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Brenda Hoddinott

S07 INTERMEDIATE: CARTOONS IN COLOR


Colored pencils are a great medium for drawing
everything and anything. They beautifully portray
soft delicate drawings such as portraits and flowers,
and also work very well for subjects needing a
bolder, more colorful approach such as cartoons.
The adorable cartoon character in this project
challenges you to create the illusion of form by
graduating values with colors.
This project is divided into the following four sections:
PUTTING CHUCK INSIDE YOUR DRAWING SPACE: You establish the
basic proportions of a chick, based on your personal preferences, and outline the
overall shapes with curved lines.
OUTLINING A FUN FACE: You outline the shapes of Chucks face and
features. Feel free to exercise your creative license and make changes to Chucks
face so as to invent your very own cartoon character.
SHADING CHUCKS HEAD AND FACE: You add shading to Chucks head
and facial features with brightly colored graduations.
SHADING CHUCKS BODY AND ADDING FINAL DETAILS: You add
shading to Chucks head, body, legs, and feet. Finally, you have the option of
outlining your cartoon with a freshly sharpened pencil or a fine-tip black marker.
You need white drawing paper, kneaded and vinyl erasers, a ruler, and seven colored
pencils as close as possible to the illustrations in the first section of this lesson.

11 PAGES - 22 ILLUSTRATIONS
This lesson is recommended for artists with good drawing skills. The curriculum is easily implemented
into instructional programs for home schooling, academic and recreational learning environments.

Published by Hoddinott Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada 2004 (Revised 2007)

-2-

PUTTING CHUCK INSIDE YOUR DRAWING SPACE


In this section, you establish the basic proportions of a chick, based on your personal
preferences, and outline the overall shapes with curved lines. You need good quality
white drawing paper, kneaded and vinyl erasers, a ruler, and seven colored pencils as
close as possible to the following:

YELLOW

LIGHT ORANGE

ORANGE-BROWN

ORANGE

LIGHT BLUE

As you draw, keep your lines very light. My drawings are


actually much lighter than they appear in this lesson so light
in fact that they are barely visible. I darkened my drawings in an
imaging program so you are able to see them!
The size you choose for a drawing space will determine how
your cartoon character looks. You can draw him the same as
in my drawing (the chick in the middle) or you can draw him
shorter and chunkier (as on the left),
or even taller and thinner
(as on the right)!

DARK BLUE

BLACK

Proportion: is the
relationship in size
of one component
of a drawing to
another or others.
Shape: refers to
the outward outline
of a form. Basic
shapes include
circles, squares
and triangles.
Form: as applied
to drawing, is the
illusion of the
three-dimensional
structure of a
shape.

1)

Use any pencil to lightly draw a square or rectangle as


your drawing space.
Mine is 3.5 by 4.5 inches. With a shorter drawing space
your cartoon character will be shorter than mine; with a
longer one youll end up with a taller character.

Drawing space:
refers to the area
of a drawing
surface within a
specific perimeter,
outlined by a
shape of any size,
such as a square,
rectangle or circle.

Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for
any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott.
E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

-3FIGURE 401

2)

Use a ruler to divide your drawing


space in half, both horizontally
and vertically, as in Figure 401.
Use a light orange colored pencil and
press very lightly because you will
need to erase these two lines later.

3)

Draw a wide egg shape, with the


narrower section at the bottom
(Figure 402).
This will be the chicks head.
FIGURE 402

Take note that the narrower section of the


head (egg-shape) is in the lower half of
the drawing space.
FIGURE 403

4)

Draw Chucks body.


At first glance the body appears to
be an oval. However with closer
inspection, you see that its
actually a U-shape, with the tops of
the U touching the lower edge of
the head.

5)

Draw small wings on each side of


the body.

Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for
any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott.
E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

-4FIGURE 404

6)

Draw Chucks skinny little legs


and add his huge feet.
His legs are a little bowed. And
no wonder; if peoples heads
were larger than their bodies,
their legs would also be bowed!
However, Chucks oversized feet
compensate for his tiny legs; each
foot is almost as large as his
whole body.

OUTLINING A FUN FACE


In this section you outline the shapes
of Chucks face and features. Feel free
to exercise your creative license and
make changes to Chucks face so as to
invent your very own cartoon
character. Maybe youd prefer to draw
Chuckette!
To keep things simple, I use the names and descriptors of a human eye to identify the
various parts of cartoon eyes. Locate each of the following in Figure 405:
FIGURE 405

1. Upper eyelid: (orange) a


movable fold of skin that opens
and closes to protect the
eyeball.
2. Highlight: (the tiny white
circle) is the brightest area
where light bounces off the
surface.
3. Pupil: (black) is the darkest
circular shape within the iris.
4. Iris: (bright blue) is the colored
circular section of the eyeball
around the pupil.
5. White of the eye: (light blue)
visible section of the eyeball.

7)

Draw Chucks big chubby cheeks and chin.


Refer to Figure 406. Make sure you keep your pencil freshly sharpened as you
draw each section of the face. At first glance the shape of the lower section of
his face is similar to that of a heart. Use an orange-brown colored pencil.

Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for
any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott.
E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

-5FIGURE 406

8)

Draw two big oval shapes to represent


Chucks eyes.
Examine Figure 407 and take note of the
tiny angle shapes on the outside edge of
each eye. These little marks indicate
where the eyelids will be separated from
the eyes with a curved line.
FIGURE 407

9)

Add a curved line across each eye as


the lower edge of the eyelid (Figure
408).

10) Draw partial circles under the


eyelids as his irises.
The top section of each iris appears to
be hidden underneath the eyelid.

FIGURE 408

11) Draw Chucks beak (Figure 409).


FIGURE 409

Observe that the upper section of his beak


is bigger than the lower part.
Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for
any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott.
E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

-612)

Draw two tiny circles in the upper right section of each iris as the highlights.
Refer to Figure 410. The highlights will stay the white of your paper. You need
to draw them however, so you remember not to accidentally color them in.
FIGURE 410

13)

Add circles inside each iris as the


pupils of the eyes.
The pupils are closer to the eyelid than
the lower sections of the irises.

14)

Add the tiny little section of his


upper legs directly below his body.
Refer to Figure 411.
FIGURE 411

FIGURE 412

15) Erase the grid lines with a vinyl


eraser, and lighten all the rough
sketch lines with your kneaded
eraser until you can barely see them.
16) With a freshly sharpened orange
pencil, outline the face and body
with nice crisp lines in preparation
for adding shading.
Before you continue, check over your
drawing and change anything youre
not happy with.
Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for
any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott.
E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

-7Shading: refers to the various values that


make drawings look three-dimensional.

SHADING CHUCKS
HEAD AND FACE

Graduated shading (often referred to as


Graduations): is a continuous progression
of graduated values from dark to light or
from light to dark.

In this section, you add shading to


Chuck with brightly colored
graduations.

Values: are the different shades of gray or


color created in a drawing by various means.

FIGURE 413

Test the colors of your pencils on a


piece of scrap paper to make sure
they are what you want. Keep your
pencil sharpener handy; you need
very sharp pencils to add shading
to the smaller sections.
17) Shade the upper section of
Chucks head with light orange.
Refer to Figure 413.
Note that some sections are a little
darker than others. You create
these different values by varying
the pressure used in holding the
pencil. For light sections you press
very lightly with your pencil. Press
harder with your pencil to make
darker values.
18) Add light values to the lower
part of Chucks face with yellow.

FIGURE 414

19) Use your bright orange pencil to


add dark values to some parts of
the upper section of the head.
Refer to Figure 414.
20) Press harder with yellow to add
darker sections to the lower
section of his face.

21) Press lightly with your bright


orange pencil to add shading to
his eyelids and beak.
Refer to Figure 415.
22) Use your light blue pencil to
color in his irises.
Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for
any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott.
E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

-8FIGURE 415

23) Press harder with your bright orange


pencil to add a few sections of dark
orange to Chucks eyelids and beak.
Refer to Figure 416.
FIGURE 416

24) Add very


light shading
to the outer
edges of the
whites of the
eyes with a
light blue
pencil.
Refer to Figure
417.

FIGURE 417

25) Outline the


irises with your
dark blue
pencil.
26) Add dark shading to the upper
sections and the sides of the irises
with your dark blue pencil.
Take note of the sections of the irises
that are left light blue, and be careful
not to accidentally darken them.
27) Outline the lower edge of each eyelid
with a freshly sharpened black
colored pencil.
FIGURE 419

FIGURE 418

Refer to Figures
418 and 419.
28) Color in
the
pupils of
the eyes
with
your
black
pencil.
Make sure you remember to leave the
highlights white!

Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for
any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott.
E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

-9-

SHADING CHUCKS BODY AND


ADDING FINAL DETAILS

FIGURE 420

The difficult shading was on Chucks head!


Shading the body, legs, and feet is easy in
comparison!
29) Shade in the light yellow sections of
the body and wings by pressing
lightly with a yellow pencil.
30) Add the darker yellow values by
pressing a little harder with the
yellow pencil.
31) Shade in the light orange sections of
the legs and feet with your light
orange pencil.
32) Add the darker orange values with a
bright orange pencil.
The next steps are completely optional;
if you wish, you can consider your
drawing complete at this point.
You need a very steady hand to outline
a cartoon. Take some time and practice
drawing solid curved lines and shapes on
scrap paper before you attempt to outline your cartoon.
Outlining with a sharpened black colored pencil is much easier than using a marker. If
you use a marker, test it on some scrap paper before you begin and make sure that it
doesnt smudge, or your drawing may be ruined! You can even color in the pupil with
the marker if you wish.
FIGURE 421

33) Use a very sharp


black colored
pencil or a fine tip
permanent black
marker to outline
all the parts of the
head, eyes, and
beak.
Take your time and
draw your outlines
VERY slowly and
carefully!
Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for
any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott.
E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

- 10 34) Complete the outlines of Chucks entire body, wings, legs, and feet.
Remember; draw your outlines slowly and carefully. Add three curved lines as his
hair, and your cartoon is finished!
35) Sign your name, put
todays date on the back,
and put a big smile on
your face!

FIGURE 422

CHALLENGE
The problem now is
that Chuck needs
some company! Use
the basic process
used in this lesson to
draw another
completely different
chick.
Use a completely
different set of colored
pencils you can even
draw him mostly blue
and purple (cool colors)
and call him Chilly
Charlie.
Or, she (adds an old
fashioned meaning to the
word chick) can be pink
and pretty with big green
eyes, lovely long eyelashes,
and a fancy hat.
Put on your
thinking cap and
have fun creating
a friend for
Chuck.

Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for
any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott.
E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

- 11 -

BRENDA HODDINOTT
As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator,
Brenda utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil,
chalk pastel, charcoal, cont crayon, and oil paints.
My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical
and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable.
Brenda Hoddinott

Biography
Born in St. Johns, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook.
She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self
directed learning, and the aid of assorted Learn to Draw books. During Brendas
twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal
investigation departments have employed Brendas skills, including Royal Canadian
Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a
commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded
a Certificate of Membership from Forensic Artists International.
Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing
and painting classes. As supervisor of her communitys recreational art department,
Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several childrens art
programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in
order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites.
Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative
approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable
drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students
of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional
approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling
programs, and educational facilities throughout the world.
Learn-to-draw books
Drawing for Dummies: Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is
available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.
The Complete Idiots Guide to Drawing People: Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book
of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this
360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.

Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for
any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott.
E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com