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Entrepreneurship

minor description-fulltime version


2014-2015

Responsibilities for the minor


Responsible Course manager:
Responsible Coordinator:
Responsible Board of examiners:
School / AUAS

John O. Sterk
Anoesjka N. Timmermans

International Business and Management Studies,

HvA International Business

Approval
This Minor description, including minor-OER is to be confirmed by the Dean of the HvA International Business School / AUAS dated
May/June 2014 after having received approval of the Board of examiners, the Education & Quality Department (O&K) and
approved by the Advisory Board (DMR)

HvA School of Economics and Management/HES all rights remain with the owner. It is forbidden to multiply, publish, copy or
store anything from this document, either partly or totally in what form or whatsoever without prior consent of HvA School of
Economics and Management/HES.

Part 1 Minor description


1 Brief description of objectives and content of the minor.
The mission of the Minor Entrepreneurship is to inspire students to create or identify and exploit their own chances and
opportunities in business and (self)employment, by training, stimulating, facilitating and appreciating Entrepreneurial knowledge,
skills and behavior.
Companies find themselves continually redefining their markets, restructuring their operations, and modifying their business
models as a result of the high rate of market dynamism that characterizes the 21 st century. Whereas companies used to be able
to rely on relatively sustainable competitive advantages in the 20 th century, the rules of the competitive game are changing so
fast, that the previously considered advantages are fleeting, with many consequences to going concern and staffing. Risk
averseness by means of short-term labour contracting leads to a higher demand for a flexible work-force and hence demands
more entrepreneurial skills, spotting or creating (self) employment opportunities.
What keeps leading companies in the lead is constant innovation.
Innovation is a trait of creative, entrepreneurial people, in equally creative and entrepreneurial companies, regardless whether
start up enterprises or multinational corporations. Entrepreneurship refers to daring to see beyond what others have seen, risking
to invest in something that might look ludicrous at the time of developing or could potentially disrupt the current business of the
company or even entire industry.
The minor Entrepreneurship centres around the concept of creating innovative business concepts with various stakeholders, the
so called co-creative business development methods, that provide opportunities to start or grow a business.
You will discover what (corporate) entrepreneurship entails and what makes entrepreneurial companies stand out in the
competitive arena of todays global business environment.
During the minor you will experiment with various methods to create a new business, from concept development to business
modelling and formal business planning, using traditional and new methods for business creation and development, such as
Design Thinking, Ideation, Effectuation and the Business Model Generation Canvas.
The entrepreneurial process of generating and implementing new business ideas will be placed in the contexts of small- and
medium sized enterprises as well as international and multinational corporations. All with an international scope.
As entrepreneurship, large or small scale, encompasses multiple disciplines, all are included in the minor. From a Management &
Organisational perspective you will be familiarized with the complexities of human functioning in organizations and how to apply
the toolkit that theory offers to deal with these complex problems. Since starting a new venture, whether within an existing
corporate structure or a new business, requires and earns money, the module Financial Management will provide you with the
proper tools for financial planning and analysis of new business activities.
No business exists without customers, the most important stakeholders in any venture. To prepare you for the toughest situations
in the commercial process, you will gain real-time experience with preparing and conducting commercial negotiations in the
module Sales Negotiation.
Finally no new business can be created without understanding how innovation comes to being. The modules contemporary
entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial skills and behaviour will help you find and develop your own personal creative and
innovative competencies, identify means and opportunities to make creation and innovation happen in small-, medium sized and
large corporate environments and implement methods to sustain innovation in corporate settings.
2 Description of the relation of the minor to the HvA-profile
The minor is connected with the HvA-profile in the three areas of:
(a) Industry and entrepreneurship in a metropolitan context: by preparing students for entrepreneurship as a start-up
entrepreneur or as a corporate entrepreneur.
(b) Entrepreneurship, innovation and the knowledge economy: The minor Entrepreneurship centres around the concept of
creating innovative business concepts with various stakeholders, the so called co-creative business development methods, that
provide opportunities to start or grow a business.
3 Description of the relation of the minor to the Professional/Programme profile
The minor is both of a profound or broad nature and as well exceeds the final terms of the Programme profile. The department of
Commercial Economics of the School of Economics and Management, has mentioned in her vision document six main themes, of
which the minor CCBS covers two: (i) international ambition and (ii) multicultural. This document also includes two vision
paragraphs on (1) International Orientation and (2) an integration of theory and practice. The first speaks for itself when called
Cross-Cultural Business Skills, but also the second concept is fully integrated in this minor through the engaging concept of socalled self-regulating streams. In fact the European Association of International Education has invited us to present our approach
on her yearly conference. Also both the educational magazine Transfer (Nuffic), as well as Folia Magazine has reported three
times each on it.
For the rest the minor CCBS relates to the Dutch Higher Education end qualifications of the IBMS/IBL programme. The subjects
furthermore relate to the Dublin descriptors through the IBMS/IBL end qualifications.
4 Minor learning plan scheme for block 1 and block 2
Below is an overview of the educational units of the minor, the followed teaching and testing method, the number of
ECs and the number of contact hours measured per individual course programme part (i.e.: not per week).
But the total average number of contact hours per week is 16 hrs.

BLOCK -1
Minor Course programme parts

Teaching method

Testing / assignment type

Fundamentals in Entrepreneurship

Lecture & Project

Written exam &

Accreditation description minor Entrepreneurship

EC
s

contact hours
*
1,8
p. 2

Contemporary Entrepreneurship

Lecture & Workshops

Cases in Entrepreneurship

Lecture

Managing Entrepreneurship &


Innovation

Lecture

Entrepreneurial Skills & Behaviour

Lecture & Workshops

Financial Management

Lecture

Minor Course programme parts

Teaching method

Fundamentals in Entrepreneurship

Lecture & Project

Contemporary Entrepreneurship

Lecture & Workshops

Cases in Entrepreneurship

Lecture

Managing Entrepreneurship &


Innovation

Lecture

Entrepreneurial Skills & Behaviour

Lecture & Workshops

Financial Management

Lecture

Project Report
Assignments
Debates
Research Papers
Assignments
Written exam
Assessment, Assignment &
Oral Exam
Paragraph in BP
Written exam

1,8
1,8
1.8
1,8
1,8

BLOCK -2
Testing / assignment type
Written exam &
Project Report
Assignments
Debates
Research Papers
Assignments
Written exam
Assessment, Assignment &
Oral Exam
Paragraph in BP
Written exam

EC
s

contact hours
*

1,8

1,8

1,8

1.8

1,8

1,8

*
Contacthours are based on a 20 week lesson programme. Because this minor runs on a semester basis, the actual contacthours per week
are
1,8 = 3; 0,9=3 hrs half a semester.

Teaching method
This minor uses a mix of several learning methods: (i) classic lecturing (due to large amount of students
necessary often), (ii) out-of-school activities: we try to put students into contact with the outside
(professional) world, we therefore have designed activities that urge students to take up contact with
professionals around the world, such interviewing stakeholders in various industries, by organising inschool business contests for which students and representatives from the business world will be invited,
(iii) workshops and (iv) roleplay.
Attendance is not so much compulsory, as the delivering of good results is. Students are obliged to
hand in peer-review forms on team and task performance for all other team students.
5 Target group
This minor is meant for: HvA (Hogeschool van Amsterdam) full-time students, KOM (Kies-Op-Maat) full-time students,
HvA-exchange students, self-registered (paying) students from foreign non-HvA partner institutes.
6 Entry requirements
Specific entry requirements for this minor include successful completion of at least one module in the subjects marketing,
management and organisation and financial management. According to the study programme exam regulation, article 3.10 under
5: a student must have obtained her/his propaedeutics, as well as a minimum of forty (40) credits (ECs) from the mainphase of
the study. Therefore the intake-level is equal to European Qualifications Framwork (EQF) level 5, Associate Degree level.
Furthermore the intake-level is equal to the specific Croho-final level of the core-phase of a course.
7 Facilities and other conditions
Students need to be able to log-in to the course website, and be able to co-author the different writings. For some elective
assignments a Skype or VoIP recording connection is required. The course itself needs a rather large class room (60 plus) for
workshop and crowd-coaching purposes.
8 Results (see also attachment 1)
The final result of the minor is the weighted average of the results of all the separate educational units.
The tests described in the matrix above, are only passed when the result is 5.5 or higher.
When assignments are carried out by duos or groups, the result will be a group mark, for the participating
individual students a peer-assessment needs to be filed by all team members.

Accreditation description minor Entrepreneurship

p. 3

Part 2 - Mini-OER
Minor Cross-Cultural Business Skills, Mini-OER 2014 2015
This Mini-OER contains essential basic information of the minor that is used for educational logistics
and internal and external communication. The information provided grants students educational rights
regarding this minor.
SIS-code

Educational unit

BLOCK -1
Teaching Method

6410ESP_TS
6410ESP_PJ
6410CEP_AS

Fundamentals in
Entrepreneurship
Contemporary Entrepreneurship

Lecture
Project
Lecture & Workshops

6410CIE_AS

Cases in Entrepreneurship

Lecture

6410MEI_AS
6410MEI_TS
6410ESB_T1
6410ESB_T2
6410ESB_T3
6410FIM_AS
6410FIM_TS

Managing Entrepreneurship &


Innovation

Lecture

Entrepreneurial Skills &


Behaviour

Lecture & Workshops

Financial Management

Lecture

Testing & assessment

ECs

contact hrs
p/w*

Written exam
Project Report
Assignments
Debates
Research Papers
Papers
Written exam
Assessment
Assignments
Oral Exam
Paragraph in BP
Written exam

1,8
1,8
1,8
1,8
1,8
1,8

Total ECs and contact hours:

10,8

SIS-code

Educational unit

BLOCK -2
Teaching Method

6410ESP_TS
6410ESP_PJ
6410CEP_AS

Fundamentals in
Entrepreneurship
Contemporary Entrepreneurship

Lecture
Project
Lecture & Workshops

6410CIE_AS

Cases in Entrepreneurship

Lecture

6410MEI_AS
6410MEI_TS
6410ESB_T1
6410ESB_T2
6410ESB_T3
6410FIM_AS
6410FIM_TS

Managing Entrepreneurship &


Innovation

Lecture

Entrepreneurial Skills &


Behaviour

Lecture & Workshops

Financial Management

Lecture

Total ECs and contact hours:

Testing & assessment


Written exam
Project Report
Assignments
Debates
Research Papers
Papers
Written exam
Assessment
Assignments
Oral Exam
Paragraph in BP
Written exam

ECs

contact hrs
p/w*

2
3
5
1
4
3
2
2
1,5
1,5
2
3
30

1,8
1,8
1,8
1,8
1,8
1,8
10,8

* Hours based on the 20 week system. Since the minor will be taught in a semester system, the hours correspond to: 1,8=3 hrs/week during a full
semester; 0,9= 3 hrs/week during half a semester

Accreditation description minor Entrepreneurship

p. 4

Part 3 Set of educational units of the minor


1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Name Educational unit of the minor


SIS code
Teacher(s)
Language
Number of ECs
Number of contact hours per week
distributed over 20 teaching weeks
Objective(s)

Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
To be assigned (6410ESP)
Vacant
English
5
1,8

Learning goals
Learning goals are formulated in can-dostatements

Content
Mention the subjects that are dealt with
(like table of contents in a study book)

10

Literature and other Study material


Mandatory and/or advised

11

Teaching method(s)

12

Testing method(s)

13

Number of tests and the connected


number of ECs

14

Specialties

Accreditation description minor Entrepreneurship

to learn about the entrepreneurial process and to draw up -on


paper- a commercially viable and financially well documented
Business Plan with a variety of scenarios, for stakeholders such
as potential venture (seed) capital financiers (and/or bankers).
Explain Entrepreneurship and discuss its importance
Explain the Entrepreneurial process and its various elements
Identify business opportunities
Carry out a feasibility study
Conduct an industry and market analysis
Construct a variety of effective business scenarios
Justify the proper ethical and legal foundation
Justify a (new) ventures financial needs, potential, strength and
viability
Starting a company
Recognizing Opportunities vs Creating Markets
Blue Ocean Strategy
Conducting a market & industry analysis
Conducting a market feasibility analysis
Marketing strategy & planning
Constructing business scenarios
Translating a business model into a business plan
Preparing the proper ethical and legal foundation
Assessing financial needs, potential, strength and
viability
Entrepreneurship; Successfully Launching new ventures by
Bruce R. Barringer & R. Duane Ireland, Pearson Education
Limited (2012), ISBN-13: 978-0-27-376140-2
Lectures
In class assignments
Project coaching
Guest lectures & Company visits
Business Concept Start document (5%)
Feasibility Analysis report (15%)
Business Plan including various Business Scenarios (40%)
Written exam (40%)
Feasibility Study Report: 1 EC (incl. start doc)
Business Plan:
2 EC
Written Exam
2 EC
Theme specialists

p. 5

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Name Educational unit of the minor


SIS code
Teacher(s)
Language
Number of ECs
Number of contact hours per week
distributed over 20 teaching weeks
Objective(s)

Learning goals
Learning goals are formulated in can-dostatements

Contemporary Entrepreneurship
To be assigned (suggestion: 6410CEP)
Vacant (Requested: Harriet Robijn)
English
5
1,8

10

Content
Mention the subjects that are dealt with
(like table of contents in a study book)

11

Literature and other Study material


Mandatory and/or advised
Teaching method(s)

12

Testing method(s)

13

Number of tests and the connected


number of ECs

14

Specialties

Accreditation description minor Entrepreneurship

Learning about Entrepreneurship through experimentation,


building upon the growing body of knowledge and insights in
successful entrepreneurship from the business and academic
world.
Explain the Entrepreneurial process and its various elements
Identify business opportunities
Create ideas, concepts and business models to exploit these
opportunities
Explain how the various aspect of business models relate to one
another
Generate novel, appropriate & viable business concepts
Examine the influence and possibilities of the infinity of
computing, the rise of digital information and digital
fabrication on the entrepreneurship
Develop web-based entrepreneurial activities (crowd-funding,
crowd-sourcing, open-sourcing, social media, etc) and
instruments to measure their success
The need for innovation Trends & Developments
Lean Start Up
Idea Generation
Design Thinking
Effectuation
Creating Value
Business Model Canvas
The Cloud, the Crowd and the Enterprise
Digital syllabus provided by lecturer(s) on DLWO
Lectures
In class workshops & assignments
Field Assignments
Guest lectures & Company visits
Professional products & Research paper
6 continuous assessment assignments: 1 EC
1 project assignment: 1EC
1 Research paper: 1EC
Guided Experience Based Learning

p. 6

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Name Educational unit of the minor


SIS code
Teacher(s)
Language
Number of ECs
Number of contact hours per week
distributed over 20 teaching weeks
Objective(s)
Learning goals
Learning goals are formulated in can-dostatements

Cases in Entrepreneurship
To be assigned (Suggestion: 6410CIE)
Vacant (requested: Anoesjka Timmermans Timan)
English
5
1,8

Content
Mention the subjects that are dealt with
(like table of contents in a study book)

10

Literature and other Study material


Mandatory and/or advised

11

Teaching method(s)

12

Testing method(s)

13

Number of tests and the connected


number of ECs
Specialities

14

Accreditation description minor Entrepreneurship

Critically discussing the success and failfactors in


Entrepreneurship, using research papers, Harvard business
review articles and case studies
Justify ones opinion based on proper academic research
Debate vision and viewpoint based on proper academic
research
Discuss the concept of value creation and its essence for a
business to be successful
Criticize the elements that make a successful entrepreneur(ial
manager)
Criticize the elements in a corporate culture that increase
entrepreneurial & innovative success
Explain what organisations require when adopting open
innovation
Discuss the benefits and disadvantages of the various
innovation models
Business Basics
Market Entry
Blue Ocean Strategies
Failure
Personal leadership & creativity in (corporate)
entrepreneurship
The entrepreneurial manager
Culture & Leadership in entrepreneurial MNCs
Innovation models (closed versus open) and their
impact on organizational structure, culture, systems and
management style
Digital syllabus provided by lecturer(s) on DLWO including
research papers, Harvard Business Review articles and Case
studies
Lectures
In class debates
Self study, research & writing
4 Debates (20%),
4 Research papers (80%)
4 Debates: 1 EC
4 Research papers: 4EC
Critically assessing and discussing research and business
publications and practices to broaden information acceptance
and appreciation and deepen understanding of themes covered.
Course in parallel with Cases in Entrepreneurship at UvA Minor
Entrepreneurship

p. 7

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Name Educational unit of the minor


SIS code
Teacher(s)
Language
Number of ECs
Number of contact hours per week
distributed over 20 teaching weeks
Objective(s)

Managing Entrepreneurship and Innovation


6410MAO
J.A.A. Kloosterman, D.M. Bout
English
5
1,8
To create alignment between the organizationational and
managerial building blocks of a company and its business
strategy.

Learning goals
Learning goals are formulated in can-dostatements

Assess the effectiveness of a business strategy in view of a


companies environment using contemporary theoretical
frameworks.
Identify the necessary key resources and capabilities to execute
a business strategy
Describe an organization structure with its departmentalization
approach, coordination mechanisms and job design
principles.
Align an organization structure with a companies strategy.
Explain employee motivation based on contemporary
motivation theories.
Identify leadership styles and leadership activities.
Align leadership style with business strategy and employee
motivation.
Create the right circumstances for effective teamwork.
Align organizational culture with the organizations strategy,
structure and leadership style
Manage the process of change in an organization or department
based on contemporary insights.

Content
Mention the subjects that are dealt with
(like table of contents in a study book)

The learning objectives are introduced through a


combination of lectures and self-study. Students write a
number of papers that show their mastery of the learning
objectives.

10
11

Literature and other Study material


Mandatory and/or advised
Teaching method(s)

12

Testing method(s)

13

Number of tests and the connected


number of ECs
Specialities

14

Accreditation description minor Entrepreneurship

Study materials consist of presentations and hand-outs in


addition to articles used for the papers.

Lectures

In class workshops & assignments

Guest lectures?
papers and written central exam
4 papers and 1 written exam; 5 ECs

p. 8

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Name Educational unit of the minor


SIS code
Teacher(s)
Language
Number of ECs
Number of contact hours per week
distributed over 20 teaching weeks
Objective(s)

Learning goals
Learning goals are formulated in can-dostatements

Content
Mention the subjects that are dealt with
(like table of contents in a study book)

10

Literature and other Study material


Mandatory and/or advised

Entrepreneurial Skills & Behaviour


To be assigned (Suggestion: 6410ESB)
F. Zwarthoed & M. van Buschbach
English
5
1,8
train and develop students entrepreneurial, commercial and
negotiating skills, and adopt a flexible approach to cultural
differences.
Sum up and describe the basic strategies, tactics and concepts
of negotiation theory
Recognize strategies and tactics used by himself and others
Validate the effect of cultural variables on communication
Identify and demonstrate various communication and
negotiation styles
Construct a plan of approach for a sales, procurement or
negotiation session
Demonstrate a professional approach during the negotiating
process

Primary Research Skills

Commercial Skills (Sales & Procurement)

Networking

Negotiating

Cross Cultural negotiation


Intercultural Business Communication
Chaney/Martin Prentice Hall 1995
ISBN 131860097
Its a deal
Steele/Murphy Russill McGraw-Hill 1989
ISNB 007709229-5

11

Teaching method(s)

12

Testing method(s)

13

Number of tests and the connected


number of ECs

14

Specialties

Accreditation description minor Entrepreneurship

Intercultural Sales Negotiations


various HES 2009
Lecture and workshop with role-play sessions
Assessments (Role Play and participation)
Written Reports
Oral Exam
Assessment:
(80% Attendance, 3-6 pop-quizzes, 3-6 preparation plans) 2EC
3 Written reports 1,5EC
1 Oral exam 1,5EC
Role Play

p. 9

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Name Educational unit of the minor


SIS code
Teacher(s)
Language
Number of ECs
Number of contact hours per week
distributed over 20 teaching weeks
Objective(s)

Learning goals
Learning goals are formulated in can-dostatements

Content
Mention the subjects that are dealt with
(like table of contents in a study book)

10

Literature and other Study material


Mandatory and/or advised

11

Teaching method(s)

12

Testing method(s)

13

Number of tests and the connected


number of ECs

Financial Management
6410FIM
J.A.A. Kloosterman / Eedaj
English
5
1,8
In the course, the student will learn the competencies needed
to develop the financial statements of a business plan and
judge the attractiveness of investing in a business. Furthermore,
the student will be able to make sound investment-, working
capital management-, cash management- and financing
decisions based on contemporary financial theories.
Prepare and analyse financial statements, including the cash
flow statement of a company and financial models
Use ratio-analysis and financial modelling to optimize the
working capital and cash position of a company
Calculate present values and future values of simple and
complex cash-flows such as annuities
Calculate the return and present and future values of an
investment
Calculate the risk and return of an investment portfolio
Calculate an investments required return using the capital
asset-pricing model and the security market line.
Describe the features of bonds, stocks and other financing
items, calculate their future and present value and their
expected return
Prepare a financial plan for a company including optimization of
working capital, financing structure and liquidity forecast.

Besides a general introduction to financial


management this course will give students a profound
knowledge of financial statements (Historical and Pro Forma),
including the meaning and usefulness of cash flow. Financial
forecasting and modelling will be a major part of this course.

Several aspects of shareholder value will be discussed


like, bond and stock valuation and the concept of time value
of money. An important issue in financial management is the
aspect of risk and its relationship with return. We will
introduce quantitative tools and methods to measure risk and
return.

Capital investments are analysed by using the net


present cash flow concept. A very important determinant of
this analysis is the cost of capital. Students will get an inside
in how the cost of capital is calculated and what its usage is
in modern financial management.
Principles of Managerial Finance - Global Edition
L.J. Gitman, C.J. Zutter
Pearson, 13th edition
ISBN: 978-0-273-75428-2
Lecture & self study
Financial Paragraph in Business Plan (MENT)
Written Exam
Financial Paragraph in Business Plan (MENT only) 2EC
Written Exam (MENT only) 3 EC

Attachment 1 From main text HvA Teaching and Examination Regulations (OER) 2013-3014
Article 5.3 Dates and frequency of examinations and tests
1. Two opportunities to take the foundation year examinations and tests will be offered every academic year, with the first
immediately following the conclusion of the unit of study concerned.
2. Two opportunities to take the post-foundation year examinations and tests will be offered every academic year, with one of
these immediately following the conclusion of the unit of study concerned.
3. etc

Article 5.9 Standardisation of assessments


1. Examination or test assessment results are expressed as one of the following:
Accreditation description minor Entrepreneurship

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2. a grade on a scale of 1 to 10, with a maximum of one decimal point, in which grade 1 or 1.0 stands for very poor, grade 2 for
poor, grade 3 for highly unsatisfactory/very unsatisfactory, grade 4 for unsatisfactory, grade 5 for slightly
unsatisfactory/fair/weak, grade 6 for satisfactory, grade 7 for quite satisfactory, grade 8 for good, grade 9 for very
good and grade 10 for outstanding/excellent.
3. The final assessment of a minor is expressed as a whole grade on a scale of 1 to 10, in which grade 1 or 1.0 stands for very
poor, grade 2 for poor, grade 3 for highly unsatisfactory/very unsatisfactory, grade 4 for unsatisfactory, grade 5 for
slightly unsatisfactory/fair/weak, grade 6 for satisfactory, grade 7 for quite satisfactory, grade 8 for good, grade 9 for
very good and grade 10 for outstanding/excellent.
4. Rounding off to arrive at a whole number or a number with one decimal point must be performed in accordance with the
ordinary rules of calculation. Accordingly, decimals higher than 500 are rounded upward and decimals lower than 500 are
rounded downward.
5. A students assessment result is deemed satisfactory where the grade allocated is 5.5 or higher.
6. If a student resits a test, the highest of the grades obtained determines whether he/she has met the requirements

Accreditation description minor Entrepreneurship

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