well, whats the good word? Mama
doling out the coins, here one, there two
asked him, exhausted by now from the
or three. Everyone received a piece of
days work.

earing a silk kerchief and a


plain apron a combination of holiday and weekday attire Mama stood
by the table, practically at her wits end.
It was no trifle, you know, receiving
almost a hundred shalakhmones, the
traditional Purim platter of sweets, and
sending out a like number. Mama had to
be careful not to omit anyone or make
any mistakes, God forbid; she also had to
remember what sort of platter to send to
whom. For instance, if someone favored
you with a fruit-cut, two jam-filled pastries, a poppy-seed square, two tarts, a
honey bun, and two sugar cookies, it was
customary to send in return two fruit-cuts,
one jam-filled pastry, two poppy-seed
squares, one tart, two honey buns, and
three sugar cookies.
You had to have the brains of a prime
minister not to create the sort of first-class
muddle that once took place, alas, in our
shtetl. What happened was that a woman
named Rivke-Beyle mistakenly shipped
back to one of the rich matrons the very
same platter of Purim goodies that the
rich matron had sent her. You should have
seen the scandal this caused. The squabble
that broke out between the husbands blossomed into a full-blown feud smacks,
denunciations, and unending strife.
Besides worrying about what to
send to whom, you also had to tip
the youngsters who delivered the
shalakhmones. And you had to
know whether to give them one
kopeck, or two, or three.
The door opened up and in
came my rebbis daughter, a freckled girl with bright red hair. She
went about from house to house
collecting the Purim sweet platters
for her father, the teacher. She carried a saucer covered with a cloth
napkin which already contained
one honey bun, dotted with a solitary raisin, and next to it a silver
coin. Mama lifted the napkin and
placed another coin alongside the
first. She also slipped something
into the girls hand. The redhead
blushed furiously and rattled off
the traditional blessing:
May you enjoy Purim a year
from now, you, your husband, and
your children.
Following the teachers daughter
came a chubby lad with a swollen
cheek bound with a blue kerchief
and eyes of unequal size. In his
Children wear Purim costumes in Danzig in 1930.
hand he held a little brass tray on
44 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015

cake, a fruit-cut or a honey bun. For a poor


man too should feel the joy of the holiday.
May you enjoy Purim a year from now,
you and your....
The same to you and many more to you
and yours.

Afterword
Sholem Aleichem (1859-1916), the great
Yiddish humorist, always wrote stories
about to the holidays. The comedy and
pathos of Purim in a shtetl are reflected
in this touching little story. His narrative
accurately reflects the tradition of sending
platters or sweets to friends and relatives
that is still practiced today. An entire sociopolitical dynamic surrounded the sending
of shalakhmones. A woman always had to
somehow balance the return platter so it
should reflect the initial offering. Too little would be insulting; too much would
be self-aggrandizing. And you must never
ever send back the same plate to the person who sent it.
The shalakhmones were delivered by
children who earned a few kopecks in
tips for their service. In addition to cakes
and pastries, coins also were sent to those
people who needed extra income, like
the narrators teacher. The daughter of
the teacher, or rebbi, is actually collecting
shalakhmones, not giving them. She goes
from house to house and gathers a few
coins to supplement the meager income
of the rebbi, who taught little boys in his
house.
The chubby boy is bringing sweets
from the shtetls rabbi and thats why,
in addition to coins, there are also
paper ruble notes on the plate,
for the peoples generosity was
enhanced for the shtetls leading
religious figure. He too earned a
meager salary.
And Velvel, the shamesh, or
sexton, who took take care of the
synagogue, and went from door
to door early weekday mornings
to wake the men up for services,
also needs to supplement his small
salary. Note that he apologizes
for delivering the shalakhmones
himself. Usually, this was done
by children; it was not dignified
for an adult to go from house to
house delivering the Purim sweet
platters. But, as we learn, Velvel
had lost his only child, a daughter,
and so he himself has to go from
household to household to offer
his Purim sweets and to collect
something for himself.
Curt Leviant is the author or
translator of 25 books, which
include seven critically acclaimed
novels, the most recent of which is
the comic A Novel of Klass.

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Jewish standard FeBrUarY 27, 2015 45

Dvar Torah
Celebrating Purim with surgical precision

here is an obvious parallel


between the observance of
Purim by the Jewish community and the celebration of New
Years Eve on the Gregorian calendar.
Both have historically been marked with
the often immoderate drinking of intoxicants. Thankfully, a considerable body of
rabbinic literature has emerged defining
the diminutive amount of drinking actually required to fulfill Purims spiritual
mandate.
There is also a less obvious parallel
between the observance of Purim and the
Gregorian New Year. The calendar based
on the onset of Christianity does not (as
one might expect) mark December 25 as
the beginning of the new year, but January
1 because it was on that date, eight days
later, that the newborn venerated by faithful Christians as savior was circumcised,
and entered into the Covenant binding
the Jewish People to God. January 1, New
Years Day, is known also as the Feast of
the Circumcision.
All this is connected to our approaching
celebration of Purim by the tradition that
Moses, the lawgiver and central human
figure in Jewish Scripture, was born on 7

Adar 2369 fully 1,393 years before the


Christian (or Common) Era. If Moses
was born on the 7th of Adar, he was eight
days old on the 14th of Adar the date destined to be celebrated as Purim by future
generations of Jews. Purim is thus the
anniversary of Moses bris just as January 1 New Years Day is the Feast of the
Circumcision. It was on Purim that Moses,
who was to lead the Jewish People and
champion the Covenant, was himself initiated into that Covenant through circumcision through bris. Purim is thus a New
Years celebration of sorts: on that date
the human vehicle of the Sinai Covenant
truly began life as a Jew, by entering the
Covenant of Abraham.
Moses had a great deal in common with
the protagonists of the Book of Esther,
beyond the timing of his birth and bris.
Like Esther and Mordechai, he exercised
personal responsibility and leadership at
extreme personal peril in order to save
the Jewish People from persecution and
destruction. Like Esther and Mordechai,
Moses survived a genocidal order originating in the highest offices of the realm. Like
Esther and Mordechai, Moses was placed
in strategic proximity to the most powerful

leaders of the land through


reminded that all the enthusiasm, energy and unbridled
a series of unlikely events.
joy of Purim is precisely the
Like Esther and Mordechai,
Moses led the Jewish People
spirit we properly bring to
our national, communal,
from a dark period toward a
family, and personal obserbrighter and more promising
vance of our covenantal misfuture.
sion our religious tradition.
Moses, of course, is credited with the most explicit
Just as Moses direct access to
Rabbi Joseph
experience of Gods Presence
God is transferred to the Book
H. Prouser
in human history. The Torah
of Esther, the joy of Purim is
Temple Emanuel
records that they spoke, as
transferred to our relationship
of North Jersey,
it were, face to face. God
to Jewish religious practice
Franklin Lakes,
famously makes absolutely
in all its manifold expressions.
Conservative
no explicit appearance in the
In the tradition of Moses,
Book of Esther. Perhaps the
may we together experience
tradition of Purim as the date of the Mosaic
a clearer sense of Gods Presence and
bris is intended to suggest that God was in
take renewed personal responsibility for
fact a forceful and decisive Presence in the
the Jewish future. To paraphrase Kol Nidre:
miracles of Purim discharging His covMi-yom Chag Purim zeh ad yom Chag
enantal and providential role in Jewish hisPurim ha-ba aleinu ltovah. May the New
tory despite His apparent absence from
Year ahead, from this Purim to the next,
the scriptural account. Moses intimate
bring blessings of light, joy, gladness, and
relationship with God is thus transferred
honor to us all and may we eagerly
to Purim and the Megillah.
and effectively bring that same light,
It seems to me that this process of transjoy, gladness, and honor to our study and
ference of biblical themes works in both
observance of the Torah Moses received at
directions. By remembering that the bris of
Sinai and which has been entrusted to
the lawgiver is celebrated on Purim, we are
our but temporary safekeeping.

Choir

can get 6-year-olds to enter and end in unison is the ninth miracle of Chanukah. Some
things they shouldnt be able to do, but
they do it because we set a high standard.
And the young singers respond, she
said. They grow in confidence, being up
in front of people. And there are some
with true talent.
She said she hears from the childrens
teachers how even the youngest choir
members raise their hands in school and
say they performed a particular song.
Then they sing it.
They take it with them, she said,
recalling that her own now 24-year-old
son and 21-year-old daughter remember
even the trickiest songs they performed
with Tzipporei Shalom. It becomes part
of them. Theyre so young, spongy, and
impressionable. They never forget it.
Singing is a huge part of the congregation, she said, citing Tavim, Kolenu
a musical minyan Tzipporei Shalom,
a Russian choir, and Ronit who constantly teaches new melodies to the congregation. Were always looking for ways
to improve the music so it can help people
connect and grow and be inspired.

People thank me for working with


Tzipporei Shalom, she said. They cant
believe Im still doing this, since my own
kids are 21 and 24. But what a gift it is to
me. It gets me to shul, I feel useful, and
I contribute to the community. Its something I can do without spending a lot of
time. Its a gift that keeps on giving.
She added that although she and her codirector wonder where new members will
come from every year, the next year the
little ankle biters come out of nowhere.
Seven-year-old Liora Palavin, a firsttimer, said that when she saw the group
perform at shul and how they learned the
music, it was really cool, and I wanted to
be a part of something really cool. Shes
always on time for rehearsal, she said,
because she tells her parents, Lets go, so
I wont be late.
Some songs are hard and some are
easy, Liora said. The different languages
are fun. She would tell her friends to join
because they would have fun and would
probably enjoy it and probably be proud
of themselves when they do all the shows.
Benjamin Mann, whose sixth-grade
daughter, Ariella, is now in the choir, said

FROM PAGE 9

civilian. Having a role and something to do


motivates me to come. And when the children sing, I get chills. I feel that God is in
the room, a spiritual elevation moments
of joy.
Ms. Avery-Grossman said that she and
Ms. Hanan acknowledge the role that our
fathers played and pay it forward. Were
doing stuff we learned as kids.
Among her own strengths, she said, is
her understanding of what the audience
is looking for. The shul is looking for joyful and emotionally connected synagogue
moments sometimes from prayer and
sometimes from other things. For some, it
comes through music. They see a hopefulness in watching the kids sing this music
and carry on tradition. Theyre also taken
by how disciplined and professional the
kids are.
As for the kids themselves, they love
it. No one quits or has a bad time. Theyre
made to feel great about themselves and
learn something new. Theyre like Navy
Seals they take it so seriously. That we

that she is the third of his three children to


perform with Tzipporei Shalom. His son,
Matan, now 17 and singing with HaZamir,
sang with the childrens choir from the
time he was 5 through the end of sixth
grade, as did his daughter Orly.
When Matan was in fifth or sixth grade,
we heard all three at one time. It was a special year for us, Mr. Mann said. Not only
was the choir fun for his children, but they
learned a ton of music. His children bring
the choir songs home, and theyve made
it into our house as part of our repertoire.
Crediting the two directors for the
groups success, we feel privileged to
have them teach our children, he said.
For her part, Ariella said she loves the
choir, participating in it along with some of
her friends from SSDS of Bergen County. I
love to learn new songs that not everybody
else knows, she said. Sometimes the different languages are hard to pronounce,
but its fun to learn different languages.
Learning music takes persistence, she
added. We keep singing until it gets stuck
in our brains. In addition, Weve got really
good teachers. On weeks when we dont
have [rehearsals], its not as much fun.

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Across
1. Sport, as tzitzit
5. A prophet
9. Where Jacob lived in his last years
14. Brit who analyzes the Arab/Israel
conflict?
15. Female U.S. pol who advocated for
Jews during WWII
16. Shekels and such
17. Jerusalem Botanical Garden flower
18. Israeli woman
19. Like Israels coastal region,
topographically
20. Like some frillier mishloach manot
baskets
23. Gila, ___....
24. Precursor to shalom?
25. Does matanot laevyonim
32. Part of an IDF uniform
33. Slandered beyond lashon hara
34. Tchelet, e.g
35. Gershwin and namesakes
36. Holiday spirit
38. Israeli sandal maker
39. Did a mitzvah in a sukkah
40. Knesset deputy speaker Nachman
41. What Moses was not at
the Burning Bush
42. They may put on a shpiel
46. It may end with .il
47. It supports hasbara for Israel
advocates
48. Megillah figureone of which
is hidden in each of 20-, 25- and
42-Across
55. Rabbi/novelist Chaim
56. European capital with the Peitav
Shul
57. First word in much wedding music
58. Send ____ package to an Israeli
Soldier (Friends of the IDF project)
59. With the Alliance Israelite
Universelle?
60. ____ Crossing (checkpoint area)
61. Kabbalists book
62. City where one of Chabads 18 locations in Arizona can be found
63. Like Maimonidean manuscripts

The solution to last weeks puzzle is


on page 55.

Down
1. On a ____ (like a possible shuk
purchase)
2. It could be exchanged for about
4.6 shekels in early 2015
3. Former Labor leader Peretz
4. Miluim, IDF-wise
5. Many Israel dwellers from Africa,
recently
6. Grape used for sweet kiddush wine
7. ____ Kandelikas (Chanukah song)
8. What one might do with some karbanot
9. Made Judenrein
10. Weaken, like Jacobs leg (literally!)
11. King Davids nephew
12. Israel Ballet dancers move
13. What one may bring back from Eilat
21. Kashrut, for one
22. Gads brother
25. 1/20 of a Biblical shekel
26. Like some Knesset members, during
a heated debate
27. Greasy like latkes
28. Prepare tzitzit
29. Tel Aviv cinema
30. Big kvetch
31. Haggadah verb
32. Bei Mir ____ Du Shein (Sammy
Cahn/Saul Chaplin hit)
36. Place to find three wise men
or more
37. ____ Nof (Jerusalem neighborhood)
38. British leader who was friends with
Chief Rabbi Jacobowitz
40. Histadrut member, at times
41. Org. which helps Israeli Persians?
43. Israels weekly Spanish paper
44. Rock ____ (Chanukah song)
45. Possible kumsitz instrument
48. A little Ladino?
49. Tabernacle state?
50. What a teen may do before the
bagrut
51. Rosh Hashanah honey-making locale
52. Canadian Jewish actress Strong who
voiced Dil Pickles on Rugrats
53. Adverb describing Gods reign
54. What some men do not do during
sefirah
55. Feature of the Golden Age of Spain

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JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015 47

Arts & Culture

At Home
in Exile

A look at diaspora,
ingathering, fear, Bibi,
and so much more
JONATHAN E. LAZARUS

s a mostly retired but unreconstructed newspaper editor,


Im licking my headline-writing chops at the possibility of
churning out a 60-pointer after the March
17 elections in Israel proclaiming Bye,
Bye, Bibi.
Is it premature? Definitely. Tabloidish?
Supremely. Biased? You betcha. Un-Jewish? Undoubtedly.
Thankfully, my bosses at the Standard
would immediately disabuse me of such
a notion, possibly conveying their displeasure in several languages. They neednt
worry, though. My leanings are toward
traditional journalistic canons of restraint
and objectivity, although in an earlier
iteration I might have wanted to precede
the Bibi blast with one shouting Attaboy
Attaturk when Mustafa Kemal delivered
his now-feckless democracy from the
Ottomans.
These zero-sum musings on my part
more or less coincided with Charlie
Hebdo, the kosher supermarket siege,
Belgium violence, a knife attack on French
gendarmes guarding a Jewish day school,
the spasm of madness in Denmark, and
the end-run invitation by House Speaker
John Boehner to Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu to address Congress (in that
purring baritone of his) and disparage
President Barack Obamas negotiations
with Iran.
An already crowded plate for worldwide Jewry gets more crowded and more
fraught.
The fallout from the speech, scheduled
March 3, is still unspooling in Washington and Jerusalem between two tightly
bound allies experiencing perhaps the
messiest moment of the relationship. The
Jewish establishment in the United States
Jonathan E. Lazarus is a former news
editor of the Star-Ledger.
48 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015

Alan Wolfe

is discomfited by the breach of protocol


that Netanyahus chief operative, Ambassador Ron Dermer, used in arranging the
event, and the fraying impact it might have
on the worlds most significant bilateral
partnership.
Some Congressional Democrats vow to
boycott the address. Abraham Foxman,
director of the Anti-Defamation League,
asked Netanyahu to call it off. AIPAC is
edgy. In Israel, opposition leaders question its appropriateness, offering the
counter-scenario of Obama addressing the
Knesset without the express bidding of the
prime minister. Columnist Thomas Friedman dismissed the Boehner-Netanyahu
axis as a campaign sugar high.
Both the president and Vice President
Joe Biden will snub him. Beware the Ides,
Bibi.
The bundling of these exigent developments (who knows what will happen
next? but something will happen) coincided with my reading Alan Wolfes provocatively titled At Home in Exile: Why

Diaspora Is Good for Jews. What began


as a straightforward book review billowed
into an introspection about the intersections of free speech, geographical relativism, and the responsibility (or the right to
irresponsibility and irrepressibility) of the
fourth estate.
When At Home was reviewed some
months ago in the New York Times by
critic and academic Peter Beinart, I knew
I wanted to read it immediately to clarify
my personal feelings of identity, security,
perspective, and where I landed on both
the Jewish spectrum and the exilic exuberance scale.
My own sensibilities as a secular Jew at
a far remove from the continent support
Charlie Hebdos right to publish what it
chooses about Mohammad, no matter
how offensive or sophomoric or for that
matter, about Netanyahu. When the prime

minister is subjected to the slings and


arrows of the fourth estate at home where
he is running for a fourth term, it doesnt
excite the violence and threats that follow crude depictions of the prophet. The
imbalance is stunning
I say this while in profound disagreement with Netanyahus conduct. I find his
shameless political alliances, lack of peacemaking mojo, and condescending treatment of my president personally disagreeable. His default position of allowing more
settlements, his intransigence toward a
two-state solution, and his insistence on
reconstituting the nation of Israel as the
binomial Jewish State of Israel strike me as
counterproductive in both the short and
long terms.
As someone living in the safest and most
accepting country for a diasporic Jew, am
SEE EXILE PAGE 55

Calendar
Bromberg on her guitar,
11 a.m. Youngsters, with
their families, join the
service in the sanctuary
for concluding hymns,
followed by Kiddush
lunch. 475 Grove St.
(201) 444-9320 or www.
synagogue.org.

Shabbat in Fort Lee:

Andrew Keltz

Alan Schmuckler

Cabaret in
Englewood: Join
Congregation Kol
HaNeshamah for
entertainment from singer/actor
Andrew Keltz and songwriter/
pianist/actor Alan Schmuckler.
They will perform favorite
American standards, from jazz
to inspirational folk music, on
Saturday, March 7, at 7:30 p.m.
Wine tasting and hors doeuvres
will precede the music. The
performance is at St Pauls, 113
Engle St. For information, call
(201) 816-1611 or email RSVP@
KHNJ.org.

MAR.

Friday
FEBRUARY 27
Shabbat in New City: PJ
Library hosts Bim Bam
Shabbat at 16 Handles
in New City, N.Y., 4 p.m.
The pre-Shabbat music
program for toddlers
and preschoolers
includes Shabbat-related
songs led by Camp
Ramah staff members,
stories, grape juice, and
challah. Yogurt will be
discounted. 170 S. Main
St. Lara, (845) 362-4200,
ext. 180, or lepstein@
jewishrockland.org.

Shabbat in Ridgewood:
Temple Israel and Jewish
Community Center
offers family services
for 4 to 13-year-olds,
led by Cantor Caitlin
Bromberg on her guitar,
7 p.m. Oneg Shabbat
follows. 475 Grove St.
(201) 444-9320 or www.
synagogue.org.

Saturday
FEBRUARY 28

Shabbat in Closter:
Temple Beth El hosts an
informal tot Shabbat,
focusing on Purim, led by
Rabbi David S. Widzer
and Cantor Rica Timman,
5:15 p.m., and a familyfriendly service at 6:45.
221 Schraalenburgh
Road. (201) 768-5112.

Shabbat in Emerson:
Congregation Bnai
Israel holds its monthly
family program with its
Esther Extravaganza,
in celebration of Purim,
6:30 p.m., followed by
a family-friendly service
at 7:30. 53 Palisade Ave.
(201) 265-2272 or www.
bisrael.com.

Shabbat in Glen Rock:


Shir Appeal, a Jewish a
cappella group from
Tufts University, will
perform at the Glen Rock
Jewish Center during the
9 a.m. service and at the
Kiddush lunch. 682
Harristown Road.
(201) 652-6624 or
office@grjc.org.

Shabbat in Ridgewood:
Temple Israel and Jewish
Community Center
offers tot Shabbat,
led by Cantor Caitlin

Congregation Gesher
Shalom/JCC of Fort Lee
offers Club Shabbat
for second- to sixthgraders and Torah Tots
for 3- to 6-year-olds
with their parents, 11 a.m.
1449 Anderson Ave.
(201) 947-1735.

Shabbat in Fair Lawn:


Rebetzin Dr. Julie
Goldstein gives a shiur,
Hanging Haman: A
Modern Jews Guide
to Erasing Amalek,
for Shabbat Zachor
at Congregation
Ahavat Achim of Fair
Lawn, 4:15 p.m. 18-25
Saddle River Road.
(201) 797-0502.

Springsteen and
scripture: Dr. Azzan
Yadin-Israel of Rutgers
discusses Salvation,
Redemption, and Raising
Cain the Lyrics of
Bruce Springsteen
and the Bible at
Congregation Beth
Sholom in Teaneck,
7:30 p.m. Hors doeuvres
and beverages.
354 Maitland Ave.
(201) 833-2620 or
office@cbsteaneck.org.

Cabaret in Wyckoff:
Temple Beth Rishon
offers cabaret-style
music including classical,
Broadway stage and
opera, contemporary
compositions, jazz,
classic rock, and a
performance by the
Syncopated Seniors Tap
Dance Troupe, 7:30 p.m.
Cabaret singers include
the shuls students,
with accompaniment
by pianist Judy
Kessler. Instrumental
performances are by
violinists Amelia Feiner
and Sylvia Rubin, pianist
Ella Feiner, and guitarist
Andrew Mester. Also,
a memorial tribute by
the congregations
rock band, Jimmy and
the Templetones, to a
band member, Irwin
Tessler, who died last
year. Members include
vocalist Gale Bindelglass,
drummer Jimmy Cohen,
lead guitarist Adam
Friedlander, keyboardist/
flutist Jane Koch,
guitarist/harpist Ilan
Mamber, bass guitarist
Jack Seidenberg, and
saxophonist Jeff Wilson.
Cheeses, hors doeuvres,

fruit, and desserts.


BYOB. 585 Russell
Ave. (201) 891-4466 or
cantor@bethrishon.org.

Trivia in Paramus:
Congregation Beth
Tefillah offers Twisted
Trivia, 8 p.m. Dinner,
raffles, spinning wheel,
and trivia. Tickets
available online at
cbtparamus.org/
store. 452 Forest Ave.
(201) 265-4100.

Music in Ridgewood:
Temple Israel & JCC
offers Winter Music
Saturday, a chamber
music concert
with violinist Barak
Shossberger, cellist Talya
Buckbinder, and pianist
Tomer Gewirtzman,
8 p.m. Dessert served.
475 Grove St. (201)
201-444-9320 or www.
synagogue.org.

Sunday
MARCH 1
Purim in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth has a
carnival with prizes,
a skit, games, and
food, 10 a.m.-noon.
1666 Windsor Road.
(201) 833-8466.

Purim in Leonia:
Congregation Adas
Emuno has a service with
Megillah reading and
spiel, The Shnook of
Esther, written by shul
president Lance Strate,
10 a.m. 254 Broad Ave.
(201) 592-1712 or www.
adasemuno.org.

Ave. (973) 696-2500 or


shomreitorahwcc.org.

Purim in Paramus:
The JCC of Paramus/
Congregation Beth
Tikvah holds a
carnival with games,
bounce house, kiddie
corner for younger
children, goldfish, and
refreshments, including
nut-free. E. 304 Midland
Ave. (201) 262-7691 or
www.jccparamus.org.

Purim in Tenafly: The


Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades holds its
annual Rubach Family
Purim carnival, 1-4 p.m.
Costumes encouraged.
Visits from life-size
cartoon characters.
Children with special
needs and their families
are welcome at noon
for an hour of fun
before the carnival
opens to the general
public. 411 E. Clinton
Ave. (201) 488-1467 or
mkleiman@jccotp.org.

Purim in Passaic: The


Friendship Circle of
Passaic County holds
a pre-Purim party with
pizza, a Mad Science
show, arts & crafts, and
food, for children with
special needs and their
siblings, 1:30-2:45 p.m.
482 Brook Ave., rear
of Chai Tots Preschool
building. Rykal,
fcpassaiccounty@yahoo.
com or (763) 228-8570.

Purim in Fair Lawn:


The Fair Lawn Jewish
Center/Congregation
Bnai Israel holds a
carnival, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m.,
with new and classic
games, goldfish, prizes, a
bounce house, and food.
Costumes encouraged.
10-10 Norma Ave.
(201) 796-5040.

Purim in Closter: Temple


Beth El of Northern
Valley has a carnival,
11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Also
crafts, raffles, and food.
221 Schraalenburgh
Road. (201) 768-5112 or
www.tbenv.org.

Purim in Wayne:
Shomrei Torah
has a carnival and
costume parade,
11:30 a.m. 30 Hinchman

Feature film: The


Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades in Tenafly
screens The Long Way
Home, 7:30 p.m., as
part of a series, Top
Films You May Have
Missed (Or Want To See
Again). Harold Chapler
introduces the film and
leads the discussion
afterward. 411 E. Clinton
Ave. (201) 408-1493.

Tuesday
MARCH 3

Patricia Lemer
Autism talk in
Washington Township:

Preschool program in
Woodcliff Lake: Temple
Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley holds Club Katan
for children who will
begin kindergarten in
September, 10:15 a.m.
87 Overlook Drive.
(201) 391-0801, ext. 12.

Countys community
shlicha, discusses the
upcoming elections
in Israel at Montebello
Jewish Center, 7 p.m.
34 Montebello Road,
Montebello, N.Y.
(845) 362-4200, ext. 115.

Youth theater in
Wayne: The Ys Rosen
Performing Arts Center
at the Wayne YMCA
offers Peter Pan Jr.,
performed by more than
50 area children, 2 p.m.
Produced in partnership
with Pushcart Players.
The Metro YMCAs of the
Oranges is a partner of
the YM-YWHA of North
Jersey. 1 Pike Drive.
(973) 595-0100 or www.
wayneymca.org.

Monday
MARCH 2
Purim in Wayne: Temple
Beth Tikvah has a
carnival, 4-6 p.m., with
a gift basket raffle and
juggling performance.
950 Preakness Ave.
(973) 595-6565.

Israeli elections: Timna


Mekaiten, the Jewish
Federation of Rockland

Patricia Lemer, author


of Outsmarting Autism,
the Ultimate Guide to
Management, Healing
and Prevention, speaks
at the Bergen County
YJCC, 7 p.m. 605 Pascack
Road. Gina Wellington,
(201) 666-6610, ext. 5810,
or gwellington@yjcc.org.

Wednesday
MARCH 4
Caregiver support in
Rockleigh: A support
group for those caring
for the physically frail or
people with Alzheimers
disease meets at the
Gallen Adult Day
Health Care Center at
the Jewish Home at
Rockleigh, 10-11:30 a.m.
Topics include long-term
care options, financial
planning, legal concerns,
and the personal toll
of caregiving. Shelley
Steiner, (201) 784-1414,
ext. 5340.

Purim in Woodcliff
Lake: Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack Valley
holds western-themed
celebrations. At 4:15 p.m.,

JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015 49

Calendar
there will be a young
family Megillah reading
and carnival with games,
rides, and food. At 7,
there will be a traditional
Megillah reading with a
Wild West theme. Dress in
western gear. 87 Overlook
Drive. (201) 391-0801 or
www.tepv.org.

Purim in Closter: Temple


Beth El of Northern
Valley has a beach party,
beginning with a cookout
dinner, 5:30 p.m. Wear
beach attire. At 6:30,
there will be a Beach Boys
musical Megillah service.
221 Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112 or www.
tbenv.org.

Purim in Wayne: Shomrei


Torah has a family friendly
service with Megillah
reading and festivities,
6 p.m. 30 Hinchman
Ave. (973) 696-2500 or
shomreitorahwcc.org.

Purim in Franklin Lakes:


The Chabad Jewish
Center of NW Bergen
County hosts a Glowing
Purim in the 80s party,
6 p.m., with a breakdance performance by
the Brooklyn B-Boys,
an all-American dinner,
interactive Megillah
reading, glowing
face-painting, drinks,
crafts, and costumed
characters. 375 Pulis Ave.
(201) 848-0449 or info@
chabadplace.org.

Purim in Ridgewood:
Temple Israel & JCC
begins its celebration
with games, hot dogs
and hamantaschen, and a
costume parade, 6 p.m.;
Megillah reading at 7. 475
Grove St. (201) 444-9320.

Purim in Glen Rock:


The Glen Rock Jewish
Center celebrates with
a childrens service,
6 p.m., and a costume
parade, followed by a
full Megillah reading at
7, hamantaschen, and a
spiel based on Disneys
hit musical Frozen.
682 Harristown Road.
(201) 652-6624.

Purim in Fort Lee:


The JCC of Fort Lee/
Congregation Gesher
Shalom has a pizza
dinner, 6:30 p.m.,
followed by the Megillah
reading and celebration
featuring costume
parade, photo booth, and
refreshments at 7. Call
for dinner reservations.
1449 Anderson Ave.
(201) 947-1735.

Purim in Teaneck: The


Jewish Center of Teaneck
offers two Megillah
readings one in the
sanctuary with costumes
and groggers, the other, a
raguah (quiet) reading in
the library, 6:30 p.m. Both
followed by a celebration

at 9:30 with music by


Eitan Katz, food, dancing,
and prizes. Hosted by
Yeshivah Heichal Hatorah
with the JCT. 70 Sterling
Place. (201) 833-0515, ext.
200.

Purim in Leonia:
Congregation Adas
Emuno has its party and
game night, with pizza
and dessert and an encore
performance of the spiel,
The Shnook of Esther,
written by shul president
Lance Strate, 6:30 p.m.
Wear costumes and bring
a favorite game. 254
Broad Ave. (201) 592-1712
or www.adasemuno.org.

Purim in Tenafly:
Lubavitch on the Palisades
has its annual Grand
Purim Bash with Megillah
reading at 6:30 p.m. and
again at 9:30. 11 Harold
St. (201) 871-1152 or www.
chabadlubavitch.org.

Haber. The Megillah


will precede the
show. Hamantaschen.
385 Howland Ave.
(201) 489-2463.

Purim in New Milford:


Shaar Communities
offers a Megillah
reading, 7:30 p.m. 275
McKinley Ave. www.
shaarcommunities.org.

Thursday
MARCH 5
Purim in Tenafly:
Lubavitch on the
Palisades hosts Purim
in France, with gourmet
French cuisine, fine
French wines for adults,
and masquerade in French
attire, 5 p.m. 11 Harold St.
(201) 871-1152 or www.
chabadlubavitch.org.

Purim in Pompton
Plains: The Chabad

Center of Passaic County


offers Purim at the
of Upper Passaic County
Shore, with temporary
holds Purim in NYC, with
tattoos for kids, sand
a New York deli dinner,
art, shore-themed
parade in NYC costumes,
dinner and dessert, and
Big Apple-style
crafts,
Alan
Schmuck- an exotic bird show,
dancing to DJ ler
Steve of
at the Regency House
Manhattan, a NYC Lchaim
(Best Western Hotel),
bar, a Times Square
5:30 p.m. 140 Route 23
break dance show, and
North. (973) 694-6274 or
refreshments. Megillah
Jewishwayne.com.
reading at 6:30 p.m.; party
at 7. 1069 Ringwood Ave.,
Suite 101. (201) 696-7609
or JewishHighlands.org.
MARCH 6

Purim in Haskell: Chabad

Friday

Purim in Teaneck: Temple


Emeth reads the Megillah,
7 p.m. 1666 Windsor
Road. (201) 833-8466.

Purim in Fair Lawn:


Temple Beth Sholom
offers a Megillah reading,
7 p.m., with a costume
parade, refreshments, and
an ice cream bar. Bring an
edible grogger, a box
or bag of rice, pasta, or
any other non-perishable
food item that makes
noise when shaken to be
donated to the Fair Lawn
Food Pantry. 40-25 Fair
Lawn Ave. (201) 797-9321.

Purim in Wayne: Temple


Beth Tikvah, has a
Megillah reading, 7 p.m.,
followed by a costume
party and after-party.
950 Preakness Ave.
(973) 595-6565.

Purim in Paramus:
The JCC of of Paramus/
Congregation Beth Tikvah
has various Megillah
readings, 7 p.m., followed
by a grand Purim festival,
with food, music, dancing.
304 East Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691.

Purim in River Edge:


Temple Avodat Shalom
presents a spiel, Garden
Shushan Plaza: The
Musical, 7 p.m. The
musical comedy was
written by Rabbi Paul
Jacobson and Barbara

50 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015

Childrens program
in West Nyack: The
Rockland Jewish
Academy offers a
Sifriyat Pijama BAmerica
Hebrew story time with
activities and a snack,
1:30 p.m. Sifriyat Pijama
continues on April 12. 450
West Nyack Road. Judy
Klein, (845) 627-0010,
ext. 104, www.
rocklandjewishacademy.
org, or kleinj@
rocklandjewishacademy.
org.

Shabbat in Mahwah: As
part of the One Book
One Community project,
sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of Northern
New Jersey, Beth Haverim
Shir Shalom offers a
Middle Eastern Shabbat
celebration with dinner,
in conjunction with this
years book selection,
The Golem and the
Jinni by Helene Wecker,
7 p.m. Also singing with
the cantor and folktales
about jinnis and golems.
280 Ramapo Valley Road.
(201) 512-1983 or www.
bethhaverimshirshalom.
org.

Shabbat in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth offers
services for families with
young children, 7:30 p.m.
1666 Windsor Road.
(201) 833-1322 or www.
emeth.org.

Saturday
MARCH 7
Israel film festival: The
Jewish Federation of
Northern New Jersey
begins its Israel Film
Festival with Hill Start
at the Tenafly Cinema 4,
9 p.m. Holy Name Medical
Center in Teaneck and the
Israeli American Council
are among the sponsors.
(201) 820-3907 or www.
jfnnj.org/filmfestival.

Sunday

American Council are


among the sponsors.
(201) 820-3907 or www.
jfnnj.org/filmfestival.

Purim in Wayne:
Shomrei Torah has
an original spiel,
Esthers Very Special
Purim Party, 1 p.m.
30 Hinchman Ave.
(973) 696-2500 or
shomreitorahwcc.org.

In New
York

MARCH 8

Wednesday

Casino trip: Hadassahs

MARCH 4

Fair Lawn chapter takes a


trip to the Sands Casino in
Pennsylvania. A bus leaves
the Fair Lawn Jewish
Center/Congregation
Bnai Israel at 8:45 a.m.;
breakfast served onboard.
$30; includes $25 slot
play money plus a $5
food voucher. Bring ID.
10-10 Norma Ave. Varda,
(201) 791-0327.

Toddler program in
Tenafly: As part of the
shuls Holiday Happenings
program, Temple Sinai
of Bergen County offers
music, stories, crafts,
and snacks, with a Purim
theme, for pre-k children
and their parents, 9:30 a.m.
1 Engle St. (201) 568-3035.

Childrens program: The


Jewish Community Center
of Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah begins a four
week Taste of Hebrew
School for 4- to 7-yearolds, 9:30 a.m., with
songs, stories, usable craft
projects, customs about
Passover. East 304 Midland
Ave. (201) 262-7733 or
edudirector@jccparamus.
org.

Purim in Fair Lawn: The


Fair Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai
Israel hosts its annual
Purim 5K Fun Run/1
mile walk, beginning
in the shul parking lot,
9:30 a.m. Run in costume.
DJ entertainment
and clowns. Prizes.
10-10 Norma Ave.
(201) 796-5040.

Purim in Glen Rock:


The Glen Rock Jewish
Center offers a carnival,
11 a.m.-1 p.m., with games,
prizes, and balloons.
682 Harristown Road.
(201) 652-6624.

Israel film festival: Jewish


Federation of Northern
New Jersey continues
its Israel Film Festival
with Is That You? at
the Ridgefield Park
Luxury Cinemas 12, 7 p.m.
Discussion with the films
actress Suzanne Sadler.
Holy Name Medical Center
in Teaneck and the Israeli

Purim in NYC: The


Jewish Theological
Seminary hosts Purim
Eve on Broadway at
at JTS, 7 p.m. Rabbi
Jan Uhrbach, director
of liturgical arts at JTS,
leads JTS students,
faculty, alumni, and
friends in a musical
spiel, part of the
evening service and
Megillah reading. A
hamentaschen and wine
reception follows. 3080
Broadway (corner 122nd
Street). RSVP by March
2 at www.jtsa.edu/
purim.

Sunday
MARCH 8

book, The Covenant


Kitchen: Food and Wine
for the New Jewish
Table, at the Museum
of Jewish Heritage
A Living Memorial
to the Holocaust,
2:30 p.m. 36 Battery
Place. (646) 437-4202
or www.mjhnyc.org.

Singles
Sunday
MARCH 1
Singles mixer
in Bergenfield:
Congregation Beth
Abraham offers a
singles mixer, Back
to the 80s, 7:30 p.m.
Food, trivia, music,
light dinner. Prizes for
best 80s costume.
396 New Bridge Road.
Facilitators present.
(201) 522-4776.

Friday
MARCH 6
Singles Shabbaton
in Teaneck: Sharon
Ganz & Friends host a
Shabbaton weekend
for Orthodox Jewish
singles, 25-39, at
Congregation Bnai
Yeshurun. There will be
three Shabbat meals,
Oneg Shabbat, singles
mixers, discussions, and
a Saturday night party.
Shadchanim invited.
Sharon, (718) 575-3962
or (646) 529-8748.

Sunday
MARCH 8
Senior singles meet in
West Nyack: Singles
Cookbook talk
and wine tasting:
Authors Jeff and Jodie
Morgan will join Russ
& Daughters Mark
Russ Federman for
a discussion about
the Morgans new

65+ meets for a social


get-together with
music by DJ Jeff, and
videos of Broadway
and Hollywood, at the
JCC Rockland, 11 a.m.
450 West Nyack Road.
Refreshments. $5. Gene
Arkin, (845) 356-5525.

Hadassah holding
concert fundraiser
The Paramus-Bat Sheva chapter of Hadassah and Temple Beth El of Hackensack are
holding a joint fundraising trip on Sunday,
March 8, at 7 p.m. to The Lincoln Legacy
performed by the award-winning Ridgewood Concert Band. The Ramapo College
Chorale, directed by Dr. Lisa Lutter, also will
particpate. The concert is at Westside Presbyterian Church, Varian Fry Way and North
Monroe Street in Ridgewood. Tickets are $20.
For information, call (201) 342-5065.

Calendar
Concert honors memory
of Stephanie Prezant
The Kaplen JCC on the Palisades presents More Songs
that She Loved, the third
annual tribute concert in
memory of Stephanie Prezant.
It will be on Saturday, March
14. Doors will open at 8:15 p.m.
for the 8:45 concert.
Three years ago, Stephanie Prezant died in a rockclimbing accident. Her parents, Elana and Jeffrey Prezant
have sought opportunities to
help others struggling with
this kind of grief. In addition
to this annual concert, More
Songs that She Loved, they
established Holding Hands, a monthly
support group in collaboration with Jewish Family Service of Bergen and North
Hudson, which offers friendship and
understanding to families who are grieving the death of a child of any age from
any cause.
The March 14 concert, featuring community musicians and vocalists, will
celebrate the memory of Stephanie Prezant and her enthusiasm for life. Stephanie attended the JCC nursery, studied
dance in its School of Performing Arts,
and served as a teen role model for her
peers. She participated in JCC Holocaust
Memorial commemorations and competed on the Team Palisades dance team
at the Maccabi Games in 2003, when the
JCC was a host site. She continued to
dance at games in Boston, Richmond,

AJC and Museum of Jewish Heritage


launch series on European Jewry
In response to the recent tragic events in
Europe, the Museum of Jewish Heritage
A Living Memorial to the Holocaust will
partner with the American Jewish Committee to launch a new series, AJC in
Action: The Future of European Jewry,
starting on March 3.
Moderated by the Jewish Weeks editor and publisher, Gary Rosenblatt, the
series will feature AJC experts who will
provide in-depth, on-the-ground insights
into the new reality confronting Jews
across Europe and beyond. The series will
focus on the rising tide of anti-Semitism,

and Stamford. This year, Elana Prezant


is chairing the JCC community maccabi
games.
The evening will include live music
performed by Jeffrey and Jonathan Prezant The evenings musical director is
Victor Lesser of Manhattan City Music.
Guest artists Susan Collins Caploe,
Diane Honig, Ronen Mikay, and Udy
Kashkash also will perform.
Funds raised will support the Stephanie I. Prezant Maccabi Fund at the JCC,
which provides scholarships for Jewish teen athletes. Tickets are $36 for
adults and $18 for students. Tickets are
available online at www.jccotp.org. For
information and underwriting opportunities, call Robyn Rosenfeld at (201)
408-1429 or email her at rrosenfeld@
jccotp.org.

mounting efforts to delegitimize the Jewish state, and other global challenges.
The series will launch with an evening with David Harris, AJCs executive
director, on Tuesday, March 3, at 7 p.m.
On Wednesday, March 11, at 7 p.m., Simone Rodan-Benzaquen, director of AJC
Paris, will speak. Deidre Berger, director
of AJC Berlin, will conclude the series on
Wednesday, March 18, at 7 p.m.
Tickets are free and donations are
welcome. Reserve tickets in advance by
going to www.mjhnyc.org. All programs
take place at the Museum.

Purim PowerPoint promotes inclusion


For Purim, which begins Wednesday,
March 4, Yachad offers its PowerPoint
presentation free of charge to synagogues and organizations interested
in promoting inclusion for those who
wish to be part of the mitzvah of listening to Megillat Esther. The presentation
is directed at the deaf and hard of hearing, the visually impaired, and children
with focusing and attention challenges
and other disabilities.

Now in its eighth year, the PowerPoint


presentation uses visual aids to indicate
when to stamp out the name of Haman.
Already, more than 600 synagogues have
signed up for the program, as well as the
Orthodox Unions Seif Jewish Learning Initiative program on 21 university campuses
across North America.
To receive a copy of the Purim PowerPoint presentation disc or for information,
call (212) 613-8376 or email naim@ou.org.

JCC University features journalist

Paper cuts on display in Tenafly


The Cutting Edge, an exhibition of
detailed paper works by Dena Levie, will
be on display at the Waltuch Gallery of
the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly
through March. An opening reception is
set for Monday, March 2, from 6 to 8 p.m.
Ms. Levie designs and creates personalized paper-cut artwork, including ketubot

( Jewish wedding documents), family trees,


and wedding and bnai mitzvah gifts, as
well as artwork for school and synagogues.
You can see her work at www.judaicpapercuts.com
For information, call Jessica Spiegel at
the JCC, (201) 408-1426, or go to www.
jccotp.org.

Gail Sheehy, a trailblazing journalist, will be


at the Kaplen JCC on
the Palisades in Tenafly
Thursday, March 12, at 1
p.m., as part of the JCC
University. She will discuss her new memoir,
Daring: My Passages,
a perspective on all of
lifes passages, and will
Gail Sheehy
sign books and take
part in a question-andanswer session. Sheehy is the author
of Passages, named by the Library of
Congress as one of the most influential

books of our time.


The same day, at 10:30
am, Ronald Brown, an associate professor at Touro
College and the Unification Theological Seminary,
will talk about Divine
New York: A Religious History of New York City. Its
about the various ways in
which different religious
groups constructed their
houses of worship in New
York City. For information, call Kathy at
(201) 408-1454 or email her at kgraff@
jccotp.org.

JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015 51

Gallery
1

n 1 At the Academies at Gerrard Berman Day Schools


annual Curriculum Fair, Emily Maines and Samuel Terdiman demonstrate how to make silky playdough out of
cornstarch and hair conditioner. AMY SILNA SHAFRON
n 2 More than 100 Zumba enthusiasts came to the
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly for its annual free Zumba fitness party. It included a 75-minute workout led by JCC Zumba instructors Louis
Scriven, Kristen Steitz, Jen Semon, Evangelina
Bishop, and Yael Alexander. COURTESY JCCOTP
n 3 Allyn Michaelson and Rosalind Melzer, co-chairs of
the Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey Holocaust
Commemoration Committee, join Rabbi Alberto and Graciela Zeilicovich of Temple Beth Sholom in Fair Lawn at the
United Nations for the 10th anniversary of the International
Day of Commemoration in memory of the victims of the
Holocaust. JFNN plans its commemoration on Thursday,
April 16, at Temple Beth Rishon in Wyckoff. COURTESY TBS
n 4 Moatza NY offered a panel discussion, The Next Generation: Educating Israeli & Jewish Children in America
Your Childs Connection to Israel, at the JCC of Fort Lee/
Congregation Gesher Shalom. Panelists included, from left,
Liz Freirich, director of institutional advancement at the
Solomon Schechter School of Manhattan; Pazit Levitan,
executive director of Moatza Mekomit New York; Amir
Sagie, Israels deputy consul general in New York; Aya
Schechter, director of the Israel Connection Center at the
Kaplen JCC of the Palisades and Moatzas vice chair; Anat
Levi Feinberg of Gesher Shalom and Moatza NY; Bess
Adler, principal of the Bergen County High School of Jewish Studies, and Ricky Stamler-Goldberg, early childhood
and lower school principal and director of Judaic studies
at the Solomon Schechter Day School of Bergen County.
n 5 In preparation for Purim, students at the JCC
of Paramus/Congregation Beth Tikvah Hebrew
school make hamantaschen. COURTESY JCCP/CBT
n 6 Students from Torah Academy of Bergen County
celebrate the beginning of Adar. COURTESY TABC

52 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015

Obituaries
Edgar Booth

Edgar H. Booth, 88, of Glen


Rock died on February 21.
He enlisted in the Army
Specialized Training Program and was a Stanford
University and Harvard
Law School graduate. He
joined his father, Benjamin,
at Booth, Lipton & Lipton
in Manhattan for over 30
years, then practiced for
another 30 years at other
firms. He served on the
Glen Rock Board of Education including a stint as its
president.
He is survived by his
wife Joan, ne Blumberg,
children, Charles (Carole
Petersen) of Hawaii and
Janet Zide (Stephen) of Connecticut; a sister, Deborah
Katz of Massachusetts, and
five grandchildren.
Donations can be sent to
Valley Hospice, Paramus.
Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.

Arthur Grabow

Arthur Grabow, 71, died on


February 22.
Born in Paterson, he
graduated from Fair Lawn
High School and worked at
Brewster Finishing Company, Service Power Transmission, and Parts Plus

Industrial Supply.
He is survived by his wife
of 50 years, Marjorie, sons,
Gary (Lynn Imanaka) of
California, and Corey (Amy)
of Illinois; brothers, Stanley
(Ellen), and Philip ( Joyce),
and four grandchildren.
Donations can be made
to the American Parkinson Disease Association.
Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.

Betty Jacobs

Betty Jacobs, ne Levine,


100, of Englewood Cliffs and
Crossville, Tenn., died on
Feb. 19.
Born in Hartford, Conn.,
she was a member of the
Rifter Benevolent Society in
New York City.
Predeceased by her
husband, David, in 2009,
she is survived by her children, Dr. Alvin of Englewood Cliffs and Connie
Epp of Tennessee; three
grandchildren, and two
great-grandchildren.
Arrangements were by
Eden Memorial Chapels,
Fort Lee.

Sylvia Morgan

Sylvia Morgan, 93, of the


New York area, formerly of
Ohio, died on February 2.

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Lillian Raff

Lillian Raff, ne Kanter, 106,


of Wyckoff, formerly of Paterson, died on Feb. 20.
She was a former member of Temple Emanuel in
Paterson and the Paterson
Chapter of ORT.
Predeceased by her husband, Samuel, and a daughter, Iris Seligson, she is
survived by a son, Donald;
three grandchildren, and
great-grandchildren.
Arrangements were by
Louis Suburban Chapel,
Fair Lawn.

Michael Raske

Michael David Raske, 62, of


River Vale died on February 20.
He is survived by his
wife, Cindy, ne Gabis, his
parents, Lillian and Gerald
Raske, children, Lauren
and Dani, and a sister, Carol
Warshaw.
Donations can be sent to
Planned Parenthood of Central and Greater Northern
New Jersey, or LEO Zoological Conservation Center.
Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.

prepared with
information provided
by funeral homes.
Correcting errors is
the responsibility of
the funeral home.

Department of Pathology
and Clinical Laboratories,
New York Infirmary Beekman Downtown Hospital,
New York City.
He is survived by a
brother, composer Robert
Stern of Massachusetts; a
nephew, Aaron Stern; two
great nieces; and the family
who cared for him in his
final years, Ia Skhulukhia
(Ilia Kamladze), and their
children.
Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.

Sondra Schaare

Sondra F. Schaare, ne
Fermaglich, 79, of Pompton
Plains died on February. 24.
Born in New York City,
she was a fashion designer.
Predeceased by her husband, Allan, she is survived
by a son, Jeffrey Ruff of
New City, N.Y.; a brother,
Dr. Daniel Fermaglich of
Massachusetts, and two
grandchildren.
Arrangements were by
Eden Memorial Chapels,
Fort Lee.

Dr. Leonard Stern

Dr. Leonard Stern of Hackensack died on February 19.


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on page 47.

Citing leaked spy cables obtained by


Al Jazeera, The Guardian reported
on Monday that the Central Intelligence Agency attempted to communicate with Hamas through back
channels, despite a U.S. government ban on contact with the Palestinian terrorist group.
According to the report, the CIA
was anxious to make inroads with
Hamas, or recruit agents, inside the
Gaza Strip. A CIA agent reportedly
discussed the possibility of gaining access to Hamas during a 2012
meeting in eastern Jerusalem with
a South African intelligence agent.

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access.
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JNS.ORG

Bank of Israel sets interest rate at all-time low


After a several-month period of
keeping interest rates steady at 0.25
percent, the Bank of Israel on Monday lowered the rate to 0.1 percent,
the lowest in Israels history.
The new interest rate is 0.4 percentage points lower than it was
during the height of the global
financial crisis in 2009, when Stanley Fischer was at the helm of the

Exile
FROM PAGE 48

I entitled to such pointed opinions? Wolfe


would posit that I have a perfect right,
nay duty, to either criticize or feel bullish
about Israels internal polity and external maneuvers, even though I have no
intention of visiting the Holy Land with
my JCCs annual pilgrimage, much less
making aliyah. But Wolfe would further
insist that I would be doing a disservice
to the tribe by my silence, with the collective experience of the 1930s and 40 as a
haunting reminder.
When Netanyahu insinuated himself into
the front rank of leaders at the Je Suis Charlie rally, only a few arm-links away from
Mahmoud Abbas, I thought the juxtaposition couldnt be crasser and more bizarre.
He followed that with an exhortation to
French Jews ( and later, to Danish Jews) to
come home to Israel, where they could
live safely and be out and about wearing
their kippot in the only nation with the
only government that prioritized and protected their nationhood and their religion.
In response, the chief rabbi of Paris
exhorted everyone to stay put and make
a statement about diaspora and national
roots. Of the countrys 500,000 Jews,
7,000 made aliyah last year, up from
3,000 in 2013, thus becoming the largest

Temple Bnai Jeshurun on High Street


in Newark.

in-source nation for Israel. Significant as


that is, it still leaves the bulk of the community remaining in France. The chief
rabbi of Denmark also exhorted his flock
to remain calm and anchored.
Wolfe penned At Home in Exile just
before these convulsions, but the timing

bank.
The decision to reduce the interest rate for March 2015 by 0.15 percentage points to 0.10 percent is
consistent with the Bank of Israels
monetary policy, which is intended
to return the inflation rate to within
the price stability target of 1 to 3
percent a year over the next 12
months, and to support growth

only heightens his exegesis. As a professor of political science and director of the
Boisi Center for Religion and Public Life at
Boston College (very catholic, lower case
c, and very nurturing) Wolfe decided after
many books to turn the spotlight on his
own traditions and religion, confronting
the ideological, ritualistic, and historical
fault lines undergirding Judaism.
His analysis touches on different brands
of Zionism and their level of acceptance
among the main streams of Judaism; patterns of flight and emigration; the effects
of the Jewish Enlightenment; tensions
and bias from those living in Israel toward
those in the galut, expressed as shilat
hagolah, or negation of the diaspora;
the twin phenomena of the Holocaust and
the emergence of the state of Israel, and
the recalibrated equilibrium of all these
incredible forces on a post-generation
knowing only an ascendant Israel and a
dominant United States.
Wolfe speaks to me strongly and directly
as a first-generation American, an unaffiliated Reform Jew who gives reflexively to
the federation among other philanthropic
organizations, and who feels explicitly
exilic in his cultural tastes and politics.
My affiliation with JCC Metrowest, which I
trace back to its lineage as the High Street Y
in Newark, is essentially for its superb gym

while maintaining financial stability, the bank said in a statement.


The path of the interest rate in the
future depends on developments in
the inflation environment, growth
in Israel and in the global economy,
the monetary policies of major central banks, and developments in the
exchange rate of the shekel.
JNS.OR

and workout facilities. Yet it also attracts


me to a haimish atmosphere for as many
days of the week as Im able to get there.
I am part of the generation that unhappily put the damper on Yiddish. I became
bar mitzvah in the great, domed cathedral
of Reform German Jewry known as Bnai
Jeshurun of Newark (many years since
relocated to Short Hills in slab-like architectural homage to the Ten Commandments, with its chancel choir intact and
multiple rabbis on the faculty). My stepsons similarly attended Conservative Bnai
Abraham of Livingston. My grandchildren,
unfortunately, not at all.
I live on a block in West Orange among
predominantly modern- to ultra-Orthodox families who literally worship at the
base of our mountainous community in a
synagogue created through a merger put
together by my secular father-in-law. They
send their children to day schools in both
the area and by bus to Bergen County. Our
interactions and conversations are minimal. I find them insular and helpful only in
moderating education taxes. They find me
well, who knows what, if they do at all.
But Wolfe considers me important
enough to be addressed in his splendid new study. That makes me feel both
invested and a fully-fledged, if flawed,
member of the tribe.
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 27, 2015 55

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offer less expensive synthetic beams, but crafty homeowners can create their own faux beams with materials found at the local lumberyard.
If you have your heart set on beams but cant afford
the cost, a series of simple flat boards edged in decorative trim can be a very cost-effective alternative,
Kelsey says.

Add Texture

Serving NY, NJ & CT

www.classicmortgagellc.com

ooking for a way to finish off that room?


Look up. Whether painted, wallpapered or
stenciled, a finished ceiling gives any room
a fresh look for not a lot of money.
A ceiling that completes and makes the space sing
makes a big statement, says John Kelsey, co-founder
of Wilson Kelsey Design, an award-winning residential
and commercial interior design firm. I recently completed a very modern galley kitchen. During construction, we kept looking at the flat ceiling and feeling as if
it wasnt quite right. We mocked up an arched ceiling,
and the kitchen came alive. The space went from ordinary to extraordinary.
Take your own room from ordinary to extraordinary
with a new hue. A simple coat of paint is perhaps the
quickest, most dramatic fix for do-it-yourselfers on a
budget.
The quickest DIY fix is to use paint and add a
touch of pearlescence to the paint. This will make the
ceiling glow, Kelsey says.
Look for interior latex with a pearl finish or pearlescent gloss that can be applied as a second coat. Its less
intense than a high-gloss finish, but the extra shimmer
makes paint pop.
When choosing colors, consider the overall vibe of
the room. Lighter and brighter shades make rooms
feel open and airy, whereas warmer, darker hues create a cozy, intimate space.
Choose your paint in the context of the effect or
feeling youre trying to achieve in the room, Kelsey
explains. A lighter color will tend to lift the ceiling,
making the room feel larger, while a darker color will
tend to lower the ceiling, making it feel smaller.

Like walls, ceilings often benefit from a boost of


texture, and its easy to get the look you want with
wallpaper.
Many people forget about decorating the ceiling.
Highlight this typically forgotten area with wallpaper that coordinates with the rest of the furnishings
in the room, says Paula Berberian, creative services
manager for Brewster Home Fashions, a leading manufacturer and distributor of wallpaper and wall art.
Wallpaper on a ceiling adds color, depth, design and
dimension. Whether you add a pleasing print to create

Hand-painted ceilings add a lot of drama to a


room, according to professional decorative painter
Michael Boudreault, pictured. But homeowners
can get the same custom look using self-adhesive
stencils and coordinated colors.
CreatOrs.COm phOtO COurtesy Of Carlisle Kellam

a cottage feel, a metallic wallpaper to add shimmer


or a paintable wallpaper for texture and dimension, it
will have everyone who enters the room looking up.
Anaglypta wallpapers sometimes called paintables are the most versatile. The three-dimensional
papers come in a wide variety of designs, from patterns that mimic tin ceilings to textured scrollwork and
contemporary facades.
Whats great about these products is that they are
truly paintable, Berberian explains. You can leave
them white or paint them with any color of your
choosing. They also hide surface imperfections like
cracks, are affordable and are easy to hang.

Go Custom
Hand-painted ornamental ceilings and overhead
murals also make a big statement.
The wow factor is best-achieved with handpainted artistry, says Michael Boudreault, decorative
finish specialist and mural painter.
Get the look yourself with self-adhesive vinyl stencils from companies such as the Modello Design Group
(http://www.ModelloDesigns.com). Its decorative
masking patterns can be used with paint, stain, glaze,
plaster and other mediums for a range of textures
and styles, and using the companys vast ornamental
library, homeowners can create one-of-a-kind designs
for that custom look.
Pick a color that is one or two shades lighter than
see ceiling page 58

Real Estate
Pharaoh fills our seder tables, though afterward we
ease the tension by singing about frogs in his bed.
In synagogue, the words of the sorcerer Bilam,
who the rabbis called harasha, the wicked, even
begins our prayers with the words Mah tovu How
goodly.
At Chanukah, if we did not have the severe decrees
of King Antiochus, we would not only be minus a
dilemma in December but a holiday, too.
The biblical antihero calls to us as well. In discussions about the Torah portion Korach, which is named
for the man who rebels against the authority of Moses,
I sometimes find it easy to take his side. Wasnt he just
a misunderstood nonconformist?
And though I first heard the story of the golem as a
child, I am still confused: Was the Rabbi Judah Loew
of Pragues monster of mud a hero or a villain? Or was
he a little of both?
The truth is that in villains we see a little of ourselves. An idea in Jewish thought is that we are all born
with both an evil inclination, yetzer hara, and a good
one, yetzer hatov. Does this internal duality connect
us to Haman? Perhaps for the part of our psyches that
conjures up ways to wipe out opposition before we
consider how wrong it is.
In terms of reconciling the villain inside, thankfully
most of dont have Darth Vader as a dad. But we do
imagine, and even know, what we look like in black.
And on Purim, if you put a light saber in our hands,
even if it is a toy, we know that somehow the force
wouldnt be any fun without the bad. Jta Wire serViCe
Edmon J. Rodman is a JTA columnist who writes on
Jewish life from Los Angeles. Email him at edmojace@
gmail.com.

Ma S OP
r. 1 UN EN
1 DAY
23P
M

Poser
FrOM page 43

TM

VERA AND NECHAMA REALT Y


A

D I V I S I O N

O F V

A N D

G R O U P

L LC

SUNDAY, MARCH 1ST


TEANECK OPEN HOUSES

TEANECK

MAJESTIC

$998,900

Stunning colonial on park-like property in prestigious area, granite eat-in kitchen, 5


bedrooms, 4.5 baths, family room w/French doors to patio & gardens, living room
w/fireplace, hardwood floors, 2 car garage, paver driveway.
DIR: Sussex to 622 Winthrop Rd.

ALPINE/CLOSTER
TENAFLY
RIVER VALE ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS TENAFLY

894-1234
768-6868

CRESSKILL
Orna Jackson, Sales Associate 201-376-1389

666-0777

568-1818

894-1234 871-0800

1285 Hasting St
1435 Hudson Rd
238 Carlton Ter

$1,275,000
$587,000
$421,000

1:00-3:00pm
1:00-3:00pm
12:00-2:00pm

JUST SOLD
22 Dohrman Ave, Teaneck
349 W Englewood Ave, Teaneck
430 Kensington Rd, Teaneck
78 Lee Place, Bergenfield
UNDER CONTRACT
703 Northumberland Rd, Teaneck
721 Carroll Pl, Teaneck
51 Wilbur Rd, Bergenfield
42 Mackay Drive, Tenafly
We hold the keys to the best front doors in town!

NEW
LISTING

www.vera-nechama.com

201-692-3700

270 Grayson Place Teaneck


Premier Open House Sunday, March 1 12 to 4
Come see this spacious, renovated colonial. Large modern eat-in
kitchen, banquet-sized dining room, 6 bedrooms, including a master
bedroom suite. Many more beautiful features. Close to transportation,
houses of worship and parks. $739,000

Call Ilene for a


free home analysis
or a buyers
consultation.
Service is my specialty.

TEANECK
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, MARCH 1

Ilene Dorn Pollack

Weichert, Realtors
ilenedpollack@gmail.com
201-214-0399 201-569-7888

FORT LEE - THE COLONY


Now is the time to buy!

United Hatzalah wins


prestigious Ometz
award for its work
The Israeli government watchdog organization
Ometz on February 3 awarded the volunteer emergency rescue organization United Hatzalah in its
first-ever ceremony honoring Israeli institutions in
medicine and science at the Eretz Israel Museum in
Ramat Aviv.
Ometz promotes economic, social and moral
equality, and annually honors individuals and institutions that exemplify these ideals.
It was a true honor to receive this prestigious
award, along with other great men and women, said
Eli Beer, founder and president of United Hatzalah.
Getting the Ometz prize gives us at United Hatzalah
the motivation to continue our fight against our biggest enemy: time. Our goal is to have a response time
under 90 seconds and this recognition reinforces
that we are doing the right thing and gives us courage to continue the fight.
Established in 2006, United Hatzalah operates a
network of volunteer medics, paramedics and doctors. Today, there are 2,500 volunteers serving Israelis
across the country through emergency medical aid to
the sick and wounded. The organization was recognized for its efforts in effectively assisting in accidents
and crises and working tirelessly to save lives.

961 E Lawn Dr.

1BR 1.5 Baths renovated from $113,800


2BR 2.5 Baths renovated from $349,900
Sponsor rentals 1 BR 1.5 Baths from $2,200
Sponsor rental 2 BR 2.5 Baths. Renovated.

$3,500

Allan Dorfman

Broker/Associate

201-461-6764 Eve
201-970-4118 Cell
201-585-8080 x144 Office
Realtorallan@yahoo.com

Like us on Facebook.

$459,000

BY APPOINTMENT

4 Brm Col/146' Deep Yard. Ultra Mod Eat In Granite


Countered Kit/Dbl Appl & Radiant Heated Flr. LR, Form DR
open to Fam Rm. Fin Hi Ceil Bsmt/Priv Ent to Yard. H/W Flrs,
3 Zone Heat, C/A/C. $399,900
Brick Front Col. Lg LRm/Fplc, DR, Off/Brm, Mod Kit/Bfst Rm
open to Fam Rm & Deck. Lov Master Brm/ Bath + 3 more
Brms + 2 more Bath. Fin Bsmt, C/A/C, Gar. $640,000
Contemp W Eglwd Col. 6 Brms (incl 1st Flr Master Suite), 4.5
Baths. Ent Hall, Liv Rm/Fplc, Banq Din Rm, State of the Art
Granite Isle Kit, Fam Rm, Huge Fin Bsmt. Gar, U/G Sprinks,
C/A/C, Patio & More! $999,999

ALL CLOSE TO NY BUS / HOUSES OF WORSHIP /


HIGHWAYS / SHOPPING / SCHOOLS & NY BUS
For Our Full Inventory & Directions
Visit our Website
www.RussoRealEstate.com

facebook.com/jewishstandard

1-3 PM

C Club Area. Spacious Custom Cape/67' X 100' Prop. LR/


Fplc open to DRm & step down to Fam Rm. Eat In Kit. 2 First
Flr BRs + Full Bath, 2 Lg Second Flr BRs + Full Bath. Fin
Bsmt w/ Bath. Att Gar.

2014
READERS
CHOICE

FIRST PLACE
REAL ESTATE AGENCY

(201) 837-8800

Jewish standard FeBrUarY 27, 2015 57

SELLING YOUR HOME?

Real Estate & Business

Call Susan Laskin Today


To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com

Cell: 201-615-5353

2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.

Crown molding paired with a ceiling medallion adds overhead drama and
shows off designer light fixtures.
CreatOrs.COm phOtO COurtesy Of WilsOn Kelsey desiGn

ceiling
FrOM page 56

your wall, Boudreault says. Colors


always appear darker on the ceiling
because of the way most lights are situated, so its best to go lighter than you
think. Hand-painted ceilings should
always complement or show off an
interesting space, not overpower it.

Think Ahead
Theres one caveat to ceiling upgrades:
If you plan on selling soon, keep it simple. Though a finished ceiling can add
appeal, buyers may not have the same
taste in decor, so subtle is better. Opt

for a look with broad and long-lasting


appeal, lest your expensive upgrade be
ripped out by the next owner.
Custom treatments are very personal, and most treatments do not
appraise into the value of the home
unless they are unique to the architecture of the ceiling and the home as a
whole, Boudreault says.
It is still very much a buyers market,
Kelsey says. A home whose ceilings are in
good repair and freshly painted may not
necessarily have a higher resale value, but
it will enhance the impression that the
home is in move-in condition and may
help shorten the time on the market.
CreatOrs.COm

Does memory loss mean


it is Alzheimers disease?
Learn when to be concerned and what to do about it

Like us on
Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard
58 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 27, 2015

Bergen County area residents are invited


to the Alzheimers Associations community education program, Understanding Memory Loss, on Thursday, March
19, from 1-2 p.m. at The Tenafly Senior
Center, 20 South Summit St.
Memory loss that disrupts everyday life
is not a normal part of aging. This program will explore the difference between
normal age-related memory changes and
abnormal changes that are associated with
Alzheimers disease or related dementia
disorders, including the 10 warning signs
of Alzheimers disease.
The presentation will discuss the
importance of receiving thorough diagnostic evaluation when symptoms first

arise, current treatment options, and


research advances.
The Alzheimers Association is the
worlds leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimers research, care
and support. Its mission is to eliminate Alzheimers disease through the
advancement of research, to provide
and enhance care and support for
all affected, and to reduce the risk of
dementia through the promotion of
brain health.
The program is free but registration
is required to reserve seating and materials. Call (973) 586-4300 by March 18
to RSVP, or visit alz.org/nj or call (800)
272-3900.

The Art of Real Estate


NJ:
NY:

Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY

201.266.8555
T: 212.888.6250
T:

ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS

ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS

LD

LD

SO

SO

201.906.6024
M: 917.576.0776

Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ

M:

ENGLEWOOD

TENAFLY

P
AR RIM
EA E
!

J
SO UST
LD
!

Gorgeous young brick Colonial.

Elegant North Cliffs home with pool.

Great 5 BR/4.5 BTH Colonial. $1,325,000

Storybook lush property with gazebo.

ORADELL

PARAMUS

DEMAREST

CLOSTER

SO

LD

SO

SO

LD

LD

SO

LD

Beautifully appointed 5 BR/3.5 BTH Colonial.

Newer custom home with great layout.

Classic architecture with attention to details.

Magnificent construction on a cul-de-sac.

TEANECK

TEANECK

FORT LEE

FORT LEE

O
PR VER
OP SIZ
ER ED
TY
!

SO

SO

LD

LD

AM EVE
EN RY
ITY
!

New construction. Time to customize. $929,000

Exquisitely renovated Center Hall Colonial.

Fabulous southeast views of NYC skyline.

Phenomenal 3 BR corner unit. $418K

GREENPOINT

CENTRAL HARLEM

CLINTON HILL

CHELSEA

6,085 sq. ft. 3-story bldg. Prime area.

The Douglass. 2 BR/2 BTH w/courtyard.

2 BR/2 BTH brownstone-style condo.

The Greenwich House. A Chelsea gem.

MIDTOWN EAST

GREENWICH VILLAGE

UPPER WEST SIDE

MIDTOWN WEST

J
SO UST
LD
!

DO
ST ORM
UD A
IO N
!

Great unit. Breathtaking courtyard. $340,000

J
SO UST
LD
!

J
SO UST
LD
!

The Hamilton. Doorman co-op bldg.

J
SO UST
LD
!

AP TH
TH E
OR
P

Grand 3,000 sq. ft. corner unit. $22,000/MO

J
SO UST
LD
!

TH

E5

05

2 BR/2 BTH w/balcony $ W/D. $1,450,000

Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!

www.MironProperties.com
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.

Jewish standard FeBrUarY 27, 2015 59

STORE HOURS

646 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666

SUN - TUE: 7AM - 9PM


WED: 7AM - 10PM
THURS: 7AM - 11PM
FRI: 7AM - 2 HOURS
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Tel: 201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225

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Temple
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lb.

ea.

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89

2/$

MEAT DEPARTMENT

99

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Top of the Rib


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GROCERY

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16 oz.

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DELI, SOUPS, SALADS, KUGELS, DIPS, APPETIZERS & MUCH MORE

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475

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99

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14.4 OZ

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PROVISIONS
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99

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Largest Purim Selection In Northern Jersey... at CRAZY LOW PRICES!

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99
89
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646 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666


201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225
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bunch

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at:
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Cedar Markets Meat Dept. Prides Itself On Quality, Freshness And Affordability. We Carry The Finest Cuts Of Meat And
The Freshest Poultry... Our Dedicated Butchers Will Custom Cut Anything For You... Just Ask!

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for

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conditions for use. Not to be combined with any other Discount/Store Coupon/Offer. *Loyalty Card
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We reserve the right to limit sales to 1 per family. Prices effective this store only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Some pictures are for design purposes only and do not necessarily represent items on sale. While Supply Lasts. No rain checks.