Você está na página 1de 87

ELECTRIC BASS LINES NO.

by CAROL KAYE

EXCELLENT INTERVAL AND NOTE READING STUDIES

Copyright 1971 by Carol Kaye

International Copyright Secured Printed in U.S.A. All Rights ReservedNo part of this
publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form
or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or
otherwise, except as permitted under Sections 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States
Copyright Act, without the prior written permission of the Publisher.

carolkaye.com

Introduction

At the time of this writing, the Electric Bass has reached proportions of importance
never visualized before by bass players. lt has opened new possibilities for the
musician in execution and has a vital role in EVERY phase of music. Rock launched this
electric "board" and at first, String Bass players became reluctant to spend their
valuable time away from their "live" instrument. In time, they surprisingly found a
certain amount of pleasure on this box and have repeatedly requested new material for
applicable study.

The contents of this folio consists of:

Basic Theory in two positions to be practiced in every key

Positional Scales to give the reader confidence as he learns good fingering habits

Basic Major and Minor (Blues) Chord changes for all situations

Interesting Scale and Walking Practice Material designed to assist in learning the whole
neck.

You will find a mixture of suggested Rock in a few Etudes. Fingerings vary according to
tempo, size of hand and neck. I have attempted to write correct fingerings for normal
conditions and the exercises are excellent for building chops in weak fingers.
Remember to point the left thumb toward the nut, keeping it slightly in back of the first
finger and pivoting to force the front of the hand to shift. The String Bass method of
keeping the left thumb with the second finger prevents freedom on the Electric Bass (see
How To Play The Electric Bass). Indicated fingerings are combinations of String
Bass and Guitar fingerings.

Special thanks must be given to Ed Gilbert, Frank Carroll, Dave Hersher and other
wonderful students who encouraged me to write this subject matter. I hope it furthers
your musical knowledge and abilities.

Yours,

Code to Symbols

Cmaj7 Major Seventh which may be written CM (big M) or C (seven with a slash)

Cm Minor which may be written C (with a dash)

C , C 7 Dimished (zero)

Cm7 5 May be written C (zero with a slash) or Cm7-5

C7 5 9 Flats can be substituted with dashes (C7-5-9)

C+ Means augmented

sus (Also add), means additional note not spelled in the chord.

Minor Keys are written usually in 3rd keys, i.e.:

Gm written in the key B major

Cm written in the key of E major

Fm written in the key of A major

Em written in the key of G major

C m written in the key of E major

Am written in the key of C major

Chord Theory

MAJOR CHORDS

MINOR CHORDS

Key of C

Key of G

Key of D

Key of A

Key of E

Key of B

Key of F

Key of F

Key of B

Key of E

Key of A

Key of D

Key of G

Scale Practice

Happy Together

ELECTRIC BASS LINES NO. 4

by CAROL KAYE

Copyright 1971, 1986, 2004 by Carol Kaye

International Copyright Secured Printed in U.S.A. All Rights ReservedNo part of this publication may be reproduced,
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying,
recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Sections 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright
Act, without the prior written permission of the Publisher.

carolkaye.com

Foreward by Ray Brown

As a bass player, having worked side by side with Carol Kaye


on numerous Movie and TV calls and recording sessions, I
have come to know how great she is on this instrument and
what contributions she has made. Also having John Clayton as
a student for the past year, I have seen great strides, and what is
more important, the future progress he will be making. I
recommend this book highly as I do all of the Carol Kaye
material.

Introduction

This folio represents various types of tunes, mostly in the Soul style of music, of my
original bass lines from the indicated hit records. They represent much of what is being
written today in the studios for Electric Bass players although some of the tunes had no
bass lines written and were improvised lines on my part at the time of recording them
(from l965 through 1971). The rest had skeleton parts written which I had to "improve"
upon to help make the recording feel good. Todays musician is called upon to read
more and more and so I felt that this book was necessary for practice. The hit records
are all familiar and the parts will be good for sight-reading practice as well as study in
continuity. It would be a good idea to purchase these records to play along with. The
tempo indications are approximate as the band rushes and drags in spots, feel was the
utmost important thing. The bass doesn't sound very distinct on the earlier recordings as
on the later ones, but one can play along with these and benefit by it.

Lately, it has been pleasurable to hear so many fine bass players play so tastefully in all
of the new great Rock groups. One of which is John Clayton, Ray Brown's protege who
I am proud to say, mine also. He assisted me in the music preparation of this book and
my heartfelt thanks go to him for the arduous work he has done. We both hope you like
this book and that it will be a challenge and a pleasure to play.

Sincerely,

John Clayton, 1972 combo winner of the Pacific Coast jazz Festival contest (The John
Clayton
Trio). Worked with Louis Bellson, Herb Ellis, Craig Hundley, and Monte Alexander.

John Clayton went on the road in the I970s playing elec. bass with the great Count Basie
Orchestra, finished his university education, married and had 2 wonderful children, one
of whom, Gerald, is also making a name for himself in jazz piano. John has had a great
musical career and jazz recordings producing some fine jazz CDs with his famous band,
the "Clayton Hamilton Orchestra", along with his brother Jeff Clayton and Jeff
Hamilton. Be sure to catch them and get the CDs, see Johns website at:
www.johnclaytonjazz.com. I owe a lot to this uniquely talented person not only for his
work on this book, but also for his enduring friendship, a quintessential great musician.

Boots

Back In My Arms

Out of My Head

Good Vibrations

If I Could Build My Whole World Around You

Wichita Lineman

I Chose to Sing the Blues

Youve Made Me So Very Happy

Dont Change on Me

Understanding

I Was Made to Love Her

This was recorded with Stevie Wonder present as a young man. He often tells his band
it was Carol Kaye who recorded bass on IWMTLH. The first riff was written and the
very first bar was written as well as the Db and Eb triads. The rest I improvised
according to the style they wanted. Its very easy to play fast 16th notes with lots of
definition with the hard pick, flat wrist picking with the beat technique Im know for, no
problem I had been playing quite a few dates that way. Ive always picked close the
end of the neck, where you get the best sounds other dates producers wanted a picky
kind of sound. As an in-demand studio bassist, you had to be able to produce all kinds
of sounds, ranging from the bassiest of the sounds (listen to my sound clips on Library
on my website www.carolkaye.com) to the clickiest of sounds (Mission Impossible
etc.).

The date was one of the cash-dates we did unfortunately. Sometimes our group of hitmaking union musicians would do cash-demo dates and then insist that company join
the Musicians Union but we didnt do that with this company and soon we understood
as they played demos for us to copy a style from, that these were not demo dates but
hit tracks we were recording for them. You never make demos from demos, you make
hit tracks like what Mr. Gordy wrote in his bio book all the great tracks coming from
LA in 1964. Motown has always had offices out here in LA since 1962-63 (SunsetVine Towers building, 2 floors of suites of offices), and when someone finally reported
these dates to our Union, suddenly Motown announced they were moving to LA.

I remember this bass line, have always written about this and other recording in my
1969 cassette bass course and described how Detroit musicians started Motown with
their fine hits in my many seminars and teachings since 1969 but that we did sone good
recording for then too out here in LA. When I saw Stevie Wonder at a recent NAMM
Trade Show, he immediately hugged me and we chatted a while. He verified that I
recorded this hit with him, and that I had played on a few other recording of his for that
period of time also. I enjoyed playing bass with him at a mid 1960s Shrine Auditorium
concert Leonard Feather wrote a review of this show where I played guitar with the
Oliver Nelson big band, guitar with the Jimmy Smith Jazz Trio and bass with Little
Stevie Wonder. The crown went wild, it was a memorable night. CAROL KAYE

Feel So Bad

Willie

Feelin Alright