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ACADEMIC PREDICTORS OF THE LICENSURE


EXAMINATION FOR THE PERFORMANCE
OF TEACHER EDUCATION GRADUATES

Salvacion J. Pachejo
University Vice President
For Student Services

Wendelyn A. Allaga
University Faculty
College of Education

Introduction
Teachers are one of the pillars of the society and the country. Without
good teachers, no country can progress. The importance of teachers in the life
of a nation cannot be overlooked. The teacher influences the immature minds
of the youth. They treat and mold the young mind into various forms. A
nation which tries to march ahead on the road to progress must do so with the
help of able teachers. A nation cannot afford to leave its future in the hands of
incompetent teachers.
No less than the President of the Philippines, His Excellency Benigno
S. Aquino III (2010) underscored the important role teachers play in nationbuilding when he said that I join the nation in saluting all of you for your
professionalism. You shape the minds of the youth who will be tomorrows
leaders.
The United States of America (USA), which is considered one of the
most powerful countries, also puts premium importance on education, when
former President Bill Clinton (1995) said that Education is the key to a
vibrant and prosperous America seeking to maximize the contributions of all
its citizens and embracing the richness and possibilities that our nations
diversity affords, as the new century approaches. The countrys economic
well-being depends on well-educated young people who can contribute in a
modern and technologically complex workforce.
The role of the teacher is a multi-faceted one comprising academic,
pedagogical and social roles. Academic role comprises teaching, counseling
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and supervisory roles. As facilitator of learning, the teacher is involved in


motivating students to learn, maintaining control in the classroom and the
school in general, and creating a conducive environment for learning to take
place. The teachers social role includes preparation of students to participate
in the way of life of the society. Others include reference roles, parent
surrogates, confidants and affectionate roles.
Studies in the economics of education have indicated that the quality
of output in an educational institution depends upon the quality of teachers
and if the latter is poor, the quality of the former would also be affected.
The strength of an educational system must largely depend upon the
quality of its teachers. No matter how enlightened the aims are and how
efficient the administration is, the evaluation of students is still determined by
the teachers.
The importance of the teacher is as clear as the sun, indeed. There is
therefore, no more important matter than that of securing sufficient supply of
the right kind of people to the profession and providing them with the best
possible training.
Ensuring that only the best and the brightest should be allowed to
venture into the teaching profession and better qualified and well-equipped
persons should be attracted to teaching is of paramount importance.
The academic institutions offering teacher education programs,
particularly the Rizal Technological University, carry a challenging yet
transcending responsibility of molding teachers of appropriate caliber to
deliver the goods to be thoroughly competent in the teaching discipline, and
be ready for the monumental task of extending the frontiers of knowledge in
their area of specialization.
Much is expected from the Tertiary Education Institutions (TEIs).
The plethora of standards, norms, and decisive factors regarding the success
of an institution reflects the peoples concern on quality education. In fact,
one standard that measures the success of an institution is manifested through
the outcomes of graduates who are fully prepared, well trained, and wellequipped with the skills, the knowledge, the habits, and the values essential
for their integration to the society in general and to the world of work in
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particular. Another standard that measures the success of an institution is the


performance of the graduates in the licensure examination.
Every teacher education graduate is required to take the Licensure
Examination for Teachers (LET) in order to practice his or her profession.
Those who passed the board examination will not only gain honor and
prestige but will also have competitive edge over those who are non-LET
passers. To pass the examination, graduates should obtain the passing rate of
75% in the three areas: General Education, Professional Education and their
Specialization.
Background of the Study
The Congressional Commission on Education (EDCOM) reported in
1991 that the Philippine Educational System was continuously declining. Two
reasons were given by that report: first, the Government is not investing
enough in education; and second, the educational establishments are poorly
managed. It was emphasized, however, as the heart of the problem was the
teacher who was found to be poorly trained and who even got lower scores
when tested.
As a result of these findings, the Commission recommended some
legislative agenda, among which are to professionalize teachers and teaching
and to adopt a periodic licensure examination which shall be given by the
Professional Regulation Commission (PRC).
Republic Act No. 7836, also known as the Philippine
Professionalization Act of 1994 strengthens the Regulation and Supervision of
the Practice of Teaching in the Philippines and prescribes a Licensure
Examination for Teachers and for other purposes.
In August 1996, the PRC administered the LET for the first time to
97,560 examinees. In 1997, there were 101,348 examinees who took the LET.
In RTU, 163 graduates took the examination and only 51 or 31.29 percent
passed. The national passing percentage for that year was 33.31%.

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Table 1. Institutional and National Passing Percentage


of the LET from 1997 to 2006

Date of
Examination
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006

INSTITUTIONAL

NATIONAL

No. of
Examinees

No. of
Passers

Percent
Passed

Passing
Percentage

163
222
223
330
374
425
477
550
613
484

51
74
82
137
137
170
140
133
154
143

31.29
33.33
36.77
41.52
36.63
40.00
29.35
24.18
25.12
29.55

33.31
29.31
34.90
35.90
34.93
36.52
26.40
27.15
25.93
32.46

Table 1 shows the institutional and national passing percentage of the


LET from 1997 to 2006. The examination was given once a year. Based on
the table, it can be seen that from 1998 to 2003, RTU obtained an average
institutional passing percentage of 36.27, which was higher than the average
national passing percentage of 32.99. However, from 2004 to 2006, the board
performance of RTU graduates started to decline by registering an over-all
institutional passing percentage of 26.28 as against the over-all national
passing percentage of 28.51.
In 2007, the Board for Professional Teachers of the PRC decided to
classify the examinees as first takers and repeaters.

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Table 2. Institutional and National Passing Percentage


of the LET from 2007 to 2008
Date of
Examination

INSTITUTIONAL

NATIONAL

No. of
Examinees

No. of
Passers

Percent
Passed

Passing
Percentage

2007
First Takers
Repeaters

515
291
224

126
103
23

24.47
35.4
10.27

29.12

2008
First Timers
Repeaters

461
311
150

143
117
26

31.02
37.62
17.33

35.34

Table 2 shows the 2007 and 2008 results of the LET for RTU. As can
be gleaned from the table, the over-all institutional passing percentage of
24.47 and 31.02, respectively, for 2007 and 2008 is lower than the national
passing percentage of 29.12 and 35.34, respectively.
The low institutional passing percentage is attributed to the repeaters
dismal performance which registers an institutional passing percentage of
10.27 and 17.33 percent for 2007 and 2009 examinations, respectively. For
the first takers, the institutional passing percentages of 35.40 and 37.62, are
higher than the national passing percentage.
Due to this continuous dismal performance of RTU in the LET, then
University President, Dr. Jose Q. Macaballug called on the attention of the
administration of the College of Education under the able leadership of Dr.
Crema T. Basuil to make an immediate intervention to prevent the decline in
the performance of the RTU-CED students in the Licensure Examination.
One of the immediate responses of the College was to revise the
teacher education curriculum and align it with the CHED Memorandum Order
(CMO) No. 30, series of 2004, also known as the Revised Policies and
Standards for Undergraduate Teacher Education Curriculum. The revised
teacher education curriculum of the College of Education was approved by
the RTU Board of Regents on October 27, 2006 on its 28th regular meeting
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through Board Resolution No. 270, s. 2006 which took effect for the 1st year
students during the SY 2007 2008.
Another intervention which the College introduced was the inclusion
of the review in the curriculum. The review subject should focused on the
General Education and Professional Education Courses. All graduating
students should enroll in the review class offered every second semester of
each school year. They have to pass the pre-board examination and the subject
in order to graduate.
In the second semester of SY 2008 2009, the College, in its
commitment to upgrade the performance of its graduates in the Licensure
Examination, introduced another strategy. This was by ranking the
graduating students based on their performance in the review. The students
who passed the pre-board examination and obtained an over-all performance
of at least 85 % shall be allowed to take the LET immediately after
graduation.
Table 3. Institutional and National Passing Percentage
of the LET from 2009 to 2010
INSTITUTIONAL

NATIONAL

Date of
Examination
Apr-09
First Takers
Repeaters
Oct-09
First Takers
Repeaters

No. of
Examinees
178
65
113
266
131
135

No. of
Passers
58
36
22
79
70
9

Percent
Passed
32.58
55.38
19.47
29.7
53.44
6.67

Passing
Percentage
24.68

Apr-10
First Takers
Repeaters

215
105
110

87
67
20

40.47
63.81
18.18

23.32

Sep-10
First Takers
Repeaters

167
66
101

50
43
7

29.94
65.15
6.93

25.86

28.2

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Table 3 presents the 2009 and 2010 results of the LET. Starting 2009,
the PRC conducted LET twice a year.
As can be seen on the table, the first takers registered a remarkable
increase in their institutional passing percentage as compared to the national
passing percentage. As shown, the repeaters contributed to the decline of the
over-all institutional passing percentage.
Although the performance of the graduates in the 2009 and 2010
Licensure Examination exceeded the national passing percentage, one could
not determine which of the subject areas under study had the biggest impact
on their LET ratings. This led the researchers to decide to have a deeper
analysis on the cited results.
Theoretical/Conceptual Framework
Every economically developed country understands the importance of
evaluating the performance of public education. Evaluation is a process
through which a value judgment or decision is made from a variety of
observations and from the background and training of the evaluator.
Ahman and Glook (1990) identified the uses of educational
evaluation as follows: (1) appraisal of the academic achievement of individual
students; (2) diagnosis of the learning difficulties of an individual or as an
entire class; (3) appraisal of the educational effectiveness of a curriculum,
instructional materials and procedures, and organizational arrangement; and
(4) assessment on the educational progress of large populations so as to help
understand educational problems and develop sound public policy in
education.
Testing is a technique of obtaining information needed for evaluation
purposes. Oriondo (1989) defined test as a device used to obtain systematic
information about the performance of the students. It provide school
administrators with information for planning and evaluating the effectiveness
of educational programs.
Being aware of the importance of testing in the educational
mainstream, Philippine educators have initiated the use of examination to
screen those who would be allowed to go to college and those who would be
permitted to legitimately practice their profession.
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In the field of education, the Congressional Commission on


Education, recommended among others, to professionalize teachers and
teaching and to adopt a periodic licensure examination which shall be given
by the professional board under the Professional Regulation Commission
(PRC).
In response to this recommendation, the Philippine Congress passed
and enacted into law Republic Act No. 7836, also known as the Philippine
Teachers Professionalization Act of 1994. The law prescribed that the
Licensure Examination for Teachers (LET) be administered to replace the
Professional Board Examination for Teachers (PBET). The Act, which
primary aimed to strengthen the regulation and supervision of the practice of
teaching in the Philippines, stated that two years after its effectivity no
person shall be allowed to engage in teaching as a profession in the preschool, elementary, and secondary level unless he or she is a duly registered
professional teacher.
One of the major requirements to become a professional teacher is to
pass the Licensure Examination. In the inhibition against the Practice of the
Teaching Profession, it provides that No person shall offer to practice the
teaching profession in the Philippines or be appointed as teacher to any
position without having previously obtained a valid certificate of registration
and a valid professional license from the Commission. Those who violate this
law shall be punished by a fine of not less than five thousand pesos (P5, 000)
but not more than twenty thousand pesos (P20, 000) or imprisonment of not
less than six (6) months but not more than five (5) years or both at the
discretion of the court. (www.prc.gov.ph/portal.asp?pid=68; 7-18-12)
An innovation was also introduced by R.A. 7836. Article III, section
14 requires a separate examination for elementary and secondary school
teachers. The examination for a teacher in the elementary level consists of
two (2) parts, namely: professional education (60%) and general education
(40%). On the other hand, the examination for teachers in the secondary level
consists of three (3) parts, namely: professional education (40%), general
education (20%), and field of specialization (40%). This set up differs from
the PBET in which a similar examination for the elementary and secondary
teacher examinees, consisting only of general education and professional
education was given.

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To pass the examination, an examinee must obtain a general average


of at least 75% in all subjects. This passing percentage is five (5) points
higher than the PBET passing rate of 70% in all subjects, with no rating below
50% in any subjects (factoidz.com/how-to-pass-the-licensure-examinationfor-teachers-let/; 7-18-2012).
The performance of the academic institutions in the licensure
examination is claimed to reflect the quality of education that the institution
offers to the students.
Figure 1 presents the working paradigm of the study. The diagram
shows the relationships between the independent variable, the dependent
variable, and the expected outcomes of the study. The independent variable
includes the performance of the graduates in general education, professional
education, specialization subjects, and overall ratings indicated by their final
grade at the end of each term. The dependent variable includes the
performance of the graduates in general education, professional education,
specialization subjects, and overall ratings in the licensure examination for
teachers.

Independent
Variable

Dependent
Variable

Performance in
the following
areas:

Performance in
the Licensure
Examination for
Teachers

-Gen Ed
- Prof Ed
- Specialization

Figure 1. Research Paradigm

Expected Output
Improved
Performance in
the LET
High percentage
of passers
Identification of
the predictive
ability of the
academic
performance on
the LET
performance

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Statement of the Problem


The study sought to determine the Licensure Examination
performance of the Rizal Technological University teacher education
graduates from 2009 2011.
Specifically, it intended to answer the following questions:
1. What is the level of academic performance of the teacher
education graduates along the following areas:
a.
b.
c.
d.

General Education,
Professional Education,
Specialization Subjects,
General Weighted Average?

2. What is the level of performance in the Licensure Examination of


the teacher education graduates along the following areas:
a.
b.
c.
d.

General Education,
Professional Education,
Specialization Subjects,
Over-all Average ?

3. What is the degree of correlation between the teacher education


graduates academic performance and the Licensure Examination
for Teachers performance along the following areas:
a. Academic average grades in the three areas and the
ratings in the subtests of the Licensure Examination for
Teachers:
b. Academic average grades in the three areas and the
overall rating in the Licensure Examination for Teachers,
and:
c. Overall average in the academic subjects and the overall
rating in the Licensure Examination for Teachers?

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4. What academic subjects best predict the teacher education


graduates performance in the Licensure Examination for
Teachers?
Hypotheses
3.1 There is a moderately linear relationship between the academic
average grades in the three areas and the ratings in the subtests of
the Licensure Examination for Teachers,
3.2 There is a moderately linear relationship between academic
average grades in the three areas and the overall rating in the
Licensure Examination for Teachers, and
3.3 There is a moderately linear relationship between overall average
in the academic subjects and the overall rating in the Licensure
Examination for Teachers.
4. The best predictors of the graduates performance in the Licensure
Examination for Teachers are the General Education, Professional
Education, and the Specialization subjects.
Significance of the Study
The research that aims to provide valid data about the academic
performance and performance rating of the RTUs teacher education
graduates in the Licensure Examination for Teachers furnishes benefits, such
as:
1. The identification and provision of information on the actual
performance of the graduates may be very useful to the
Universitys administrative and academic councils that are
seeking qualitative and quantitative information. Such will serve
as based decisions in establishing an action response in what
needs to be done after and in formulation of plans and policies
with regard to what areas should be improved, revised,
supplemented, or strengthened;
2. It may inspire curriculum makers and implementers to do
everything to raise the students achievement. They may derive
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significant information in terms of areas to be improved such as


content areas to be emphasized in the syllabi, books to be used,
strategies and techniques, nature of the assessment to be given,
and the like;
3. The findings may also serve as the basis in the re-evaluation and
re-examination of the programs and policies relative to the
improvement of the curriculum so that the students will be in a
better position in preparing themselves for the LET.

Review of Related Literature


The main concern of the teacher education is the preparation of
globally competitive teachers yet imbued with the ideals, aspirations, and
traditions of Philippine life and sufficiently equipped with pedagogical
knowledge and skills. Whatever skills acquired or learning gained by the
students in all subjects are always assessed and expressed through grades and
holistically termed as academic performances.
Tollefson and Osborn (2008) defined academic performance as that
which measured success in educational institutions on how well a student
meets standards set out by local government and the institution itself.
Although education is not the only road to success in the working world,
much effort is made to identify, evaluate, track and encourage the progress of
students in schools.
As discussed by Armstrong (2009), the subjectivity of academic
performance evaluation has lessened in recent years, but it has not been totally
eliminated. It may not be possible to fully remove subjectivity from the
current evaluation methods, since most are biased toward students that
respond best to traditional teaching methods. Standardized testing is best
responded to by students who excel in reading, mathematics and test-taking, a
skill that is not in itself indicative of academic worth. The tests reward visual
learners, and give no chance for kinesthetic or auditory learners to show their
abilities. The standardized test fails to recognize students learning and
physical disabilities that do not allow them to complete the test in the same
manner or amount of time as other students.

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Merrigan (2000) discussed that standardized tests are indicators for


evaluating academic progress. The LET is an example of a standardized test
and that once passed will serve as passport for graduates of Teacher
Education Institution (TEI) to land in a teaching career and may enjoy the
fringe benefits of a teacher in schools.
Academic Predictors in the Licensure Examination
Educators have long been looking for a predictor of success for
students as they enter college because unsuccessful students waste personal
and social time and resources of the educational institution (Buckingham and
Clifton, 2001). Students who can be identified as at risk for failure early in
their academic careers can be targeted for interventions in order to increase
the likelihood of success. As higher education institutions prepare for
increased enrollment, the predictability of student success becomes of
paramount importance.
Gallup (2000), in his journal, states that success can be difficult to
define based on the individual perspective, in terms of academic success in
college; however, there are a number of commonly used measures. The firstsemester grade point average (GPA) is a measure of a students immediate
performance upon entering the university atmosphere. The cumulative GPA
is a long-term measure of the consistency of performance while in that
atmosphere. Certainly other academic outcomes would include performance
on a formative professional licensure exam, performance in selected key core
courses, engagement in the collegiate experience (i.e. leadership involvement,
service learning, etc.), and overall personal satisfaction with the collegiate
experience. Many would agree that the ultimate measure of success in college
is graduation from an institution leading to employment in a career that
provides for a satisfactory level of quality of life. Universities would benefit
from the ability to predict academic performance and have used several
instruments to accomplish this task.
In the Philippines, some schools and universities have experienced
the closure of some program offerings ordered by the Commission on Higher
Education (CHED) because of poor performance of their graduates in the
licensure examinations. Most of them do not meet the national passing rate
for several consecutive years or do not even produce board passers. This
problem may be encountered but should not be ignored by schools and should
be addressed properly by making plans and formulate solutions.
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Planning is essential to good business management and planning, for


the future begins with forecasting or predicting as stated by Clauss (2000).
Schools may adopt this statement for it has organization that is making
business with its clientele, the students.
Developing a forecasting model that will predict the performance
rating of the examinee in the Licensure Examination can be considered longterm because some examinations are held once or twice a year. A longrange forecast is a combination of (1) mathematically projecting past trends
forward and (2) adjusting projections of past trends for anticipated changes in
the future. (Clauss, 2000)
Prediction or forecasts can help school administrators set goals, and to
achieve these goals, planning of the courses of action are next developed.
After these steps, there is monitoring and controlling to ensure that the goals
are achieved. The sequence is repeated over and over again and information
may change from time to time.
It is not only the institution that may benefit from the results of these
prediction but also the graduates. Prediction may help them in assessing and
improving their ability and capacity to analyze, think critically, and even
express ideas effectively. With this, even though success in examinations
depends more on the intellectual ability of the examinee, the effectiveness of
instruction and performance of a teacher are measured.
Grades serve as the reports of students educational status to parents,
future teachers and prospective employers. These provide a basis for
important decisions about educational plans and career options. Menecio
(2002) underscores this point, if the marks earned in a course of study are
made to represent the progress toward getting an education, working for
marks is ipso facto a furtherance of the purposes of education.
Balmeo (2003) referred to grade as concrete measure that quantifies
students level of learning. It also presents a clear picture on how far
students performance and achievement have reached a required standard. If
these grades are insignificant factors of success, something is wrong with the
institutional program or with the assessment of students learning. It is for
this very reason that the researchers are extremely interested in determining
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whether the grades in general education, professional education and


specialization subjects taken by the graduates can predict their performance in
the LET.
In the study of Valencia (2000), it was concluded that the higher the
grades of the students, the better their performance in mathematics and
science.
According to Mangaliman (2001), the Philippines ranked 43rd among
the 45 countries in terms of knowledge in Mathematics in the Asia Pacific
Region during an International Mathematics and Science Testing. The result
would imply that mastery of a teacher in the discipline must be achieved to
improve students performance.
This study was based on results of data gathered and analyzed to
enable the school concerned to take the necessary actions geared toward the
improvement of the examinees performance in the Licensure Examination.
The possession of a general education with adequate technical knowledge and
the ability to apply such knowledge with reason and logic are prerequisites for
success in taking major examinations.
Peckley (2000) found a fair level of performance in the Criminology
board examination in the different subjects but an average over-all
performance of the criminology graduates of University of Baguio. He
concluded that there exists a high level of correlation between academic
performance of University of Baguio students to their performance in the
Criminology board subjects, and a moderate correlation between academic
performance and the over-all performance in the board examination.
In a parallel study conducted by Caseldo (2008), the findings showed
that in terms of the level of academic performance of the BSEd-mathematics;
the graduates performed better in professional education and general
education with above average performance as compared to the average
performance in major subjects and the over-all academic average of the
graduates was above average. Moreover, when it comes to the level of
performance of the BSEd-mathematics graduates in the LET, the graduates
registered the highest academic performance in professional education and
least in major amongst the three subtests. On the other hand, the correlation
of the grades in the academic subjects and the ratings in the LET showed that
there exist a positive high and significant correlation between the academic
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grades of the graduates in major subjects and that of the rating in the LET
subtest, major. Likewise, the predictive values of the academic subjects on
the LET resulted that the over-all academic average strongly predicts the
over-all average of the LET.
Taken singly, the results were as follows: professional education
exhibited the best predictive ability in relation to the general education and
professional education components of the LET while major had the highest
predictive ability in relation to the major component of the LET. Further,
major had the greatest predictive ability in relation to the over-all rating of the
graduates in the LET. Taken in combination, the results showed that the
academic subjects, major and professional education had the best predictive
ability in relation to the over-all rating of the graduates in the LET.
As cited by Dante, Gozar (2000) offered a straightforward note that
the academic performance of the students is an index of the teachers teaching
ability as well as their teaching success, that a failure of a student is not of a
failure of him alone but failure of all those involved in the educative process.
Menecio (2002) found that there was a positive relation between the
level of academic performance and performance in the board examination of
Medical Technologies of the University of Baguio examinees. It was also
found out in the study that there existed a high level of correlation between
academic performance of University of Baguio students to their performance
in the major subjects and a moderate correlation between academic
performance and the overall performance in the Board Examination.
On the other hand, Antijendra (2002) in his masters thesis found out
that the computed r of 0.20 indicates a positive low correlation. This means
that there is a direct relationship between academic rating and NSAT
percentile rank in Filipino. As a whole, the computed r for the over-all
academic rating and the over-all NSAT percentile rank is 0.64, which
indicates a moderately high correlation. The results generalized that a student
with high academic rating tends to rank high in NSAT.
Arals (2003), study of the ECE graduates of RTU, showed that the
respondents excelled in communications engineering subjects but they
performed best in electronic engineering subjects. He established that the
academic subjects significant in forecasting the examinees performance rating
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in the ECE licensure examinations were: Mathematics, Electronics


Engineering and Communications Engineering. All were significant at
p<0.05.
In relation to the above studies, the present study would like to
determine the best predictor among the General Education, Professional
Education and Specialization. Its purpose is also to determine the predictive
value of the grades obtained in these subjects to the LET performance. This
study will help administrators evaluate how effective their admission and
retention policy is, and to know if some guidelines need to be revised for strict
implementation, ensuring a greater percentage of passing in the LET.

Methodology
The researchers employed the ex post facto research method or causal
comparative method since they analyzed existing documents pertaining to the
academic performance and the teacher education graduates in LET ratings
from 2009 to 2011. According to Gay (1976), ex post facto means from after
the fact, a study in, which the researcher attempts to determine the cause, or
reason, for existing differences in the behavior or status of groups of
individuals.
Kerlinger (1973) also defines ex post facto as systematic empirical
inquiry in which the scientist does not have direct control of independent
variables because their manifestations have already occurred or because they
are inherently not manipulative. Inferences about relations among variables
are made without direct intervention from concomitant variation of
independent and dependent variables.
Correlational method was also used in finding the degree of
relationship of the graduates performance in general education, professional
education, and specialization subjects to their performance in the Licensure
Examination for teachers. The method was treated as the foundational
structure for prediction. Borg (1983) said that predictions through the use of
correlational techniques are based on the assumption that at least some of the
factors that lead to the behavior to be predicted are present and measurable at
the same time the prediction was made.

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Population of the Study


The population of the study included a total of 343 teacher education
graduates of RTU who passed the Licensure Examination for teachers from
October 2009 to September 2011, for a period of three years.
For the purpose of having consistency and uniformity in determining
the academic performance, only those graduates who were admitted in the
main campus of the University from year 2005 and whose grades were
complete were included in the study.
Table 4 shows the population of the study who are the teacher
education graduates who passed the LET from 2009 to 2011. There are 227
teacher education graduates who passed the LET for the duration covered by
the study.
Table 4. Population of the Study
Batch
2009
2010
2011
TOTAL

No. of Passers
87
90
50
227

Percent
38.0
40.0
22.0
100.0

Out of 227, 87 or 38 percent passed the LET in 2009, while 90 or 40


percent passed the LET in 2010, and only 50 or 22 percent passed in 2011.
Description of the Respondents
Table 5. Gender of Respondents
Sex
Male
Female
Total

Frequency
52
175
227

Percent
23.0
77.0
100.0

Table 5 shows the frequency distribution of the respondents according


to their gender. The female with a frequency of 175 or 77 percent

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outnumbered the male respondents with a frequency of 52 or 23 percent. This


only shows that the teacher education program is attractive to female students.
Table 6 presents the distribution of respondents according to their
area of specialization. Based on the table, majority of the students who passed
the LET are English majors with a frequency of 69 or 30 percent. It is
followed by the Social Studies majors with 53 or 23 percent, while
Mathematics majors account for 39 or 17 percent.
The specialization with the least number of students who took the
LET is the Computer Education major, with a frequency of 8 or 4.0 percent. It
is followed by the Science majors with 25 or 11 percent.
Table 6. Specialization of Respondents
Specialization
Computer Education
English
Filipino
Math
Science
Social Studies
Total

Frequency
8
69
34
39
25
52
227

Total
4.0
30.0
15.0
17.0
11.0
23.0
100.0

For the purpose of providing qualitative description on the level of


performance of the respondents both on the academic and LET, the scale that
is being applied in the university was adopted. This is shown in the Table 7.
Table 7. RTU Grading System
Percentage Equivalent
97 100
94 96
91 93
88 90
85 87
83 84
80 82
78 79

RTU Rating System


1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00
2.25
2.50
2.75
19

Descriptive Rating
Excellent
Very Good
Very Good
Good
Good
Fair
Fair
Passing

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75 77
Below 75

3.00
Below 3.00

Passing
Poor

Data Gathering Procedure


The documentary analysis technique was the main tool in gathering
the required data in this study. Data on the academic performance of the
graduates were obtained from the database of the Management Information
Center (MIC) of RTU.
As regards to the Licensure Examination for Teachers results, the data
were acquired from the master list of examinees with their corresponding
performance rating at the Deans office as certified by the Professional
Regulation Commission (PRC).
Statistical Treatment of Data
The following statistical tools were used in the presentation,
interpretation and analysis of data:
Frequency was used in the counting of data gathered
Percentage was used to determine the relative distribution of the
categorical responses.
General Weighted Average (GWA) was used as a numerical index
denoting the level of academic performance of the graduates in general
education, professional education, and specialization subjects.
GWA =
where:

(G x W )
N

G = subject grade
W = number of units per subject
N = total number of units

Pearson Product-Moment Correlation or Pearson r was used to


determine the strength or magnitude of relationship between two variables
such as: a) Academic average grades in the three areas and the ratings in the
subtests of the Licensure Examination for Teachers, b) Academic average
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grades in the three areas and the overall rating in the Licensure Examination
for Teachers, and c) Overall average in the academic subjects and the overall
rating in the Licensure Examination for Teachers. The formula is expressed
as:

where: N = the total number of observation


N = the sum of the data of the independent variable
Y = the sum of the data of the dependent variable
XY = the sum of the product of the independent
and dependent variable
X2 = the sum of the squared values of the
independent variable
Y2 = the sum of the squared values of the
dependent variable
The range of values for the correlation coefficient shown below was
used to interpret the degree of strength of linear relationship (Best & Kahn,
1998)
Correlation Coefficient
0.00 0.20

Interpretation
Slight correlation, Almost
negligible relationship

0.21 0.40

Slightly high correlation, definite


but small relationship
Moderate correlation,
substantial relationship

0.41 0.60
0.61 0.80

High correlation,
marked relationship

0.81 1.00

Very high correlation, very


dependable relationship

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Multiple Regression Correlation is used to make predictions of the


performance of the graduates in the LET. The researchers considered their
academic performance as the predictor.(Freund and Simon, 1997)
Y = 0 + 1 X1 + 2 X2 + 3 X3 + 4 X4
LET Performance (Y) = 0 + 1 (general education) + 2 (professional
education) + 3 (specialization) + 4 (over-all GWA).
where:

0 = intercept or constant
1 = measure in change in the dependent variable
with respect to general education
2 = measure in change in the dependent variable
with respect to professional education
3 = measure in change in the dependent variable
with respect to specialization
4 = measure in change in the dependent variable
with respect to over-all GWA
X1 = predictor in general education
X 2 = predictor in professional education
X 3 = predictor in specialization
X 4 = predictor in over-all GWA

Results and Discussion


Problem No.1: What is the level of academic performance of the education
graduates along the following areas?
1.1 General Education
Table 8. Academic Performance of Education Graduates
in the General Education Subjects
General Education
Subject
Social Sciences
Mathematics
Science

Mean
1.93
2.4
2.05
22

Verbal
Interpretation
Good
Fair
Good

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Filipino
English
OVERALL

RTU ACADEMIC JOURNAL

2.06
2.16
2.12

Good
Good
Good

Table 8 shows the academic performance of the education graduates


in the general education component. Mathematics subject got the lowest mean
of 2.40 and interpreted as fair. However, for the rest of the general education
subject components, the performance of education graduates on these subjects
was interpreted as good since they got mean scores of 1.93 on Social
Sciences, 2.05 on Science, 2.06 on Filipino and 2.16 in English.
These ratings gave a 2.12 overall mean score and interpreted as good.
The result only proves that most of the students entering Teacher Education
courses belonged to the average level.
1.2 Professional Education
Table 9. Academic Performance of CED Students
in Professional Education Subjects
Professional Education Subject
EDUC1: Socio./Psycho./Anthro. Found
of Education
EDUC2: Hist., Philo. & Legal
Foundations of Education
EDUC3: Human Growth & Development
EDUC4: Guidance and Counseling
EDUC5: Introduction to Curriculum
Development
EDUC6: Qualitative Approaches to
Research
EDUC7: Quantitative Approaches to
Research
EDUC8: Educl& Preparation of Audio
Visual Materials
EDUC9: Tests, Measurement &
Evaluation
23

Mean

Verbal
Interpretation

1.73

Good

2.43

Fair

2.22
2.17

Fair
Good

2.06

Good

2.30

Fair

2.56

Fair

2.06

Good

2.36

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EDUC10: Principles & Methods of


Teaching
EDUC11: Professional Ethics
&Personality Devt.
EDUC12: Student Teaching In-Campus
EDUC13: Student Teaching Off-Campus
SEMINAR: Seminar in Education
OVERALL

2.04

Good

1.90

Good

1.90
1.62
2.43
2.13

Good
Good
Fair
Good

Table 9 reveals that education graduates are good in the subjects that
require application skills; the graduates got a highest mean score of 1.62 in
Student Teaching Off-Campus and followed by mean score of 1.73 in
Sociological, Psychological and Anthropological Foundations of Education.
The mean scores of Student Teaching In-Campus and Professional Ethics and
Personality Development was 1.90, Introduction to Curriculum and Guidance
Counseling have mean scores of 2.06 and 2.17, respectively, which are also
interpreted as good.
With reference to the remaining education subjects that require
memorization, logic, computation and analysis the education students showed
a fair performance. The students got a mean score of 2.56 in Quantitative
Approaches in Education and 2.43 in both Seminar in Education and Hist.,
Philo. & Legal Foundations of Education subjects. Test and Measurement,
Qualitative Approaches to Research and Human Growth and Development
got mean scores of 2.36, 2.30, and 2.22 respectively.
This re-affirms the result in Table 4 that most education students are
not good in computation. This also implies that the graduates of education are
noticeably good in expressing or showing their abilities.
1.3

Specialization

Table 10 shows the academic performance of the CED graduates in


their area of specialization.

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Table 10. Academic Performance of CED Students


in Specialization Subjects
Specialization Subject

Mean

Verbal Interpretation

Computer Education

2.02

Good

English

2.10

Good

Filipino

2.01

Good

Mathematics

1.90

Good

Science

2.05

Good

Social Studies

1.99

Good

Overall

2.01

Good

Table 10 presents the performance of CED graduates in their


specialization subjects. Evidently, students from different specialization
showed good performance in their major or specialized subjects. Students
specialized in Mathematics got the highest mean score of 1.90, followed by
Social Studies students with a mean score of 1.99. Next are the students
specializing in Filipino with 2.01, followed by Computer Education, Science
and English with mean scores of 2.02, 2.05 and 2.10 respective, of which are
verbally interpreted as good. This finding affirms the study made by Aragon
(2012) that education graduates achieved grades comparable to an above
average performance and opposes the claim in the article of Manila Bulletin
(2000) that the subject specialization in preparation of teachers is weak.
Nevertheless, the researchers are not slashing out the fact that there are
professors who are lenient in giving grades that may affirm the claim of US
Department of Education (2007), that is is not possible to fully remove
subjectivity on the part of the professors for it is part of traditional teaching
methods (Aragon, 2012).
All the same, this study confirmed the recent studies made about the
performance of Teacher Education students on their specialization subjects.
Likewise, lhebuzor in 2004 stated that a student who devotes more time to
particular aspects of his / her training is bound to do well in those aspects.
This explanation assumes greater plausibility in the light of subjectivity of
teachers.
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1.4 Grade Point Average in College

Specialization

Overall

Good

Professional
Education

SY 2005 - 2006 to
2008 - 2009
SY 2006 - 2007 to
2009 - 2010
SY 2007 - 2008 to
2010 - 2011

General
Education

Academic Year

Verbal
Interpretation

Table 11. Overall Academic Performance of the Education Graduates

General
Weighted
Average

2.14

2.12

2.03

2.09

2.12

2.27

2.02

2.14

2.09

2.01

1.99

2.03

Good

2.12

2.13

2.01

2.09

Good

Good

Table 11 shows the overall academic performance of the education


graduates through their obtained general weighted averages.
Conspicuously, the entry level of year 2006 showed a slightly better
performance in the three component subjects of their curriculum as this group
obtained a mean score of 2.14. On the other hand, the entry level of 2005 and
2007 got a mean score of 2.09 and 2.03 respectively.
This is an indication that all graduates achieved grades comparable to
an above average level of performance. This also implies that apparently the
respondents were able to balance their school work because they obtained the
same level of academic rating in the three subject areas.
Problem No. 2: What is the level of performance in the Licensure
Examination of Education graduates in the following areas?
2.1 General Education
Table 12 shows the performance of education graduates in the
Licensure Examination for Teachers under the General Education component.

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Table 12. Education Graduates Performance in General Education


Component of the Licensure Examination for Teachers (LET)
Rating
1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00
2.25
2.50
2.75
3.00
Less than 3.00

Level
Excellent
Very Good
Very Good
Good
Good
Fair
Fair
Passing
Passing
Failed

TOTAL

Mean

Frequency

Percentage

12
35
54
94
32
227
3.1

5.29
15.42
23.79
41.41
14.10
100.00
Failed

It can be gleaned from the table that the student graduates of CED
failed in the General Education component of the LET. Out of the 227 takers,
only 12 scored a rating of 2.25 and interpreted as fair, which is only 5.29
percent of the distribution also interpreted as fair in the score of the 35 takers
whose scores fall under the rating 2.50 and the remaining percentage of the
distribution obtained passing and failed marks. Almost 65 percent of the
distribution obtained a passing score while 14.10 percent obtained a failed
rating on this category.
The failed result of this can be attributed to the fact that the contents
of this LET component were taken by the students during their first two years
in the university.

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2.2 Professional Education


Table 13. Education Graduates Performance in Professional Education
of the Licensure Examination for Teachers (LET)
Rating

Level

Frequency Percentage

1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00

Excellent
Very Good
Very Good
Good
Good

10

4.41

2.25

Fair

17

7.49

2.50

Fair

70

30.84

2.75

Passing

60

26.43

3.00

Passing

60

26.43

Less than 3.00

Failed

10

4.41

TOTAL

227

100.00

Mean

2.77

Fair

Table 13 shows the performance of the student graduates in the


Professional Education of the Licensure Examination for Teachers.
It can be gleaned from the table that out of 227 respondents, 70
scored a rating of 2.50 and classified under the level of fair. Unlike in the
General Education component, 10 out of 227 respondents scored a rating of
2.00 or a level of Good. On the other hand, in spite of a good performance on
this LET component, there are still 10 takers who failed. Nevertheless, the
CED graduates have an improved performance on this category as it obtained
a mean score of 2.76 and can be interpreted as fair.
This result can be attributed to what the students who learned on their
professional education subjects are being put into practice in their In-campus
and Off-campus teaching subjects. This likewise confirms the philosophy of
Progressivism by John Dewey, which states there is no better way to
understand a thing than interacting with it.
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2.3 Specialization
Table 14. Education Graduates Performance
in Specialization Component of LET
Rating

Level

Frequency Percentage

Excellent

1.25

Very Good

1.5

Very Good

1.75

Good

0.44

Good

2.20

2.25

Fair

14

6.17

2.5

Fair

43

18.94

2.75

Passing

61

26.87

Passing

71

31.28

Less than 3.00

Failed

32

14.10

TOTAL

227

100

Mean

3.05

Failed

Table 14 shows the performance of CED graduates in their


specialization subjects. Most of the respondents obtained a rating of 3.00 and
2.75 and interpreted as passing. Only one or only 0.44 percent in the
distribution obtained a score of 1.75 which is interpreted as good. Likewise,
interpreted as good are the scores of the 5 takers who obtained a score of 2,
and the 14.10 percent of the distribution obtained failing grades. The extreme
of distribution of scores resulted in a pull down of mean scores of CED
graduates on this component, which resulted to a failed interpretation.
This result implies the mismatch of the learning content prescribed by
CHED for the specialization of the teacher education curriculum and the table
of specification of the Board Exam for Teachers released by the Professional
Regulation Commission (PRC).

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2.4 Overall Average


Table 15 presents the overall performance of the CED graduates in
the Licensure Examination for Teachers.
Table 15. Education Graduates Performance in LET
Rating

Level

Frequency Percentage

Excellent

1.25

Very Good

1.5

Very Good

1.75

Good

Good

2.20

2.25

Fair

2.64

2.5

Fair

47

20.70

2.75

Passing

65

28.63

Passing

104

45.81

Less than 3.00

Failed

0.00

TOTAL

227

100

Mean

2.78

Passing

The result implies that in spite of the very good passing percentage of
the College compared to the National Passing Percentage, the scores of
students in the said examination are still in the boundary of passing as shown
in its mean of 2.78. The result can also be attributed to the pull down effect of
scores because of the lower scores obtained in the General Education and
Professional Education components.
The result also shows that the mean score did not meet the standard
passing rate of at least 75% in the overall rating, contrasting with the
academic performance rating of the respondents. It can be observed that even
though respondents academically excelled in the three subject areas including
the overall GWA, it did not show on their rating on the board examination,
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thus there is no consistency in the academic and licensure examination


performance.
This is contradictory to the study of Peckley (2000) as mentioned in
the study of Aragon (2012), where a fair level of performance in the
Criminology board examination in the different subjects was obtained but an
average over-all performance of the criminology graduates of the University.
Problem No. 3 What is the degree of relationship between the academic
grades (X) and the ratings in the subtests of the LET (Y)?
The results of the Licensure Examination reflect the foundation and
internal efficiency of the educational system that provided training prior to the
board examination.
3.1.a. General Education

(Y1)

Table 16 shows the correlation between the academic grades and the
rating in the LET subtest, general education.
Table 16. Correlation of Academic Grades in the Three Areas and the
Ratings in the Subtests of LET, General Education
Academic
Performance
(X)

Pearson
r

General Education

0.172

Professional
Education

0.172

Specialization

0.078

Verbal
Interpretation
Slight
correlation
Slight
correlation
Slight
correlation

pvalue
0.0047
0.0047
0.121

Interpretation
With linear
relationship
With linear
relationship
No linear
relationship

As shown in the table, all computed correlations, r = 0.172 for general


education and general education, r = 0.172 for professional education and
general education, and r = 0.078 for specialization and general education
indicate slight correlations. The general education and professional education
registered a p-value of 0.0047 which is lower than 0.05. Hence, it is indicative
that there is a linear relationship with the general education subtest of LET.
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No linear relationship was established between the specialization and


general education, since the obtained p-value = 0.121 is greater than 0.05.
3.1.b. Professional Education (Y2)
Table 17 reveals the correlation between the academic grades of the
respondents and the rating in the LET subtest, professional education.
Table 17. Correlation of Academic Grades in the Three Areas and
Ratings in the Subtests of LET, Professional Education
Academic
Performance
(X)
General
Education
Professional
Education
Specialization

Pearson
r
0.244
0.122
0

Verbal
Interpretation
Slight high
correlation
Slight
correlation
No correlation

p-value
0.0001
0.033
0.5

Interpretation
With linear
relationship
With linear
relationship
No linear
relationship

It can be seen from the table that there is a slight high correlation
between the general education and the professional education as indicated by r
= 0.244 and p value of 0.0001 which is less than 0.05, hence, an indication of
positive relationship.
However, in terms of specialization, no correlation exist with the
professional education, r = 0, and no linear relationship with p-value of 0.5.
3.1.c. Specialization (Y3)
The relationship between the academic grades of the respondents and
their rating in the LET is shown in Table 18.

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Table 18. Correlation of Academic Grades in the Three Areas and the
Ratings in the Subtests of LET, Specialization
Academic
Performance
(X)
General
Education
Professional
Education
Specialization

Pearson
r

Verbal
Interpretation

p-value

0.086

Slight
correlation

0.0098

No correlation

0.5

-0.141

Slight
correlation

0.0169

Interpretation
With linear
relationship
No linear
relationship
With linear
relationship

As can be gleaned from the table, there is a slight correlation between


the general education and the specialization, with r = 0.086 and a p-value of
0.0098 which is less than 0.05. This indicates that there is a linear relationship
between the general education and the specialization.
3.2

Academic average grades in the three areas and the overall


rating in the Licensure Examination for Teachers

Table 19. Correlation of Academic Average Grades in the


Three Areas and the Overall Rating in LET
Academic
Performance
(X)
General
Education
Professional
Education
Specialization

Pearson
r
0.417
0.208
0.189

Verbal
Interpretation
Moderate
correlation
Slight high
correlation
Slight
correlation

p-value
2.89 x 10-11

0.000813
0.00213

Interpretation
With linear
relationship
With linear
relationship
With linear
relationship

The table shows the correlation between the overall rating in the LET
and General Education with r = 0.417, which indicates moderate correlation,
while the correlation between Professional Education and overall, and
Specialization and overall with r = 0.208 and r = -0.189, respectively, indicate
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slight correlation. There is a linear relationship between the three academic


subjects and the overall rating of LET.
3.3

Overall average in the academic subjects and the overall


rating in the Licensure Examination for Teachers.

Table 20 presents the relationship between the overall academic


average and the overall rating in the LET.
Table 20. Correlation of the Overall Average in the
Academic Subjects and the Overall Rating in LET
Academic
Performance
(X)

Pearson
r

GWA

0.481

Verbal
Interpretation
Moderate
correlation

p-value

Interpretation

7.582 x 10-15

With linear
relationship

The overall academic average correlates moderately to the LET


overall rating indicating a direct substantial relationship. This means that the
better the performance of the graduates in the college academic subjects, the
better are their performance in the overall rating of LET.
The computed value of r = 0.481 establishes a linear relationship such
that a significant number of high general average in the academic subjects
corresponds to a significant number of high overall ratings in the LET.
The present findings that the academic average correlates positively
with the LET ratings coincide with the findings of Menecio (2002) where the
academic performance of accounting graduates of St. Louis University had a
positive relationship in the CPA board examination.
Balmeo (2003) referred to grade as concrete measure that quantifies
students level of learning. It also presents a clear picture on how far
students performance and achievement have reached a required standard. In
the study of Valencia (2000), it was concluded that the higher the grades of
the students the better their performance in mathematics and science.

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The hypothesis that the overall academic performance of the


graduates, which is composed of the performance in the general education,
professional education and specialization has a moderate correlation with the
LET overall rating is confirmed.
Problem No.4: What can best predict the education graduates performance
in the Licensure Examination for Teachers?
Table 21 shows the predictors which may affect the performance of
the education graduates in the Licensure Examination for Teachers.
Table 21. The Multiple Regression Analysis on the Predictors
of Education Graduates Performance in the Licensure
Examination for Teachers
VARIABLES

General Education
Grades
Professional
Education Grades
Specialization Grades
General Weighted
Average
R = .05
R2 = .002

BETA

T-VALUE

SIGNIFICANCE

.098

.071

.943

.169

.114

.909

.077

.052

.958

-.267

-.073

.942

F Ratio = .346 Constant = 2.716

It can be gleaned from the table that the set of predictors for the
performance in the LET has a very weak relationship to the performance of
the students in the said exam, as the computed R value is only .05. On the
other hand, when squaring the R value, it enables the researchers to determine
the amount of variation of the dependent variable from the set of predictors
wherein the computed R2 is only .002. Thus, it shows that there is only .2%
of the variation of Licensure Examination performance that could be
accounted for through the combined linear effects of the predictor variables.
Based on the value of R Square which is .002, the variables when
taken together, account for only .2 percent of the variance in the performance
of the graduates in the LET. The remaining percentage can be attributed to
other factors which are not used as predictors in this study such as the
programs on the review of the College, students physical, emotional and
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mental conditions, the financial capability of the students family and family
background.
In spite of the very weak relationship, the computed coefficient still
gives a positive interpretation. It can be gleaned from the data below the table
that the beta score for the overall academic performance is -.267, which
means that in every one unit increase in this predictor (overall academic
performance) there will be a 2.67 increase in the overall Licensure
Examination Performance for Teachers. This might be confusing because of
the negative computed score that usually entails decrease effects, which are
not applicable with the scoring of this research where it uses the usual grading
system used in the tertiary where the lower the value the higher the grade.
Because all these predictors are more than the .05 level of
significance, the given predictors cannot be considered as predictors in
passing the LET.
These findings do not support the study by Rubio (1992), when she
stated that academic performance significantly relates with the Nursing
Licensure Examination performance. However, the results of the study
conform with the findings of Martinez, et.al. (1980), in the existence of a
correlation between academic achievement and their performance in the
Licensure Examination, hence, this study supports his claim that the academic
achievement is a good predictor of performance in the board exam. The study
shows that there will be an increase in the board exam performance in a unit
increase in the students academic performance based on the computed
coefficient value for academic performance.
On the other hand, the findings revealed in this study were supported
by the study of Aragon (2012), which indicates that a very good performance
in the academic subjects does not guarantee a passing performance in the
teachers board exam.

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Summary of Findings
The following are the findings of this study:
1. The entry level of year 2006 showed a slightly better performance in
the three component subjects of their curriculum as this group
obtained a mean score of 2.14. On the other, the entry level of 2005
and 2007 got a mean score of 2.09 and 2.03 respectively.
2. The result shows that the mean score did not meet the standard
passing rate of at least 75% in the overall rating, in contrast with the
academic performance rating of the respondents.
3. The computed value of r = 0.481 establishes a linear relationship such
that a significant number of high general average in the academic
subjects corresponds to a significant number of high overall ratings in
the LET.
4. The set of predictors for the performance in the Licensure
Examination for Teachers have a very weak relationship to the
performance of the students in the said exam, as the computed R
value is only .05. While the computed coefficient gives a positive
interpretation, it can be gleaned from the data the beta score for the
overall academic performance is -.26700 and all the p-value for the
set of predictors are more than .05 level of significance.

Conclusion
Based on the aforementioned findings, the following conclusions are
drawn:
1. The College of Education graduates in general education, professional
education, specialization and overall general weighted average are all
good that is comparable to above average level of performance.
2. The rating of the Teacher Education graduates in the Licensure
Examination for Teachers failed in both General Education and
Specialization and a fair performance in the professional education
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received a passing mark in the overall General Weighted Average in


the board exam.
3. The academic performance of the graduates has a slight positive
influence on their performance in the LET.
4. The academic performance of the students is not a predictor of the
LET performance rating.

Recommendations
Based on the conclusions, the following recommendations are
forwarded:
1. Since the Teacher Education Curriculum is more of memorization of
theory, the Teacher Education Institution should provide
supplemental activities which will allow the students to apply the
theories learned in actual situation.
2. The students have to establish good study and working habits, which
can be achieved by providing them with seminars along these aspects.
3. Considering the education graduates rating in the board examination,
the school administrators should make an evaluation of the course
syllabi as per PRC specification. They must also review the sequence
and balance of the course content. Likewise, they should continue to
conduct comprehensive pre-board and review seminar.
4. Since the academic performance does not predict the performance in
a board examination, teachers must be aware on the content of the
teacher education board exams prescribed by CHED and PRC. Also
they r must be strict and objective in giving grades.
5. A comprehensive examination has to be given on the students final
year to determine their strengths and weaknesses.

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6. The University has to look into the implementation of the selective


and retention policy for students who would like to take teacher
education courses.

7. Further research and studies may be conducted using different


predictors such as qualifications of faculty and methods or strategies
of teaching used which are factors that contribute to the examinees
academic and LET performance.

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