Real Numbers and their

Set

a collection of items or objects.

Elements

the individual items or objects that are in sets

Union

the joining of sets into a master set. Union will not yield
multiples of the same item

Intersection

what is common between two sets

Null Set

a set with no contents

Subset

a set, all of whose elements are also elements of the other set

Properties

Sets of Numbers we will be studying:
Number Set

Letter

Definition

Natural
Numbers
(Counting)

N

{1,2,3,...}

Whole
Numbers

W

{0,1,2,...}

Integers

IN

{...,-1,0,1,...}

Rational
Numbers

Q

Examples

Irrational Numbers IR Real Numbers R Imaginary Numbers IM Complex Numbers C Any of the above Square roots of negative numbers. It stands for Quotient. That is why it is called the Real Number Line.19i 18i. Q is a logical replacement however. 8 Rational Numbers in Decimal Form: repeater or terminator. Irrational Numbers in Decimal Form: non-repeating. Q is used here because R is reserved for Real Numbers. 14+7i.-3i. i. which is at the heart of the Definition of the Rational Numbers. Absolute Value Definition: . non-terminating Diagram of Relationships of Sets The number line is not filled until all of R is included. By definition.

As the "troubling statement" above points out. An expression which has at least one variable in it. it means that we are either x units to the left of the goal.Absolute Value The distance that a number is from zero on the number line. Using the above definition.. Expression Algebraic Expression Formula 5 A mathematical statement using numbers. variables. And so. This must always be either zero or positive. . we will have to find two solutions to these problems. final solution. Memory Represents Rank P Please Parentheses 1 E Excuse Exponents 2 M My Multiplication 3 D Dear Division 3 A Aunt Addition 5 S Sally Subtraction In case of a tie. what we have is an ambidextrous statement. Therefore. Abbr. Of course the additive inverse of a number can be positive. work from left to right. and operations. Troubling Statement: Remember: The "-" sign in front of a number or variable really does not mean "negative. there are two possible solution to an absolute value statement. before we can find a combined. or x units to the right of the goal. the absolute value of an expression can have a "-" sign in it. A mathematical sentence that expresses the relationship between certain quantities. if we were told that the distance from an object is x units. With Absolute value." it means additive inverse. Order of Operations Definitions: Order of Operations The order in which mathematical operations must be done.

it will results always result in an integer Whatever you do to one side of an equation. you must do the same to the other side also.3 in. r: radius Properties: Property Addition Multiplication Commutative property Associative property Distributive property Identity Property Inverse Property Substitution property Closure property Equal Rights Amendment for Algebra (ERAA) if then either can be substituted for either at any time The set of integers If two elements of a set can is closed under be combined using an subtraction because operation and a third number when you subtract 2 from that same set always integers.Example: A ball has a radius of 8. A: area. Properties of Equality . Find the surface area of the ball.

The Equal Rights Amendment for Algebra Property Definition Example Notes Equal Rights Amendment for Algebra (ERA) Whatever you do to one side of an equation. you must do the same to the other side also Divided both sides by 14 Equal Rights Amendment for Algebra (ERA) Whatever you do to one side of an equation. a = a Symmetric Property For all real numbers a and b. b. you must do the same to the other side also Subtraced 3 from both sides Equal Rights Amendment for Algebra (ERA) Whatever you do to one side of an equation.Reflexive Property For any real number a. then b = a Transitive Property For all real numbers a. you must do the same to the other side also Took both square roots of both sides Equal Rights Amendment for Algebra (ERA) Whatever you do to one side of an equation. and c. you must do the same to the other side also Squared both sides . if a = b and b = c. then a = c. you must do the same to the other side also Multiplied both sides by 3 Equal Rights Amendment for Algebra (ERA) Whatever you do to one side of an equation. if a = b.