Você está na página 1de 10

labelling theory

Social constructionism and Labelling 

A development in philosophy / sociological theory which became popular 
after the 2nd World War esp in U.S.A. 
(see Chicago School) 

Rejection of ; 
Positivism (and empiricism) 

Structuralism 

Determinism 

Celebration of ; 
The conscious individual. 

The importance of meaning. 

The social construction of reality. 

The processes of interaction between individuals in the construction of 
meaning. 

“ Society consists of people responding to and negotiating over symbols” 

“ If people define situations as real they are in their consequences” 

In the Sociology of Deviance this represents a challenge to the dominant ( 
positivist ) paradigm which sees deviant behaviour as clearly defined, 
measurable and determined; 

1.Deviant Behaviour is caused / constrained by biological,psychological or 
social structures. 

2.Homogenous society with a collective conscience which clearly 
distinguishes between; 
‘normal’ and ‘deviant’ 
‘right’ from ‘wrong’. 

3.Hence ‘deviants’ and ‘criminals’ are clearly identified as rule / law breakers. 
Studies often restricted to convicted criminals. 

4. Potential deviants / criminals are easily identified from the statistical data 
e.g. the positive correlation between (lower) class position and crime.


The New Deviancy emphasised; 

1. Deviants and criminals are rational individuals who make choices from the 
cultural situations they find themselves in and the options available to them. 
i.e their actions are meaningful. 

2. Society is made up of a plurality of interests.To understand deviance we 
have to adopt the standpoint of the deviant. 
“ One man’s deviation may be anothers custom” 

3. The inverse correlation between class and crime is a fiction ­ crime occurs 
at all levels of society its prosecution is unequal. 

4. The operationalisation and measurement of deviance and crime is 
problematic ­ see especially the official crime stats. 

“ The key argument is that human actions are best understood in terms of the 
meaning that those actions have for actors, rather than in terms of preexisting 
biological, psychological or social conditions. These meanings are to some 
extent created by the individual, but primarily they are derived from intimate 
personal interactions with other people. That is, people first construct 
meanings in relation to situations they find themselves in, and then they act 
toward those situations in ways that make sense within the context of their 
meanings” 

Vold, Bernard and Snipes (1998) p219 

This has 2 major consequences;


1. The Construction and Application of Rules. 

Behaviour takes place within a ‘rule governed’ environment. 

Rules and Laws are socially constructed by people (‘moral entrepreneurs’) 
and applied by people (‘legitimate labellers’). 

Hence the construction of rules, their application and exemptions need to be 
analysed; 

i.In what conditions are rules applied? 

ii.Who is subjected to a rule and who are the exemptions (and why?) 

iii.How flexible is the rule? 

iv.Who made the rule and whose interests does it serve? 

v.What are the reactions to deviation from the rule? 

"SOCIAL GROUPS CREATE DEVIANCE BY MAKING RULES WHOSE 
INFRACTION CONSTITUTES DEVIANCE, AND BY APPLYING THOSE 
RULES TO PARTICULAR PEOPLE AND LABELLING THEM AS 
OUTSIDERS... THE DEVIANT IS ONE TO WHOMTHAT LABEL HAS 
BEEN SUCCESSFULLY APPLIED; DEVIANT BEHAVIOUR IS 
BEHAVIOUR PEOPLE SO LABEL” 
BECKER 

Deviance is not therefore a characteristic of the individual or their actions but 
the social reaction their behaviour provokes. 
see p 7 Unit 1 
The application of the ‘deviant’ label is part of a process of definition.


2. The Impact of labelling upon the ‘self’. 
Labelling theory is usually concerned with the application of negative labels 
which encourage deviant behaviour. 
“The application of a label to someone has significant consequences for how 
that person is treated by others and perceives him/her self.” 
(Moore) 
These perceptions of self involve a process of 
i) Expectation. 
ii) Negotiation. 
iii) Identification. 

In this process labels are 
i) created 
ii) applied 
iii) sustained 
iv) internalised 
But they may also be 
vi)rejected 

“It is one thing to commit a deviant act­e.g. acts of lying, stealing, 
homosexual intercourse, narcotics' use, drinking to excess, unfair 
competition. It is quite another thing to be charged and invested with a 
deviant character, i.e. to be socially defined as a liar, a thief, a homosexual, 
a dope fiend, a drunk, a chiseler, a brown­noser, a hoodlum, a sneak, a 
scab, and so on. It is to be assigned to a role, to a special type or category 
of persons. The label  ­ the name of the role ­ does more than signify one 
who has committed such­and­such a deviant act. Each label evokes a 
characteristic imagery. It suggests someone who is normally or habitually 
given to certain kinds of deviance; who may be expected to behave in this 
way; who is literally a bundle of odious or sinister qualities. It activates


sentiments and calls out responses in others: rejection, contempt, 
suspicion, withdrawal, fear, hatred.” 
(Cohen 1966) see Unit 2  p 14 

Deviance as a ‘career’ or ‘sequence’ 

Becker argues that a deviant act does not = Deviance. 
Social control produces deviance through labelling. In response to this the 
labelled enter upon a ‘career’ which involves a sequence of acts or events by 
which they adopt a deviant identity. 

Goffman refers to the deviant role as a ‘moral career’ 
e.g. In total Institutions ( Asylums) the ‘mortification of the self’ and the 
‘inmate role’. 
Lemert and the deviant self concept; 
distinguishes between the initial stage of the deviant career ( Primary 
Deviance) and the final stage  of commitment to the deviant role 
( Secondary Deviance ). 

Matza distinguishes ‘formal’ (dominant) from ‘subterranean’(deviant) values 
and argues that we ‘drift’ in and out of deviance.


Implications for the study of Crime & Deviance 

1. The concepts “Deviance” and “Crime” are problematic. 

2. Some people have the power to define. 
see ‘legitimate labellers’ ‘moral entrepreneurs’ and ‘moral panics’. 

3. Justice is ‘negotiable’. 

4. The application of labels involves  processes of interaction and 
stigmatisation. 

5. Internalisation of the label and the impact on the self concept. 
‘moral career’ 
‘primary’ to ‘secondary’ deviance 
‘rites of passage’ into ‘deviant sub ­ culture’. 

6. The ‘amplification’ of crime and the encouragement of ‘moral panics’ about 
crime


Criticisms of  ‘labelling theory’; 

1. It is a perspective rather than a theory in that it does not explain deviant 
behaviour  but  describes  “the  impact  of  labels”  and  “how  criminals  are 
processed”. 

2.  Too  deterministic;  implies  that  criminal  behaviour  is  an  automatic 
outcome of  negative labels. 

3. The sociology of the underdog. 

­Too sympathetic to the offender 
­ selective use of less serious forms of  deviance  rather  than 
dangerous crime. 

4. Overlooks the role of power and links to social structure in the defining of 
crime and the labelling process. 
see especially Marxist critics 

These are a brief overview of the criticisms of the labelling perspective. For 
a  more  detailed  analysis  see  Plummer  (1979)  in    Downes  &  Rock  Deviant 
Interpretations and Vold et al (1998)


Does the face fit the crime?


For each face identify the crime which that person committed (One crime per face) 
Robbery  Rape  Car Theft  Fraud  Drug  Gross 
Dealing  Indecenc 

Face A 
Face B 
Face C

10