Technology Deep Dive

:
Phosphorus removal
innovation
PAGE 58

tpomag.com
AUGUST 2015

In My Words:
Knowing residuals markets
PAGE 56

Tailgating to

Chuck Smithwick
District Manager
Grifton, N.C.

Excellence
CONTENTNEA MSD TEAM GETS THE
MOST FROM A NEW BNR PROCESS
PAGE 42

Sustainable Operations:
Low-risk biogas power
PAGE 28

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Aerzen USA .............................. 41 ❒

JDV Equipment Corporation 47 ❒

AllMax Software, Inc. ............. 47 ❒

JWC Environmental ................ 29 ❒

Aqua Ben Corporation ............. 59 ❒

Keller America Inc. .................. 7 ❒
Komline-Sanderson ................ 31 ❒

AQUA-Zyme Disposal
Systems, Inc. ........................ 67 ❒

Kuhn North America, Inc. ........ 69 ❒

Bilfinger Water
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Blue-White Industries ............ 2 ❒
Bright Technologies, div. of
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Carylon Corporation ................. 17 ❒
CB&I .......................................... 21 ❒
Centrisys Corporation ............ 59 ❒
CST Industries .......................... 19 ❒
Eagle Microsystems, Inc. ......... 31 ❒
Enviro-Care Company ...........

4 ❒

FKC Co., Ltd. ............................ 25 ❒

Flo Trend Systems .................. 54 ❒

Lovibond Tintometer .............. 35 ❒
Parkson Corp. ........................... 37 ❒
Roto-Mix, LLC ............................. 71 ❒
Schreiber LLC ............................ 35 ❒
Screenco Systems LLC ............ 73 ❒
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Smith & Loveless, Inc. ............. 79 ❒
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8 ❒

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TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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contents

top performers:

August 2015

WATER: PLANT Page 32

Beyond the Normal

An Illinois water treatment plant improves water quality and operations
with a major upgrade and a team that thrives on challenges.
By Trude Witham
WASTEWATER: OPERATOR Page 22

Beautiful Music

32

22

Frank D’Ambrosia hits all the right notes conducting plant operations
and training programs while building an award-winning career as a
clean-water plant superintendent.
By Jack Powell

on the cover
Chuck Smithwick and the team
at the Contentnea Metropolitan
Sewerage District (North
Carolina) hold informal morning
“tailgate” gatherings where
ideas are broached, solutions
discussed and experiences
shared. Says Smithwick: “Everybody works
together. We don’t let any good ideas go to
waste.” (Photography by Stuart Jones)

42

12

WASTEWATER: BIOSOLIDS Page 12

Doing It by the Book

A Maine sanitary district demonstrates that no agency is too small to
benefit from creating and following a formal biosolids management plan.
By Ted J. Rulseh
WASTEWATER: PLANT Page 42

Tailgating to Excellence

Operators at North Carolina’s Contentnea MSD quickly learn to get the
most performance from a new biological nutrient removal facility.
By Jim Force

LET’S BE CLEAR Page 8

BUILDING THE TEAM Page 40

PRODUCT NEWS Page 72

What if the U.S. had a strategic energy policy,
defining roles for each energy source and backed
by major funding? What might that mean for
clean-water plants and biogas?

New York’s Southern Cayuga Lake Intermunicipal Water Commission faces recruitment
challenges while keeping the leadership
pipeline filled.

Product Spotlight – Wastewater: Sampler
controller provides single-screen programming,
USB transfer capability
Product Spotlight – Water: Hydraulically balanced
diaphragm pump designed for long life

By Ted J. Rulseh, Editor

By Ann Stawski

By Ed Wodalski

@TPOMAG.COM Page 10

Headworks and Biosolids
Management Directory Page 48

2016 WWETT Show Invites
Seminar Proposals Page 75

IN MY WORDS Page 56

INDUSTRY NEWS Page 75

Lise LeBlanc helps organic residuals suppliers
connect with their customers. Her success with
municipal and private-sector clients holds lessons
for biosolids recycling programs.

People/Awards; Education; Events

Pure Recognition

By Ted J. Rulseh

FOCUS:

San Diego Public Utilities picks up honors for
effective communication about its Water Purification
Demonstration Project for indirect potable reuse.

TECHNOLOGY DEEP DIVE Page 58

Hey, a Guy Can Dream

Visit daily for exclusive news, features and blogs.
HOW WE DO IT: WASTEWATER Page 20

May-December Marriage

A Massachusetts plant team takes heroic
measures to integrate a new biogas-fueled CHP
system with an older treatment process.
By Scottie Dayton
HEARTS AND MINDS Page 26

By Craig Mandli
SUSTAINABLE OPERATIONS Page 28

Next in Line

Residuals as Resources:
Knowing the Market

Nutrient Solutions

An innovative process combines chemical treatment
and membrane separation to extract and recover
phosphorus from wastewater biosolids.

Low-Risk Biogas Power

By Ted J. Rulseh

A power purchase agreement lets a California
agency benefit from a fuel-cell-based generation
system without investing up-front capital.

WWETT SPOTLIGHT Page 60

By Doug Day
PLANTSCAPES Page 30

Roots of Preservation
A wide variety of trees beautify the landscape
and put the brakes on stream bank erosion at a
Missouri clean-water plant.
By Jeff Smith

6

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

Simple Screening

Dewatering plant owner markets his receiving
station to the industry.

WORTH NOTING Page 76

coming next month: September 2015
Digital Technology, WEFTEC Pre-Show Issue
�� Let’s Be Clear: Hire the resume? Or the person?
�� Top Performer – Wastewater Plant: Fisherman’s
work ethic in Petersburg, Alaska
�� Top Performer – Biosolids: John Donovan, P.E.,
CDM Smith
�� Top Performer – Water Operator: Michael Ramsey,
Westmont (Illinois) Water Treatment Plant
�� Top Performer – Wastewater Operator: Benjamin
Carver, Fairfield-Suisun Sewer District, California

By Craig Mandli

�� How We Do It: Edge-retentive coating in
Springfield, Illinois

PRODUCT FOCUS Page 62

�� Sustainable Operations: Biogas to energy in
Thousand Oaks, California

Headworks and Biosolids
Management
CASE STUDIES Page 68

Headworks and Biosolids
Management

�� In My Words: Planning for and responding to
climate change
�� Tech Talk: Managing data with mobile technology
�� Technology Deep Dive: Kruger’s AnoxKaldnes
Hybas process for SBRs

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let’s be clear

Hey, a Guy Can Dream
WHAT IF THE US HAD A STRATEGIC ENERGY POLICY,
DEFINING ROLES FOR EACH ENERGY SOURCE AND
BACKED BY MAJOR FUNDING? WHAT MIGHT THAT
MEAN FOR CLEAN-WATER PLANTS AND BIOGAS?
By Ted J. Rulseh, Editor

T

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8

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

he other night I had a dream.
I dreamed I woke up one
morning to find out that our
federal government had adopted a
comprehensive energy policy. (OK,
I didn’t really have this particular
dream, but bear with me.)
This policy was not some hodgepodge of here-today/gone-tomorrow
grants, loans and incentives for this
or that form of green or sustainable
energy. It was an actual policy with
defined roles for coal, nuclear, natural gas, diesel gasoline, wind,
solar, geothermal and, yes, biogas.
And what a great thing it was.
No longer would major energy
decisions be based on private companies’ short-term economic considerations — like closing and tearing down a perfectly
good, newly refurbished and relicensed nuclear plant near
my hometown, because right now it’s cheaper to make electricity with natural gas and coal.
Instead, long-range thinking would apply. In the above
example, the federal government would subsidize the nuclear
plant’s power to keep it open, since in time we’d need that
reliable, clean, greenhouse-gas-free energy, and at some point
its price would again be market-competitive.

RUDE AWAKENING
But of course I woke up to reality. The nuclear plant was
still gone. And as far as the eye could see we’d continue, as a
nation, making stupid decisions about energy.
I wonder, if we had an actual energy policy, what that would
mean for biogas from the nation’s clean-water plants —
those with anaerobic digestion, anyway. This one seems like
the ultimate no-brainer. Clean-water plants all over the country have anaerobic digesters that produce methane. Many do
not use them to produce energy. What stands in their way?
More often than not, it’s the up-front investment in enginegenerators or combined heat and power (CHP) systems.
Treatment plants increasingly are recognized as resource
recovery facilities. One of their resources clearly is energy.
Biogas-to-energy systems, based on what I have seen and

read, yield a pretty good return on investment and relatively
attractive simple payback times.

WHERE’S THE DOWNSIDE?

OF

It stands to reason that a national energy policy would
aggressively encourage biogas-fueled CHP. Digestion of biosolids alone can produce substantial gas and energy. The gas
burns clean and in many or most cases would displace power
from more-polluting sources like coal-fueled power plants.
And once a facility has digesters, it’s natural to feed them
food waste, FOG and other high-BOD waste products, yielding even more gas. That brings the extra benefit of keeping
those materials out of landfills, with all the cost and environmental risk they can entail.
How much potential is there for biogas-to-energy? How
much biogas do we produce today versus what we could
produce if the resource was fully developed? Well, a few
years ago, the North East Biosolids and Residuals Association (NEBRA) collected data on biogas production at cleanwater plants across the United States.
The survey found that 1,238 treatment plants use anaerobic digestion and produce biogas, mostly at larger facilities
(flows exceeding 1 mgd). On the other hand, two-thirds of
the 3,300 or so plants above that size threshold do not produce biogas. And only a small number of plants with flows
below 1 mgd do so.
So only a fairly small percentage of the nation’s 15,000 to
16,000 permanent treatment facilities produce and use biogas. To be fair, some of these are small package plants, but
the survey did find some small facilities with anaerobic
digestion — plants with flows from 1 to 5 mgd, and even
some with less than 1 mgd. Some of these use biogas to generate electricity.

C

lean-water plants all over the country have
anaerobic digesters that produce methane. Many
do not use them to produce energy. What stands in
their way? More often than not, it’s the up-front
investment in engine-generators or combined heat
and power (CHP) systems.

Get it Right at the
HEADWORKS
Mission Critical
Processes
Downstream
Perform Better

WHAT’S THE POTENTIAL?
Another study, the 2014 Biogas Market Snapshot from
XPRT Media, said the United States had the world’s greatest
untapped biogas potential, and that from all sources — cleanwater plants, farms and others — this country could produce
nearly 70 million MWh of electricity per year from biogas.
That won’t solve all the country’s energy challenges, but it
does compare to the output from several 1,000 MW utility power
plants, and that’s a substantial amount of renewable energy.
So if our country had a real energy policy, maybe we’d
see incentives put in place to encourage anaerobic digestion
and biogas-to-energy. Such incentives could include lowinterest loans structured so that the loan repayment would
“cash flow” from the energy cost savings (and revenue).
Then perhaps we’d have this valuable resource on the
way to being fully developed. That would be a boon to our
energy supply, the environment and our economy — not to
mention a dream come true.

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tpomag.com August 2015

9

@tpomag.com

Visit the site daily for new, exclusive content. Read our blogs, find resources and get the most out of TPO magazine.

SOCIAL CONNECTION

7 Wastewater Groups to Follow on LinkedIn
Some days, you might wonder why you need more social media. Isn’t Facebook
enough? But if you’re not using LinkedIn, you could be doing your career a
disservice. Dive into the world of LinkedIn with this list of water and wastewater discussion groups. Before you know it, your newsfeed will be flooded
with industry-specific information.
Tpomag.com/featured

PINTEREST WORTHY

How to Upcycle
Old Water Meters
When an Iowa water utility replaced its manual
water meters, creativity broke loose. See how the
team repurposed old equipment, turning one
fine example into an office aquarium. (Hint: Some
trial and error was involved at the expense of
Bertha the Betta.) Take a look at these Pinterestworthy ideas, and let us know if your team has
found new uses for retired equipment.
Tpomag.com/featured

EXPERT ADVICE

5 Tips to a
Newbie from a
Seasoned Veteran

OVERHEARD ONLINE

“Unlike our traditional water
resources that are stressed by
dry weather and population
growth, wastewater is a
drought-resistant water resource
that is too valuable to waste.”

Forward Thinking: Citizen’s Group Drives Flagstaff’s Wastewater Initiatives
Tpomag.com/featured

10

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

When you’re new to wastewater, nothing is more important than listening
to a plant’s seasoned operators. Here,
contributor Marcel Tremblay shares
what he would tell a newcomer, pointing out some sound advice for the
next generation of wastewater plant
employees.
Tpomag.com/featured

Join the Discussion
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11

top performer
wastewater: BIOSOLIDS

Doing It

by the
Book
A MAINE SANITARY DISTRICT DEMONSTRATES THAT NO AGENCY IS TOO SMALL TO BENEFIT
FROM CREATING AND FOLLOWING A FORMAL BIOSOLIDS MANAGEMENT PLAN
STORY: Ted J. Rulseh | PHOTOGRAPHY: Gabe Souza

BEING SMALL IS NO REASON TO CUT CORNERS.
That’s a reason the Mechanic Falls (Maine) Sanitary District has a formal
biosolids management plan, even though it serves just 3,100 people and
moves just 23 dry tons of material per year.
“It’s about saying what you do and doing what you say,” says Nicholas
“Nick” Konstantoulakis, district director. “It’s a booklet that tells exactly

12

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

what we do, where we do it and how we do it. When regulators know that you
have a program in writing for anybody to see and you have a history of following it, you’re fine.”
The plan is built in the model of the National Biosolids Partnership Environmental Management System (EMS) program. The district land-applies
liquid, lime-stabilized biosolids on a farm 6 miles from its 490,000 gpd

LEFT: Chlorination levels are logged daily at the Mechanic

Falls Sanitary District plant. BELOW: Nick Konstantoulakis,
director, and Brian Ahlquist, operator.

‘‘

When regulators know that
you have a program in writing
for anybody to see and you have
a history of following it, you’re fine.”
NICK KONSTANTOULAKIS

career change. “I was bored with what I was doing,” he recalls. “When you
work in a lab, you pretty much do the same thing day in, day out.”
He and 11 others applied for an opening at the Mechanic Falls district.
Then-director Tom Schultz chose Konstantoulakis largely because he was
familiar with the ISO 9000 international quality standard, similar in character to National Biosolids Partnership’s EMS: “Tom wanted to do the EMS,
and I was a perfect fit.”

EFFICIENT TREATMENT
Mechanic Falls, in southern Maine, has a 33-year-old activated sludge
treatment facility using a racetrack-style oxidation ditch. The community is
all residential and light commercial, which means flows rates and influent
quality are consistent year-round.

(design) clean-water plant. The management plan spells out every detail of
procedures. All land application takes place in October. The entire process
— lime addition, hauling, spreading, testing, recordkeeping — costs about
$15,000 a year.

HOMEGROWN TALENT
Konstantoulakis, a Maine native, has been with the district for 10 years
and director for two. He served in the U.S. Air Force for four years after high
school, lived in Texas for nine years working and attending Sam Houston
State University, then returned to Maine, where he put his industrial technology studies to work in laboratory positions with electronics manufacturers.
His quality assurance experience from those jobs helped him make a

Mechanic Falls (Maine) Sanitary District
FOUNDED: |

1982

POPULATION SERVED: |

3,100 (700 sewer connections)
0.49 mgd design, 0.25 mgd average
BIOSOLIDS PROCESS: | Oxidation reactor, lime stabilization
BIOSOLIDS VOLUME: | 23 dry tons per year
BIOSOLIDS USE: | Agricultural land application
CITY WEBSITE: | www.mechanicfalls.govoffice.com
GPS COORDINATES: Latitude: 44° 6’37.94”N; longitude: 70°23’7.55”W
PLANT FLOWS: |

tpomag.com August 2015

13

The Mechanic Falls plant uses an
oxidation ditch secondary treatment
process (Lakeside Equipment).
The aerators are controlled
automatically to sustain optimum
dissolved oxygen.

HOSTING THE YOUNG ONES
As director of the Mechanic Falls Sanitary District, Nicholas
“Nick” Konstantoulakis has emphasized public outreach.
“I’m trying to get the community more involved,” he says.
“When I started here 10 years ago, this district was the best-kept
secret in town. You could drive by and you weren’t even sure what
it was. When I bring people here, they can’t believe how beautiful it
is. There’s no odor. My predecessor, Tom Schultz, ran the operation like a military base in terms of being neat and clean. I’ve kept
that up. We plant flowers. I planted 111 tulips, and 88 came up. For
a plant that’s 33 years old, this place is looking pretty good.”
Konstantoulakis loves to bring in local fifth graders once a year:
“They’re so much fun because they’re interested. I start by opening
the manhole at the headworks and letting them look down there.
They think that’s so cool. I have a safety barrier around it, and I say,
‘If you ever see a manhole open, make sure you call somebody.’
“I take them to the aeration basin and tell them, ‘This is as much
a living thing as all of us here. It needs air, it needs oxygen, it needs
food.’ Then I tell them that every time they flush the toilet, this is
where it goes. I say, ‘Does anybody want to guess what’s out there?’
Always, some little girl will say, ‘Poop?’ And I’ll say, ‘That’s right
— 288,000 gallons. And that’s good, because it’s in here and not in
the river. We’re a wastewater treatment plant and proud of it.’”
As for adults around his own age, Konstantoulakis reminds
them of days of the first Clean Water Act. “I’ll jokingly say,
‘Remember when you were a hippie in the 1970s and you wanted
clean water? That’s what you’re paying for.’”

14

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

Wastewater (250,000 gpd average flow) passes through a Worthington
comminutor for preliminary treatment and then directly into the 288,000-gallon oxidation ditch (Lakeside Equipment). A set of grooved, motor-driven,
rotating paddles beat air into the mixed liquor. Konstantoulakis and assistant Brian Ahlquist achieve optimum removal of volatile solids by holding
dissolved oxygen in the ditch at 0.8 mg/L, with help from oxygen sensors
(ABB Automation).
“We can control it manually, but generally we use our SCADA system,”
Konstantoulakis says. “If it starts raining heavily or if the DO starts dropping for any reason, the paddles kick in automatically. Our SCADA pretty
much takes care of it all.”
Water from the aeration process passes to two final clarifiers (Lakeside
Equipment). After chlorine disinfection, final effluent averaging about 8
mg/L BOD and TSS is discharged to the Little Androscoggin River. “If you
put a glass of drinking water beside a glass of our effluent, you couldn’t tell
the difference,” Konstantoulakis says.

TO THE FIELDS
On the solids side, waste activated sludge is pumped to a pair of 150,000-gallon storage tanks, where it accumulates until land application season in October. Two Sutorbilt blowers (Gardner Denver) mix the material; there is no
digestion. Material enters the tanks at about 3 percent solids, and periodic
decanting raises the solids content to 4 percent.
Just before land application the tank contents are lime stabilized. After
an initial pH reading on the material, lime slurry is delivered to the tanks
by a trash pump until the pH reaches 12, a process that takes about 30 minutes. The pH is held at that level for two hours and rechecked the next day.
A year’s biosolids production is typically about 140,000 gallons.
(continued)

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15

A contractor delivers biosolids to the farm in a 4,000-gallon tank truck
and surface-applies it to the field as directed by the landowner. The farm has
109 acres of corn and hay land permitted by the state Department of Environmental Protection. The lime-stabilized material, applied in cool autumn
conditions, presents no odor issues.
“We don’t use all 109 acres,” Konstantoulakis says. “We apply about 600
pounds per acre. We do a chemical analysis on the material we spread, and
about a month to six weeks later we take a soil sample and send it to the University of Maine for laboratory analysis.”
The biosolids are tested for 25 parameters, including pH and nutrients,
as well as heavy metals, which are nearly nonexistent. The contractor, at the
district staff’s direction, observes required setbacks from roads (100 feet)
and the farmer’s well (300 feet). No other homes are nearby.
“Our farmer loves the material,” Konstantoulakis says. “A brick cheese
that was made from milk he supplied recently won an award. The cheesemakers were so impressed with the product that they put a picture of his
farm on one of the packages.”

ACCORDING TO PLAN
The district’s process is fully documented in the biosolids management
plan. The district joined the National Biosolids Partnership EMS program
in 2007 and is also a member of the North East Biosolids and Residuals
Association.
An EMS is a management framework that helps treatment facilities constantly improve in key areas, such as quality management, regulatory com-

‘‘

A colorimeter is used to test a water sample for chlorine levels (Lovibond
Tintometer).

pliance, environmental performance and relations with interested parties.
“Our plan tells who the director is and who the helper is,” Konstantoulakis says. “It has sections on roles and responsibilities for each one of us. It
describes our public participation plan, our process controls, our internal
audits. There’s a section on management review and a section on chemical
(continued)

It’s a win-win program that benefits us all. It helps us continue to ensure that our biosolids
are of the highest quality and that our recycling program remains cost-efficient.”

NICK KONSTANTOULAKIS

Brian Ahlquist checks the
facility’s sludge blanket early
in the morning as part of his
daily rounds.

16

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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17

‘‘

If you put a glass
of drinking water
beside a glass of our
effluent, you couldn’t
tell the difference.”
NICK KONSTANTOULAKIS

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To Konstantoulakis, the plan is
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For now, Konstantoulakis, Ahlquist and office manager Carrie White
they can look at our plan and see putting it into practice.”
are keeping the biosolids program and the treatment plant running smoothly.
The plan also helps the district run a consistent, clean operation and
“Our goal right now is to keep things as they are, business as usual,” Konavoid alarming the public:
stantoulakis says. “Our No. 1 goals are to continue with preventive main“It’s a win-win program that benefits us all. It helps us continue to ensure
tenance and to make our community more knowledgeable about us.
that our biosolids are of the highest quality and that our recycling program
“My colleagues are in their 40s. They’re computer-smart, they have posremains cost-efficient. There are a handful of people who are against land
itive energy and it’s great. I plan to work until I’m 70. I really like what I’m
application, but they tend to be the same people who will go to a hardware
doing. This is the first time in my life where I don’t need an alarm clock to
store and buy fertilizer from another country, not even knowing where it
get up and go to work.”
comes from. We don’t look over our shoulder when we do this, but we do
understand that members of the public who don’t understand it or have been
misinformed might raise concerns.”

18

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19

wastewater:
HOW WE DO IT

May-December Marriage
A MASSACHUSETTS PLANT TEAM TAKES HEROIC MEASURES TO INTEGRATE
A NEW BIOGAS-FUELED CHP SYSTEM WITH AN OLDER TREATMENT PROCESS
By Scottie Dayton

H

undreds of pounds of solids slipped downstream through worn
equipment at the Fairhaven (Massachusetts) Water Pollution Control Facility. The volume made it difficult for the plant to meet its
discharge permit.
Looking for solutions, the town took part in a pilot study on anaerobic
digestion and combined heat and power (CHP) systems. “It concluded that
although we are a small plant, the process could be cost-effective if we used
glass-fused-to-steel tanks instead of concrete structures,” says Linda Schick,
sewer and wastewater superintendent.
The $8 million project was financed by a principal-forgiveness loan through
the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (federal stimulus) and the
State Revolving Fund Green Infrastructure. “We had two years to deploy the
system or face repaying the money with 2 percent interest,” says Schick.
Challenges accompanied the integration of new technology with 28-yearold equipment, requiring operators to be constantly on call at first. “We
almost didn’t make it,” says Schick. “Besides the generation gap, small-scale
digestion is most successful on farms, where there are
no other processes to integrate or sidestreams to absorb.”
The team’s two-year effort made Fairhaven the second
wastewater facility in the state to generate its own heat
and energy.

The installation includes two fixed-cover Aquastore digester tanks (CST Industries) and dual membrane DuoSphere container (WesTech Engineering).

SETTING THE TABLE
Built in 1969 and upgraded in 1989, the 5 mgd (design)
activated sludge facility averages 3 mgd. Three 1987
plunger pumps on timers (Komline-Sanderson) feed primary sludge to two fixed-cover Aquastore digestion tanks
(CST Industries). Two chopper pumps (Vaughan Co.)
circulate solids through mixing nozzles in the tanks.
Two other pumps move material through the heat exchangers to maintain a constant 98 degrees F in the digester.
A gas conditioner removes water from the gas before
it enters the MAN 100 kW CHP generator (Kraft Power
Corporation), which runs on natural gas, biogas or a
mix. Excess biogas is stored in a dual-membrane DuoSphere containment
(WesTech Engineering) or flared through a burner stack (Varec Biogas, a
division of Westech Industrial).
Digested biosolids are treated with ferric chloride, then dewatered in two
1-meter gravity belt thickeners (Komline-Sanderson). The resulting cake is
incinerated by a vendor.

INTO THE FRAY
Plant designers were present during the CHP system’s startup in September 2012, but Tom Bienkiewicz, director of the Massachusetts State Board
of Certification of Operators of Wastewater Treatment Facilities, was pivotal
in providing technical and moral support.

20

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

LEFT: Assistant superintendent Rene Robillard (left) and Bob Gomes, CHP
operator, connect a hose to the grease receiving tank. RIGHT: Gomes and
Linda Schick, sewer and wastewater superintendent, monitor energy
production from the MAN generator (Kraft Power Corporation).

“He spent a lot of time and energy explaining to state Department of
Environmental Protection officials why it was taking so long to get the process going,” she says. “Tom was our moral support. We even had his personal
number, and he’d talk us through problems no matter when we called.”
Most repairs involved shutting down the digester, then starting up again
from square one — a time-consuming process. It began the first day of startup
when solids in the feed system never reached the digester. Increasing pressure
burst an underground pipe, sending the material bubbling to the surface.
After investigating for weeks, Bob Gomes, CHP operator, Joe Frates,

plant mechanic, and Ray Paczosa, plant electrician, pinpointed the cause.
Rags had clogged a static mixer on the feed line in the CHP building, creating back-pressure on the line. Once they removed the mixer, solids flowed
to the digester. They also retrofitted the plunger pumps, rerouted piping and
installed new timers.
“Bob came to the plant every weekend to check on the digester,” says
Schick. “Without his commitment, I doubt we would have been as successful. While others lost faith, Bob always rose to the challenge.”

SEVERE INDIGESTION
More challenges were in store. A miscalculation placed the sludge level
too close to the top of the digester tanks, causing violent agitation. The burping, foaming material infiltrated and then blocked the output lines. Seeking
an escape route, the material entered the gas piping, forcing operators to
open pressure release valves instead of flaring the gas.
“After we reduced the sludge level by 10 to 15 percent, Joe Frates installed drainlines on the gas piping, enabling operators to flush the system,” says
Schick. “Assistant superintendent Rene Robillard
was the lead on purging the entire gas system, beginning at the top of the digester and working back to

EVALUATING PERFORMANCE
Because the system is still in its infancy, projected savings are moving
targets. The process generates only enough biogas to heat the digester tanks
and power pumps in the digester building. To increase methane production
and reduce purchased gas from a third to less than a quarter, the town is considering adding restaurant grease to supercharge the system.
Electric rates doubling in March also moved the number. “My normal
electricity budget is $300,000,” says Schick. “I’m probably realizing a 20 percent savings from the CHP system and solar panels on three buildings after
deducting maintenance and other costs.”
One solid benefit is the 50 percent reduction in biosolids sent for incineration. “We had 10 to 12 trucks hauling it away every week,” says Schick. “That’s
down to four or five, reducing hauling costs by $130,000 last year.”

Gomes (left), and Matt Manzone, maintenance craftsman, work on the DuoSphere container blowers.

the CHP generator.” The fire department stood by to
assist in case of an emergency.
The struggle to meet the startup deadline heightened the operators’ stress. After learning new techniques, they had to relearn them as components and
processes were re-engineered from within. Schick’s
team spent two years modifying piping, adding chemical feed sites and reformulating how the facility
wasted sludge.
While the adjustments benefited the digester,
they often were not conducive to the main plant’s
treatment train. Wastewater usually entered the primary settling tanks at about 50 degrees F, but mixing it with hot solids from the digester’s return
sidestream adversely affected the process.
“We’re trying to balance how we optimize the
digester to get the profit we were hoping for, but also
minimize the effect it has on the other side of the
plant,” says Vincent Furtado, Board of Public Works
superintendent. The successful marriage of new with
old was hard-won. “The town had budgeted $500,000
for startup adjustments, but they cost an additional
$1.5 million,” says Schick.

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21

top performer
wastewater: OPERATOR

BEAUTIFUL

MUSIC

FRANK D’AMBROSIA HITS ALL THE RIGHT NOTES CONDUCTING PLANT OPERATIONS
AND TRAINING PROGRAMS WHILE BUILDING AN AWARD-WINNING CAREER
AS A CLEAN-WATER PLANT SUPERINTENDENT
STORY: Jack Powell | PHOTOGRAPHY: Amy Voigt

LIKE A MASTER MUSICIAN, A
WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT

procedures for taking readings on sludge blankets, grit removal procedures and lab analysis.”
As for D’Ambrosia’s reaction, “I was very
surprised,” he says in an accent that gives away
his New Yorker background. “It’s quite an honor
and one that reaffirms my belief that wastewater
has been a great career that I’ve had the good
fortune to pursue for the last 35 years.”

superintendent must make sure everything
works in harmony — from equipment to operators. That’s what Frank D’Ambrosia has been
doing successfully for 11 years as superintendent
at the Village of Archbold (Ohio) Wastewater
Treatment Plant.
Since March 1, 2004, this easygoing former
EXPANSION EXPERIENCE
music teacher and traveling musician has overD’Ambrosia started work life as a music
seen a major expansion at the plant, 40 miles
teacher. Later, while touring with a five-piece
southwest of Toledo. He has also ensured that the
band (see sidebar), he met his wife, Susan, who
2.5 mgd facility meets all federal and state envihad family in Defiance, a city of 16,500 in northronmental regulations, kept the collections syswestern Ohio. In 1979, D’Ambrosia found a job
tem functioning, and made sure his operators
at the city wastewater treatment plant, which
get the training they need to keep their certifica“went from work-and-a-paycheck to a career.”
tions. Such diligence has earned D’Ambrosia a
“A year later, we went down to south Florida,
rewarding career and an industry lifetime
where I worked for about a year and a half,” says
achievement award.
D’Ambrosia. “I first worked at a 2 mgd wastewaLast year D’Ambrosia received the William
ter facility for a private utility and got my Class
D. Hatfield Award from the Northwest Ohio
A wastewater license. Then I moved to the BroWater Environment Association (NWOWEA).
ward County Wastewater Treatment Plant just
The award recognizes outstanding performance
Frank D’Ambrosia, superintendent, Village of Archnorth of Miami. When I started there the facility
and professionalism over a career.
bold Wastewater Treatment Plant.
was under construction to expand from 20 mgd
The awards program said, “Frank D’Ambrosia
to 60 mgd. While in Florida, I gained a lot of
truly embodies what it means to be a consumvaluable knowledge that I brought back to Defiance.”
mate wastewater professional.” Citing how he organized and taught the
D’Ambrosia worked his way up from operator to assistant superintenNWOWEA’s semiannual Operator Education Day, which prepares operadent and experienced a plant expansion from 4 mgd to 6 mgd. He then
tors to take state wastewater certification tests, the writeup mentioned that
moved to Archbold, a village of 4,300. Along the way, he got his Class III
D’Ambrosia has opened the plant to host many hands-on workshops for
certification in wastewater.
area operators and “routinely provides training to employees in many areas,
The Archbold plant underwent a $6 million upgrade in 2006-07. The
including digester operations, secondary system DO control and proper

22

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

‘‘

Communication up and
down is very important.
So is delegating — letting people
take ownership of their work
and become part of what’s being
done, rather than wait to be told
what to do.”

ABOVE: D’Ambrosia oversaw a major upgrade of the Archbold facility in 2006-07. BELOW: D’Ambrosia,

FRANK D’AMBROSIA

shown with Randy Volkman, plant operator, is a big believer in training. He provides classes at his
own facility as well as through the Ohio Water Environment Association.

Frank D’Ambrosia,
Village of Archbold (Ohio)
Wastewater Treatment Plant
POSITION: |

Wastewater treatment plant superintendent
35 years in clean-water industry
DUTIES: Oversee plant and collections system
operations, supervise 6 employees
EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree, music education –
Queens College, New York
CERTIFICATIONS: Class III municipal wastewater
operator
MEMBERSHIPS: Water Environment Federation,
Ohio Water Environment Association,
Northwest Ohio Water Environment
Association
GOALS: Continue to serve village residents, contribute
to a better environment and promote
wastewater as a career choice
GPS COORDINATES: Latitude: 41°30’26.57”N;
Longitude: 84°18’49.84”W
EXPERIENCE: |

|

|

|

|

|

|

tpomag.com August 2015

23

Frank D’Ambrosia, a
former music teacher
and traveling musician,
has enjoyed a rewarding
career and earned an
industry lifetime achievement award as superintendent at the Village of
Archbold Wastewater
Treatment Plant.

A TALE OF TWO CAREERS
Frank D’Ambrosia’s career in clean water had the most unlikely
of starts. Growing up in New York City, D’Ambrosia wanted to be a
music teacher. He went to a Catholic high school in Brooklyn,
earned a bachelor’s degree in music education from Queens
College and got some credits toward a master’s.
“I taught music in the New York school system in the mid1970s, but after only a year, the city had to lay off 5,000 teachers,”
he says. “If you were teaching less than eight years, you got laid
off.” Always resourceful, D’Ambrosia formed a five-piece band
with some other unemployed teachers. Called Frequency, and later
Touch, they played Top 40 songs and covered groups like Steely
Dan, Pablo Cruise and Foreigner. D’Ambrosia played the keyboard.
After successful gigs at various New York resorts, the band
moved to hotels and lounges along the East Coast, from Boston to
Miami. One night, while playing at a bar in Jacksonville, Florida,
D’Ambrosia’s future wife, Susan, came in and liked what she heard.
Soon the couple started dating. Shortly thereafter, they moved to
Defiance, Ohio, her hometown, and D’Ambrosia’s three-year music
career ended. He began putting down roots and working at the
wastewater treatment plant.
Does he have regrets? “Wastewater certainly has been a good
career for me,” D’Ambrosia says. “The more I got into it, the more
I saw that there was advancement and that I could make a good
career for myself. Plus, you’re doing something that’s good not
only for the environment but also for people in the community.
Every day you have a chance to learn something new. There’s
always something different going on, so yes, I definitely think it’s
a good career choice for young people.”
While running the Archbold plant, D’Ambrosia still keeps his
musical chops, playing clarinet and saxophone as well as piano.
He performs on weekends with community groups, at churches
and with the Defiance College Jazz Band.

24

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

renovation increased capacity from 1.75 mgd to 2.5 mgd with 5 mgd peak
flow. It also added a grease removal system, new final clarifiers, a new ferrous chloride storage tank, new chlorination and dechlorination systems, a
new process monitoring and control system, and a new operations building.
The project also included modifications to a tertiary lagoon to create an
overflow basin that retains diverted influent over 5 mgd.
Today, the plant’s activated sludge process treats an average daily flow
of 1.6 mgd and removes 96.8 percent of TSS, 99.1 percent of CBOD, 92.4

‘‘

Everybody has a lot of respect for Frank.
If you can’t get along with him, it’s your
problem. Frank fits in with our vision of being
proactive in keeping our wastewater operators
trained and their skills sharp.”

DENNIS HOWELL

percent of ammonia and 90.5 percent of phosphorus. Effluent discharges to
Brush Creek, which flows into the Tiffin River, a 55-mile-long tributary of
the Maumee River. Class B biosolids are applied to farm fields.
During the renovation, D’Ambrosia worked closely with the city’s engineering team and with Jones & Henry Engineers of Toledo. Five years ago,
D’Ambrosia and his team added two biosolids lagoons, bringing the total to
five and providing a year’s storage. In 2013, the facility added an air diffusion system to its wet-weather retention lagoon, keeping solids suspended
until the water is treated. Last spring, the plant added a larger and more
efficient grit removal, washing and dewatering system.

THE RIGHT TOUCH
Orchestrating these projects, while maintaining 40 miles of sewer lines,
nine lift stations and an industrial pretreatment program, requires a deft
touch and strong management skills. D’Ambrosia displays those qualities
in abundance, says Dennis Howell, village administrator.
“Frank is an interesting guy,” says Howell. “He has a lot of interests and
talents, including being a fine musician, and he’s very knowledgeable and
astute in the wastewater field. Everybody has a lot of respect for Frank. If
you can’t get along with him, it’s your problem. Frank fits in with our vision
of being proactive in keeping our wastewater operators trained and their
skills sharp.”
Of the plant’s seven operators (one a nearly full-time lab technician),
five have Class III certifications and one has a Class I certification. Three
know how to operate the plant’s combination cleaning truck to vacuum the
sewer lines. D’Ambrosia sees that they get the continuing education they
need to keep their certifications, learn new technologies and maintain plant equipment.
“I do my own training,” says D’Ambrosia. “Through
NWOWEA, I set up a half-day of training that we
invite people in the community to come to. Plus, I
do training with the operators, such as bringing in
chlorine people to talk about chlorine application.
Also, through the Ohio WEA, I set up a review session twice a year for young operators planning to
take the wastewater certification exam. We have
three sessions that day. I teach the basic wastewater
course and have experts who teach advanced wastewater and do a review of the collections system.”

‘‘

Frank is an easy guy to work for. When we
have bigger projects, we tell him and he gives
us the green light to proceed. He’s very supportive
and gives us every chance to get the training we
need to do our jobs better.”

RANDY VOLKMAN

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PRAISE FOR TRAINING
The operators are grateful for the education
D’Ambrosia provides and for his collaborative management style, which encourages them to take
responsibility and run with good ideas. They credit
him with keeping morale high and fostering a team
environment.
“He’s a real good boss who lets us do what we
need to do to get the job done,” observes Mike Short,
assistant superintendent and maintenance chief.
“Frank gives us free rein and doesn’t micromanage,” says Short, a Class III operator and 28-year
plant veteran. “Frank is excellent when it comes to
getting us training. If we get an email message
about a program, say a motor or pump class, he’ll let
us go, juggling the schedule so we’ll have people
here to run the plant. We can go pretty much anywhere in Ohio. It’s an asset to everybody.”
Randy Volkman, a Class III operator who has
been at the plant for 19 years, adds, “Frank is an
easy guy to work for. When we have bigger projects,
we tell him and he gives us the green light to proceed. He’s very supportive and gives us every chance
to get the training we need to do our jobs better.”
For D’Ambrosia, it’s all part of being a good
leader, as is a strong work ethic. That means getting
in at 6:30 in the morning, checking the SCADA system, overseeing lab tests and addressing issues,
from balky equipment to a homeowner with a
backed-up sewer.
“Communication up and down is very important,” he says. “So is delegating — letting people
take ownership of their work and become part of
what’s being done, rather than wait to be told what
to do. It’s what makes the job rewarding.”
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tpomag.com August 2015

25

HEARTS
AND MINDS

Pure Recognition
SAN DIEGO PUBLIC UTILITIES PICKS UP HONORS FOR EFFECTIVE
COMMUNICATION ABOUT ITS WATER PURIFICATION DEMONSTRATION
PROJECT FOR INDIRECT POTABLE REUSE
By Craig Mandli

Y

ou could say the San Diego Public Utilities Department started in a
deep hole. “Toilet to Tap” was the original negative idea the department
was saddled with selling to the public for adding purified wastewater
to the drinking water supply.
But a program facelift and innovative community education programs,
all while dealing with severe drought, helped convince residents that wastewater reclamation can be a solution for the area’s water shortage.
In late 2014, the Public Relations Society of America San Diego/Imperial
Counties Chapter presented the department with the Edward L. Bernays
Silver Award of Merit for Public Affairs for its Water Purification Demonstration Project public outreach program.

CREATING DIALOGUE
The demonstration project’s goal was to confirm the feasibility of purifying recycled water to supplement drinking water supplies. The outreach
program for the demonstration project included presentations, booths at
community events, facility tours, informational materials, advertisements
and social media.
After an outpouring of support, the San Diego City Council unanimously adopted the project’s findings in April 2013 and set forth directives
for implementing the Pure Water San Diego program, which when complete
will divert some 100 mgd from the
Point Loma Wastewater Plant to
What’s Your Story?
three future water purification
facilities. Those plants will treat
TPO welcomes news about your
the water with membrane filtrapublic education and community
tion, reverse osmosis and UV disinoutreach efforts for future articles
fection/advanced oxidation before
in the Hearts and Minds column.
Send your ideas to editor@tpo
delivery to existing reservoirs.
mag.com or call 877/953-3301.

Outreach tools include infographics
and handouts on the safety of recycled
water and the final report of the Water
Purification Demonstration Project.

“It was really a comprehensive communication plan and outreach strategy that encouraged public involvement and fostered active community dialogue,” says Alma Rife, senior public information officer. “The
result was an increase in understanding and a general approval rating of
water purification that went from 26 percent in 2004 to 73 percent in 2012.”

THE BEGINNING
After several years of study, the council in October 2007 chose indirect
potable reuse as the best way to maximize use of recycled water. The council commissioned the Water Purification Demonstration Project to determine the feasibility of turning recycled water into purified water.
For a year beginning in 2012, the Advanced Water Purification Facility
reclaimed 1 million gallons of effluent daily and treated it to a level clean
enough to drink. The project included extensive testing at each step of the
process, along with a multipronged education program inviting people to
take virtual and actual tours of the facility.

‘‘

The result was an increase in understanding
and a general approval rating of water
purification that went from 26 percent in 2004
to 73 percent in 2012.”
ALMA RIFE

“City staff participated in a variety of community events, including
community street fairs, health fairs and expos, events on college campuses,
and events with a focus on the environment and science, such as the annual
San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering EXPO Day at Petco Park and
Earth Fair at Balboa Park,” says Rife.
“The city also reached out to the multicultural communities at events
such as Linda Vista Multicultural Festival, Juneteenth Celebration, Asian
Cultural Festival and Fiesta del Sol.”
The yearlong demonstration project included more than 9,000 waterquality tests that determined no contaminants were present in the purified
water. The California Department of Public Health and the San Diego
Water Board approved the city’s water purification concept.
According to Rife, the city received a positive response from the public
at events. “Most people did not have much previous knowledge of purifying water, but once the water purification process was explained to them in
detail, they are generally supportive of potable reuse,” says Rife. “The
public realizes that the city needs a reliable and drought-proof local
water supply.”

PHOTOS AND GRAPHICS COURTESY OF THE CITY OF SAN DIEGO PUBLIC UTILITIES

Pure Water San Diego had a presence at the annual San Diego Festival of
Science & Engineering EXPO Day at Petco Park.

YOUTH COMPONENT
Rife says the city considers educating children at least as important as
informing adults. In her mind, the next generation will make decisions
about future water supply solutions and needs information about the longterm benefits of water reuse.
“The city offers free tours of our North City Water Reclamation Treatment Plant to Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops, elementary schools and various youth organizations,” says Rife. “Additionally, the staff participates in
events at schools and with youth organizations such as the YMCA. We focus
on creating content that involves lots of engagement. This includes handson activities, easy-to-understand visuals that are eye-catching, and asking
questions to keep their attention.”
That includes answering questions that are not always positive. While
people have embraced the idea of drinking recycled wastewater as they
receive more information, some adults and children remain skeptical.
Rife says city employees answer the tough questions with transparency
and honesty: “If one of our staff members does not know the answer to a
question, they take down the person’s contact information and get back to
them in a timely manner with an accurate response.”

THE NEXT STEP
In November 2014, backed by the findings of the outreach program, the
City Council unanimously voted to advance the Pure Water San Diego program. The program has support from several environmental groups, city
officials and community leaders, many of whom recently served as members
of the Pure Water Working Group behind the Water Purification Demonstration Project.
The immediate goal is the construction of a full-scale purification facility that will process 15 mgd by 2023. By 2035, if all goes as planned, nearly
30 percent of San Diego’s water (83 mgd) will come from local sources or
treated wastewater.
Public outreach campaigns will play a large part and include infographics and handouts on the safety of recycled water. “This is a very diverse area,
and we can reach a broader multicultural audience by translating materials
into additional languages,” Rife says.
“In addition, we plan to increase our audience on all social media platforms, seek more partnerships with youth-based organizations, and partner
with colleges and universities to offer tours and presentations.” Youth-oriented materials will include fact sheets, presentations, activity pages and
trading cards. Virtual events such as video contests and social media polls
will help educate the tech-savvy crowd.
The city’s outreach program has served as a model to other agencies
seeking to implement water purification. Water agencies from as far away as
Japan and Australia have visited to learn more.
“We’ve come a very long way from the idea of drinking water from the toilet,” says Rife. “We’ve been proactive from the start, and it has paid off. The people here
now know that recycled wastewater is a viable and
needed remedy for California’s water issues.”
(For more information about San Diego’s water purification efforts and the findings of the Water Purification
Demonstration Project, visit www.purewatersd.org.)

Pure Water San Diego staff give a youth presentation during an Earth Fair event.
tpomag.com August 2015

27

PHOTOS COURTESY OF INLAND EMPIRE UTILITIES AGENCY

SUSTAINABLE
OPERATIONS

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your facility for the Sustainable
Operations column. Send your
ideas to editor@tpomag.com or
call 877/953-3301.

By Doug Day

A

California clean-water plant has moved closer to a vision of being off
the grid by 2020 through a partnership that now fulfills about 50
percent of its power needs.
Regional Water Recycling Plant No. 1 (RP-1), located in the City of
Ontario and operated by Inland Empire Utilities Agency (IEUA), delivers
biogas to run a privately owned fuel cell installation, then buys the power at
rates below utility grid prices.
The 44 mgd (design) tertiary plant treats an average of 28 mgd. Its effluent, along with that of IEUA’s other three wastewater treatment plants, goes
into the utility’s reclaimed water system, where it is used for in-house processes; for irrigation of parks, golf courses and farms; for industrial purposes;
and for groundwater recharge.
Its biosolids system uses three-phase digestion, which provides some
700,000 cubic feet of biogas every day for the fuel cells. The biosolids are
trucked to an IEUA composting facility in Rancho Cucamonga that produces
more than 230,000 cubic yards of SoilPro Premium Compost per year.

CLEANER ELECTRICITY
IEUA needed a new plan when air-quality regulations required a reduction in output of RP-1’s two 1.4 MW cogeneration engines. While their total

‘‘

ABOVE: About half of the electricity for the Regional Water Recycling Plant No.1

comes from this 2.8 MW fuel cell power plant. A 20-year power purchase
agreement sets a price for the power for the life of the contract.

In exchange, IEUA signed a 20-year power purchase agreement (PPA)
to buy all the electricity the fuel cells generate. “Most of the biogas is used
by the fuel cells,” says Pietro Cambiaso, IEUA senior engineer for environmental compliance. “Excess gas is used in boilers to heat the digesters.” Heat
from the fuel cells is also recovered.
Switching to fuel cells, which don’t require combustion, greatly reduced
emissions:
• Carbon monoxide (CO) by 92 percent
• Nitrogen oxides (NOx) by 6 percent
• Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by 91 percent
• Sulfur oxides (SOx) by 72 percent
• Particulate matter by 86 percent
A small amount of gas from the acid phase of digestion is flared because
it is low in heating value and would require substantially more cleanup of
hydrogen sulfide and siloxanes than the rest of the digester gas.

NO CAPITAL INVESTMENT
The PPA gives IEUA a set cost for electricity into the
future without having to fund the project from its capital budget. “There was no capital outlay,” says Cambiaso. “We’re
only purchasing the power at an established rate. We didn’t
want to assume the risk, so the PPA was a good solution.”
Jesse Pompa, senior associate engineer in environmental
compliance, adds that the PPA addresses some issues the agency
had heard of with other projects. “With other agencies, we had seen that the
gas conditioning skid and the fuel cells would be from separate manufacturers, and there would be a lot of finger-pointing if there was any downtime.
The fuel cells can also be powered with natural gas, in which case RP-1
still pays the guaranteed starting rate for the power: 12.6 cents per kWh with
a 2.5 percent annual escalation. That is comparable to the price now paid to
Southern California Edison. “The assumption is that Edison’s rates will

There was no capital outlay. We’re only purchasing the
power at an established rate. We didn’t want to assume
the risk, so the PPA was a good solution.”
PIETRO CAMBIASO

output capacity was the same as the new 2.8 MW fuel cell installation, the
agency was limited by emissions standards to operating just one of engines.
The agency decided on a partnership with a private firm, which owns
and operates the fuel cell plant and handled its design, financing and construction. The system uses a DFC3000 Direct FuelCell power plant from
FuelCell Energy, which calls the project the largest digester gas fuel cell
installation operating in the United States. It went online in January 2013.

28

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

increase between 4 and 6 percent based on historical data,” says Cambiaso.
“Over time, we’re going to see the savings.”

SUPPLY AND DEMAND
RP-1’s electrical demand ranges from 3.5 MW in winter to just above 4
MW in summer. “There is some parasitic load for the 2.8 MW fuel cell plant,
so we see a maximum of around 2.4 MW,” says Pompa.
The fuel cells are supplemented by a 4-acre, 800 kW solar array, installed
in 2008, that uses both fixed and tracking solar panels. IEUA installed similar

The gas conditioning system is covered by Inland Empire Utilities Agency’s
power purchase agreement.

The wastewater treatment plant’s biosolids system uses three-phase
digestion, which provides some 700,000 cubic feet of biogas every day for the
fuel cells.

systems at all its locations through a PPA with SunPower, for a total of 3.5 MW
solar generating capacity. The solar installations provide 8 percent of the
utility’s electrical needs, replacing power previously purchased off the grid.
“We’re still working on implementing some efficiency projects at RP-1
to conserve energy,” says Cambiaso. “Ultimately, the goal is to be self-sufficient. We have higher demand in summer, so we need to work on that. In
winter, we make some excess power and are working with the local utility to
export that power back to the grid.”
At present, biogas generation matches up well with the need for gas on
site, but the agency is considering adding gas storage. “The demand may
change or the production may change,” says Cambiaso. “So we’re looking to
see if it would be cost-effective to add gas storage.”
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tpomag.com August 2015

29

PLANTSCAPES

Operators planted oak and
walnut saplings in the area
farther from the creek.

Roots of Preservation
A WIDE VARIETY OF TREES BEAUTIFY THE LANDSCAPE AND PUT THE BRAKES
ON STREAM BANK EROSION AT A MISSOURI CLEAN-WATER PLANT
By Jeff Smith

O

perators and staff of the 1.8 mgd Perryville (Missouri) Wastewater
Treatment Facility planted more than 1,400 trees last spring to halt
erosion along the banks of the Cinque Hommes Creek, which passes
in front of the plant and is its receiving water.
In the bargain, they’re beautifying the landscape. “We sure hope it
works and the trees take hold before a gully washer rain comes along,” says
Jeremy Meyer, water and wastewater superintendent at the two-stage trickling filter facility. A portion of creek bank near the plant has eroded away at
least 10 to 12 feet in the last decade.

AN INSIDE JOB
Using a planting machine pulled by a 108 hp John Deere model 6415
tractor, operators Robert Brown and Dave Myer planted 14- to 16-inch-tall
cottonwood, bald cypress and sandbar willow cuttings, spaced 10 feet apart and
in rows with 10 feet of separation. Operator Wendell Valleroy drove the tractor.

‘‘

Tree plantings are designed to curtail erosion on the bank of the Cinque
Hommes Creek.

The idea is to have the slower-growing trees
mature to provide shade in an area where a
planting attempt several years ago partially failed.”

area farther from the creek. “The idea is to have the slower-growing trees
mature to provide shade in an area where a planting attempt several years
ago partially failed,” says Meyer.

JEREMY MEYER

The idea of planting the trees grew out of a request from the Missouri
Department of Conservation (MDC). Staff members spotted the severe erosion while surveying the creek for Japanese hops, an invasive species that
can quickly choke off a waterway. “I asked them if the hops could be used to
make beer,” Meyer recalls jokingly.
The creek empties into the Mississippi River, where the Japanese hop
vine is most commonly found. In recent years it has been increasing its
range into streams and tributaries. The MDC worked with the city and
Meyer to negotiate a cost-sharing agreement that provided 90 percent funding for the nearly $7,000 project. A portion of the funding was to revisit and

In eight hours over two days, the men covered nearly 11 acres of field
and the embankment near the creek, assisted by Neil Bert, plant operations
foreman, and Mike Compte, operator. Meyer used a dibble bar to handplant 100 willow stakes on the eroded portion of the stream bank. He plans
to plant 300 more next spring. “We are counting on the root structure of the
trees to stop the erosion,” says Meyer.
The operators also used a dibble bar to hand-plant 3-foot-tall saplings of
pin oak, red oak, shumard oak, white oak, bur oak and black walnut in the

30

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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Plant personnel involved in the project include, from left, Jeremy Meyer,
water/wastewater plant superintendent; Neil Bert, plant operations foreman;
Mike Compte and Dave Myer, plant operators; and Wendell Valleroy, plant
operator/electrician. Not shown: Robert Brown, plant operator.

update the previously failed planting. The cost also included field preparation by chemical application to eradicate competing vegetation around
newly planted and existing trees.
As a condition of the agreement, plant operators will be responsible for
the maintenance, mowing and weed-control spraying of the newly planted
field for 10 years. Meyer says the project was worthwhile and an efficient
team effort: “Once we all got going and figured out how to do it the best way,
we got it done quickly. We hope the roots of the new trees will stabilize the
creek bank and stop the erosion.”

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31

top performer
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PLANT

Beyond

the Normal

AN ILLINOIS WATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVES
WATER QUALITY AND OPERATIONS WITH A MAJOR
UPGRADE AND A TEAM THAT THRIVES ON CHALLENGES
STORY: Trude Witham

32

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

PHOTOGRAPHY: Stephen Haas

In 2013, a UV/advanced oxidation process disinfection system was added
to take care of seasonal taste and odor issues. The operators’ learning curve
is ongoing. “I’m happy with the length of time these projects took, as it gave
the operators time to focus on each new system and provide input,” says Ross.
“Throughout construction, the team faced a different daily challenge. They
had to keep up with constant changes, but they took it on, and I think they
actually enjoyed the challenge.”
The new system is more efficient. “The clarifiers operate without moving parts,” says Ross. “The old system had paddles, chains, gears, shear pins
and so on. Our maintenance went from a daily disaster to near zero. The old
plant had a small chlorine room that
was converted to a lab, but that was
When we started
also the main plant entrance. So, we
up the new plant,
upgraded to a new lab with enough
room for all the proper equipment
the sludge blanket we
we need to perform routine lab work.”
Today, the 3.5 mgd (1.8 mgd averneeded was already in the
age) conventional treatment plant
cones, so we were able
produces finished water with 0.03 to
0.10 NTU and 184 mg/L hardness
to make water that met
for 17,000 customers.

‘‘

our permit the first day.”

MAKING IMPROVEMENTS

DENNIS ROSS

The Otter Lake treatment plant
and the 765-acre Otter Lake were built in 1969 in response to water shortages from the City of Springfield, the area’s previous water supplier. The
plant is operated by the Otter Lake Water Commission, which serves the
communities of Auburn, Divernon, Girard, Pawnee, Thayer, Virden, Nilwood
and Tovey, the South Palmyra Rural Water District and Henderson Water.
“None of these towns or districts could afford to have a water plant of
their own, so the towns got together in the early 1960s and designed this
plant,” says Ross. The commission is run by an eight-member board of directors, one appointed by the leadership of each member community.
Joe Hogan, Class A operator, checks one of the sensors inside a TrojanUVSwift
reactor during routine maintenance at the Otter Lake Water Commission
treatment plant.

Otter Lake Water Treatment Plant,
Girard, Illinois
FOUNDED: |

1969

POPULATION SERVED: |

17,000
8 communities, 2 water districts
SOURCE WATER: | Otter Lake
TREATMENT PROCESS: | Conventional
DISTRIBUTION: | 40 miles of pipeline
SYSTEM STORAGE: | 1.1 million gallons
KEY CHALLENGE: | Keeping up with new regulations
WEBSITE: | www.otterlakewater.net
GPS COORDINATES: | Latitude: 39°26’5.95”N; longitude: 89°53’48.68”W
SERVICE AREA: |

OPERATORS AT THE OTTER LAKE WATER TREATMENT

Plant have a lot to be happy about — improved water quality and operations
after an $8.5 million upgrade, a supportive water commission and general
manager Dennis Ross.
Ross brought his operations team through an 18-month improvement
project at the plant, in Girard, Illinois. Completed in 2010, it included adding solids contact clarifiers, two new multimedia filters, a new control room
and laboratory, and a million-gallon clearwell.

tpomag.com August 2015

33

‘‘

One thing that really stands out is when someone offers to work a holiday for an operator
with young kids. That shows how much we are like a family here.”

DENNIS ROSS
Team members at the Otter Lake Water Commission treatment plant include,
from left, Stan Crawford, Jeff Stanley, Joe Hogan, Brian Durbin, Rudy
Rodriguez, Dennis Ross, Bob Dill and Tim Walter.

chose ClariCone solids contact clarifiers from CB&I for ease of operation and
low maintenance. “We visited other plants that were using those and talked
to the operators,” says Ross. “We spent a lot of time doing our homework.”
Water from Otter Lake is pumped to the plant where it is fed powdered
activated carbon and a preoxidant before entering the head tank for mixing.
From there, it enters the ClariCone units (two, for redundancy). Treated
water overflows into a weir and is piped to multimedia filters (Leopold - a
Xylem Brand). Peroxide is added for advanced oxidation to eliminate taste
and odor issues.
The water is sent to the UV system (TrojanUV) and then disinfected with
sodium hypochlorite gas before entering the clearwell. “The new clearwell
is baffled to meet Illinois EPA contact time requirements before the water is
sent to our second clearwell,” says Ross. A MOSCAD SCADA system (Motorola Solutions) ties the plant together.
Plant equipment includes a pair of ClariCone solids contact clarifiers supplied
by CB&I.

The board decided in 2007 to upgrade the water plant to replace aging
equipment and accommodate growth. The existing flocculation/sedimentation basins were not automated and were wearing out.
“It was a good system back then, but new regulations required lower turbidity, which we had a difficult time meeting,” says Ross. The board hired
Hurst-Rosche Engineering to look at equipment options. The commission

34

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

SMOOTH STARTUP
The ClariCone clarifiers provide mixing, tapered flocculation and sedimentation in one hydraulically driven vessel. There are no mixers, scrapers,
recycle pumps or other continuous moving parts. The system maintains a
dense, suspended, rotating slurry blanket that provides solids contact, accelerated floc formation and solids capture. The conical concentrator maximizes
slurry discharge concentration and enables operators to visually monitor the
slurry discharge.
“The cones look like a wine glass, narrow at the base and larger at the
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35

top, basically an upside-down cone,” says Ross. “Water comes in the bottom, where it is mixed with caustic and polymer, turning at a pretty high
rate. As the water makes its way up the cone, the surface is larger, so the
water turns at a much slower rate. A blanket is formed in the lower portion of the cone, and clean water comes off the top.”
The operators’ learning curve was smooth. “Our lead operator, Jeff Stanley,
received hands-on training at another plant, then returned after a week and
trained the others,” says Ross.
Bob Dill, operations supervisor, helped ensure a successful startup. “He
did his homework, and we tested new chemical feeds in the old plant so we
knew what rates we would need to feed,” recalls Ross.
Since the clarifiers need to have a sludge blanket to perform, the operators pumped lime sludge from the old plant into the new clarifiers with a
3-inch trash pump. “When we started up the new plant, the sludge blanket
we needed was already in the cones, so we were able to make water that met
our permit the first day. This would not have happened without Bob’s upfront work.”

BETTER TASTE
The $2.3 million upgrade to UV/AOP technology allows the plant to comply with the Cryptosporidium rule and produces better-tasting water. “We had
just gone through about eight months of algae in the lake and were getting
calls about taste and odor,” recalls Ross. “We looked at other plants’ UV/AOP
systems and talked to operators to find out what they liked and didn’t like.”
Although the new system uses significant electricity, Ross feels it is a
better way to reduce taste and odor. “The system looks simple, but there is
a whole set of automated controls, separate from the SCADA,” Ross says.
“Operators must calibrate the in-line meters and check the sensors as part
of the state-required verification process.
“The UV system looks at several things to ensure that the water is getting the correct dose of light. We have to verify that the systems are working

WATER BUFFALO
Dennis Ross, Otter Lake Water Commission general manager,
has dedicated his adult life to the water industry. At 17, he began
working for Missouri Cities Water Company in St. Charles. After
getting his certification, he moved into management and worked
for several water systems.
He reached a high point in 2014 when he received the AWWA
George Warren Fuller Award from the Illinois Section of AWWA. “I
didn’t feel that I was in the same class as others I know who had
received this award,” he says. “It was very emotional. Besides my
family, the chairman of my board, Jake Rettberg, was there.”
Ross credits his mentors for his success: “My main mentor
was the late Max Wells, who was the division manager for the St.
Charles division of Missouri Cities Water. I was working as a
draftsman, and Max asked if I would like to move to meter reading,
which is where everyone starts. Max taught me how to deal with
customers and mentored me while on that job.”
Another mentor was Lynn Bultman, vice president of Missouri
Cities, who promoted Ross to division manager in Warrensburg,
Missouri. “He was willing to put a 29-year-old kid in a management position, even though everyone else in that operation was
older than I was,” Ross says. “I don’t think either of these gentlemen knew they were my mentors, but they enjoyed sharing their
knowledge with the next generation, and I was lucky enough to be
there to soak it up.”

Dennis Ross,
general manager

Today, Ross mentors others: “When I came to the Otter Lake
plant, I missed having peers to talk to in a larger water system, so I
got involved with ISAWWA.” He ended up chairing the Education
Committee and met people from other water plants, helping them
with treatment issues. Ross also serves on the Diversity Committee, chairs the Water for People Committee and serves on the
Water Utility Council.
His hobby is riding his 2009 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic
motorcycle as part of the Water Buffaloes (www.ridewithpurpose.
org). He does the annual Ride with Purpose to the AWWA ACE
conference to raise money for Water for People. He has ridden to
Dallas, Denver and Boston.

(continued)

36

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Plan B Leads to

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tpomag.com August 2015

37

properly. UV transmittance is important. The in-line meter feeds this information to the UV system, so that’s why we have to calibrate it every week.”
Sensors in the reactor tell the system how much power is needed for the
correct dose of light. Operators check the sensors monthly by comparing
them to three reference sensors kept in storage. Each unit has two reference
sensors, which TrojanUV verifies and calibrates yearly.
The quartz sleeves that house the bulbs are automatically cleaned at
startup and shutdown and every eight hours. The lubricant must be refilled
and checked every six months. Magmeters that report the flow of water to
the system are calibrated monthly.

LOOKING AHEAD
Future challenges for the Otter Lake team include keeping up with EPA
regulations, fixing line breaks in the aging distribution system and preparing for weather events. An ice storm in the early 1980s knocked out power
for three days; the plant now has standby generators. “We also have cots and
sleeping bags tucked away, and in the winter we stock canned goods just in
case,” says Ross.
More plant improvements are in the works. New high service pumps and
two new backwash pumps should be in place by summer 2016. Variable-frequency drives will save about $40,000 a year on electricity.

‘‘

The UV system
looks at several
things to ensure that
the water is getting the
correct dose of light.
We have to verify that
the systems are
working properly.”
DENNIS ROSS

HIGH MORALE
High productivity and morale
define the plant operations team. “I
believe they’re happy here because
they are encouraged to make suggestions and to come up with things that
are beyond the normal job,” says Ross.
The operators use their talents
to everyone’s advantage; they even
remodeled the plant’s bathroom.
“Moving the lab allowed us to convert the old lab into a break area for
the microwave, coffee maker and
refrigerator,” says Ross. “All of these
were in the filter room before. The
operators welcomed that change.”
The job offers substantial variety: lab work, maintenance, meter
Plant team members like Jeff Stanley, lead operator, routinely take initiative in offering ideas and providing labor to
reading, grounds maintenance. Operimprove the facility.
ators also help protect the Otter Lake
watershed by planting trees and laying riprap along the shoreline. Otter Lake is the only lake in the state with
The team will continue its watershed preservation work and community
its own mechanical barge, according to Ross. It can haul 17 tons of riprap
outreach. “We’re very involved with the ISAWWA, and we hosted a plant
and place it along the shoreline at a rate of about 100 feet per day with a crew
tour for them in September 2014,” says Ross. The plant also offers tours to
of three.
local schools: “Even if those students don’t go on to become operators, they
The operators support each other, helping new hires understand a treatmay be our customers some day, so it’s important for them to know who we
ment process or prepare for the next exam. “One thing that really stands out
are and what we do.”
is when someone offers to work a holiday for an operator with young kids,”
says Ross. “That shows how much we are like a family here.”
from:
Ross, a commission team member since 1997 and general manager since
CB&I
Motorola Solutions
1998, holds a Class A water treatment license. Besides Dill (Class A, 16 years)
832/513-1000
847/576-5000
and Stanley (Class A, 17 years), the team includes Rudy Rodriguez, crew
www.cbi.com
www.motorolasolutions.com
foreman (Class D, 18 years); Class A operators Stan Crawford, Otis Foster,
(See ad page 21)
Joe Hogan and Tim Walter; Class C operator Eric Walsh; and Brian Durbin.
TrojanUV
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39

BUILDING
THE TEAM

Next in Line
NEW YORK’S SOUTHERN CAYUGA LAKE INTERMUNICIPAL
WATER COMMISSION FACES RECRUITMENT CHALLENGES
WHILE KEEPING THE LEADERSHIP PIPELINE FILLED
By Ann Stawski

I

n 2011, the Southern Cayuga Lake Intermunicipal Water Commission
suddenly found itself with open positions for general manager and production manager.
Besides filling those two roles, the commission had to fill the newly created positions of assistant distribution manager and assistant production
manager at the Bolton Point Municipal Water System. That meant four key
leadership positions open.
The commission responded not by rushing to fill the slots but by taking
the long view and developing training and succession plans to help ensure a
full pipeline of leadership candidates for the future.

ON THE CAREER PATH

PHOTOS COURTESY OF BOLTON POINT MUNICIPAL WATER SYSTEM

The Southern Cayuga commission, based in Ithaca, New York, operates
the Bolton Point system, which serves just under 7,000 metered connections
in the towns of Ithaca, Dryden and Lansing and the villages of Cayuga
Heights and Lansing.
Without a succession plan in place, it was difficult to move existing personnel into the open leadership slots. The Bolton Point system has a staff of
17, including four distribution operators, four water treatment plant operators, instrument and control mechanic operators, water maintenance specialists and a GIS/IT specialist.

tell us about your team
Joan Foote was appointed general
manager May 30, succeeding the
retiring Jack Rueckheim.

This feature in TPO aims to help
clean-water plant leaders develop
strong, cohesive operating teams.
We welcome your story about
team-building at your facility.

The most likely internal candiSend your ideas to editor@
date for general manager was Jack
tpomag.com or call 877/953-3301
Rueckheim, then distribution manager and a 33-year employee of the
Southern Cayuga commission. However, he felt ill equipped for that role and
was focusing on retirement. Still, in 2011, he agreed to step in as general
manager for up to five years or until a replacement could be named.
Rueckheim took charge, immediately identifying opportunities to collect and standardize information and align training for all staff. “I kind of
stumbled into this as a career years ago,” he says. “I never thought, ‘Oh, I
want to work in a water treatment facility,’ but it has proven to be solid,
dependable work.”

‘‘

As we recruit and bring in candidates, we
focus on people who want advancement and
want to learn more and move up. That’s important
for us to build our succession planning. That’s the
best way for this kind of facility.”
JUDITH DRAKE

Judith Drake, human resources manager for the Town of Ithaca and the
Southern Cayuga commission, agrees that people do not always consider
work in water facilities as a career option: “It’s not always a calling one thinks
about in high school, but once they are introduced to the occupation, most
tend to stay for the long haul.”

RECRUITING CHALLENGES
A succession plan has helped the Bolton Point Water System prepare for a
future of capable and stable leadership.

40

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

Drake finds recruiting for the water facility to be a challenge in that many
professionals don’t want to jump from one water plant to another. The Bolton
Point system advertised nationally for its open positions and received only
eight responses.

The succession plan includes methods for identifying talented
people who are interested in increasing responsibility.

ments as time allows. We want to develop our staff into leaders.”
Since Rueckheim’s appointment as general manager, he and his team
have worked diligently to update facility procedures so that information does
more than sit on a shelf. “We took the information out of our heads and put
it on paper,” he says. “When someone asks a question, we pull out the manual and find the answers. That makes the team stronger and smarter.”
Leaders hope that by creating a plan and cultivating internal candidates,
the commission will be able to create a dependable pipeline of leadership prospects. Drake observes, “In developing our succession program and managing open recruitment, Bolton Point focuses on people who want to move up.
This means making our entire staff the strongest it can be on all levels.”
“People like stability and staying at one facility
or municipality,” says Drake. “They don’t always
want to uproot their lives and their families’ lives for
a job.” That makes it all the more critical to hire people who fit into a succession plan for the long term.
“As we recruit and bring in candidates, we focus
on people who want advancement and want to learn
more and move up,” says Drake. “That’s important
for us to build our succession planning. That’s the
best way for this kind of facility.”
Aside from traditional recruitment, the commission looks to local programs to generate awareness
of the industry and its facilities. Tompkins Cortland
Community College offered a New York State Health
Department Water Operator IIA license course in
which the Bolton Point system water staff helped
teach a section. The students toured the water plant
facility and interacted with staff in the laboratory.
A professor from Cornell University brings in
students from his environmental engineering course.
Earlier this year, he produced a video of the treatment plant. Extending and promoting the facility’s
activities in the community helps make prospective
employees aware of the career opportunities.

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PROMOTING INTERNALLY
While Rueckheim stepped in as general manager,
the Southern Cayuga commission found a suitable
production manager from an internal source. While
a leadperson, Joan Foote had been performing some
work normally done by the production manager; she
was able to transition into that role.
Drake acknowledges challenges in enticing employees to advance through the ranks: “Some people
understand that by moving up to a manager level,
there is more responsibility to undertake. Sometimes
it means being on call and making quick decisions
at two in the morning. Some people just don’t want
to step up to that level.”
To help promote from within, the Southern Cayuga
commission launched extensive supervisory and management training to employees who show interest and
potential to become managers or supervisors. In addition, employees receive operational training beyond
what is required to maintain their licenses.
“The training and tests taken by our staff is a
strong point of the commission,” says Rueckheim.
“Employees receive cross-training in other depart-

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41

top performer
wastewater:

PLANT

Tailgating to

Excellence

OPERATORS AT NORTH CAROLINA’S CONTENTNEA MSD
QUICKLY LEARN TO GET THE MOST PERFORMANCE
FROM A NEW BIOLOGICAL NUTRIENT REMOVAL FACILITY
STORY: Jim Force
PHOTOGRAPHY: Stuart Jones

AT THE CONTENTNEA METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE

District, tailgating doesn’t mean getting together for beer and burgers
before a football game. It refers to the informal morning gatherings of the
eight-member operations staff before they head out for their daily tasks.
Ideas are broached. Solutions discussed. Experiences shared.
“We’re a team,” says Chuck Smithwick, manager of the district, based in
Grifton, North Carolina. “Everybody works together. We don’t let any good
ideas go to waste.”
Adds Renee Smith, operator in responsible charge, “We’re small. Each
day we might be doing something different. You put on whatever hat you
need to wear that day.”
The daily exchange of ideas and observations helps because the district
is operating a brand-new wastewater treatment plant, the culmination of
more than $33 million in improvements and upgrades over the last 10 years,
driven by new requirements from state and federal environmental agencies.
The result? The district meets all discharge parameters, including nutrient
reductions.

STEP UP TO BNR
The Contentnea district serves the communities of Winterville (population 10,000), Ayden (5,000) and Grifton (2,800). Average daily flow to the 4
mgd (design) treatment plant is 2.14 mgd. Effluent flows into Contentnea
Creek, a part of the Neuse River watershed.
In the old days before the improvement project, the district operated a

42

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

Plant operators including Stephen
Berry (left) and James Woodard
received training to ensure
proper functioning of the facility’s
BNR oxidation ditch (Ovivo).

2 mgd multistage aerationcl a r i f ic at ion
facility designed
to reduce BOD
and TSS and convert ammonia to nitrite in a partial nitrogen removal process. “Our operators did a fantastic job of making the old plant work, but the
flow had gone beyond what the old plant could handle, and it couldn’t meet
the new nutrient limits,” Smith says. “It wasn’t designed to do what we needed
it to do.”
To meet the tighter nutrient requirements, the new treatment works is
anchored by a five-stage biological nutrient removal (BNR) Bardenpho oxidation ditch process (Ovivo). The new headworks includes a screen and
cyclone grit removal system (Parkson Corp.). The flow then passes through
a Parshall flume where flow is monitored.
The headworks is designed for a maximum wet-weather flow of 8 mgd.
Smithwick says infiltration and inflow is a problem in the collections sys-

tem. Each community is responsible for the integrity of its own system. “We’re
working with our communities on reducing I&I,” Smithwick says.

OUT WITH N
In the Bardenpho system, the first phase of the oxidation ditch operates
in the anaerobic mode for luxury uptake of phosphorus. It is followed by an
anoxic zone for nitrogen removal, an aerobic aeration stage for nitrification,
a second anoxic stage for further denitrification, and a post-aeration stage to
promote settling in the clarifier. Return activated sludge is directed back to
both anoxic zones.
Two 90-foot-diameter, 16-foot-deep clarifiers settle solids and produce a
clear overflow that passes to a tandem of deep bed sand denitrification filters.

Methanol is the carbon source. The filters are “bumped” periodically to release
nitrogen in its gaseous form.
The filter also polishes the wastewater.
Filter backwash water is returned to the head of the plant. TSS is not an
issue, as the plant easily meets its requirement of less than 30 mg/L. Total nitrogen isn’t an issue anymore: In 2014, the plant effluent averaged just 1.69 mg/L
total nitrogen. Final effluent is UV disinfected (WEDECO) before discharge.
Biosolids are aerobically digested, gravity thickened to 2 percent solids
and dewatered on two new 800 Series incline screw presses (Huber Technology) rated at 90 gpm. Cake averaging 18 to 20 percent solids is hauled to a
compost facility about 90 miles away. The district owns 70 acres surrounding the treatment plant where liquid biosolids can be applied.
tpomag.com August 2015

43

‘‘

We’re a team. Everybody works together. We don’t let
any good ideas go to waste.”

CHUCK SMITHWICK

Contentnea Metropolitan Sewerage District,
Grifton, North Carolina
BUILT: |

1976 (new plant 2010-2014)
POPULATION SERVED: | 17,000
FLOWS: | 4 mgd design, 2.14 mgd average
TREATMENT PROCESS: | Biological nutrient removal, denitrification filters
TREATMENT LEVEL: | Tertiary
RECEIVING WATER: | Contentnea Creek (feeds Neuse River)
BIOSOLIDS: | Land-applied
ANNUAL BUDGET: | $2.28 million
GPS COORDINATES: | Latitude: 35°21’24.02”N; longitude: 77°24’56.96”W

“We started operating the screw presses in March 2014, with the goal of
reducing land application of biosolids to our property by 50 percent,” says
Smithwick. “We typically apply about 2.2 million gallons to our fields annually.” In 2014, the property received 800,000 gallons, fertilizing Bermuda grass
and coastal hay for livestock feed. Material is applied from mid-March through
October. About 1.5 million gallons was dewatered in the presses in 2014.

KEEPING CONTROL
The control system (Ovivo) ramps the aerators up and down to control
dissolved oxygen in the BNR process and optimize chemical and energy use.

44

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

The CMSD staff includes, front row, from left, Harriett Pridgen, Windy
Sammond and Renee Smith; back row, Jimmy Edwards, Stephen Berry,
James Woodard and Chuck Smithwick. Not shown: Ricky Barrow.

PLCs on the individual pieces of equipment provide further process control,
and the plant uses a telemetry system to oversee all processes and alert operators to an issue if necessary. “The ditch is very operator-friendly,” Smith
says. “We essentially turn it on and let it run.”
The new plant capped a 10-year outlay in capital improvements to the
treatment system and the wastewater collections system, including interceptor and pump station work. Much of the funding came from outside sources
and zero- or low-interest loans. About 30 percent came as grants from the
U.S. Department of Agriculture and Rural Development and the North Carolina Rural Center. Other money came from the state’s Clean Water Management Trust Fund. “Without their help, none of this would have been
possible,” Smithwick says.
The district bills the communities it serves, and they in turn bill customers. Smithwick says individual sewer bills have increased slightly, and
the communities are implementing flow-based billing over the next two years.

USING THE OLD PLANT
While the former treatment plant is gone, it is not forgotten. In fact, it
serves a purpose. The district uses space in the old plant for solids processing and storage. “Four of the old circular clarifiers have been converted to
aerobic digesters for processing solids,” he says. These small tanks (150,000-gallon capacity) have been retrofitted with diffused air blowers. They are used
in rotation, week by week.

Chuck Smithwick inspects a valve
actuator (AUMA Actuators) in the
plant’s filter gallery.

oxygen entering the second anoxic
zone. “The manufacturer gave us
the idea, and we’ve learned how to
operate with the DO a bit lower and
get better denitrification in the ditch,”
says Smith. “That means less methanol needed in the denitrification
filters and less cost. We’ve been able
to optimize the efficiency of the denitrification process.”
Plant operators have made another
adjustment that improved phosphorus removal. “Weather and mixed
liquor suspended solids play a big
part in phosphorus removal,” Smith
says. During summer, the staff maintains the MLSS at 3,000 mg/L or
less and increases the DO content of
the basin. In winter, the MLSS
increases to about 4,000 mg/L.
“We’ve found the lower MLSS
in summer results in better phosContentnea Metropolitan Sewerage District
PERMIT AND PERFORMANCE
INFLUENT

EFFLUENT

PERMIT

143 mg/L

2.26 mg/L

15 mg/L

TSS

165 mg/L

< 2.5 mg/L

30 mg/L

Phosphorus

3.79 mg/L

0.66 mg/L

2.0 mg/L

Total nitrogen

24.19 mg/L

1.69 mg/L

37,100 lbs/yr

BOD

“We pump biosolids into one of the digesters for a week, then switch to
a second digester and pump into that one for a week,” Smithwick says. It’s a
batch operation: Each digester holds solids for about a month to condition the
material before it is transferred to the dewatering facility or spread on land.
“By using the old plant, we’ve been
able to increase our storage from 1 milThe (oxidation)
lion gallons to 2.4 million gallons,” Smithwick says. “From an operations standpoint,
ditch is very
we can’t have enough storage space.” The
operator-friendly. We increased capacity enables the plant to
remove, stabilize and properly recycle its
biosolids.
essentially turn it on

‘‘

and let it run.”
RENEE SMITH

OPERATING INNOVATIONS

The Contentnea team’s ingenuity has
helped the plant perform effectively.
Besides Smithwick and Smith, the team includes James Woodard, Ricky Barrow and Stephen Berry, operators; Jimmy Edwards, mechanic; Windy Sammond, lab assistant; and Harriett Pridgen, administrative officer.
As is typical with new treatment processes, the staff received training
from the equipment manufacturers, but Smith and her staff have made their
own adjustments to meet their specific needs. “Each facility is different,”
Smith says. “We learned the new processes together and we brainstormed
with all our operators on how to optimize operations.”
One of the most important lessons learned was that the BNR oxidation
ditch system can be most effectively controlled by monitoring dissolved

James Woodard changes
the effluent flow chart.

tpomag.com August 2015

45

James Woodard cleans the RoS 3Q
800 screw press (Huber Technology)
after processing a batch of biosolids.

‘‘

Each facility is
different. We
learned the new
processes together
and we brainstormed
with all our operators
on how to optimize
operations.”

RENEE SMITH

phorus removal,” Smith says. In hot weather, increased DO reduces the tendency of phosphorus to release back into the water. The plant also adds alum
during summer to increase phosphorus removal.

PEAK PERFORMANCE
The tweaks make a difference. The district produces outstanding effluent, averaging well under permitted levels for BOD, TSS, phosphorus and
total nitrogen. Effluent phosphorus averaged 0.66 mg/L for all of 2014; total
nitrogen averaged 1.69 mg/L.

The plant’s nitrogen permit limit is stated in pounds released per year.
“Our permit limits us to no more than 37,100 pounds of nitrogen on an annual
basis,” Smithwick says. “In 2014, our actual was 10,492 pounds.”
The district has gone from near
the bottom of the list to first in
nitrogen removal among the members of the Neuse River Compliance
from:
Association, a regional nutrient
AUMA Actuators, Inc.
trading group formed to reduce
724/743-2862
nitrogen into the sensitive Pamlico
www.auma-usa.com
Sound estuary.
Huber Technology, Inc.
Before installation of the new
704/949-1010
treatment processes, the district diswww.huberforum.net
charged more than 6 mg/L of total
(See ad page 9)
nitrogen at the midyear points of
Ovivo USA, LLC
2008 and 2009, and more than 8
512/834-6000
mg/L in 2010. In 2014, the midyear
www.ovivowater.com
number was 1.52 mg/L, lowest in the
Parkson Corp.
compliance association. “It’s much
888/727-5766
easier now,” says Smithwick. “It’s
www.parkson.com
better for our operators and for the
(See ad page 37)
environment.”
WEDECO – a Xylem Brand

featured
products

855/995-4261
www.wedeco.com
Windy Sammond, lab assistant,
performs regular tests to help keep
the process in control and on track.

46

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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47

Alfa Laval Ashbrook Simon-Hartley
5400 International Trade Dr., Richmond, VA 23231
866-253-2528
customerservice.usa@alfalaval.com www.alfalaval.us/wastewater

See ad page 59

See ad page 67

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Headworks/Biosolids Management

Aqua Ben Corporation
1390 N Manzanita, Orange, CA 92867
877-771-6041 714-771-6040 Fax: 714-771-1465
jwallace@aquaben.com www.aquaben.com

AQUA-Zyme Disposal Systems, Inc.
PO Box 489, Van Vleck, TX 77482
979-245-5656 Fax: 979-245-8070
zymme@aqua-zyme.com www.aqua-zyme.com

Aqualitec Screening Equipment
3415 S Sepulveda Blvd., Ste. 1100, Los Angeles, CA 90034
855-650-2214
info@aqualitec.com www.aqualitec.com
BDP Industries, Inc.
354 Rte. 29, Greenwich, NY 12834
518-695-6851 Fax: 518-695-5417
kelly@bdpindustries.com www.bdpindustries.com

See ad page 73

See ad page 2

Bilfinger Water Technologies, Inc.
1950 Old Hwy 8 NW, New Brighton, MN 55112
800-833-9473 651-636-3900 Fax: 651-638-3171
william.emmers@bilfinger.com www.water.bilfinger.com
Blue-White Industries
5300 Business Dr., Huntington Beach, CA 92649
714-893-8529 Fax: 714-894-9492
sales@blue-white.com www.blue-white.com

Boerger, LLC
2860 Water Tower Pl., Chanhassen, MN 55317
612-435-7300 Fax: 612-535-7301
america@boerger.com www.boerger.com

See ad page 69

Bright Technologies Specialty div. of Sebright Products, Inc.
127 N Water St., Hopkins, MI 49328
800-253-0532 269-793-7183 Fax: 269-793-4022
julie@brightbeltpress.com www.brightbeltpress.com

See ad page 17

Carylon Corporation
2500 W Arthington St., Chicago, IL 60612
800-621-4342 312-666-7700 Fax: 312-666-5810
info@caryloncorp.com www.caryloncorp.com

See ad page 21

CB&I
2103 Research Forest Dr., The Woodlands, TX 77380
832-513-1000 Fax: 832-513-1005
water@cbi.com www.cbi.com

See ad page 59

See ad page 59

48

Centrisys Corporation
9586 58th Pl., Kenosha, WI 53144
877-339-5496 262-654-6006 Fax: 262-764-8705
info@centrisys.us www.centrisys.us
CNP - Technology Water and Biosolids Corp.
9535 58th Pl., Kenosha, WI 53144
262-764-3651 Fax: 262-764-8705
gerhard.forstner@cnp-tec.com www.cnp-tec.com

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR















Underdrain
Filter
Bottoms

tpomag.com August 2015

(continued)

49

Dry
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Oth
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Slu
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-

Scr
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s

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Gri
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Gri
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See ad page 19

CST Industries
498 N Loop 336E, Conroe, TX 77301
936-539-1747
kmathis@cstindustries.com www.cstindustries.com

Bio
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Headworks/Biosolids Management

DEL Tank & Filtration Systems
436 Hwy 93 N, Scott, LA 70583
800-468-2657 337-237-8400 Fax: 337-266-7800
sales@deltank.com www.deltank.com
Duperon Corporation
1200 Leon Scott Ct., Saginaw, MI 48601
800-383-8479 989-754-8800 Fax: 989-754-2175
bbauer@duperon.com www.duperon.com

See ad page 31

See ad page 4

Eagle Microsystems, Inc.
366 Circle of Progress Dr. , Pottstown, PA 19464
610-323-2250 Fax: 610-323-0114
info@eaglemicrosystems.com www.eaglemicrosystems.com
Enviro-Care Company
1570 St. Paul Ave., Gurnee, IL 60031
815-636-8306 Fax: 815-636-8302
ecsales@enviro-care.com www.enviro-care.com

See ad page 25

FKC Co., Ltd.
2708 W 18th St., Port Angeles, WA 98363
360-452-9472 Fax: 360-452-6880
mail@fkcscrewpress.com www.fkcscrewpress.com

See ad page 54

Flo Trend Systems, Inc.
707 Lehmen St., Houston, TX 77018
713-699-0152
sales@flotrend.com www.flotrend.com

See ad page 8

See ad page 61

See ad page 9

See ad page 55

See ad page 47

See ad page 29

50



Fournier Industries, Inc.
3787 Frontenac Blvd. W, Thetford Mines, QC G6H 2B5 CANADA
418-423-6912 Fax: 418-423-7366
s.fournier@fournierindustries.com www.rotary-press.com
Grace Industries, Inc.
305 Bend Hill Rd., Fredonia, PA 16124
724-962-9231 Fax: 724-962-3611
sales@graceindustries.com www.graceindustries.com
Huber Technology, Inc.
9735 NorthCross Center Ct., Ste. A, Huntersville, NC 28078
704-949-1010 Fax: 704-949-1020
marketing@hhusa.net www.huberforum.net
Hydro International
2925 NW Aloclek Dr., Ste. 140, Hillsboro, OR 97124
866-615-8130 503-615-8130 Fax: 503-615-2906
questions@hydro-int.com www.hydro-int.com
JDV Equipment Corporation
1 Princeton Ave., Dover, NJ 07801
973-366-6556
www.jdvequipment.com
JWC Environmental
290 Paularino Ave., Costa Mesa, CA 92626
800-331-2277 949-833-3888 Fax: 949-833-8858
jwce@jwce.com www.jwce.com

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR



























Grease
Receiving

tpomag.com August 2015

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Headworks/Biosolids Management
Komline-Sanderson
12 Holland Ave., Peapack, NJ 07977
800-225-5457 908-234-1000 Fax: 908-234-9487
info@komline.com www.komline.com

See ad page 69

Kuhn North America, Inc.
PO Box 167, Brodhead, WI 53520
608-897-2131 Fax: 608-897-2561
chris.searles@kuhn.com www.kuhnnorthamerica.com

See ad page 3

Lakeside Equipment Corporation
1022 E Devon Ave., Bartlett, IL 60103
630-837-5640 Fax: 630-837-5647
sales@lakeside-equipment.com www.lakeside-equipment.com

See ad page 31

Noxon North America, Inc.
4-470 N Rivermede, Concord, ON L4K 3R8 CANADA
416-843-6500
pg@noxon.com www.noxon.com

See ad page 37

Ovivo USA, LLC
2404 Rutland Dr., Austin, TX 78758
512-834-6000 Fax: 512-834-6039
info.us@ovivowater.com www.ovivowater.com

Parkson Corp.
1401 W Cypress Creek Rd., Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309
888-727-5766 954-974-6610 Fax: 954-974-6182
technology@parkson.com www.parkson.com

PWTech (Process Wastewater Technologies)
9004 Yellow Brick Rd., Ste. D, Rosedale, MD 21237
443-648-3300 Fax: 410-238-7559
contact@pwtech.us www.pwtech.us

See ad page 71

See ad page 35

See ad page 73

Roto-Mix, LLC
2205 E Wyatt Earp Blvd., Dodge City, KS 67801
620-225-1142 Fax: 620-225-6370
info@rotomix.com www.rotomix.com
Schreiber LLC
100 Schreiber Dr., Trussville, AL 35173
205-655-7466 Fax: 205-655-7669
info@schreiberwater.com www.screiberwater.com
Screenco Systems LLC
13235 Spur Rd., Genesee, ID 83832
208-790-8770
screencosys@gmail.com www.screencosystems.com

See ad page 39

SEEPEX Inc.
511 Speedway Dr., Enon, OH 45323
937-864-7150 Fax: 937-864-7157
sales.us@seepex.com www.seepex.com

See ad page 79

Smith & Loveless, Inc.
14040 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, KS 66215
800-898-9122 913-888-5201
answers@smithandloveless.com www.smithandloveless.com

See ad page 78

52

SUEZ ENVIRONNEMENT
8007 Discovery Dr., Richmond, VA 23229
800-446-1150 804-756-7600
info-infilco@degtec.com www.degremont-technologies.com

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR



























































Continuous
Deflection
Separation

Sludge Incineration

tpomag.com August 2015

(continued)

53

Dry
ers

Oth
er

Slu
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Ha ge ulin
g/D
isp
osa
l
Slu
dge
-H
eat
ers
Slu
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Lan ge dA
ppl
ica
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Slu
dge
Mix ers
/ Th
ick
ene
rs

Slu
dge
-

Scr
e
Scr ens/S
een trai
ing ners
Sys /
tem
s
Scr
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Co
nve
yor
s
Se
pta
Re ge
c
Sta eivin
tio g
ns
Slu
d
De ge wa
Pre teri
sse ng /
s

Pu
m
Arc ps h
Sc imed
rew es
/

Gri
t
RemHand
ova ling
l/ H /
aul
ing
He
adw
ork
s

Gri
n
Sh ders
red /
der
s

See ad page 47

See ad page 80

Tank Connection Affiliate Group
3609 N 16th St., Parson, KS 67357
620-423-3010 Fax: 620-423-3999
sales@tankconnection.com www.tankconnection.com

USABlueBook
PO Box 9006, Gurnee, IL 60031
800-548-1234 847-689-3000 Fax: 847-689-3030
customerservice@usabluebook.com www.usabluebook.com
USP Technologies (US Peroxide)
900 Circle 75 Pkwy., Ste. 1330, Atlanta, GA 30339
877-346-4262 404-352-6070 Fax: 404-352-6077
info@usptechnologies.com www.usptechnologies.com

See ad page 11

See ad page 15


Vaughan Company, Inc.
364 Monte-Elma Rd., Montesano, WA 98563
888-249-2467 360-249-4042 Fax: 360-249-6155
info@chopperpumps.com www.chopperpumps.com
VFOLD INC.
15700 Robins Hill Rd., Unit 2, London, ON N5V 0A4 CANADA
877-818-3653 Fax: 519-659-6523
sales@vfoldinc.com www.vfoldinc.com
WesTech Engineering, Inc.
3665 S West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84115
801-265-1000 Fax: 801-265-1080
info@westech-inc.com www.westech-inc.com

FREE INFO – SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

54

Bio
Tre solids
a
Ap tmen
plic t /
ati
on
Ce
ntr
Se ifug
par es
ato /
rs
Che
Feemical
d E /Po
qui lym
pm er
ent
Co
agu
Flo lan
c
Po cula ts/
lym nts
ers /
Co
m
Equ post
ipm ing
ent
Co
nve
yor
s

s/

Bin
Sil s/Hop
os pe
r

DIRECTORY

An
a
Dig erob
est ic
ers

2015

Headworks/Biosolids Management

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

Slu
d
Ha ge ulin
g/D
isp
osa
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Slu
dge
-H
eat
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Slu
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Lan ge dA
ppl
ica
tion
Slu
dge
Mix ers
/ Th
ick
ene
rs

Oth
er

Dry
ers
Slu
dge
-

Scr
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Scr ens/S
een trai
ing ners
Sys /
tem
s
Scr
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Co
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yor
s
Se
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Re ge
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Sta eivin
tio g
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Slu
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De ge wa
Pre teri
sse ng /
s

Pu
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Arc ps h
Sc imed
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/

Gri
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RemHand
ova ling
l/ H /
aul
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s

Gri
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red /
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Odor Control


Fine
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FREE INFO – SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

tpomag.com August 2015

55

IN MY WORDS

Residuals as Resources:
Knowing the Market
LISE LEBLANC HELPS ORGANIC RESIDUALS SUPPLIERS CONNECT WITH
THEIR CUSTOMERS. HER SUCCESS WITH MUNICIPAL AND PRIVATE-SECTOR
CLIENTS HOLDS LESSONS FOR BIOSOLIDS RECYCLING PROGRAMS.
By Ted J. Rulseh

L

ise LeBlanc started a consulting career 18 years ago, helping farmers
in Canada’s Atlantic provinces develop crop management programs.
Along the way, she saw a critical need to manage nutrients on land, “to
ensure that we don’t have excessive nutrients leading to environmental issues,
or not enough nutrients so that farmers don’t get good crop yields and quality.”
It was then her business, LP Consulting in Mount Uniacke, Nova Scotia,
took an additional direction. Today, she helps businesses and municipalities
turn organic waste materials into resources and market them, usually as farm
fertilizers and soil amendments. She sees big potential for residuals of many
kinds, including municipal biosolids, as commercial fertilizers grow more
expensive and as the farm community looks to more sustainable practices.
She believes the biggest key to successful farm-based waste-to-resource
programs is understanding the market: To be viable, a product must deliver
provable economic value and fit in with farmers’ existing practices. LeBlanc
shared a broad picture of Canada’s residuals market in an interview with
TPO. Many of her insights translate well to biosolids recycling projects.
: What triggered your interest in residuals as a viable product for
farmers?
LeBlanc: I’m really interested in the economics of growing crops: How
much money are we putting in, and what are we getting out? It became clear
that straight inorganic commercial fertilizers were becoming more expensive. Farmers were cutting back. Soil pH and nutrient levels decreased. So I
started asking what was out there that could improve my farm clients’ crop
production.
: What was your first venture into the residuals area?
LeBlanc: We started with the Brooklyn Power utility here in in Nova
Scotia. They were taking wood ash to a landfill and paying a tipping fee.
That was very expensive. They were interested in reducing expenses but
also in whether this material could be a resource. We did tests on the material, secured environmental permits and conducted research on 26 farm
fields to look at the soil health over time. We found we were increasing yield,
improving soil pH and increasing nutrients. I encouraged my farm clients
to use the wood ash in their crop production programs. As they saw improvements in their fields, neighbors noticed, and it grew from there.
: How exactly is the wood ash beneficial?
LeBlanc: It has a lot of nutrients, in particular potash, phosphorus, sulfur and calcium. It also acts like lime by increasing soil pH. It was like a
huge multivitamin. All of a sudden, farmers were greatly increasing production at a fraction of the cost of commercial lime and fertilizer. On really poor
soils, we more than doubled yield and quality.

56

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

: What is the scope of your
company’s services on projects like
this one?
LeBlanc: We work for the company on testing, permits and regulator y compliance. We handle
marketing, with demonstration sites,
booths and farm meetings to make
farmers aware. Then we work with
the farmers. How much do you need?
What’s the best way to use it? Put in
front of corn? Apply it in fall or spring?
We determine the tonnage to send
to each farm and work with trucking companies to make sure they
deliver on a timely basis. If issues
with the public arise, we put on public meetings and talk to the media.
: Have you been involved
with municipal biosolids projects?
LeBlanc: Halifax Regional
Municipality had been putting wastewater sludge into the harbor, which
Lise LeBlanc, with a soil amendment
was not acceptable. They looked at
made from alkaline-stabilized bioalternatives in what they called the
solids from the Halifax (Nova Scotia)
Clean Harbor Solution. They decided
Regional Municipality.
on an alkaline-stabilization program
through N-Viro Systems Canada,
which is now owned by Walker Industries.
They approached me for help in working with farmers. I looked at the
product analysis and thought it was great. We had nitrogen and phosphorus
in the biosolids, high potash from the cement kiln dust, and lime to increase
soil pH. We did have pushback from environmental groups and went through
our painful years, but now we have a waiting list of farmers. We secured a
CFIA (Canadian Food Inspection Agency) label for the product. Because it’s
sold as fertilizer, it doesn’t have to follow provincial biosolids guidelines.
: What are some keys to a successful waste-to-resource program?
LeBlanc: It’s important to understand the market. It’s not enough to
say your product has N, P and K in it and farmers should take it. The agriculture community will only embrace a product if there is a good return on
their dollar. Take the Halifax product, for example. To buy lime and com-

About LP Consulting
LP Consulting, based in Mount Uniacke, Nova Scotia, works
to develop sustainable solutions for farmers, businesses and the
environment. The company’s four staff professionals offer
expertise in nutrient, soil and waste management, crop production, land reclamation, education, training and research.
The company also partners with municipal and industrial
clients to develop, manage and sustain waste-to-resource
programs involving biosolids, wood ash, compost, anaerobic
digestate, offshore drilling waste, rendering plant effluent,
fishery waste, paper mill sludge, and construction and demolition waste. LP also works with crop and livestock producers to
increase yields and profitability. That includes helping them
make use of local soil amendments that improve crop production
and soil health.
Company principal Lise LeBlanc holds a bachelor’s degree in
agriculture from Dalhousie University, along with a bachelor’s
degree in education and a Master of Science degree from Acadia
University. Both institutions are in Nova Scotia.

mercial fertilizer to replace a tonne of N-Viro product, farmers would have
to spend $125 to $150. So if they’re paying $40 to $50 a tonne for the product, that’s a significant return. It takes somebody to show them that — a lot
of presentations and penciling out the economics at the table.
: Apart from pure economics, what factors influence success?
LeBlanc: What’s the soil type in your locality? If farms already have a
high soil pH, then an alkaline-stabilized biosolids will not have a market. If
the soil already has good organic matter, then organic matter in a compost
is not a selling feature. You need to understand the growing season farmers
are working with. During peak times when the farmers need the product,
you need to have a lot of trucks lined up. Some residuals companies will have
just a couple of trucks going. Farmers can’t wait and will just cancel. They’ll
apply commercial fertilizer because it’s faster. It’s important to have a good
relationship with the farm community. If you don’t have one, work with somebody who does. I recommend finding a local agrologist who is highly respected
among farmers — someone who knows what will sell and what won’t.
: How do you recommend approaching community relations?
LeBlanc: The way farmers manage the product is important. You want
to reduce neighbor conflicts as much as possible. Make sure you don’t apply
it on weekends. Make sure you don’t apply it in the heat of summer when
you could generate odors, because odors will shut you down. Instead of having farmers store material on the fields, ship it when they’re ready to use it.
In our programs, once we adopted these practices, essentially 99 percent of
calls and concerns stopped. If something does go wrong, deal with it up front.
Don’t hide it, because it will come out, and then it’s difficult to get trust back.
One thing most people don’t think about is: Your first face to the public
is your truckers. They don’t need to be your PR people, and they shouldn’t
be; that’s not their training. But spend some time with them to at least let
them know what the product is that they’re hauling. Give them brochures so
if someone stops and asks a question, they can say, “This is a biosolids compost (or whatever it is); here’s some information, and you can call the person
listed on the back.”
The key to communication is being honest. I’ve conducted public meetings. I prefer one-on-ones because public meetings can be hijacked. Meet
one on one with people who have concerns. Provide information. Listen to
them. You’ll have those who’ve heard bad things about residuals and aren’t

sure. With information, you can bring them around. You also have those
who, whatever you give them or tell them, will never change their minds.
: Besides the products you’ve already mentioned, what other programs has your company been involved with?
LeBlanc: We run a wood ash program for the J.D. Irving forest products company out of New Brunswick. Our wood ash programs are booked
now about two years in advance, before the product is even made. We’re looking at moving chicken manure and livestock manure that farmers can’t use
on their own land. We’re also looking at soil blending and composting.
: What are some other residual products that you see as having
potential?
LeBlanc: One is pulp and paper sludge. Some companies try to burn
it, but it has high water content, so that’s very inefficient. Some years ago, a
company tried a land application program, but it wasn’t well managed, and
odors shut it down. But I’ve seen it on agricultural land, and it works fantastic. I think it has big potential.
Fish waste is an excellent source of nitrogen and other nutrients for farms,
but again, there’s a need to address odor. You could co-compost it. Biofuel is
another potential market for using residuals. To the general public, if they’re
uncomfortable with biosolids, if there is an “ick factor,” well, you’re not using
it to grow food. You’re using it to grow energy. There’s probably residual
material out there that we don’t even know about yet that could be excellent
for waste-to-resource programs.
: What’s the benefit of co-composting?
LeBlanc: Co-composting can increase the value of a compost and make
it easier to move. Suppose you have a material that has a nutrient value of $5 or
$10 per tonne. That’s not going to be very attractive to the farm community. But
what if there’s another residuals company nearby that has a different product, so that if you blended those two together, it’s worth $50 a tonne? Now
you certainly can go back to the table and talk about moving that product.
: What are some examples of residuals that could be profitably mixed?
LeBlanc: Adding biosolids to compost can greatly increase the nutrient value, but then you have to deal with public concern about biosolids.
That’s not difficult in the agricultural sector, but then farmers have to deal
with their neighbors. Another material that can be composted is digestate
from food waste, or food waste mixed with animal manure.
: How would you characterize the future potential for residuals?
LeBlanc: I think there is huge potential for residuals. The price of fertilizer continues to go up. The ability to easily extract phosphorus from the
earth is decreasing. In the next 30 years, that phosphorus will be extremely
expensive. Phosphorus is key to plant growth, so it’s important that governments support residuals for land application. If we’re to be sustainable in the
future, we can’t keep putting these residual nutrients into landfills.
: Can regulatory agencies play a role in advancing residuals
programs?
LeBlanc: Departments of environment need to improve their approaches
if we’re to move ahead on these sustainable programs. Many departments
say they support sustainable programs, but in reality they make it very difficult. Many don’t like to look at research conducted in other areas. They say,
“We’re different here.” But in reality they’re not so different.
Why do we set programs back by decades because their first response is
to say no, regardless if there are similar successful programs elsewhere?
That’s not supportive of sustainability. I understand they need to ensure that
a product is safe, but when they have all the data to show that it’s safe, they
shouldn’t put up roadblocks to making programs successful. That’s frustrating for companies that want to provide sustainable programs. It all comes
back to sustainability: reducing waste, changing waste to resources and using
those resources.
tpomag.com August 2015

57

TECHNOLOGY
DEEP DIVE

1) Biosolids are pumped into Tank 1 and acidified to lower
the pH, thus solubilizing the phosphorus.

5) Lime is added to the phosphorus-rich solution in Tank 2 to
raise the pH and precipitate the phosphorus.

2) Low-pH material is pumped through a ceramic membrane,
allowing only liquid and solubilized materials to pass.

6) A second ceramic membrane separates the precipitated
phosphorus from the liquid stream, allowing phosphorusfree liquid to pass, and leaving behind extracted
phosphorus.

3) Low- or no-phosphorus material is pumped to dewatering.
4) Solubilized phosphorus solution passes through membrane and is pumped to Tank 2.

Nutrient Solutions
AN INNOVATIVE PROCESS COMBINES CHEMICAL TREATMENT AND MEMBRANE SEPARATION
TO EXTRACT AND RECOVER PHOSPHORUS FROM WASTEWATER BIOSOLIDS
By Ted J. Rulseh

P

hosphorus can be a challenge not only in clean-water plant effluent but
in biosolids. For facilities looking to land-apply biosolids in areas with
naturally phosphorus-rich soils, high P in the material can be an obstacle.
Now, Renewable Nutrients, based in Pinehurst, North Carolina, offers a
process that can remove phosphorus from the solids and capture it downstream. The results are crop- and soil-friendly biosolids and a granular calcium phosphate product that can be used as fertilizer.
The Quick Wash process chemically separates phosphorus from the biosolids in one tank, then chemically precipitates it in another tank. The company offers a mobile, trailer-mounted pilot treatment unit that can be installed
at clean-water plants to test how the process could be configured to operate
at a commercial scale on the site.
Jeff Dawson, CEO, and Larry Sandeen, chief engineer, talked about the
process in an interview with Treatment Plant Operator.
: What need in the marketplace drove development of this
technology?
Dawson: Around the country and the world, there is an issue with the
amount of phosphorus being land-applied with biosolids. Excess phosphorus
can run off into waterways and cause algae blooms. On the other side, the world

58

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

has reached its peak in extraction of phosphorus, a nonrenewable resource
that is also essential to growing food. Our technology creates biosolids with
a more desirable nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio while capturing the extracted
phosphorus in a product that can be directed to other beneficial uses.
: How is the phosphorus extracted from the biosolids stream?
Sandeen: We acidify the solids to a pH of roughly 2.5 to lyse some of
the cells, dissolve the phosphorus and make it available to be carried forward in a liquid stream through a separation process. There we capture the
low-phosphorus solids, which can be land-applied without affecting surface
waters. The low-pH, high-phosphorus liquid moves to another tank.
: How is the phosphorus recovered from that liquid stream?
Sandeen: We add lime to that liquid to a pH of about 10.5, causing calcium phosphate solids to precipitate out. After another separation process,
the high-pH, relatively clean liquid stream can be returned to the treatment
plant headworks or to a point in the process that requires alkalinity. The
precipitated solids can then be processed further — concentrated, dewatered
or dried, depending on the intended use and the specific market we would
be delivering the product to.

: Where in a wastewater treatment plant process would this process be deployed?
Sandeen: Most commonly, it would be installed before sludge dewatering. Our system could function as the thickening process. It could also be
implemented on a phosphorus-rich sidestream. There are ample opportunities to customize it to the specific needs of a facility.
: What is the typical solids content of the biosolids created from
this process?
Sandeen: We typically target about 4 percent, but it depends on how
we apply the technology. That’s one reason we have our pilot plant — so we
can look at different plants, different scenarios, different points in the process to pull the sludge from. You can work this process with digested biosolids, waste activated sludge or almost any solids stream.

‘‘

Customers don’t buy a ‘black box’ from us.
They buy the technology, and all the parts along
the chain are off-the-shelf, proven technologies
that have been around the waste treatment business
for quite some time.”

JEFF DAWSON

Ideas Ahead
See us at WEFTEC booth 2674

THK Thickening System
WEF Innovative Technology
Award Winner

Attacking key challenges with new thinking. At Centrisys, that’s
how we’ve been moving the wastewater industry forward
for more than 25 years. From more efficient dewatering, to
polymer-free thickening, to the next valuable breakthrough, we
continue to advance innovations that save money, increase

: How would you describe your pilot unit?
Sandeen: It’s a trailer-mounted unit that we can move from location
to location to demonstrate the technology. It receives flows on the order of 3
to 5 gpm. The point is to model the extraction process on site and collect
data that will inform full-scale implementation. We can also collect samples
of the two solids streams and send them to dewatering vendors to see how
their equipment would handle the materials. For an existing facility considering a retrofit of our process, we can send samples to the manufacturers of
the dewatering equipment they currently use to get an assessment of how
operations would be affected by our process.
: What degree of phosphorus removal can your process achieve?
Dawson: We can customize the amount of extraction depending on
what the customer wants the solids to look like on the back end. So if you
need a 2-to-1, 3-to-1 or 4-to-1 nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio in your biosolids
because in your region that’s what you need for land application, we can do
that. We have a technology that extracts more than 80 percent of phosphorus, but that can be dialed down if the customer so desires.
: What does this technology look like in terms of the equipment
deployed on a site?
Dawson: We’re agnostic in terms of the equipment that’s needed. Customers don’t buy a “black box” from us. They buy the technology, and all the
parts along the chain are off-the-shelf, proven technologies that have been
around the waste treatment business for quite some time. We’re agnostic in
how we put a process together to meet the needs of a facility.
: What are prospective customers saying about this technology?
Dawson: As we have conversations with consulting engineering firms
and end users, there are dynamic discussions about changing how the industry deals with nutrient issues and nutrient extraction and how this could be
a game-changing technology. There’s a need for it because states are getting
much more restrictive in the land application of phosphorus in biosolids.
And the reality is that as a society we have to start reusing phosphorus as
that resource becomes scarcer and prices continue to go up.

uptime and advance your success.

Get ahead today at Centrisys.com/IdeasAhead.

Road Trip and a Tour – Sunday, September 27, 2015
Join us on a tour of the Kenosha Wastewater Treatment Plant, and see
how this 1938 facility has been transformed into a plant for the future.
Unable to make the tour?
Come visit Centrisys at WEFTEC Booth 2674 or
CNP Technology Water and BioSolids Corp. at WEFTEC Booth 2593.

FREE INFO – SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

Coagulants and Flocculants
for Septic, Grease, Municipalities and Industry

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FREE INFO – SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

tpomag.com August 2015

59

spotlight

PHOTO BY CRAIG MANDLI

Scott Meyer, right, owner of
Screenco Systems and inventor
of the Dual Screen System,
discusses the features of
his receiving station with an
attendee at the 2015 WWETT
Show. The gravity system
dewaters septage, filtering
out garbage that collects atop
screens and is manually raked
into a collection device.

Simple Screening
DEWATERING PLANT OWNER MARKETS HIS RECEIVING STATION TO THE INDUSTRY
By Craig Mandli

S

filtered garbage that collects atop the
cott Meyer was stuck. An increase in material volume at his Idaho
screens can be raked into a wheelseptage dewatering plant, along with tighter regulations on the cleanWater & Wastewater Equipment,
barrow or other collection device.
liness of land-applied biosolids, left him struggling to keep up. That’s
Treatment & Transport Show
The unit comes with a stainless steel
when he took matters into his own hands.
www.wwettshow.com
rake.
“Our screening system was constantly plugging with hair and rags, and
Education Day: Feb. 17, 2016
“We built and tested multiple
having to stop periodically to clean it meant I couldn’t filter septage at the
Exhibits: Feb. 18-20, 2016
Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis
designs, and have been beta testing
volume I needed to,” says Meyer. “I started tinkering with my own design,
this current version in commercial
and that’s how Screenco Systems was born.”
applications for the past 18 months,” says Meyer. “We use it every day at our
Meyer’s high-capacity Dual Screen System, which made its commercial
dewatering plant, and we’ve seen cleaner biosolids, faster off-load times and
debut at the 2015 Water & Wastewater Equipment, Treatment & Transport
improved productivity. We’ve run 35,000 gpd through our screen, and the
(WWETT) Show, is constructed of aluminum with stainless steel screens,
biosolids are virtually garbage-free.”
with a collection sump and a high-capacity 6-inch drain. The system has two
While he’s been to several past WWETT Shows, the 2015 show was Mey3/8-inch gapped stainless steel bar screens at opposing angles; the front
er’s first as an exhibitor. He says his goal was simply to introduce the indusscreen is virtually self-cleaning. It is a non-mechanical, simple way to remove
try to his product. “We aimed this
large pieces of trash, rocks and other
system at people like me — private
debris from the flow stream.
We’ve run 35,000 gpd through our screen,
contractors who do their own dewa“It’s really a simple design with
and the biosolids are virtually garbage-free.”
tering and small municipalities that
no moving parts,” says Meyer. “When
SCOTT MEYER
dewater as part of their pretreatthe septage is pumped in, trash and
ment,” he says. “I’m hoping to show them that there is a product out there
debris hits the deflector and ends up on the bottom of the screen. Once it
that is simple and affordable. Judging by the positive reaction, a lot of guys
starts draining slower, the operator manually rakes it clean.”
have been dealing with the same issues I was.”
This unit has a 4-inch telescoping inlet hose that moves laterally and can
Meyer was excited by the response and sold several units while on the
be connected to a vacuum truck or other flow stream. The system is portafloor. He’s already thinking about WWETT 2016 and promises to be back
ble; and the 19.5 square feet of screening area allows for continued use and
with a “bigger and even better” dual-screen design.
is easy to rake clean to the garbage drain tray. It can treat over 500 gpm. Var“I have a couple upgrade ideas, including adding forklift skids to make
ious screen gap sizes are available.
the station more portable,” he says. “The guys I talked with at WWETT told
The unit can be mounted above an open-pit settling pond or as a standme it was a great design at a good price. Hearing that kind of feedback is
alone application that can be stationed almost anywhere. The station is easexciting!” 208/790-8770; www.screencosystems.com.
ily cleaned with water; catwalk access enables easy cleaning and raking. The

‘‘

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FKC SKID-MOUNTED
DEWATERING SYSTEM

Headworks and
Biosolids Management
By Craig Mandli

Aftermarket Parts/Service
AGC CHEMICALS AMERICAS AFLAS
FLUOROELASTOMERS

FKC skid-mounted dewatering systems can be
set up strictly for dewatering or used to heat-pasteurize biosolids while dewatering to achieve a Class
A product. Lime is added before dewatering
Skid-mounted dewatering
to raise the pH to 12 in a separate agitated
systems from FKC
tank. The liquid biosolids are then pumped
with polymer to the flocculation tank on the skid. Flocculated biosolids
overflow from the tank into the rotary screen thickener and are gravity
fed into the screw press, where steam from a small boiler is injected, heating the biosolids to meet the time and temperature requirements. 360/4529472; www.fkcscrewpress.com.

ML SPIRALS SHAFTLESS SCREWS

AFLAS Fluoroelastomers for pumps, valves
and seals from AGC Chemicals Americas enable
parts and components to withstand taxing conditions and help reduce downtime in
potable water/wastewater operations. AFLAS Fluoroelastomers from
AGC Chemicals Americas
They enhance performance and extend
the life of pumps, seals and valves used in harsh chemical processing
applications. They are resistant to acids, bases, solvents, hydrocarbons,
sour oil and amines, as well as extreme temperature ranges and highpressure environments. They are copolymers of tetrafluoroethylene and
propylene with high molecular weights. Classified by ASTM D 1418-01
as FEPM, they don’t deteriorate under prolonged exposure above 392
degrees F. 800/424-7833; www.agcchem.com.

CONVEYOR COMPONENTS
COMPANY VA AND VAX
Model VA and VAX bucket elevator alignment
controls from Conveyor Components Company are
designed to indicate when the head or boot section
of a bucket elevator drifts too far out of alignment.
They can be used to signal a problem
Model VA and VAX bucket elevator
alignment controls from Conveyor
or simply shut down the bucket elevaComponents Company
tor leg. This control device has a sequential two-pole double-break microswitch rated for 20 amps at 120, 240 or
480 VAC. The switch actuation is field adjustable with a simple 3/32 hex
wrench adjustment. The metal roller is sturdy and bidirectional, and
designed to survive in difficult environments. The housing is a rugged
polyester powder-coated steel frame with a specially designed non-accumulating pocket. The microswitch is rated NEMA 4 weatherproof, or
NEMA 7/9 explosion-proof. Epoxy coating is available. 800/233-3233;
www.conveyorcomponents.com.

ENVIRONMENTAL DYNAMICS INTERNATIONAL
AERATION WORKS
The Aeration Works Division of Environmental Dynamics International was created to give operators of aeration systems a source for fast,
reliable installations and maintenance. Made up of experienced installers and field service professionals, personnel are experts at the installation and maintenance of aeration systems. These expert installers
know what tools are needed, how to do it quickly and how to ensure it
is done to manufacturers’ specifications. When doing maintenance, the
group has the experience to evaluate the degree of work needed. If a
construction crew is lined up, Aeration Works can provide supervision
to ensure the work is done to any manufacturer’s specifications. 573/4749453; www.aerationworks.com.

Shaftless screws from ML Spirals are constructed from high-strength Swedish alloy steel
with high wearing ability and the torque requirements for various spiral applications. They are
cold formed in a multitude of close-tolerance
Shaftless screws
diameters and pitches up to 30 inches in diamefrom ML Spirals
ter, and in a variety of bar sizes as large as 4.8 by
1.2 inches. They can be used to transport wet, sticky and difficult materials with a high risk of clogging. 416/277-4262; www.ml-spirals.com.

Belt Filter/Rotary Presses
ALFA LAVAL SCREW PRESS
The Screw Press from Alfa Laval uses
moderate rotational speed for low power consumption, providing a positive impact on
operational costs. Its controls ensure consistent continuous operation with minimal
Screw Press from Alfa Laval
need for supervision. The moderate rotational speed also results in a low noise level, ensuring a positive working
environment, and low spare parts demand. Applications include dewatering of municipal wastewater plant sludge (primary, secondary, mixed
or digested sludge), as well as industrial biosolids and biogas residues. It
reduces sludge volume for lower transportation and disposal costs. 866/2532528; www.alfalaval.us/wastewater.

ANDRITZ SEPARATION
LOW-PROFILE BELT PRESS
The low-profile dewatering belt press from
Andritz Separation has SmarTrax technology
that lowers the costs of ownership. The Center of Competences of Arlington with
Low-profile dewatering belt
collaboration of specialists of the French
press from Andritz Separation
ANDRITZ facility developed the press,
which is engineered with the operator in mind. The low-profile design
provides modular flexibility, a smaller footprint, quality of construction
and easy maintenance without compromising performance. 800/433-5161;
www.andritz.com/separation.

BRIGHT TECHNOLOGIES
BELT FILTER PRESS
Belt filter press unit from
Bright Technologies

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The 1.7-meter, trailer-mounted belt filter press unit from Bright Technologies has
an insulated control room with FRP walls,
air conditioning, electric heat, a refrigera-

tor, stainless steel desk, tool storage, locker, closed-circuit TV and remote
operator controls. The modular design allows the room to be custom
manufactured to fit most single-drop trailers. Units are made for rapid
setup, with folding conveyor and operator walkways. No special lifting
equipment is required. 800/253-0532; www.brightbeltpress.com.

eliminating the possibility of partially hydrated polymer molecules.
The chamber has a flushing valve for the mechanical seal pocket to
extend the life of the seal. The standard unit is able to handle 20 gpm
through the chamber. An optional post dilution line can be used to
provide an additional 20 gpm. 855/328-9200; www.ipm-sys.com.

FOURNIER INDUSTRIES
ROTARY PRESS

LUTZ-JESCO AMERICA
LJ-POLYBLEND POLYMER SYSTEM

The rotary press from Fournier Industries uses two slowly rotating screens to create a 2-inch channel that biosolids pass through
as they dewater. A pressure restrictor on the
Rotary press from
outlet allows the operator to vary the degree
Fournier Industries
of cake dryness in the final product. It has
few components and is designed for ease of maintenance. The totally
enclosed design mitigates odors and allows the operator to stay out of
direct contact with the sludge. The robust control system allows for unattended operation, and it can be equipped with a single dewatering channel, expandable up to six channels on a single machine. It offers low
power usage, low noise levels, very little water use and a compact footprint. 952/288-5771; www.rotary-press.com.

The LJ-PolyBlend Polymer System from LutzJESCO America Corp. is a dependable, motorized
mixing machine with a corrosion-resistant housing, large turbine and multi-zone mixing chamber that provides uniform dispersion energy at the
moment of initial polymer wetLJ-PolyBlend Polymer System
ting. The prime mixing zone
from Lutz-JESCO America Corp.
fully activates the polymer, while
the second mixing zone promotes gentle polymer activation via a
small turbine, lessening molecule fracturing. Its stainless steel injection valve prevents agglomerations and reduces the need for extended
mixing time. The system includes a clear mixing chamber that provides visual monitoring of mixing polymer feed. Its compact design
– only 1 to 1.5 square feet – means it’s light and allows for easy installation and transportation. It has automatic pump speed adjustment
via 4-20 mA input, water flow sensor and priming port. 800/5542762; www.lutzjescoamerica.com.

Chemical/Polymer Feeding Equipment
EAGLE MICROSYSTEMS VF-100
The VF-100 polymer feeder from Eagle Microsystems
is constructed of stainless steel and uses a direct drive
to ensure optimum performance and durability in harsh
chemical feed environments. It can be optimized for
any dry-feed application with options like dust collectors, flex-wall agitation, explosion-proof motors,
VF-100 polymer feeder
wetting cones, solution tanks, flow pacing confrom Eagle Microsystems
trol, extension hoppers and multiple screw
and motor ranges to accommodate any required feed rate. The chemical feed rate is controlled by electronic SCR speed control for increased
accuracy and control. With no external gears, pulleys, chains, belts or
lubrications required, it is user-friendly and low-maintenance. 610/323-2250; www.eaglemicrosystems.com.

FORCE FLOW MERLIN CHEMICAL
DILUTION SYSTEM
Merlin Chemical Dilution Systems from Force Flow
enable automatic adjustment of chemical strength on site
to keep a metering pump operating in the ideal speed range,
regardless of changes in seasonal chemical demand. Operators can save money by purchasing standard high-strength
chemical, then diluting on site as needed.
Merlin Chemical Dilution
925/686-6700; www.forceflow.com.

Systems from Force Flow

IPM SYSTEMS PARADYNE
The ParaDyne liquid polymer activation system
from IPM Systems includes a polymer check spring
located outside the path of polymer flow to eliminate
the polymer from gumming or clogging around the
spring. A non-impinging rotor is used to pull polymer
through the mixing zone to provide efficiency and eliminate damage to the polymer. There
ParaDyne liquid polymer activation
is no need to recirculate the polymer
system from IPM Systems
solution through the mixing zone,

PULSAFEEDER PULSATRON SERIES HV
The Pulsatron Series HV from Pulsafeeder is
designed for high-viscosity applications up to 20,000
CPS for precise and accurate metering control. It
offers manual control over stroke length and stroke
rate as standard, with the option to choose between
4-20 mA and external pace inputs for automatic control. Five models are available, having pressure
Pulsatron Series HV
capabilities to 150 psi at 12 gpd, and flow capacfrom Pulsafeeder
ities to 240 gpd at 80 psi, with a turndown ratio
of 100-to-1. It comes with a reliable timing circuit, circuit protection against voltage and current upsets, panel-mounted fuse, solenoid protection by thermal overload with auto-reset, water resistance,
and guided ball check valve systems to reduce backflow and enhance
priming characteristics. 800/333-6677; www.pulsatron.com.

Coagulants/Flocculants
BASF CORPORATION –
WATER SOLUTIONS DIVISION
ZETAG ULTRA
The Zetag Ultra flocculant range from
BASF Corporation – Water SoluZetag Ultra flocculant range
tions Division is a high molecular
from BASF Corporation –
weight cationic product designed
Water Solutions Division
to improve dewatering efficiencies.
It has been shown to offer improvements in cake solids of up to 20
percent while reducing effective doses by as much as 40 percent.
Originally designed specifically for dewatering municipal sludges
by centrifuge, the range has also found positive results in thickening applications, including gravity belts and dissolved air, as well as
in other industries where sludge is processed at high temperatures
and extremes of pH. 800/322-3885; www.watersolutions.basf.com.
(continued)

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Composting Equipment
BIONETIX INTERNATIONAL
BCP85 COMPOST ACCELERATOR
BCP85 Compost Accelerator from Bionetix
International is a blend of bacteria, yeast,
enzymes and nutrients that accelerate
and optimize degradation of organic BCP85 Compost Accelerator
from Bionetix International
wastes. Microorganisms and nutrients
enrich the material to be degraded and yield an enriched fertilizer. The
product provides microbial diversity for maturation and degradation of
compost. It contains minerals, amino acids, peptides and vitamins for
growth and metabolic activity of microorganisms, including bacteria,
yeast and fungi, providing basic element nutrients often missing in
organic waste. 514/457-2914; www.bionetix-international.com.

KUHN NORTH AMERICA
KNIGHT VT VERTICAL MAXX
The Knight VT Vertical Maxx twinauger mixer from Kuhn North America
is available in four mid-sized trailer modKnight VT Vertical Maxx
els in sizes from 320 to 680 cubic feet.
twin-auger mixer from
Truck model units are available in 440- to
Kuhn North America
680-cubic-foot capacities, with the 440-cubicfoot unit available in a stationary model. Improvements to the mixing
chamber and redesigned augers provide aggressive processing of virtually all food waste materials, as well as efficient blending with other
organic materials. Faster auger speeds result in improved auger cleanoff and more complete clean-out of the mixer with each batch. The rugged, dependable drive system helps ensure reliable service and long life.
Multiple discharge options offer increased versatility, and a variety of
conveyor choices are available to match most discharging situations.
608/897-2131; www.kuhnnorthamerica.com.

ROTO-MIX INDUSTRIAL
COMPOST SERIES
Industrial Compost series mixers
from Roto-Mix have a GeneRation II
Staggered Rotor that combines gentle
tumbling with quick complete mixing to
Industrial Compost series
ensure rapid decomposition and quality
mixers from Roto-Mix
compost. Ingredients are lifted up to the
side augers that move the material end-to-end for a fast, thorough mix.
Total movement of material in the mixing chamber eliminates dead
spots. The rotor lifts the material past the wedging point of the lower
side auger, providing a fluffier mixture while lowering power requirements. The conveyor is used to build windrows or static piles. They are
available in 16.7-, 23-, 27.8- and 34.1-cubic-yard capacities as stationary,
trailer- or truck-mount units. 620/338-0090; www.rotomix.com.

Dewatering Equipment
AQUA-ZYME DISPOSAL SYSTEMS 30-YARD
OPEN-TOP ROLL-OFF DEWATERING UNIT
The 30-yard Open-Top Roll-off Dewatering Unit from AQUA-Zyme
Disposal Systems can be filled with 22,000 to 25,000 gallons of biosolids at 1 to 2 percent solids in about two hours. After draining 24 hours,
the unit can be picked up using a standard-capacity roll-off truck and

transported for solids disposal. Sludge volume
can be reduced by 80 percent with reductions
to 98 percent in BOD, COD, FOG and TSS. It
has few moving parts, and the size of the filter
media can be selected according to the particulars of the job. Standard equipment
Roll-off Dewatering Unit from
includes a roll-over tarp system; side,
AQUA-Zyme Disposal Systems
floor and center screens; 1/4-inch
floor plate; seven-gauge side plates; four door binder ratchets; eight drain
ports; two inlet ports; and a long-handle scraper. The average life span
is 12 to 14 years. Units are also available in a 15-yard size. 979/245-5656;
www.aqua-zyme.com.

Grinders/Shredders
HYDRA-TECH PUMPS S4SHR-LP
The S4SHR-LP 4-inch hydraulic submersible shredder pump from Hydra-Tech Pumps continuously rips and
shears solids with a 360-degree shredding action. The carbide-tipped impeller and hardened macerator suction plate
work together to produce a violent shredding action that
keeps the discharge open. It is narrower in
S4SHR-LP shredder pump
size at 21.5 inches, which allows it to fit through
from Hydra-Tech Pumps
most manholes. Depending on the application, there is a version for portable or fixed installations. A guide rail
assembly is available for stationary applications. Combined with HT15
to HT35 power units, it is capable of flows up to 810 gpm. The safe and
variable-speed hydraulic drive can be used where electric power is hazardous or impractical. 570/645-3779; www.hydra-tech.com.

JWC ENVIRONMENTAL 7-SHRED
The 7-SHRED industrial grinder from JWC Environmental can be quickly configured in a variety of sizes with
cutter and motor options tailored to meet exact requirements.
It is available with up to a 100 hp drive motor and 29-to-1
cycloidal reducer to turn the hardened steel dual cutting
shafts. The 28,000 ft-lbs of available torque can produce forces
up to 69,000 pounds at the cutting tips, providing the strength
to grind up to 1,000 cubic feet per hour. It can grind imperfect consumer goods, materials for recycling, organics for
waste-to-energy, meat and seafood processing waste, and
high-volume delumping applications. It
7-SHRED industrial grinder
incorporates individual steel scrapers
from JWC Environmental
between each spacer to increase solids
throughput for maximum grinding efficiency. The standard 30-, 40- and
50-inch sizes meet a wide range of output requirements. Standard feed
hoppers are available to accommodate a variety of material conveyance
methods to the grinder. Customers can choose from 3-, 7- or 17-tooth cutter combinations. 800/331-2277; www.jwce.com.

VAUGHAN COMPANY TRITON
Triton screw centrifugal pumps from Vaughan Company
handle thick biosolids, large or stringy solids, shearsensitive fluids, and delicate or highly abrasive
materials. They have non-overloading power
characteristics, heavy-duty power frames and
a flushless mechanical seal. A water-flushed mechanical seal or packing is available. 888/249Triton screw centrifugal pumps
2467; www.chopperpumps.com.
from Vaughan Company

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Grit Handling/Removal/Hauling
PAXXO LONGOFILL
The Longofill continuous bag system from Paxxo
can connect to the discharge point of machines used
to move, dewater or compact screenings, grit and
biosolids. Material is then deposited in a 90-meterlong continuous bag for odor containment and spillage control. The cassette bag is easy to seal, and the
material and odors are trapped inside, cutting down development of bacteria and fun- Longofill continuous bag
system from Paxxo
gus spores. 770/502-0055; www.paxxo.us.

SCHREIBER GRIT & GREASE
The Grit & Grease removal system from Schreiber
consists of two rectangular concrete channels that separate and collect grit and grease. One channel settles
particles while the other collects grease. A rotating
spiral flow pattern washes organics from the grit, then
deposits it in a trough at the bottom of the chanGrit & Grease removal
nel. A grit pump mounted to a traveling bridge
system from Schreiber
then pumps the grit to an elevated trough sloped
at one end to transfer the slurry to a classifier for further washing and
dewatering. Floating grease is transported to one end of the channel by
an air skimming system. Air is directed onto the surface of the grease
channel in the direction of a rotating screw conveyor. The screw conveyor rotates, lifting the grease for disposal in a collection container.
205/655-7466; www.schreiberwater.com.

Screw Conveyors
SPIROFLOW SYSTEMS FLEXIBLE
SCREW CONVEYOR
Flexible Screw Conveyors from Spiroflow Systems can help accurately meter chemicals used for
pH, bacteria, taste and odor control. Chemicals such
as hydrated lime, activated carbon and soda ash can
be accurately dosed using either loss-in-weight or volumetric metering, while eliminating dust and environmental contamination. They easily
Flexible Screw Conveyors
convey dosing chemicals from silos, bulk
from Spiroflow Systems
bags or bin hoppers to achieve accurate
dosing rates as low as 2 pounds per hour. They are flexible and can convey in any direction from horizontal to vertical, routed around fixed
obstacles and equipment, and from one room to another through small
wall openings. They require minimal maintenance, are easy to clean
and dust-free, and can operate at rates of 2 to 88,000 pounds per hour.
704/246-0900; www.spiroflowsystems.com.

Septage Receiving Stations
BIO-MICROBICS MYFAST HS-STP
MyFAST HS-STP (High-Strength Sewage
Treatment Plant) wastewater treatment systems
from Bio-Microbics use an enhanced aeration pretreatment zone, adding the LIXOR XD
MyFAST HS-STP
Submerged Aeration System and MyTEE
wastewater treatment
Grit Vault as an effective pretreatment
systems from Bio-Microbics
zone to reduce the levels of BOD and

TSS. Engineered to fit most residential and commercial property
applications, systems provide alternative wastewater treatment
options for those residing outside the reach or in lieu of municipal
treatment plants. The technology, with its 100 percent submerged,
fixed-film, packed-bed media bioreactor for low/peak, toxic shock
or heavy loading is ideal for septage receiving stations. 800/753-3278;
www.biomicrobics.com.

LAKESIDE EQUIPMENT
RAPTOR SEPTAGE
ACCEPTANCE PLANT
The Raptor Septage Acceptance Plant
and Raptor Septage Complete Plant from
Lakeside Equipment CorpoRaptor Septage Acceptance Plant
ration help manage the unloadand Complete Plant from Lakeside
ing process and protect
Equipment Corporation
downstream equipment. The
system, with security access and hauler management and accounting software, provides municipalities the tools needed to maximize
revenue generation and produce more energy with minimal maintenance. 630/837-5640; www.lakeside-equipment.com.

Screening Systems
AQUALITEC CORP. RAKETEC
The Raketec multi-rake bar screen from
Aqualitec Corp. is capable of huge flow capacity, with low operational costs and hassle-free
maintenance. It offers up to 80 mgd flow capacity and is resistant to clogging and
Raketec multi-rake bar screen
debris damage because it has no subfrom Aqualitec Corp.
merged moving parts. The design
helps increase debris capture efficiency, prevent costly downtime
and repairs, and allow safer and more efficient wastewater treatment
plant operation. 855/650-2214; www.aqualitec.com.

E & I CORPORATION
CATENARY BAR SCREEN
The Catenary Bar Screen from E & I Corporation,
A Div. of McNish Corporation, is used for the screening of solids from the influent of wastewater treatment plants. It is a heavy-duty, reliable and
easy-to-maintain unit for the protection of pumps
in stormwater pump stations, especially in lowlying areas. It has since been utilized extensively
in both municipal and industrial
Catenary Bar Screen from
wastewater treatment plants. Its chain
E & I Corporation, A Div. of
and rakes form a natural catenary loop
McNish Corporation
at the bottom of the screen to eliminate the need for any sprockets or chain guides below the liquid surface. This allows all maintenance to be performed from the
operating-floor level. 614/899-2282; www.eandicorp.com.

JDV EQUIPMENT CORPORATION
SCREW SCREEN
The Screw Screen from JDV Equipment Corporation is a reliable self-cleaning method for the removal of solids from industrial
or municipal wastewater. It is designed for in-channel or septage
receiving applications with low to moderate flow rates. It provides
screening, conveying and dewatering in one compact and efficient

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Headworks and Biosolids Management

design. Influent enters the screen, and solids are
captured by the filter media per design requirements. The solids are then transported by the
shaftless screw to the compaction zone and finally
the discharge point. The optional wash zone
removes organic material from the screenScrew Screen from JDV
ings prior to compaction and discharges
Equipment Corporation
into a container or discharge bag. The
product can be installed inclined in an existing channel or as a septage
receiving station. 973/366-6556; www.jdvequipment.com.

KUSTERS WATER,
DIVISION OF KUSTERS
ZIMA CORP., PROTECHTOR
ProTechtor multi-rake screens from Kusters
Water, division of Kusters Zima Corp., can be
used in nearly any screening application.
ProTechtor multi-rake screens
The multiple rake design, lubrication-free
from Kusters Water, division
lower bearings, automatic jam reversing
of Kusters Zima Corp.
and individually replaceable bars provide
reliable, low-maintenance operation. Materials of construction include
304 or 316 stainless steel. They are manufactured in the USA at a ISO
9001:2008 certified facility. 800/264-7005; www.kusterswater.com.

REE PRODUCTS STATIONGUARD
The StationGuard removable bar screen
from REE Products filters non-organic debris
that can typically be hard on pumps. It is
quickly installed, either directly on the pipe
or on the wall in a lift station or treatment
plant. It could even be used in a manhole situation. It is compatible with dif- StationGuard removable bar
screen from REE Products
ferent types of pipe, including PVC,
SDR, DI, IP, AC and CP. It comes in two adjustable sizes, either for 4to 10-inch or 12- to 20-inch pipes. It effectively removes plastics, diapers, rags and rocks. 888/959-6999; www.ree-nc.com.

SCREENCO SYSTEMS
DUAL SCREEN SYSTEM
The high-capacity Dual Screen System from Screenco Systems is
constructed of aluminum with stainless steel screens, with a collection
sump and a high-capacity 6-inch drain. The screen
has two 3/8-inch gapped stainless steel bar screens
at opposing angles, with the front screen virtually
self-cleaning. It is a non-mechanical, simple way to
remove large pieces of trash, rocks and other debris
from the flow stream. This unit has a 4-inch
Dual Screen System from
telescoping inlet hose that moves laterally and
Screenco Systems
can be easily connected to any vacuum truck
or other flow stream. The system is portable, and the 19.5 square feet of
screening area allows for continued use and is easy to rake clean to the
garbage drain tray. It can treat over 500 gpm. Various-gapped screen
sizes are available. 208/790-8770; www.screencosystems.com.

SMITH & LOVELESS SCHLOSS MARK CI
PIN RACK SCREEN
The SCHLOSS Mark CI Pin Rack Screen from Smith & Loveless
can be used for coarse screening at medium- to large-sized treatment
plants and CSO applications up to 100 mgd. The system’s climbing rake

arm uses a motorized drive system that raises
and lowers the rake to screen materials against
a stationary bar rack inside the channel. Cleaning from the front side of the rack, the rake
arm swings wide open to engage screenings
with teeth long enough to fully penetrate
SCHLOSS Mark CI Pin Rack
the rack. Only the rake head and arm
Screen from Smith
enter the water, ensuring durable perfor& Loveless
mance of the motor, chain, sprocket, bearings and other carriage elements. A telescopic arm adjusts itself to
effectively screen large or rake-clogging objects, including consumer
flushables. Multiple housing options promote operator safety, while a
submersible motor enclosure option protects against flooding. 913/8885201; www.smithandloveless.com.

WESTECH ENGINEERING
CLEANFLO MONOSCREEN
The CleanFlo Monoscreen from WesTech Engineering is a highly efficient, self-cleaning fine screen
that can be used in a wide variety of wastewater and
process water treatment applications. Using a reliable blade and drive system, it creates a progressive step
motion that allows the screenings to be evenly distributed while minimizing water level surges. The result is
a screenings capture ratio of 82.5 percent.
CleanFlo Monoscreen from
When matched with a CleanWash SWP/CPS
WesTech Engineering
dewatering unit, the combination maximizes
the solids capture rate while minimizing the amount of solids for disposal. 801/265-1000; www.westech-inc.com.

Sludge Handling/Hauling/
Disposal/Application
FLO TREND SYSTEMS SLUDGE MATE
Sludge Mate container filters from
Flo Trend Systems can be used to dewater a variety of sludge and waste, including alum, ferric, lagoon and digested
sludge, septic tank, grease-trap and slaughterhouse waste, wastewater residual, and
Sludge Mate container filters
sump bottoms. The closed-system design
from Flo Trend Systems
provides total odor control, no spillage,
reduced maintenance and weather independence. It has 10-gauge reinforced walls and a seven-gauge carbon steel floor. Available designs have
peaked roofs with gasketed bolted-down access hatches, drainage ports,
inlet manifolds, floor filters and side-to-side rolling tarps. They produce
cake that passes the paint-filter test, and transports straight to landfills
for dumping. They dewater on site and are available in roll-offs, trailer
mounted and tipping stand mounted in 5- to 40-cubic-yard sizes. 713/6990152; www.flotrend.com.

Sludge Heaters/Dryers/Thickeners
KRUGER USA BIOCON
The BioCon thermal dryer from Kruger USA processes wastewater
treatment plant biosolids into a marketable biosolids end product specific to local market needs. It is a dual-belt dryer designed for safe and
efficient operation, creating an end product dried to a minimum solids
content of 90 percent that meets Class A requirements. The end product

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66

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

SOLEX THERMAL SCIENCE
PELLET COOLER
The pellet cooler from Solex Thermal Science
ensures particle thermal stabilization using indirect heat transfer, creating conduction through
each pellet to stabilize the particles to prevent
decomposition and possible smoldering. It uses
process effluent water as the heat transfer medium
with no emissions since fans or blowers are not
required. It requires minimal space and is available in capacities ranging from 1,000 to
Pellet cooler from
25,000 pounds per hour, with incoming temSolex Thermal Science
peratures up to 200 degrees F. 403/254-3500;
www.solexthermal.com.

DEWATERING
Dewatering Unit • Polymer Injection System
Sludge Pump • Hoses • Working Platform • Hydraulic Trailer

We do one thing to perfection —
Dewater Liquid Waste!
»Pass the paint filter test in 24 hours
»No waiting, Equipment is in stock

»Visitors welcome at our dewatering facilities

Don’t settle for less ... demand the best – ADS

AQUA-Zyme
Disposal Systems
Call us at (979) 245-5656
zymme@aqua-zyme.com

FINANCING
AVAILABLE

is suitable for final disposal via most
agricultural routes, providing economic
benefits to municipalities. The end
product can be enhanced with particle-sizing equipment that can alter
characteristics such as density. The
BioCon thermal dryer
enhanced dried product is then screened
from Kruger USA
to meet specific size requirements. The
unit can be paired with an end product storage system such as a
bagging station or silo system for handling the dried product.
919/677-8310; www.krugerusa.com.

www.aqua-zyme.com

FREE INFO ON THESE PRODUCTS — RETURN FOLLOWING FORM

FREE INFO – SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

For FREE information on these products, check the box(es) below:
Aftermarket Parts/Service

❒ AGC Chemicals Americas AFLAS Fluoroelastomers
❒ Conveyor Components Company Model VA and VAX
bucket elevator alignment controls

❒ Environmental Dynamics International Aeration
Works Division

❒ FKC skid-mounted dewatering systems
❒ ML Spirals shaftless screws
Belt Filter/Rotary Presses
❒ Alfa Laval Screw Press
❒ Andritz Separation low-profile dewatering belt press
❒ Bright Technologies belt filter press unit
❒ Fournier Industries rotary press
Chemical/Polymer Feeding Equipment
❒ Eagle Microsystems VF-100 polymer feeder
❒ Force Flow Merlin Chemical Dilution Systems
❒ IPM Systems ParaDyne liquid polymer activation system
❒ Lutz-JESCO America Corp. LJ-PolyBlend Polymer
System
❒ Pulsafeeder Pulsatron Series HV
Coagulants/Flocculants
❒ BASF Corporation – Water Solutions Division Zetag
Ultra flocculant range
Composting Equipment
❒ Bionetix International BCP85 Compost Accelerator
❒ Kuhn North America Knight VT Vertical Maxx mixer
❒ Roto-Mix Industrial Compost series mixers
Dewatering Equipment
❒ AQUA-Zyme Disposal Systems 30-yard Open-Top
Roll-off Dewatering Unit

Grinders/Shredders
❒ Hydra-Tech Pumps S4SHR-LP shredder pump
❒ JWC Environmental 7-SHRED industrial grinder
❒ Vaughan Company Triton screw centrifugal pumps
Grit Handling/Removal/Hauling
❒ Paxxo Longofill continuous bag system
❒ Schreiber Grit & Grease removal system
Screw Conveyors
❒ Spiroflow Systems Flexible Screw Conveyors
Septage Receiving Stations
❒ Bio-Microbics MyFAST HS-STP wastewater treatment
systems
❒ Lakeside Equipment Corporation Raptor Septage
Acceptance Plant and Complete Plant

Screening Systems
❒ Aqualitec Corp. Raketec bar screen
❒ E & I Corporation, A Div. of McNish Corporation,
Catenary Bar Screen
❒ JDV Equipment Corporation Screw Screen
❒ Kusters Water, division of Kusters Zima Corp.,
ProTechtor screens
❒ REE Products StationGuard bar screen
❒ Screenco Systems Dual Screen System
❒ Smith & Loveless SCHLOSS Mark CI Pin Rack Screen
❒ WesTech Engineering CleanFlo Monoscreen
Sludge Handling/Hauling/Disposal/Application
❒ Flo Trend Systems Sludge Mate container filters
Sludge Heaters/Dryers/Thickeners
❒ Kruger USA BioCon thermal dryer
❒ Solex Thermal Science pellet cooler

❒ FREE subscription to TPO magazine
PRINT NAME:

TITLE:

FACILITY NAME:
MAILING ADDRESS:
CITY:

STATE:

PHONE:

CELL PHONE:

FAX:

EMAIL:

ZIP:

Scan and email to: nicole.labeau@colepublishing.com / Fax to: 715-546-3786
Mail to: COLE Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 220, Three Lakes WI 54562

O0815

tpomag.com August 2015

67

case studies

HEADWORKS AND BIOSOLIDS MANAGEMENT

By Craig Mandli

Scrapers clean solids from intake system

Problem

Thickening centrifuge operates more efficiently
and in a smaller footprint

Problem

Backwash strainers at a wastewater treatment plant in Toronto, Ontario,
Canada, were consistently clogging with oversized solids that made it past
the intake bar screens. Downstream pumping equipment experienced high
failure rates, and subsequent treatment stages were overwhelmed.

The Kenosha (Wisconsin) Water Utility Wastewater Treatment Facility
faced a decision to repair an aging dissolved air flotation treatment (DAFT)
system or move forward with emerging sludge thickening technology.

Solution

Solution

The plant installed two 16-inch Automatic Scraper Strainers from
Acme Engineering Products, rated for 6,000 gpm each. The scrapers
use aggressive brushes that clean
out the slots of the wedge-wire
screen. They operate automatically, using line pressure to intermittently purge accumulated solids.
Maintenance is infrequent and
requires simple replacement of
the scraper blade and brush.

RESULT
The plant has more uptime
as the strainers effectively remove
large solids, and downstream treatment equipment operates within
normal parameters. Maintenance is reduced on related equipment in
the pumping system. 518/236-5659; www.acmeprod.com.

Biosolids treatment system saves
significant costs at naval station

Problem

The U.S. Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville in Florida needed to
meet the U.S. Navy’s aggressive energy reform targets.

Solution

NuTerra’s detailed financial analysis compared the base’s aerobic digestion operating data to BCR Environmental’s CleanB system. NuTerra
installed a unit to treat waste activated sludge from the clarifier to Class B
standards before dewatering;
the final product is suitable for
land application.

RESULT
The project delivered
$75,000 in energy savings, a
95 percent reduction in
energy for biosolids treatment, and a total operating
cost savings of $105,000.
Payback on equipment is
projected at five years (six and a half years including installation). Projections indicate a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of 480 tons
annually. Improved dewatering reduced the total biosolids volume by
12 truckloads annually, saving more than $10,000 per year in hauling
costs. Polymer consumption was reduced by 71 percent. 904/819-9170;
www.bcrenv.com.

68

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

Kenosha installed the
Centrisys THK 200 Thickening Centrifuge. The unit
uses a smaller footprint and
can be easily installed in a
1,000-square-foot building. Its
enclosed process nearly eliminates odors. It produces material at 5 percent solids and has
the capability to produce 7 percent solids. The thicker sludge improves digester operation and produces
more biogas. It requires minimal operator oversight and less maintenance.

RESULT
The system, in place for three years, uses no polymer and saved
$80,000 to $100,000 in pump and equipment upgrades. Electricity consumption is low, as it incorporates a 10 hp feed pump, a 50 hp main
drive and a 20 hp scroll drive, all tied into variable-frequency drives.
The city installed a second THK 200 for primary sludge thickening to
improve digester performance. 262/654-6006; www.centrisys.com.

City contracts to replace rectangular
clarifier parts

Problem

Five wastewater treatment facilities in New York City faced various
rectangular clarifier components wearing out due to age and fatigue. The
city issued a contract to address replacement of nonmetallic and metallic
chain, segmented sprockets, laminated wood and FRP flights, screw conveyor assembly, metallic and
nonmetallic wear strips and wear
shoes, wall bearings, safety collars, shafting, torque limiters,
gear reducer drives, and miscellaneous hardware.

Solution

Fairfield Service Company provided OEM replacement
of all those components with a contract value of $5 million.

RESULT
Fairfield is in the final stages of completing the order, assuring the
facilities of uninterrupted service. The city will issue the company
another contract for replacement of additional clarifier components at
other facilities. 219/872-3000; www.fairfieldservice.com.

Do It Once!
Do It Bright!

THOROUGH MIXING AND MATERIAL BREAKDOWN.
TOUGH, LONG-LASTING DESIGN.

Mobile Belt Filter Press with
Operator Room
Dewatering Solutions for
Bio Solids, Sludge & Slurries

Sales, Rentals,
& Leasing Options

VT & VTC SERIES VERTICAL TWIN-AUGER MIXERS
360 - 900 cu. ft. capacities

• Withstands continuous operation while breaking down tough materials
• Redesigned augers, steep sides and baffles ensure a fast, complete mix
• Hydraulic discharge options for unloading at ground or raised levels

Phone: 269-793-7183 Fax: 269-793-4022
127 N. Water St., Hopkins, MI 49328
www.brightbeltpress.com

FOOD WASTE

Problem

WOODCHIPS

PLASTIC PELLETS

Kuhn North America • Brodhead, WI • 608-897-2131 • KuhnNorthAmerica.com
FREE INFO – SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

FREE INFO – SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

Fine bar screen removes high amount
of solids from headworks

BIOSOLIDS

Dewatering press produces drier
cake solids, runs more efficiently

Problem

The Andover (Kansas) Wastewater Treatment Plant serves a community of 12,000 next to Wichita. The original plant was built in 1977 and
upgraded four times. In 1993, a coarse bar screen with 3/4-inch bar spacing
was installed at the headworks. By 2012, the plant began investigating fine
bar screens for greater solids removal.

The Chestnut Ridge Area Joint Municipal Authority in New Paris,
Pennsylvania, required an upgrade from an aging belt press. High operation and maintenance requirements had to be as low as possible to keep life
cycle costs down, and dry cake solids were critical to reducing disposal
expenses even as plant throughput rose.

Solution

Solution

“The best kind of process improvement is one that pays for itself,” says
Brian Walls, wastewater superintendent. “In this case, the ongoing cost of
cleaning the aeration basin, removing rags from diffuser tubes, unclogging
return activated sludge pumps and improving the overall performance of
the process had an obvious payback calculation.” The city selected the EnviroCare Flo-MultiRake Fine bar screen
with 1/4-inch bar spacing.

RESULT
The plant staff estimates the new
screen is removing two and a half
times more solids than the old coarse
screen. “We had specified the bar screen
to be a turnkey, plug-and-go setup,”
says Walls. “When we got it, it was. We did the install ourselves and
had an electrician run the conduit and wiring to code. The control
panel was preprogrammed and only needed minor adjustments. The
bar screen fit perfectly in the pre-existing channel.” 815/636-8306;
www.enviro-care.com.

Doug Vitovitch, chief facility operator, personally sourced and supervised the installation of a Volute ES302 following the results of a free
pilot study. PWTech and local representatives from EnviRep included all
necessary pumps and polymer preparation equipment,
and provided both remote
and on-site installation assistance to enable Vitovitch to
complete the entire municipal project from project
inception to installation and
successful startup in just
over six months.

RESULT
Chestnut Ridge began realizing immediate operational cost savings as the Volute press can run unattended while producing drier cake
than the old belt press. The 2 hp unit uses significantly less power and
wash water. The first two-hour maintenance is scheduled for February
2020, if needed. 443/648-3300; www.pwtech.us.
(continued)
tpomag.com August 2015

69

case studies

HEADWORKS AND BIOSOLIDS MANAGEMENT

Screw press helps plant add efficiency
to dewatering process

Screw press helps dewater biosolids quickly

Problem

Problem

For years, the Williamson (New York) Wastewater Treatment Plant had
placed anaerobically digested biosolids from a contact stabilization treatment process into two drying beds or four reed bed lagoons. Typically, every
five to seven years the town would allow the reed beds to dry and remove the
deposited solids via shovels into trucks. The material was unloaded and
bulldozed into the nearby property the plant owned. This was time-consuming and labor-intensive, and rain made matters worse. There was also
concern about damaging the liners during the operation. Plant leaders
decided on a permanent dewatering operation and in the short term hauled
the dewatered material to a
composting facility in nearby
Ontario, New York.

Solution

BDP Industries conducted on-site demonstrations
with its belt press and a screw
press. For financial and operational reasons, town leaders
chose the screw press. To
save on installation costs, the
unit was skid-mounted with all accessories and piped and wired at the BDP
factory. The press offers a small footprint, low operation labor and expected
lower maintenance costs due to few moving components.

RESULT
The 12-inch-diameter screw press has met performance expectations.
Throughput averages 25 gpm at an average of 2.15 percent influent solids
concentration, representing 260 pounds per hour of dry solids. It produces
a cake averaging 17.3 percent solids. Williamson is now exploring its
own composting operation. 518/527-5417; www.bdpindustries.com.

The wastewater treatment plant in the Town of Middlebury, Indiana,
treats an average daily flow of 0.99 mgd. The plant had been using beds of
pea gravel to dry biosolids. This process yielded biosolids at 5 to 8 percent
solids but was proving labor-intensive, costly and time consuming with the
increasing plant flows.

Solution

The plant installed a Schwing Bioset Screw Press, selected by
the town and a consulting engineer after it outperformed other
equipment pilot trials. The feed
pump draws material from the
aerobic digesters and feeds it to
the screw press under low pressure. A simple control system
allows unattended operation,
and the resulting cake exceeds
19 percent dry solids.

RESULT
The press has improved operations and accommodates increasing
plant flows by allowing the plant to quickly dewater the material with
less labor, reduced odors and lower hauling costs, all within a smaller
footprint. 715/247-3433; www.schwingbioset.com.

Dewatering system decreases energy demand

Problem

A septage dewatering facility in California wanted to become more
energy-efficient. Facility leaders decided to replace an aging vacuum filter,
which had a high energy demand and required significant time and expense
to keep operating.

Solution

Are you ingenious?
Have you solved a tough problem with a creative solution?
Share your story with 40,000 other professionals.
Send a note to editor@tpomag.com or call 877/953-3301

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70

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

|

tpomag.com

They chose a 20-foot dewatering drum
from In The Round Dewatering. A cement
pad was poured outside the building under a
roof overhang, which allows dewatering to
take place outside. The process is similar to a
gravity dewatering box, as with the box the
material must be mixed with a polymer to
achieve the waste stream floc. The inside of
the drum is lined with interlocking PVC tiles.
The difference is that once the drum is full, it
rotates one turn every two hours, allowing all free liquids to filter out overnight. The drum is mounted on a roll-off frame and can be loaded on a rolloff truck for transport to the landfill. Once unloaded, it can be washed out
quickly with a garden hose and is ready to be filled again.

RESULT
The facility can dewater 20,000 to 24,000 gpd with virtually no
maintenance. The 1/4 hp motor creates large energy savings and eliminates the diatomaceous earth used in the old process. 317/539-7304;
www.itrdewatering.com.

Reverse aeration evens out temperature differentials

Problem

The City of Arlington, Washington, population 18,000, shifted its biosolids process to composting from land application to produce compost for
city road improvements, ball fields, parks, a cemetery and a community garden. The challenge was to keep target temperatures within best management practice (BMP) range in the face of variable moisture content in the
dewatered cake arriving at the facility, and variable moisture content in
wood waste used as an amendment.

Solution

Arlington installed an Aeration Static Pile System (ASP) from
Engineered Compost Systems (ECS). The system has automatically
reversing aeration for primary and secondary composting and a biofilter to
control odors. The facility produces eight batches of compost mix each
weekday, or 40 batches a week, for a total of 2,100 cubic yards per year.
Roughly 70 percent of the biosolids (800 cubic yards) are
processed into Class A Exceptional Quality compost. The
process takes five to six weeks.

RESULT
The reversing aeration
system allows the operator to
better control temperature
and odor. Operator Kevin Bleeck says his ideal mix is 2 yards of biosolids cake, 3 yards wood waste and 2.5 to 3 yards of compost overs (larger
wood particles that remain after product screening, providing porosity
and a source of carbon). 206/634-2625; www.compostsystems.com.

Extra! Extra!

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tpomag.com August 2015

71

product news

3

5

7

4

1

2

6

1. KSB DRY-INSTALLED SOLIDS HANDLING PUMP
The Sewatec dry-installed solids handling pump from KSB is
designed to handle stormwater, wastewater and sludge. Sealing technology enables the pump to operate in a dry environment. Because the
pump doesn’t require a source of clean water or the recirculation of
pumped liquid to lubricate the seals, the pump can run dry without
damage. 804/222-1818; www.ksbusa.com.

2. BAF HIGH-AIRFLOW PORTABLE FAN
The Black Jack portable high-airflow fan from Big Ass Fans is
designed for indoor and outdoor use. The 6.5-foot frame fits through
standard interior doorways and plugs into any 110-volt power supply.
The fan moves air up to 120 feet, has a matte-black finish and is wet
rated for easy cleaning. Other features include a 25-foot power cord,
gearless direct-drive motor for quiet operation, variable-speed controller
and locking wheels. 877/244-3267; www.bigassfans.com.

dual-tube assembly is engineered for optimum performance and pressure capability (110 psi). The intelligent control permits connection to
SCADA systems and other remote controllers. Optional advanced SCADA
communications command and status capabilities include start, stop,
motor status, prime and setpoint speed. Protocols include Profibus,
DPV1, Modbus RTU, Modbus-TCP, Ethernet/IP and Profinet RT I/O.
714/893-8529; www.blue-white.com.

6. FOSTER TRANSFORMER MULTI-VOLTAGE
TRANSFORMER
The Model 16531 multi-voltage isolation transformer from Foster
Transformer Co. is designed for control panel and lighting applications.
The UL-listed transformer accepts all common North American singlephase voltages and provides an isolated 120-volt output up to 0.625
amps. Input voltages include 120/208/240/277/480/60, 50/60 Hz with
120-volt 0.075 kVA output. 800/963-9799; www.foster-transformer.com.

7. McELROY SOCKET FUSION TOOL

3. KROHNE RADAR LEVEL METER
The Optiwave 5200 C/F, 10 GHz FMCW radar level meter from
Krohne is designed for liquid applications in up to a 98-foot measuring
range. The two-wire, loop-powered device measures level and volume in
storage or process tanks, with process conditions up to 482 degrees F
and pressures to 580 psi in general purpose or hazardous locations
(Class I, Division 1). 800/356-9464; http://us.krohne.com.

4. MAGNETROL GUIDED WAVE RADAR TRANSMITTER
The Eclipse Model 706 guided wave radar transmitter with Modbus
protocol from Magnetrol International is compatible with industry standard
RTUs. The complete probe line ensures reliable performance in every
application, regardless of media. 800/624-8765; www.magnetrol.com.

5. BLUE-WHITE PERISTALTIC METERING PUMP
Designed for smaller municipal water and wastewater systems, the
ProSeries-M M-2 peristaltic metering pump from Blue-White Industries injects aggressive and/or viscous chemicals. The Flex-A-Prene,

The Spider 125 socket fusion tool with universal clamping from McElroy Manufacturing is designed for installations using 63 mm to 125 mm
PP pipe in overhead, vertical and tight workspaces. Universal clamping
accommodates any size pipe or coupling, eliminating the need for inserts.
The 15-pound tool comes with a carrying case and full assortment of
heaters and heat adapters. 918/836-8611; www.mcelroy.com/fusion.

8. BJM SUBMERSIBLE EXPLOSION-PROOF PUMPS
XP-KZN submersible pumps from BJM Pumps are designed for
heavy slurries containing coal, ash, sand, gravel or other abrasives. The
agitator keeps solids suspended in liquid and prevents clogging. The
impeller, wear plate and agitator are made of abrasive-resistant 28 percent chrome iron. The replaceable wear plate’s hardened surface on the
suction side prevents erosion. The pump delivers up to 665 gpm, heads
to 61 feet and is able to pump a sump or pit within inches of the bottom.
877/256-7867; www.bjmpumps.com.

FREE INFO ON THESE PRODUCTS — RETURN FOLLOWING FORM

72

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

8

1 1. Johnson Screens TRITON underdrain

wastewater:

2. CONTRA SHEAR / RT Rotating screen drums
3. MID/V Integrated Screen, Screw and Washing Compactor

product spotlight

3

Sampler controller provides single-screen
programming, USB transfer capability
2

By Ed Wodalski
The AS950 sampler
controller from Hach
Company features a
full-color, 2 1/2- by
3-inch display for
intu it ive, single screen programming,
USB drive compatibility, error alert and status screen to simplify
troubleshooting in wastewater treatment.
Single-screen programming eliminates the need for
AS950 from
scrolling through the menu, says
Hach Company
Jamie English, product manager,
Hach Company.
“The other benefit is the status screen,” she says. “If you want to
know what’s going on with the sampler — has it missed any samples,
when’s the next program going to start — all you have to do is hit the
status button and all that information comes up.”
Logged data such as sample history, cabinet temperature and sensor measurements can be downloaded directly from multiple samplers
onto a USB drive, eliminating the need for special cables or having to
carry a laptop to sampling locations in inclement weather.
The USB port also enables users with multiple samplers to program
one sampler, download the settings to a flash drive and upload it to the
next controller, eliminating the need to reprogram each sampler.
“It saves a lot of time when you have the same program on multiple samplers,” she says.
The AS950 works with existing Hach sampler bases and bottle configurations. It includes connections for several digital Hach sensors,
enabling pH samples to be taken at the discharge site or when levels reach
designated setpoints. Digital sensors can also measure rate of flow.
The high-speed, dual-roller sample pump has a 3/8-inch I.D. by
5/8-inch O.D. pump tube and flow rate of 1.25 gpm at 3 feet vertical
lift. Sample intervals can be set in single increments from 1 to 9,999
flow pulses or 1 to 9,999 mins in one-minute increments.
The memory stores up to 4,000 history entries for sample time
stamp, bottle number and sample status, up to 325,000 entries for
selected measurement channels and 2,000 events.
Optional IO9000 input/output modules can be used to set up relays
and alarms that can be set for system diagnostics and logging, such as
program end, sample complete, missed sample and full bottle.
The compact, portable sampler, designed for use in 18-inch manholes, can also be used to measure stormwater runoff and pretreatment
by industrial users to ensure permit requirements are being met.
800/227-4224; www.hach.com.
FREE INFO ON THIS PRODUCT — RETURN FOLLOWING FORM

WE MAKE WATER WORK
Bilfinger Water Technologies has a comprehensive, cost-effective,
tailor-made range of equipment for water /water treatment,
sludge treatment and industrial applications.

www.water.bilfinger.com

phone: 651-638-3151 | 1950 old hwy. 8 n.w. new brighton, mn 55112
email: william.emmers@bilfinger.com
FREE INFO – SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

MARKETPLACE ADVERTISING

SOLD
Reach over 78,000 professionals
each month and sell your equipment in the classified section.

ScreencO
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Systems
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.

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SEPTIC
RECEIVING STATIONS
Aluminum & Stainless Construction

tpomag.com

n Affordable n No Moving Parts
n Screens That Really Work
n Gravity Off-Load At 500 GPM

NEW Stand Alone Screen
Set it up anywhere

mswmag.com

208-790-8770
www.ScreencoSystems.com
screencosys@gmail.com
FREE INFO – SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

(continued)
FREE INFO – SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

tpomag.com August 2015

73

water:

product spotlight
Hydraulically balanced diaphragm pump
designed for long life
By Ed Wodalski
Other features include
powder-coated housing for
corrosion resistance, plus/
minus 1 percent accuracy
regardless of pipeline pressure
fluctuations, separate or combined capacity adjustment for
maximum turndown and finetuned control from SCADA systems or other process signals.
Depending how the pump is
used, Carling recommends annual maintenance of the wetted parts, primarily the check mROY series of metering
pumps from Milton Roy
valves and diaphragm.
“Many people can go years without maintenance, it really depends on the service,” he says. “Is it operating 24/7?
Are there a lot of particulates in the pump that are being pumped where
it might cause wear? Annual maintenance is always recommended as a
preventive, but the diaphragm will last about 10 years.”
Pump options include motors and variable-speed drives based on system
requirements and installation condition, electronic capacity adjustment for
remote control and advanced technology diaphragm leak detection system.
“It’s really a unique item in the world of industrial products,” Carling
says of the pump. “Its fundamental design has been around for many
years, and yet, the mROY continues to evolve and is still an innovative
technology.” 215/441-0800; www.miltonroy.com.

The mROY series of metering pumps from Milton Roy is the little
pump that can. Featuring a design life of 20 years, the low-maintenance
pumps are available in PVC, PVDF, 316 stainless steel and alloy 20 with
flow rates from 0.017 to 170 gph.
“While improvements have been made over the years with various materials, advanced casting technologies, coating systems and control interfaces, the pump has at its core the dependable design that the industry
relies on,” says Jim Carling, global product line manager for Milton Roy.
Applications include the injection of coagulants, flocculants, filter
aids, pH control chemicals, chemicals for taste and odor control, dechlorination and disinfectants such as sodium hypochlorite in the municipal
water treatment process.
Weighing about 65 pounds, the pump is 8 inches wide, 12 inches deep
and 18 inches high (including motor).
Key features include a hydraulically balanced diaphragm with a 96,000hour design and turndown ratios up to 100-to-1 for a full range of adjustments based on plant treatment requirements.
“Most diaphragm pumps used in water treatment, or even peristaltic
pumps, are pressurized on one side, or in the case of a tube, on the inside,”
he says. “On the outside or backside of the diaphragm it’s atmospheric.
So the diaphragm or tube is containing all of the pressure. With the
hydraulically balanced diaphragm you have the process fluid on one side
and hydraulic fluid on the other. So the diaphragm is balanced between
two pressurized fluids. It’s under very low stress. You’re not stretching
anything. You’re not compressing anything. All you’re doing is flexing a
piece of Teflon.”

FREE INFO ON THIS PRODUCT — RETURN FOLLOWING FORM

For FREE information on these products, check the box(es) below:
❒ 1. KSB Sewatec dry-installed solids handling pump
❒ 2. Big Ass Fans Black Jack portable high-airflow fan
❒ 3. Krohne Optiwave 5200 C/F radar level meter
❒ 4. Magnetrol International Eclipse Model 706 guided wave radar transmitter
❒ 5. Blue-White Industries ProSeries-M M-2 peristaltic metering pump
❒ 6. Foster Transformer Co. Model 16531 transformer
❒ 7. McElroy Manufacturing Spider 125 socket fusion tool
❒ 8. BJM Pumps XP-KZN submersible pumps
❒ Hach Company AS950 sampler controller
❒ Milton Roy mROY series of metering pumps

O0815
PRINT NAME:
FACILITY NAME:
MAILING ADDRESS:
CITY:
PHONE:
FAX:

❒ FREE subscription to TPO magazine

TITLE:

STATE:

ZIP:

CELL PHONE:
EMAIL:

Scan and email to: nicole.labeau@colepublishing.com / Fax to: 715-546-3786 / Mail to: COLE Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 220, Three Lakes WI 54562

‘‘

The team members are the greatest resource at this plant. They do the work.
I’m support staff. I coordinate what they do, and the best way for me to do that
is to listen to what they have to say.”

Nate Tillis
Operations and Maintenance Supervisor
Beloit (Wis.) Water Pollution Control Treatment Facility

74

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

People.

The greatest natural resource.

tpomag.com
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2016 WWETT Show Invites
Seminar Proposals

industry news
WAMGROUP names Enviro-Care
Company president
WAMGROUP named Philip A. Thompson president of WAM North
America, doing business as Enviro-Care Company. WAMGROUP purchased
Enviro-Care in February. Thompson had been vice president of sales and
marketing under the previous owners.

Lined Valve Co. celebrates 20th anniversary
Lined Valve Co. celebrates the 20th anniversary of its founding by Jeff
Bowman, P.E., in 1995. Beginning in Beaverton, Oregon, the company moved
to Woodland, Washington, and opened a second manufacturing facility in
Ocala, Florida. In 1999, Bowman purchased A-C Valve, merging the two
companies with A-C Valve, doing business as LVC.

Like something? Hate something? Agree? Disagree?
Share your opinions about TPO articles through our Letters to the Editor.
Send a note to editor@tpomag.com

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The 2016 Water & Wastewater Equipment,
Treatment & Transport (WWETT) Show is seeking proposals for educational seminars.
The show, Feb. 17-20 in Indianapolis, features
dozens of presentations given by industry experts.
To offer a presentation, send a completed seminar proposal form by Aug. 1. Forms may be completed online at www.wwettshow.com/cfp.
Presentations should be 60 minutes long covering topics in a generic manner, without promoting a specific company or product. Seminar topics are:
• Septage collection, treatment and disposal
• Grease collection, treatment and disposal
• Municipal wastewater collection, treatment and disposal
• Onsite wastewater treatment system installation, components and
maintenance
• Sewer and drain cleaning, inspection, repair, lining, locating and detection
• Biosolids dewatering, treatment and technology
• Portable sanitation – special events and restroom service
• Business – marketing, financials and social media
• Safety
• Trucks and service vehicles – DOT regulations, service and
maintenance
• Technology and software
• Excavation
Those whose submissions are accepted will receive four full registration
passes to the 2016 WWETT Show. For more information, call 866/933-2653.

CLASSIFIED
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EDUCATION

facebook.com/TPOmag
twitter.com/TPOmag

RoyCEU.com: We provide continuing education courses for water, wastewater and water
distribution system operators. Log onto www.
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courses. Call 386-574-4307 for details.(oBM)

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POSITIONS AVAIlAblE

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Looking for experienced operators & technicians in Florida. Florida-based sewer,
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POSITIONS AVAIlAblE

OPERATORS

Various locations, Texas
SouthWest Water Company has openings for Water and Wastewater Operators in Austin, Benbrook, Conroe, Mabank and Pottsboro, Texas. Performs
routine checks of the facilities, maintenance and field customer service;
helps ensure compliance with governing agencies regulations. Requirements: TCEQ C or above water and/or
wastewater license, advanced skills
and technical knowledge of water and
wastewater treatment, HS diploma or
GED, 1-2 years’ related experience; water / wastewater operations and maintenance experience. Apply:
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tpomag.com August 2015

75

worth noting

people/awards
The Village of Roberts received the Wastewater System of the Year award
from the Wisconsin Rural Water Association.
The City of Eustis Wastewater Treatment Plant received the 2015 Earle
B. Phelps First Place Award (advanced facilities less than 5 mgd category)
from the Florida Water Environment Association for outstanding performance and professionalism.
Michael Finoia was named the new wastewater treatment superintendent for the plant in Southington, Connecticut. He replaces John DeGioia,
who retired after 37 years. Finoia had been the wastewater treatment superintendent in Fairfield, Connecticut.
Bhavani M. Rathi was named project manager for the Wastewater Practice Group of Wright-Pierce, a water, wastewater and infrastructure engineering firm serving the Northeast.
Caitlyn S. Butler, an assistant professor at the University of Massachusetts, received a $500,000 five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to conduct research on algae and bacteria and ways to improve wastewater
treatment. The grant funds her work on algal-sludge granules, which can
produce oxygen during wastewater treatment, reducing electricity use while
also cleaning the wastewater.
Brett Morgan was named the head of the wastewater treatment plants
at Hazel Hurst and Lantz Corners, Pennsylvania.
Jim Schreiber retired as director of the Hudson (Wisconsin) Wastewater Utility after serving there for nearly 40 years.

events
Aug. 13-14
Rocky Mountain Water Environment Association/Grand
Junction Water/Wastewater Conference, Two Rivers Conference
Center, Grand Junction, Colorado. Call 970/249-3369.
Aug. 24-28
Caribbean Water and Wastewater Association Conference and
Exhibition, InterContinental Hotel, Miami, Florida. Visit www.
fsawwa.org.

Gerald Plank, wastewater supervisor in Fort Smith, Arkansas, earned
the Water Environment Federation’s William D. Hatfield Award.
Van Buren Municipal Utilities received the Arkansas Water Environment Association Safety Award for cities with a population greater than
20,000.
Buddy Burns, water and wastewater superintendent for the City of Glenwood Springs, Colorado, retired in May after 38 years with the city.
Allen Schreiber was elected 2015-16 president of the Texas Water Utilities
Association. He is supervisor of field services for Fort Bend County, Texas.
Richard Kruse, water treatment supervisor with the Taupo District
Council in Australia, received the Water Industry Operations Group Operator of the Year award. He supervises the district’s 20 water treatment plants.

Johnny Brean, water operations superintendent for the Ramona Municipal Water District in Southern California, retired after nearly 30 years with
the district.

TPO welcomes your contributions to this listing. To recognize members of your
team, please send notices of new hires, promotions, service milestones, certifications
or achievements to editor@tpomag.com.

The Florida Section of AWWA named Collier County as the winner in
its annual Best Tasting Drinking Water Contest in southwest Florida.

education

Nels Halgren of Devils Lake received the Outstanding Water Works
Employee award from the North Dakota Rural Water Systems Association.

AWWA

The City of Wichita Falls, Texas, received the Alan Plummer Environmental Sustainability Award for its water reuse project.
The Pace Water System in Florida received the Excellence Award from
Water Company of America for billing accuracy and high standards of excellence in ratepayer equity and resource management.
Powdersville Water in South Carolina received the Directors Award in the
Partnership for Safe Water’s Distribution System Optimization Program.

The American Water Works Association is offering these webinars:
• Aug. 5 – Optimizing Collection Systems Data for Capital Investment
Planning and Prioritized Cleaning
• Aug. 12 – Treatment Tips and Tricks: Filtration
• Aug. 19 – What We Know of Cyanotoxins: Research and Advisories
• Aug. 26 – Optimizing Filters: Assess Conditions, Rehabilitation and
Management
Visit www.awwa.org/store/webinars.aspx.

Arkansas

The Wisconsin Rural Water Association (WRWA) honored Dan Mulhern
of the Arlington Water Utility as 2015 District Operator of the Year.

The Arkansas Environmental Training Academy is offering these courses:
• Aug. 4-5 – AETA Train-The-Trainer, Camden
• Aug. 17-21 – Backflow Assembly Tester, Fayetteville
• Aug. 18 – Backflow Assembly Tester Recertification, Fayetteville
• Aug. 18-20 – Advanced Water Treatment, Lowell
• Aug. 25-27 – Basic Water Treatment, North Little Rock
Visit www.sautech.edu/aeta/.

Fred Partin retired in June after 33 years as executive director of Bonita
Springs Utilities (formerly Bonita Springs Water System) in Florida.

The Arkansas Rural Water Association is offering these courses:
• Aug. 4-6 – Intermediate Water Treatment, Midway

The Environmental Utilities Department of the City of Roseville received
the California Municipal Utilities Association Resource Efficiency Award
for its water-use efficiency program in partnership with WaterSmart software.

76

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

• Aug. 11 – Basic Math, Springdale
• Aug. 12 – ADH Compliance, Springdale
• Aug. 13 – Applied Math, Springdale
• Aug. 13-14 – Plumbing Inspectors School, Lonoke
• Aug. 18-20 – Backflow Repair, Lonoke
Visit www.arkansasruralwater.org.

California
The California-Nevada of Section of AWWA is offering these courses:
• Aug. 3 – Groundwater Workshop, West Sacramento
• Aug. 4 – Customer Service Workshop, West Sacramento
• Aug. 7 – Backflow Refresher, West Sacramento
• Aug. 8 – Exam BF, Fresno
• Aug. 8 – Exam BF, West Sacramento
• Aug. 14 – Exam BF, Pleasanton
• Aug. 14 – Sustainability 101 Workshop, Rancho Cucamonga
• Aug. 17 – Introduction to Water Treatment, Rancho Cucamonga
• Aug. 17 – Water Quality Workshop, West Sacramento
• Aug. 18 – Regulations Workshop, West Sacramento
• Aug. 22 – Exam BF, Carson City, Nevada
• Aug. 22 – Exam BF, Sunnyvale
• Aug. 24 – Backflow Tester Course, Rancho Cucamonga
• Aug. 25 – Water Use Efficiency Grade 2 Workshop, West Sacramento
• Aug. 29 – Exam BF, Rancho Cucamonga
Visit www.ca-nv-awwa.org.

Florida

• Aug. 27 – NCWTFOCB Exams, Morganton, Snow Hill and Raleigh
Visit www.ncsafewater.org.

Ohio
The Ohio Water Environment Association is offering a One Water Utility Management Workshop Aug. 18 in Lewis Center. Visit www.ohiowea.org.

Oklahoma
The Oklahoma Environmental Training Center in Midwest City is offering these courses:
• Aug 3-4 – C Water Operator
• Aug. 5-6 – C Wastewater Operator
• Aug. 17 – Trenching and Shoring
• Aug. 17-20 – A/B Wastewater Operator
• Aug. 19 – Confined Space Entry
• Aug. 24-28 – OSHA 40-Hour HAZWOPER Class
• Aug. 31-Sept. 4 – Operator Bootcamp
Visit www.rose.edu.
Accurate Environmental in Oklahoma is offering these courses:
• Aug. 4-6 – D Water & Wastewater Operator, Stillwater
• Aug. 7 – Open Exam Session, Tulsa
• Aug. 12 – General Refresher for Water Operators, Tulsa
• Aug. 12-13 – C Water Operator, Tulsa
• Aug. 14 – Open Exam Session, Stillwater
• Aug. 18-20 – D Water & Wastewater Operator, Tulsa
Visit www.accuratelabs.com/classschedule.php.

The Florida AWWA is offering an ISA Water/Wastewater and Automatic
Controls Symposium Aug. 4 in Orlando. Visit www.fsawwa.org.

Texas

Illinois

The Water Environment Association of Texas is offering a Biosolids and
Odor and Corrosion Conference Aug. 5-6 in San Marcos. Visit www.weat.org.

The Illinois AWWA is offering these courses:
• Aug. 11 – Water Main Rehabilitation Alternatives, Decisions and
Design, Westmont
• Aug. 13 – Water Operator Exam Refresher for Class C and D, Elgin
• Aug. 20 – Distribution System O&M – Hydrants, Valves, Water
Service Lines, Morris
• Aug. 25 – Pumps and Pump Maintenance, Benton
• Aug. 25 – Chemical Properties, Safety and Security, Macomb
Visit www.isawwa.org.

New Jersey
The New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station Office of Continuing
Professional Education is offering these courses:
• Aug. 11 – Study and Exam Skills for Licensing and Professional
Certification Testing, North Brunswick
• Aug. 18-19 – Fundamentals of Generators and Transformers, New
Brunswick
• Aug. 19 – Water Sampling and Laboratory Procedures, Dover
• Aug. 25 – O&M of Water Treatment Filters, North Brunswick
Visit www.cpe.rutgers.edu.

New York
The New York Section of AWWA is offering a Distribution System O&M
course Aug. 5 in Melville. Visit www.nysawwa.org.

North Carolina
The North Carolina Section of AWWA-WEA is offering these courses:
• Aug. 3-5 – Advanced Management and Supervisory Leadership
Training, Greensboro
• Aug. 24-28 – Eastern Biological Wastewater Operators School,
Raleigh
• Aug. 25-28 – 2015 Physical/Chemical Wastewater Operators School,
Raleigh

The Texas Water Utilities Association is offering these courses:
• Aug. 3 – Activated Sludge, Corpus Christi
• Aug. 5 – Utilities Safety, Terrell
• Aug. 18 – Utilities Safety, Victoria
• Aug. 18 – CSI/CCC, Gatesville
• Aug. 18 – Basic Water, online
Visit www.twua.org.

Utah/Colorado
The Intermountain Section of AWWA is offering an Administrative Professionals Training – Women in Industry seminar Aug. 13 in West Jordan,
Utah. Visit www.ims-awwa.org.

Wisconsin
The University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Engineering Professional Development is offering a Purchasing and Inventory Control course
Aug. 26 in Madison. Visit www.epdweb.engr.wisc.edu.
The Wisconsin Rural Water Association is offering these courses:
• Aug. 6 – Cross Connection Hazards and Your Water System, Kaukauna
• Aug. 6 – Emergency Response Plan/Waiver Assessments, Kaukauna
• Aug. 13 – Cross Connection Hazards and Your Water System,
Mount Horeb
• Aug. 13 – Emergency Response Plan/Waiver Assessments, Mount Horeb
Visit www.wrwa.org.
The Wisconsin Section of the Central States Water Environment Association is offering a Pretreatment Seminar Aug. 11, location to be determined.
Visit www.cswea.org.
TPO invites your national, state or local association to post notices and news
items in this column. Send contributions to editor@tpomag.com.
tpomag.com August 2015

77

FREE INFO – SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

Go to tpomag.com to view the e-zine.

78

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

SPA-110815-00 8_August - PolyBlend Systems (Decatur, TX - R2)_Layout 1 6/24/15 4:04 PM Page 1

Joe Guinn

Wastewater Superintendent
City of Decatur WWTP
Decatur, TX

ors

Operat

re
e
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w
y
Ever Trust

In Decatur, TX, Wastewater Superintendent
Joe Guinn and his team are dedicated
to the efficient operation of the city’s
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“I have the best operators in the state of
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According to Joe, one of their facility’s greatest sources of pride is the
condition of their filter belt press. “It takes a good operator to keep a
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wear and tear. “When we needed a new belt for our filter press, you
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