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Flight to Iceland

An Educational Flight and Travel Adventure

August 3 – August 12, 2010

Mel Rushton
&
Tom Polgreen
Table of Contents

Introduction...............................................................................................................................3
....................................................................................................................................................3
Iceland........................................................................................................................................4
Reykjavik...................................................................................................................................5
Route Map.................................................................................................................................6
....................................................................................................................................................6
Trip Schedule.............................................................................................................................7
Notes on the Schedule...............................................................................................................8
Survival Equipment and Training...........................................................................................9
General..............................................................................................................................................9
Life raft.............................................................................................................................................9
Immersion suit..................................................................................................................................9
EPIRB...............................................................................................................................................9
Open water survival training............................................................................................................9
Over water operations.....................................................................................................................10
International procedures course (IPC)............................................................................................10
General Information...............................................................................................................11
Aircraft and Flight Requirements..........................................................................................12
Documents for your airplane:.........................................................................................................12
FCC licenses:..................................................................................................................................12
Mode S:...........................................................................................................................................12
8.33 kHz channel spacing:..............................................................................................................12
RVSM.............................................................................................................................................13
RNP-5.............................................................................................................................................13
Equipment codes for ICAO flight plans.........................................................................................13
Fuel Cards................................................................................................................................14
Jet-A Fuel Detail......................................................................................................................15
Cost Estimate Summary.........................................................................................................16
Recommended Charts and Plates...........................................................................................17
Nav Data..................................................................................................................................18
Chronological “To Do” List for All (except where noted)....................................................19
Program and Travel Guide.....................................................................................................20
Reykjavik, Iceland..........................................................................................................................20
Reykjavik Gay Pride 2010 _______________________________________________________20

2
Introduction

On every flight across the North Atlantic, Iceland is, of course, a necessary
stop. Having crossed the Atlantic nine times, that means nine visits to
Reykjavik. However, Iceland is worth more than just a tech stop en route.
Several of our Iceland stops were for three or more days, as there is much to
see and do in its cities and in its countryside.

So, in August of 2010, we plan another visit to Iceland. After all, it is just
3184nm, only about eleven hours flight time in a TBM. That’s only about
500nm farther than flying from the northwest corner of the US to the
southeast corner of the US!

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Iceland
According to Landnamabok, the settlement of Iceland began in AD 874
when the Norwegian chieftain Ingolfur Arnarson became the first permanent
Norwegian settler on the island. Others had visited the island earlier and
stayed over winter. Over the next centuries, people of Norse and Celtic
origin settled in Iceland. Until the 20th century, the Icelandic population
relied largely on fisheries and agriculture, and was part of the Norwegian,
and later the Danish monarchies. In the 20th century, Iceland’s economy and
welfare system developed quickly, and in recent decades the nations has
implemented free trade in the EEA, diversifying from fishing to new
economic fields in services, finance, and various industries.

Iceland is a European Island country located in the North Atlantic Ocean. It


has a population of about 320,000 and a total area of 103,000 km2. Its
capital and largest city is Reykjavik, whose surrounding area is home to
some two-thirds of the national population. Located on the Mid-Atlantic
Ridge, Iceland is volcanically and geologically active on a large scale; this
defines the landscape. The interior mainly consists of a plateau
characterized by sand fields, mountains and glaciers, while may beg glacial
rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Warmed by the Gulf Steam,
Iceland has a temperate climate relative to its latitude and provides a
habitable environment and nature.

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Reykjavik
Pure energy can be experienced at the heard of Iceland’s capital city,
Reykjavik. It has a lively culture and fun-filled nightlife, as well as great
natural qualities: space, clean air, nature, and boiling underground thermal
energy. It has the features of a modern, forward-looking society which are
complemented bya close connection to beautiful nature right on the city’s
doorstep.

Reykjavik is a great place to visit, whether for some cultural nourishment, a


spot of excitement, a dip in the Blue Lagoon, or a tech stop on the way to
Europe!

5
Route Map

6
Trip Schedule

Trip Schedule
Departure Arrival
Date Day Airport TZ City Miles Gals. hh:mm Airport TZ City

8/3/10 TU CYVR -7 Vancouver, BC 621 115 2:21 CYMM -6 Ft. McMurry


8/3/10 TU CYMM -6 Ft. McMurry 563 91 2:00 CYYQ -6 Churchill, MB
8/4/10 WE CYYQ -6 Churchill, MB 789 126 2:48 CYFB -4 Iqaluit, NU
8/5/10 TH CYFB -4 Iqaluit, NU 485 78 1:43 BGSF -3 Kangerlussuaq, GR
Kangerlussuaq,
8/5/10 TH BGSF -3 GRL 726 116 2:34 BIRK 0 Reykjavik, ISL
8/9/10 MO BIRK 0 Reykjavik, ISL BIRK 0 Reykjavik, ISL

TOTALS: 3184 526 11:26:00

7
Notes on the Schedule

Participants starting from airports other than the Pacific Northwest could meet up with us
at any one of our Canadian stops along the way.

A list of airports of entry in Canada can be found by province and territory at


http://cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/contact/listing/indexpages/indextype5-e.html.

Travel days have been kept to a maximum of six hours of flying time for the TBM.
There are only one or two legs per day. Eastbound, only one day has been built in for a
weather (or other) delay. We might want to depart one day earlier.

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Survival Equipment and Training

General

Www.equipped.org is a good website for all sorts of survival information and


ratings of products like rafts.

Life raft

One option is to rent a raft, such as a Survival Products four-person raft


(www.survivalproductsinc.com). Rental rates for a basic (but TSOed) four-
person raft with a canopy are approximately $300 per month, plus shipping each
way. Rafts are considered “hazmat” due to their CO2 cartridge. So, shipping is a
hassle, and expensive. Figure another $75 each way. It would weight about 20
pounds. While I have used this raft for flights in the Gulf of Mexico and the
Caribbean, I would not suggest it for the North Atlantic.

The best option is to buy a Winslow raft. We own the Winslow Super-Light
Island Flyer Plus with six-person capacity, basic survival pack built in, self
erecting canopy and insulated double floor. It weighs about 50 pounds. In 1994,
1996, and in 2000, Aviation Consumer rated this the best raft by a wide margin.
It cost $3600 in December 0f 2000. Winslow rafts are not for rent.

Immersion suit

One option is to rent an immersion suit at Telford Aviation in Bangor, Maine


(www.telfordaviation.com). The rate is $50 per week (figure two weeks), plus
shipping each way.

Another option is to buy a Mustang Ocean Commander 8000. It weighs about 10


pounds. I bought ours from Seattle Marine and Fishing Supply Company
(www.seamar.com). Presently is $665 from www.oceanmedix.com.

EPIRB

After April 30, 2005, according to ICAO rules, “Part 91 operators flying to
Europe, Russia and on extended over-water flights (200nm from shore) need to
carry a single, permanently mounted, automatic ELT capable of broadcasting on
121.5 MHz and 406 MHz.”

All 406 MHz devices must be registered annually with NOAA. You can do so
online at www.beaconregistration.noaa.gov.

Open water survival training


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Consider an open water survival training course such at the one offered by Stark
Survival Training (www.starksurvival.com).

Over water operations

Read the Flight Safety Foundation’s “Waterproof Flight Operations—A


comprehensive guide for corporate, fractional, on-demand and commuter
operators conducting overwater flights.” It is available for $240 in printed form
or $69 for the CD version.

http://www.flightsafety.org/ecommerce/default.cfm?Action=Detail&ItemID=919

International procedures course (IPC)

Consider taking an IPC course. The three-day course taught by Aviation Training
International, Ltd. near Dallas, TX (http://www.trainati.com) is excellent.

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General Information

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Aircraft and Flight Requirements

Documents for your airplane:

Copies of your medical and licenses


Copies of your certificate of insurance
Copies of your proof of purchase
Your Aircraft Radio Station license (see below)
Your Restricted Radiotelephone license (see below)

FCC licenses:

You must obtain an Aircraft Radio Station license by electronically or manually


filing FCC Form 605, Schedule C.

You must obtain a Restricted Radiotelephone Operator Permit by filing FCC


Form 605, Schedule E.

These are both required to be onboard “if you will land in a foreign country or
communicate via radio with a foreign ground station” according to the
Telecommunications Act of 1996.

See: http://wireless.fcc.gov/aviation/fctsht4.html

Mode S:

Mode S Enhanced Surveillance (EHS) Basic Mode S is required in parts of


Europe (e.g., parts of the UK, France and Germany) beginning April 1, 2005 for
aircraft weighing more than 5,700 kg (12,000 lbs.) or having a maximum true
airspeed of 250 kts. or greater.

8.33 kHz channel spacing:

Due to a shortage of VHF r/t frequencies in the European airspace a decision was
made to reduce the spacing from 25 kHz to 8.33 kHz. This resulted in an increase
in available frequencies, which permitted the creation of new control sectors,
thereby contributing to an increase in ATC capacity. The mandatory carriage of
8.33 kHz radio equipment was effective from October 7, 1999 throughout the
ICAO European Region above FL245. Aircraft must be equipped with two
independent sets of 8.33 kHz radios. No exemptions can be granted within
sectors where 8.33 kHz channel spacing is in use. The letter “Y” must be inserted
in field 10 of the ICAO flight plan, if your radios are capable of 8.33 kHz channel
spacing.

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Garmin 530s are capable of 8.33 kHz channel spacing. This option is user
selectable.

RVSM

Northern Domestic Airspace in Canada, North Atlantic Airspace, and European


Airspace implemented Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum in January of 2002.
DRVSM was implemented in the rest of North America, Central America and
South America on January 20, 2005. Unless you are RVSM approved, you will
not be able to fly higher than FL280. The letter “W” (not “Q”) must be inserted
in field 10 of the ICAO flight plan, if you are RVSM approved.

RNP-5

Required Navigation Performance – 5 is defined as RNAV that meets a track


keeping accuracy equal to or better than +/- 5nm for 95% of the flight time. This
value includes signal source error, airborne receiver error, display system error,
and flight technical error. This navigation performance assumes the necessary
coverage provided by satellite or ground based navigation aids is available for the
intended route to be flown. In brief, this is lateral traffic separation of 5nm for
approved aircraft and crew. This applies primarily to North Atlantic air
navigation operations, and is planned to become more widespread.

The Garmin G1000 and Garmin 530s are certified for RNP-5. For more
information, see: http://www.faa.gov/avr/afs/afs410/docs/ac_90-96a.pdf

Equipment codes for ICAO flight plans

Most TBMs will file “SRGYW/C”, where S = Standard equipment


(VHF/VOR/ILS), R = RNP appropriate to route flown, G = GNSS, Y = 8.33 mHz
channel spacing, W = RVSM approved and C = Mode C transponder

TBMs with the G1000 must file DGLORVWY/S, because they do have an ADF
(which is part of S – Standard Equipment).

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Fuel Cards

Fueling card services are accepted for Jet-A by several companies at FBOs on our trip:

Colt US and Canada http://www.coltinternational.com


WORLD Fuel Worldwide http://wsso.wfscorp.com
UVAir Worldwide http://www.uvair.com

Fuel purchased at FBOs with these cards is often significantly less than the posted price.
Monthly price booklets and online fuel quotes are available. UVAir will automatically
charge your bankcard (Visa and MC). WORLD will bill you, and you must pay by
check. I have no personal experience with Colt.

Domestically and in Canada, these cards simply allow you to purchase fuel at discounts.
However, on our trip, such cards are essential. Not only will there be significant fuel
savings, but in most “third world” countries (and some other locations) bankcards are not
accepted for fuel purchases. So, you will wind up carrying huge amounts of cash.

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Jet-A Fuel Detail

Fuel
Detail
as of 3/3/10

World
Airport City Zulu FBO contact Hours FBO UVAir Fuel

BGBW Narsarsuaq, GRL -3 MITTARFEQARFIIT No $6.32


BGGH Nuuk, GRL -3 MITTARFEQARFIIT 11-19 No $6.32
Kangerlussuaq,
BGSF GRL -3 StatOil $5.72 $5.13
BIRK Reykjavik, ISL 0 Chevrontexaco 24 $2.85 $2.40
CYFB Iqaluit, NU -4 UQSUQ (CD$.89/l) $5.70 No
CYMO Moosonee,ON -5 No No
CYQT Thunder Bay, ON -5 Maintair Aviations Services - Shell No $4.27
CYRT Rankin Inlet, NU -5 Gov/t of Nunavut (pre-arr.) No No
CYTS Timmins,ON -4 Esso (CD$1.36/l) No $4.40
CYVR Vancouver, BC -7 Shell AeroCentre 24 $4.76 $3.75 $3.76
CYWG Winnipeg, MB -6 Avitat Esso $4.96 $4.08 $3.86
CYYQ Churchill, MB -6 Shell 08-17 $5.72 $5.73 $4.78
CYYR Goose Bay, NL -4 Irving Air $3.49 $3.90
EGPC Wick, SCT 1 Far North Aviation 24 No $4.60
KGBR Bangor, ME -5 Bangor Aviation No No
CYMM Ft. McMurry -6 Borealis Esso $6.99 No $4.35
CYYZ Toronto -4 Skyservice Esso Avitat $4.61 $4.33 $3.81

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Cost Estimate Summary

Cost Estimate Summary


03/03/10

Item $ USD

ATC Fees $1,500.00


Airport Fees $300.00
Charts $332.02
Fuel $2,332.00
Nav Data $175.00
6 nights at
Lodging $900.00 $150/night

Total $5,539.02

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Recommended Charts and Plates

IFR Charts for Canada

Nav Canada Approach plates CAP-4 06/03/10 08/26/10 Aviation World $19.95
Nav Canada Approach plates CAP-5 06/03/10 08/26/10 Aviation World $19.95
Nav Canada Approach plates CAP-7 06/03/10 08/26/10 Aviation World $19.95
Nav Canada Low Alt Enroute CL 1 - 10 06/03/10 08/26/10 Aviation World $19.95
Nav Canada Terminal Charts CT 1 & 2 06/03/10 08/26/10 Aviation World $24.75
Nav Canada High Alt Enroute Set of 3 06/03/10 08/26/10 Aviation World $10.47
Subtotal
or
$132.0
East Canada - Trip Kit Basic ACAE0446 on issue Jeppesen 0
Canada & Alaska Trip Kit Basic -
(Enroute High Only) ACANHI46 on issue Jeppesen $76.00

Subtotal

Atlantic Only

Atlantic Special Manual $217.0


TransAtlantic - Trip Kit Basic AATLSM46 on issue Jeppesen 0

Subtotal

Europe Only

$708.0
Europe - Trip Kit Basic AEUR0446 on issue Jeppesen 0
$151.0
Europe - Enroute High Only AERMHI46 on issue Jeppesen 0

Subtotal

VFR charts

CF-17,18,19 Aircraft Spruce &


WAC charts CG-19,20 Specialty $52.50
CWAC D-
14,15 E-
WAC charts 17,18,19 www.maptown.com $68.75
C-1,13 D-
1,16 E-1, F-1,
G-1,H-1,J-
ONC charts 1,2,3,K-1,2 www.maptown.com $58.37
Subtotal

Minimum chart cost (Nav Canada charts & Jepp trip kit for North Atlantic only)

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Nav Data

NavData for Dual Garmin 530s (need one for each unit)

Description Item Effective Expiration Vendor Cost

Dual Install Garmin - International One-


Time Update download service non-WAAS 07/29/10 08/26/10 Jeppesen $150.00

Dual Install Garmin - International One-


Time Update download service non-WAAS 07/29/10 08/26/10 Jeppesen $150.00

Dual Install Garmin - International One-


Time Update download service WAAS 07/29/10 08/26/10 Jeppesen $160.00

Dual Install Garmin - International One-


Time Update download service WAAS 07/29/10 08/26/10 Jeppesen $160.00

Subtotal non-WAAS $

NavData for G1000

G1000 Garmin - International One-Time


Update download service WAAS 07/29/10 08/26/10 Jeppesen $175.00

Subtotal $

Note: for the G1000, we currently have the western hemisphere. We will pay for eastern hemisphere,
but we will get world-wide, so that it is all on one card when downloaded.

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Chronological “To Do” List for All (except where noted)

7/1 Purchase or rent life raft


7/1 Purchase or rent immersion suits
7/1 Apply for FCC licenses
7/15 Obtain and register EPRIB
7/15 Purchase Jeppesen FlightStar software Nav Data effective 7/29/10 M+T only
7/15 Determine all routes using FlightStar with latest Nav Data M+T only
7/15 Order Jeppesen Charts and Nav Data for aircraft effective 7/29/10
7/28 Verify all routes with Eurocontrol’s online verification system M+T only
7/28 Assemble and distribute routes and flight plans to all pilots M+T only
7/28 Download Garmin Domestic Nav Data effective 7/29/10
7/28 Download Garmin International Nav Data effective 7/29/10
8/2-3 Arrive in Vancouver, BC (CYVR) for preflight briefing
8/3 Depart CYVR
8/5 Arrive BIRK

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Program and Travel Guide

Reykjavik, Iceland

Iceland is a surprisingly scenic and exciting place to visit. We’ll spend three
nights in Room With A View, in the heart of Reykjavik. Just look at their photos
of the splendid accommodations and views at
http://www.roomwithaview.is/photos.html

Geothermal activity is present in much of the country and has been harnessed to
supply hot water for heating, swimming pools, steam generation of electricity and
industrial applications. We’ll visit such places as the spa of Blue Lagoon, a
unique natural wonder of mineral-rich geothermal seawater. One day we’ll
participate in a private Golden Circle tour, including the Gullfoss, Iceland’s most
famous and picturesque waterfall, the town of Geysir where you’ll see much
geothermal activity and the National Park at Pingvellir. Whale watching tours
and deep-sea fishing is also very popular. In the town of Reykjavik, there are
numerous museums, galleries, gift shops and restaurants.

Reykjavik Gay Pride 2010 -- http://www.gaypride.is/Index/English

The twelfth annual Reykjavik Gay Pride parade and outdoor concert will be August
5 – 8, 2010. The website listed above has not been updated for 2010 yet. However,
keep checking.

Typically, this event attracts about 80,000 people to the middle of Reykjavik on
Saturday—roughly 25% of the entire population. The sheer size of the party is
tribute to Iceland’s leading equal rights legislation and the citizens’ inclusive
nature.

The Reykjavik Gay Pride parade 2009 featured Pall Oskar (probably Iceland’s
biggest pop star), and a greater number of carnival floats than ever before (37),
meaning the crowds did not go away disappointed. In fact, Iceland as a Gay holiday
destination has become increasingly popular recently – partly because of features in
major media: Reykjavik was featured as a recent ‘destination of the month’ in
Attitude magazine, among others.

Iceland does not have a Gay village. It does not even have many Gay bars and clubs
at all. But that has nothing to do with Iceland being a strict, conservative society…
quite the opposite in fact.

Peek into a Reykjavik Gay bar on a Saturday night and you will see a clientele
anything but exclusively Gay. And if you think all the dozens of other bars in town
are straight-only, think again. People in Reykjavik go partying in places dictated by
20
their taste in music, their taste in décor or simply by their bossy friends. They do
not need to choose a venue based only on their sexuality.

There are a variety of helpful websites available for Gay travelers in Iceland. The
English language www.gayice.is is a good start and includes a list of links to other
useful sites.

The Icelandic Tourist Board’s Visit Iceland website is also packed with invaluable
information on things to do in Iceland; from the Blue Lagoon and the hundreds of
geothermal pools to glacier hiking and white water rafting.

More details about Iceland vacations are available on


http://www.visiticeland.com.

21
Notes to Mel:

On the daily briefing page:


DO NOT START YOUR ENGINE
Obtain your clearance
Request permission to start your engine.

Where to switch databases if using G430/530

Where to switch to 8.33 kHz spacing

Non-radar position reporting

22

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