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More Unbeatable

Chess Lessons

More Unbeatable
Chess Lessons
Instruction for the Advanced Player
CHESS FOR EVERYONE SERIES

Robert M. Snyder
Author of Chess for Everyone, Unbeatable Chess
Lessons, Winning Chess Traps, Winning Chess
Tournaments and Basic Chess Tactics

iUniverse, Inc.

New York Lincoln Shanghai

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons


Instruction for the Advanced Player
Copyright 2007 by Robert M. Snyder
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be used or reproduced by any
means, graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording,
taping or by any information storage retrieval system without the written
permission of the publisher except in the case of brief quotations embodied in
critical articles and reviews.
iUniverse books may be ordered through booksellers or by contacting:
iUniverse
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Lincoln, NE 68512
www.iuniverse.com
1-800-Authors (1-800-288-4677)
The views expressed in this work are solely those of the author and do not
necessarily reflect the views of the publisher, and the publisher hereby disclaims
any responsibility for them.
ISBN: 978-0-595-45346-7 (pbk)
ISBN: 978-0-595-89658-5 (ebk)
Printed in the United States of America

This book is dedicated to my uncle Max Perea, a talented artist


who drew the picture for the cover of this book. His work inspired
me to collect chess art.

Contents

Acknowledgments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Symbols Used in This Book. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
1. Surprise Move
Amateur v. Robert Snyder, Kings Gambit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
2. Castling on Opposite Sides
Ivanchuk v. Rozentalis, Petrovs Defense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
3. Effective Use of the Queen
Berne v. Paris, Ponzianis Opening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
4. Weathering the Storm
Anthony Jasaitis v. Robert Snyder, Goring Gambit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
5. Pressure on the e File
Chigorin v. Schiffers, Scotch Game. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
6. Overextended Pieces
D. Parniani v. R. Snyder, Giuoco Piano. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
7. Refuting an Inferior Opening
R. Cornelis v. R. Snyder, Giuoco Piano. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

-vii-

viii

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8. Taking Advantage of an Out of Play Queen


Kindermann v. Tatai, Ruy Lopez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
9. A Deep Opening Trap
Tarrasch v. Marco, Ruy Lopez. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
10. Surprise Diagonals
Jasper Rom v. Robert Snyder, Ruy Lopez. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
11. Surviving the Marshall Gambit
Badzarani v. Malinin, Ruy Lopez. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
12. Allowing an Isolated Pawn for Active Piece Play
Jorge Brittencourt v. Robert Snyder, Ruy Lopez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
13. Exploiting Small Advantages in Time and Space
Zapata v. Welling, Scandinavian Defense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
14. The Bad Bishop
Minic v. Hulak, Pirc Defense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
15. Taking Advantage of an Uncommitted King
Robert Snyder v. Sergey Kalinitchew, Modern Defense. . . . . . . . . . . 134
16. Position under Siege
Sax v. Hecht, Alekhines Defense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
17. Sacrificing on f6 Against the Castled King
Sax v. Ghinda, Alekhines Defense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
18. Junior Champion Kasparov in Action
Kasparov v. Palatnik, Alekhines Defense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
19. Fighting the Sicilian
Gross v. Zrzavy, Sicilian Defense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
20. Sacrifice on f2
Bukhuti Gurgenidze v. Mikhail Tal, Benoni Defense . . . . . . . . . . . . 194

Robert M. Snyder

ix

21. Sacrifice on h7
Anatoly Karpov v. Victor Korchnoi, Queens Indian Defense. . . . . . . 205
22. The Desperado
James Tarjan v. Robert Snyder, Queens Indian Defense. . . . . . . . . . 212
23. Breaking a Pin
Laurence Newton v. Robert Snyder, Nimzo-Indian Defense . . . . . . . 222
24. A Knight on the Rim is Dim
Richard Mann v. Robert Snyder, Birds Opening. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
About the Author. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243

Acknowledgments

Thanks are due to Calvin Olson (author of The Chess Kings) for his extensive help
in editing, proofreading and reviewing the manuscript. Additional proofreading
has been provided by Chris Stratford. I am very grateful for their help.

-xi-

Introduction

Thousands of chess books have been written containing game collections. Even
though there are so many game collection books, when I wrote my second book,
Unbeatable Chess Lessons, I was confident that it would be a success. I felt that since
I had used these games in lessons for many years and understood in some detail
the thinking process of my students, such a work would allow me to provide a
unique insight to my readers not found in other books.
The readers of my first book, which covered basic rules and strategy, had
urged me to write a second and more advanced book. So the story continues;
after completing my second book, consisting of the games I use in lessons, I was
then urged to write yet another book with more lessons based on games. After
being hit over the head numerous times with the idea of expanding on Unbeatable
Chess Lessons, I realized that another twenty-four lessons would fill in most of the
important gaps that couldnt be covered in one volume. But, before I started on this
project I completed another book. My third book, Winning Chess Tournaments,
was designed to be the perfect companion and at an equal level of understanding
to go along with Unbeatable Chess Lessons.
Just as in Unbeatable Chess Lessons, the games in this new book were selected
mostly for their instructive value, but with elements of beauty and entertainment
taken into consideration. Even though More Unbeatable Chess Lessons is a followup book, it still works well enough for the more advanced scholastic player as a
stand alone book.
To some extent, the same tiered approach is used to cover basic ideas while
going into more advanced concepts and analysis. In order to allow this book to
expand on Unbeatable Chess Lessons I included a more detailed analysis of the
openingsnot just a simple repetition of the same general rules and concepts
found in my previous books. However, on occasion when an idea or concept is of
extreme importance there may be some repetition.

-xiii-

xiv

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Every move in each game is commented onexcept for when the exact same
opening moves were played in a previous game. A major focus is placed on important
tactical and positional concepts. However, another important consideration is the
selection of games using openings that filled in gaps in Unbeatable Chess Lessons.
Since the games have been arranged by opening in both books, this makes them
especially easy to use in helping to prepare a comprehensive opening system. Many
new opening innovations will be found in these games that will not be found
elsewhere. Since I am a full time chess teacher and educator, with total dedication
to my work, many hours of analysis went into making sure that this book contains
the highest quality and most accurate analysis possible.
Many of the games were played by the worlds best players. However, I have
also selected some games that I played against players ranging from expert to
Grandmaster. Such games allow me to show my readers how to exploit mistakes
made at different levels of play. An added advantage is that teachers usually
understand their own games best.
In these games the first player named, which is on the left, is playing White. We
will now move on to our first lesson!

Symbols Used in This Book

SYMBOL
x
+
++
=
0-0
0-0-0
e.p.
?
??
!
!!

MEANING
captures
check
checkmate
promoted to a
Castles kingside
Castles queenside
en passant
weak move
very weak move
strong move
very strong move

-xv-

LESSON 1

2 f4
White initiates the Kings Gambit.
He offers to sacrifice his f Pawn
to remove Blacks e Pawn from the
center. By removing Blacks Pawn from
e5 White can more easily occupy the
center by placing a Pawn on d4. If
Black accepts the gambit Pawn, White
plans to apply pressure to Blacks Pawn
on f4 along the half open f file after
castling and with his Bishop on the
c1-h6 diagonal after moving the d
Pawn.

Surprise Move
Amateur vs. Robert Snyder
2001
Opening: Kings Gambit
It is rare to see the Kings Gambit played
at the Master level today. However,
it is important to be prepared for less
common and inferior openings. This
short game shows how preparation and
precise play can bring a quick victory.
Though White (with an Elo rating of
approximately 2200) knew after nine
moves that he had a bad position he
had no idea that his opponents next
move would cause him to resign.

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{$NGQIBHR}
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1 e4
White immediately claims a stake in
the center and frees the Bishop on f1
and the Queen. When I was a scholastic
player I experimented with other first
moves, but quickly returned to my
favorite 1 e4. I recommend this and
the next move to my students because
it quickly leads to the greatest variety of
tactical situations.

Diagram 1. Position after 2 f4.

2 exf4
The old saying, The only way to refute a
gambit is to accept it, applies here. There
is nothing wrong with playing the Kings
Gambit Declined if you are satisfied
with an equal game after 2 Bc5 3 Nf3
(not 3 fxe5?? because of 3 Qh4+ and
now if 4 g3, then 4 Qxe4+ forking
King and Rook, or if 4 Ke2??, then 4
Qxe4++) d6 4 Nc3 (if 4 c3, then 4

1 e5
Black also stakes his claim in the center
while freeing his Bishop on f8 and
Queen.
--

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Nf6 5 d4 exd4 6 cxd4 Bb6 7 e5 Ne4 8


Nc3 d5) Nf6 5 Bc4 Nc6 6 d3 a6 7 fxe5
dxe5 8 Bg5 h6 9 Bh4 Qd6.
3 Bc4
White immediately develops his Bishop
and attacks the weak f7 square (a
common target point and thematic idea
with the Kings Gambit). The weakness
of this move is not that it leaves the
h4-e1 diagonal available to Blacks
Queen, but because through aggressive
play Whites Bishop on c4 will be a
target to Blacks d Pawn.
The most common move played in
Kings Gambit is the natural developing
move 3 Nf3. This not only keeps Blacks
Queen off h4 but it avoids the pitfalls
of having the Bishop exposed to attack
on c4.
After 3 Nf3, Fischers defense with 3
d6 is a very effective way of combating
the Kings Gambit. With 3 d6,
Black immediately challenges the
control of the important e5 square
while freeing his Bishop on c8. Part
of the idea will be to reinforce Blacks
weak Pawn on f4 by creating a
Pawn chain with Pawns at h6 and
g5. In reality there is a fine balance
between these Pawns being a weakness
or becoming a threat to expose Whites
King to an attack.

After 3 Nf3 d6 there are two main lines


for White:
1. 4 Bc4 h6 5 d4 (5 h4, to prevent 5
g5, is nicely met by 5 Nf6
6 Nc3 Be7 7 d4 Nh5) g5 6 h4 (or
if 6 0-0, then 6 Bg7 7 c3 Nc6
8 g3 Bh3) Bg7 7 c3 Nc6 8 Qb3
Qe7 9 0-0 Nf6 10 hxg5 hxg5 11
Nxg5 Nxd4! 12 Bxf7+ Kd8 13
cxd4 Nxe4 14 Bxf4 (not 14 Nf3?
because of 14 Bxd4+! 15 Nxd4
Qh4) Bxd4+ 15 Be3 Ng3.
2. 4 d4 g5 5 h4 g4 6 Ng1 (if 6 Ng5,
then 6 f6 and Whites Knight
dies without nearly enough compen
sation) f3 (another good alternative
is 6 f5 7 Nc3 fxe4 8 Bxf4 d5) 7
gxf3 Be7 8 h5 (if 8 Be3, then 8
Bxh4+ 9 Kd2 Bg5) Bh4+ 9 Ke2 (if 9
Kd2, then 9. Bg5+) f5.
3 Nf6
Black develops his Knight, threatens
Whites e Pawn and prepares support
for a future placement of a Pawn on
d5. Making White lose his ability
to castle with 3 Qh4+ 4 Kf1 is
acceptable. However, White will have
a decent game after developing his
Knight to f3 and gaining time by
attacking Blacks Queen.

Robert M. Snyder

4 Nc3

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of taking advantage of Whites early


development of his Bishop to c4.
5 e5

White develops his Knight to defend his


threatened e Pawn. Other alternatives
also give Black an edge:
1. 4 Qe2 d5! (this aggressive freeing
move is thematic) 5 exd5+ Be7 6
Nf3 0-0 7 d4 c6 8 dxc6 (if 8 Bxf4,
then 8 cxd5) Nxc6 9 c3 Bd6 10
0-0 Bg4 11 Nbd2 Re8 and Blacks
lead in development and active
pieces more than compensate for
his weak Pawn on f4.
2. 4 d3 d5! 5 exd5 Nxd5 6 Nf3 Nc6
7 Bxd5 Qxd5 8 Bxf4 Bg4 9 Nc3
(if 9 Bxc7?, then 9 Nd4) Qa5
10 0-0 0-0-0 11 Qd2 Bc5+ 12 Kh1
Rhe8 and Black achieves a dream
position with every piece nicely in
play.

This aggressive advance, which threatens


Blacks Knight on f6, is over-ambitious.
White had a choice of a couple of slightly
more accurate moves, which could
continue:
1. 5 Bb3 (this is probably Whites best
choice; it anticipates Blacks attack
on his Bishop by 5 d5) d5 6 exd5
cxd5 7 d4 Bb4 8 Nf3 0-0 9 0-0 Bxc3
10 bxc3 Qc7 11 Qe1 Nc6 12 Qh4
Ne7, planning to meet either 13
Qxf4 or 13 Bxf4 with 13 Qxc3.
Though Black is a Pawn ahead,
White has some compensation with
his spatial advantage and lead in
development.
2. 5 d4 d5 6 exd5 cxd5 7 Bb5+ (if 7
Bb3, then 7 Bb4 8 Nf3 Qe7+ 9
Ne5 Nc6 10 Bxf4 0-0 11 0-0 Nxd4
12 Nxd5 Nxd5 13 Bxd5 Be6) Bd7
8 Bxf4 Bb4 9 Bxd7+ Nbxd7 10
Nge2 0-0 11 0-0 Qb6 12 Qd3 Rfe8
and Black stands slightly better.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

4 c6

5 d5

Black prepares to support the advance of


his Pawn to d5 in line with the theme

Black follows through with his plan by


boldly countering in the center while
attacking Whites Bishop on c4. This

Diagram 2. Position after 4 Nc3.

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

also frees Blacks queenside pieces by


opening the c8-h3 diagonal for his
Bishop and d7 for his Knight.
6 exf6
White intends, through exchanges, to
give Black two sets of doubled Pawns.
However, Blacks extra Pawn and active
Bishop pair will still give him the
advantage. The alternative, 6 exd6e.p.,
also gives Black a clear advantage. After
6 exd6e.p. the game might continue, 6
Bxd6 7 Qe2+ (or 7 Nf3 0-0 8 0-0
Bg4) Be7 8 Nf3 b5 9 Bb3 0-0 10 0-0
(or 10 d3 Bc5!) Bc5+ 11 Kh1 Re8.
6 dxc4
Black recovers his piece.
7 Qe2+

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{P)P)QdP)}
{$wGwIwHR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 3. Position after 7 Qe2.

White brings his Queen to a more


active location and sets up a pin on
Blacks Bishop when it goes to e6.

7 Be6
This is Blacks only move to avoid a
loss of material. However, you only
need one good move in a position!
Black develops his Bishop and aids the
protection of his Pawn on c4 with
one move.
8 fxg7
White saves the Pawn by capturing and
doubling Blacks isolated f Pawns.
8 Bxg7
Black recovers his Pawn and develops
his Bishop. A good alternative would be
8 Qh4+, planning to meet 9 g3 with
9 fxg3 10 gxf8=Q+ (if 10 gxh8=Q,
then 10 g2+ 11 Qf2 gxh1=Q 12
Qxh4 Qxg1+ 13 Ke2 Bg4+ 14 Qxg4
Qxg4+) Kxf8 11 Kf1 Rg8 12 Qg2
Qf4+ 13 Ke2 (if 13 Nf3, then 13
Bh3! 14 Qxh3 Qxf3+) gxh2 14 Qxh2
Qxh2+ 15 Rxh2 Rxg1 16 Rxh7 Kg8
17 Rh4 Na6 and an endgame emerges
with Black a Pawn ahead and with a
superior position.
Therefore, after 8 Qh4+ White does
better to play 8 Kf1 Bxg7 9 Nf3 Qg4.
Blacks extra Pawn and active Bishop
pair still give him a major advantage.
9 Nh3?
White attacks Blacks weak Pawn
on f4. However, it will soon be

Robert M. Snyder

demonstrated that White should


have played the natural developing
move 9 Nf3 (keeping Blacks Queen
out of h4). After 9 Nf3 the game
might continue 9 Na6 (from a6
the Knight has numerous ways to get
actively into play) 10 0-0 Nb4 and
Black has a superior position and an
extra Pawn.
9 Qh4+
Black attacks Whites King along the
weakened h4-e1 diagonal.
10 Kd1?

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{P)P)QdP)}
{$wGKdwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 4. Position after 10 Kd1.

This innocent looking move is a fatal


mistake! White had nothing better
than to offer a Queen trade with 10
Qf2 Qxf2+ 12 Nxf2 Na6 (once again,
placing the Knight temporarily on the
edge of the board gives it opportunities
to come into play by going to either
c5 or b4 and attack Whites weak
c Pawn) 13 a3 Nc5. However, Blacks

doubled isolated f Pawns are little


compensation for White because of
Blacks active pieces, Bishop pair, and
extra Pawn.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
10 f3!
White resigned here.
This subtle move must have been a
shock for White. It attacks Whites
Queen and g Pawn (a critical defender
of the Knight on h3). Black wins at
least a piece. If 11 Qxf3, then 11
Bg4 pins and wins Blacks Queen. If 11
Qf2 (or 11 Qf1), then 11 fxg2 12
Qxg2 Qxh3 13 Qxg7? Qf3+ forking
the King and Rook.

LESSON 2

2 Nf6
Black initiates Petrovs defense. Instead
of defending his e Pawn, Black
counters by developing his Knight
toward the center and attacking Whites
e Pawn.

Castling on Opposite Sides


Ivanchuk vs. Rozentalis
Debrecen, 2001
Opening: Petrovs Defense

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{dwdwdNdw}
{P)P)W)P)}
{$NGQIBdR}
vllllllllV

When I was young I read in a book that


Petrovs defense (where the first two
moves of the game are copied by Black
and a symmetrical position is reached)
often leads to a dry and boring game.
In theory, as White, if your opponent
copies your moves to excess Black will
be forced to deviate or obtain an inferior
game at some point. In reality, Petrovs
defense contains some very sharp and
interesting tactical lines that still make
it popular among world-class players.
In this game Ivanchuk, one of the top
rated players in the World, shows how to
use the Steinitz variation in an effective
way against Blacks defense. After both
players castle on opposite sides of the
board, White uses elaborate tactics to
quickly destroy his opponent.

Diagram 5. Position after 2 Nf6.

3 d4
This is known as the Steinitz Variation.
White boldly strikes at the center with
a Pawn, attacking Blacks e Pawn a
second time and freeing his Bishop on
the c1-h6 diagonal as well as his Queen
on the d file. Also, in some variations
White will develop his Knight to d2,
which is now available.
The most common move here is
to capture Blacks e Pawn with 3
Nxe5. It would be unwise for Black to
immediately recapture his Pawn with 3
Nxe4? because White would attack
along the e file with 4 Qe2. After 4
Qe2 the game might continue 4
Qe7 (not 4 Nf6?? because of 5 Nc6+

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3
This is the most popular second move
for White in the open game. It develops
a piece toward the center and attacks
Blacks e Pawn.

--

Robert M. Snyder

winning Blacks Queen, or 4 d5?


losing a Pawn after 5 d3 Qe7 6 dxe4
Qxe5 7 exd5) 5 Qxe4 d6 6 d4 dxe5 7
dxe5 Nc6 8 Bb5 Bd7 9 Nc3 0-0-0 (if 9
Nxe5, then 10 Nd5 Qd6 11 Bxd7+
Kxd7 12 Bf4 Re8 13 0-0-0 Kc8 14
Rhe1) 10 Bf4 g5 11 Bg3 Bg7 12 0-0-0
and White emerges with an extra Pawn
and a spatial advantage.
After 3 Nxe5 Black does best to first
drive back Whites Knight before
recovering his Pawn by playing 3 d6
4 Nf3 Nxe4. The game might continue
5 d4 d5 6 Bd3 Be7 (Marshalls more
aggressive 6 Bd6 gives White the
edge with a possible continuation being
7 0-0 0-0 8 c4 c6 9 Re1 Bf5 10 Qc2) 7
0-0 Nc6 8 Re1 Bg4 9 c3 Nf6 (if 9
f5, then 10 Qb3 is strong) 10 h3 Bh5
11 Bg5 0-0 12 Nbd2 and White stands
better.
3 Nxe4
Black liquidates part of Whites Pawn
center and posts his Knight aggressively.
The other common book move here
also liquidates part of Whites Pawn
center with 3 exd4. After 3 exd4
the game might continue 4 e5 Ne4 5
Qxd4 d5 6 exd6e.p. Nxd6 7 Nc3 Nc6
8 Qf4 g6 (if 8 Be7, then 9 Bd2 0-0
10 Bd3 Be6 11 0-0-0) 9 Bd3 Bg7 10
Be3 Be6 11 0-0-0 Qf6 12 Qa4 Qe7
(if 12 h6, then 13 Bb5 Bd7 14 Bd4
Qf4+ 15 Rd2 0-0 16 Nd5) 13 Ne4 0-0

14 Rhe1 Nxe4 15 Bxe4 Rfd8 16 Rxd8+


Nxd8 17 Bd4 with a clearly superior
position for White.
4 Bd3
White develops his Bishop with an
attack on Blacks aggressively posted
Knight. This also clears the way for
castling.
4 d5
Black boldly strikes at the center with
a Pawn, defends his Knight on e4,
and frees his Bishop on the c8-h3
diagonal along with his Queen on
the d file. This also opens up the
possibility for Black to develop his
Knight to d7.
An interesting possibility for Black is to
immediately develop his Knight toward
the center with 4 Nc6. After 4
Nc6 the game might continue 5 Bxe4
d5 6 Nxe5 Nxe5 (if 6 dxe4, then
7 Nxc6 bxc6 8 0-0) 7 Qe2! dxe4 (if
7 Be6, then 8 dxe5 dxe4 9 Nc3) 8
Qxe4 Bf5 (if 8 Be6, then 9 Qxe5
Qd7 10 0-0 Bd6 11 Qe2 0-0 12 Be3
f5 13 f4) 9 Qxe5+ Qe7 10 Qxe7+ Bxe7
11 c3 and Whites extra Pawn is worth
slightly more than Blacks Bishop pair
and temporary lead in development.

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{dwdBdNdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$NGQIwdR}
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Diagram 6. Position after 4 d5.

5 Nxe5
White recovers his Pawn and takes the
active e5 outpost for his Knight.
5 Nd7
This is the most common move
here. Black develops his Knight and
challenges Whites aggressively posted
Knight on e5.
The second most popular move for
Black is to develop the Bishop and apply
pressure to Whites Knight on e5 with
5 Bd6. After 5 Bd6 the game
might continue 6 0-0 0-0 7 Nd2 (the
most common move recommended by
theory is 7 c4, which gives Black a dead
even game after a somewhat complex
variation with 7 Bxe5 8 dxe5 Nc6 9
cxd5 Qxd5 10 Qc2 Nb4 11 Bxe4 Nxc2
12 Bxd5 Bf5 13 g4 Bxg4 14 Be4 Nxa1
15 Bf4 f6 16 Nc3 fxe5 17 Be3 Bf3 18
Rxa1 Rad8) Bxe5 8 dxe5 Nc5 9 Nb3
Nxd3 10 Qxd3 Nc6 11 Bf4 (also good

is 11 Qg3 and White is slightly better)


Qh4 12 Bg3 Qc4 13 Rad1 Nb4 14
Qxc4 dxc4 15 Nd4 c5 16 Nb5 Nxc2
17 Nc7 Rb8 18 e6 fxe6 19 Bd6 and
White is better.
The passive development of Blacks
Bishop with 5 Be7 results in a
somewhat more substantial advantage
for White. This becomes clear after 5
Be7 6 0-0 0-0 7 c4 Nf6 8 Nc3 c6 9
Re1 Be6 10 cxd5 cxd5 11 Qb3. If Black
recaptures with 10 Nxd5 (instead
of 10. cxd5) then an interesting
continuation could occur after 11 Nxd5
Bxd5 (if 11 Qxd5, White would play
12 Bc4 planning to meet 12 Qd6
with 13 Bxe6 and Black loses material
after either 13 Qxe6 14 Nxc6 Qxc6
15 Rxe7, or 13 fxe6 14 Qb3 b6 15
Ng6! hxg6 16 Rxe6) 12 Qh5 g6 (if 12
h6, then 13 Qf5! g6 14 Nxg6) 13
Bxg6! hxg6 14 Nxg6 Bf6 (if 14 fxg6,
15 Qxg6+ Kh8 16 Re5 threatening 17
Rh5++) 15 Nxf8 Kxf8 (if 15 Qxf8,
then 16 Bh6 Bg7 17 Bxg7 Kxg7 18
Qg4+ and now 18 Kh7 19 Re3, or
18 Kf6 19 Re5 Qh6 20 Rae1 Qg6
21 Qf4+ Kg7 22 Rg5) 16 Bh6+ Bg7 17
Bxg7+ Kxg7 18 Re3 with the idea of 19
Rg3+ and White has a winning attack
against Blacks exposed King.
6 Nxd7
White relieves the pressure on his Knight
on e5 by exchanging Knights.

Robert M. Snyder

6 Bxd7
Black recovers his piece and develops
his Bishop.
7 0-0
White removes his King from the
center and brings his Rook to an active
location.

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Diagram 7. Position after 7 0-0.

7 Qh4
Black brings his Queen aggressively
into play on the kingside and prepares
to castle queenside.
Another reasonable move for Black is to
complete his minor piece development
with 7 Bd6, in which case White
does best to immediately strike at the
center with 8 c4. After 8 c4 the game
might continue 8 c6 9 cxd5 cxd5
10 Qh5 and now Black must sacrifice
a Pawn to avoid getting a bad position
with 10 0-0 (if Black defends his
Pawn with 10 Nf6, White would

play 11 Re1+ Be7 12 Qe2) 11 Qxd5


Bc6 12 Qh5 g6 13 Qh3 Ng5 14 Qh6
Ne6 (if 14 Be7, then 15 Be3 Bf6
16 Bc4 Re8 17 Nd2 Ne6 18 Rad1) 15
Be3 Qf6 (if 15 Bf4, then 16 Bxf4
Qxd4 17 Be3 Qxd3 18 Nc3, or if 15
Re8, then 16 Nc3 Bf8 17 Qh3 Nxd4
18 Rad1) 16 Nc3 Nxd4 (if 16 Bf4,
then 17 Qh3 is best) 17 f3 and White
is slightly better.
8 c4
White boldly strikes at the center
with a Pawn. This move is particularly
effective because it attacks Blacks d
Pawn, which supports his Knight on
e4, and allows for the possibility of
Whites Queen going to c2 or b3.
8 0-0-0
Black removes his King from the center
and brings a Rook onto a center file.
Often when players castle on opposite
sides of the board an imbalance is created
and the game becomes complicated.
This allows for the possibility of Pawns
to be advanced in a Pawn storm against
the enemy King without each side
exposing their own King. As a result
a sharp struggle may ensue. Critical
judgments may be required between
moves that pursue the attack against
the enemy King and moves that defend
your own King.

10

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

As you have probably noted, it is far


more common to castle kingside than
queenside. This is for two reasons:
1. It only requires two pieces between
the King and Rook to be developed
to castle on the kingside.
2. Castling kingside removes the
King further away from the center
(removing the King from the center
and placing him behind a wall
of protective Pawns are the main
reasons for castling). However, the
one common advantage of castling
queenside is that the Rook is
immediately placed on a central file.
9 c5
This move prevents Blacks Bishop
from being developed to d6 and is in
line with the theme of attacking on the
queenside. It is not appealing for White
to go Pawn grabbing with 9 cxd5 since
after 9 Nf6 10 Nc3 Bd6 11 g3 Qh3
White has doubled, isolated Pawns that
are targets for Black.

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Diagram 8. Position after 9 c5.

9 g6
Black prepares to fianchetto his Bishop
to g7. However, this is not as popular
as the more aggressive 9 g5. Playing
9 g5 allows Black to fianchetto his
Bishop to g7 and also start a counterattack on the kingside.
After 9 g5, a favorite move of the
famous Soviet World Champion Garry
Kasparov is to immediately develop the
Bishop with 10 Be3. The idea (instead
of the usual 10 Nc3) is to develop the
Knight to d2 where it will challenge
Blacks actively posted Knight on e4,
allow for an increased possibility of
attack along the c file, and give White
the option of bringing his Knight to
f3.
After 9 g5 a possible continuation is
10 Be3 Re8 (or 10 Bg7 11 f3 Nf6 12
Bf2 Qh6 13 Nc3 g4 14 b4 gives White
a small edge) 11 Nd2 Bg7 12 Nf3
Qh5 13 Nxg5 Qxd1 14 Rfxd1 Nxg5
15 Bxg5 Bg4 (if 15 Bxd4, then 16
c6 Be6 17 cxb7+ Kb8 18 Rd2 favors
White) 16 Rd2 Bxd4 17 c6 Be5 18
Bb5 b6 19 f4 Rhg8 20 Re1 and White
is clearly better.
10 Nc3
White develops his Knight toward the
center attacking Blacks Knight on e4
and unprotected Pawn on d5.

Robert M. Snyder

10 Bg7
Black completes his fianchetto and attacks
White unprotected Pawn on d4.
11 g3
White attacks Blacks Queen and drives
her away from her aggressive post where
she supports the Knight on e4. It
would be weak to prematurely capture
Blacks Pawn with 11 Nxd5?. After 11
Nxd5? a possible continuation is 11
Be6 12 g3 Nxf2! 13 Rxf2 Qxd4 14
Nf4 g5 15 Nxe6 fxe6 16 Bxg5 Rhf8 17
Bf4 Qxd3 18 Qxd3 Rxd3 19 Re2 Rf5
and Black stands slightly better in the
endgame.
11 Qh3?
It will soon become apparent in the
game that Blacks attempt to keep
the Queen aggressively posted on the
kingside is inaccurate on both a tactical
and positional basis. Correct is 11
Qf6 keeping the Queen where the
action is and increasing the pressure
on d4 and f2. Whites strongest
move is then to develop his Bishop and
reinforce his protection of d4 and
f2 with 12 Be3. The game might then
continue 12 Ng5 (weak is 12 Bf5
because of 13 Nb5! and now if 13
a6, then 14 Nxc7! planning to meet
14 Kxc7 with 15 Bf4+ Kc8 16 Be5;
or if 13 Bh3, then White obtains a

11

nice attack by sacrificing the exchange


after 14 Nxa7+ Kb8 15 Nb5 Bxf1 16
Bxf1 threatening numerous winning
continuations with moves such as 17
Bf4, 17 Qa4, or 17 f3) 13 f4 Nh3+
(White clearly dominates in the center
after 13 Qe6 14 Re1 Ne4 15 Bxe4
dxe4 16 d5) 14 Kg2 Rde8 15 c6 (the
usual move recommended by theory,
15 Qd2, gives Black too much counterplay on the kingside after 15 h5)
Qxc6 16 Re1 planning to meet 16
Qb6, 16 Qd6 or 16 Kb8 with
17 Rc1. White gets more than enough
compensation for the sacrificed Pawn.
12 Nxd5

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Diagram 9. Position after 12 Nxd5.

White wins Blacks d Pawn and


undermines the protection of Blacks
Knight on e4.
12 Bg4
Black attacks Whites Queen with a
discovered attack on Whites Knight on

12

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

d5. Black is under the false impression


that he has good counter-play for the
Pawn he just sacrificed.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
13 Ne7+!
White gets his Knight out of attack
while attacking Blacks King. Black
must have been hoping for the very
interesting continuation 13 Qb3 Bf3
(threatening 14 Qg2++) 14 Nf4 Ng5!
15 Be2 (not 15 Nxh3?? because of
15 Nxh3++) Qg4 (threatening 16
Qxf4!) 16 c6! (threatening 17 Qxb7++)
b6 (if 16 bxc6, then 17 Ba6+ Kd7 18
h3) 17 Qa3 (threatening 18 Qa6+ Kb8
19 Qb7++) Kb8 18 Qa6 (threatening
19 Qb7++) Qc8 and both sides have
survived with a fairly even game!
13 Kb8
Moving the King toward the center
wouldnt be much better, e.g. 13 Kd7
14 Qb3 Bf3 15 Bb5+ Kxe7 16 Qxf3 Qf5
17 Qe2 Kf8 18 Re1 Rxd4 19 Be3.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
14 Nc6+!
This aggressive attack against Blacks
King is the key move that makes Whites

earlier moves sound. Otherwise, Blacks


attack would be overwhelming.
14 Kc8
White is also winning after 14 bxc6
15 Qb3+ Ka8 (if 15 Kc8?, then 16
Ba6+ Kd7 17 Qxf7++) 16 Bxe4. Also if
14 Ka8 then 15 Qa4 is devastating.
15 Nxa7+
White wins a Pawn and continues his
attack against Blacks King.

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{dwdBdw)q}
{P)wdW)w)}
{$wGQdRIw}
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Diagram 10. Position after 15 Nxa7+.

15 Kb8
Moving the King toward the center
with 15 Kd7 would lose quickly
after 16 Qb3 (threatening 17 Qxf7++)
Rhe8 17 Bxe4 Rxe4 18 Qd5+ forking
King and Rook.
16 Nc6+
White relentlessly continues his attack
on Blacks King.

Robert M. Snyder

16 Kc8
Capturing the Knight with 16 bxc6
once again allows White to win easily
with 17 Qb3+. See if you can find
Whites best move here without looking
at the next move in the game.
17 f3
White interposes with a Pawn to get his
Queen out of attack and forks Blacks
Knight and Bishop. If 17 Be2, then
Whites advantage is minimal after 17
Bxe2 18 Qxe2 Rhe8 (threatening 19
Nxg3) 19 Ne5 Rxd4.

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{wdw)ndbd}
{dwdBdP)q}
{P)wdWdw)}
{$wGQdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 11. Position after 17 f3.

17 Rxd4?
Black has too many pieces under attack
along with an exposed King. He cant
avoid eventual loss. However, this move
speeds up the collapse. Objectively best
is 17 Nxg3 18 fxg4 Bxd4+ (if 18
Rxd4, then 19 Rf4! and now 19
Rhd8 20 Qe1! Rxd3 21 Nxd8, or 19

13

Ne4 20 Rxe4 Rxd3 and White can win


with either 21 Ne7+ Kb8 22 Qe2 or
the more complicated 21 Qa4 bxc6 22
Be3! Kd7 23 Rd1 Rxd1+ 24 Qxd1 Kc8
25 Qa4) 19 Nxd4 Rxd4 20 Rf4 Rhd8
21 Rxd4 Rxd4 22 Qe1! Qxg4 (if 22
Rxd3, then 23 Bg5! threatening 24
Qe8+; or if 22 Ne4, then 23 Be2!)
23 hxg3 Rxd3 24 Be3 and Whites
material advantage will prevail. Also if
17 bxc6, then 18 Ba6+ Kd7 19 fxg4
opening the f file wins easily.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
18 Be3
Even though 18 fxg4 would also win
the game, this move is the most efficient
because it eliminates any significant
counter-play by Black. White develops
his Bishop and attacks Whites Rook on
d4 a second time.
18 Rxd3
With so many pieces under attack Black
tries to get as much material as he can!
He has nothing better.
19 Qxd3
White gets his Queen out of attack by
capturing Blacks Rook.

14

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

19 Nxg3
Black captures a Pawn and attacks
Whites Rook on f1. The Knight
cannot be captured with 20 hxg3
because of 20 Qxg3+ 21 Kh1 Bxf3+
22 Rxf3 Qxf3+ followed by 23 Qxc6,
and then it is Black who is winning.
20 Bf4

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{P)wdWdw)}
{$wdwdRIw}
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Diagram 12. Position after 20 Bf4.

White attacks Blacks Knight on g3 a


second time and plans to meet 20
Nxf1 with 21 Ne7+ Kb8 22 Bxc7+!
Kxc7 (or if 22 Ka7, then 23 Qa3++)
23 Qd6++.
Black Resigns. He cannot avoid being
hopelessly behind in material.

LESSON 3

3 c3

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{P)w)W)P)}
{$NGQIBdR}
vllllllllV

Effective Use of the Queen


Berne vs. Paris
1921
Opening: Ponzianis Opening
A common opening problem among
amateurs is when to bring their Queen
out and where to place her. Often
the Queen is brought out too early
or is placed where she becomes an
easy target for the opponents weaker
pieces, thus resulting in a loss of the
time.
In this game White commits his
Queen early by bringing her out on
the fourth move. As a result she ends
up being ineffectively placed. Black,
on the other hand, waits until the
ninth move to bring his Queen into
play. He waits until it becomes clear
where she will be effectively placed
and this results in a major pay off in
the game.
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6
Black develops his Knight toward the
center and defends his e Pawn.

Diagram 13. Position after 3 c3.

White initiates the Ponziani Opening.


With 3 c3 White releases his Queen
along the d1-a4 diagonal and prepares
support for a Pawn on d4. The
drawback is that at this point Whites
plan is over ambitious; it gives Black a
chance to play aggressively and achieve
easy equality.
3 d5
This is Blacks most aggressive and best
treatment! Black immediately strikes
at the center with a Pawn, threatens
Whites e Pawn, and frees both his
Bishop on the c8-h3 diagonal and his
Queen on the d file.
A weaker line for Black is 3 Nf6 4
d4 Nxe4 5 d5 Ne7 6 Nxe5 Ng6 7 Qe2
Qe7 8 Nxg6 hxg6 8 Bf4 and White
stands slightly better.

-15-

16

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

4 Qa4
White immediately brings his Queen
into play, pins Whites Knight on c6,
and threatens Blacks Pawn on e5
with 5 Nxe5.
It becomes apparent that a drawback
of Whites third move (placing a Pawn
on c3) is that it doesnt allow White
to attack Blacks Queen on d5 by
placing a Knight on c3after 4 exd5
Qxd5. A possible continuation after
this might be 5 d4 exd4 6 cxd4 Bg4 7
Be2 0-0-0 8 Nc3 Qa5 9 Be3 Nf6 10
0-0 with an even game.
Developing and pinning Blacks
Knight by playing the more dynamic
continuation 4 Bb5 also gives Black
a comfortable game after 4 dxe4
5 Nxe5 Qd5 6 Qa4 (if 6 Bxc6+, then
6 bxc6 7 d4 exd3e.p. 8 0-0 Bd6)
Nge7 7 f4 exf3e.p. 8 Nxf3 Qe6+. This
might continue: 9 Be2 (if 9 Kf2, then
9 Bd7 10 d4 0-0-0 11 Re1 Qf5 12
Nbd2 a6 13 Bf1 g5) Bd7 10 Qc4 0-0-0
11 Qxe6 Bxe6 12 0-0 h6 13 d4 g5 14
Nbd2 Bg7 15 Bd3 Rhe8.
4 Nf6
Black develops his Knight with an
attack on Whites e Pawn. Black offers
his e Pawn as a gambit. However, it
will soon be pointed out that this is
inferior to reinforcing the e Pawn
with 4 f6. After 4 f6 5 Bb5 (5
exd5 would transpose after 5 Qxd5

6 Bb5 Nge7) Nge7 6 exd5 Qxd5 Black


is to be preferred.
5 Nxe5

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{P)w)W)P)}
{$NGwIBdR}
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Diagram 14. Position after 5 Nxe5.

White does best to accept the gambit


and attack Blacks Knight on c6 a
second time.
5 Bd6
In keeping with the theme of the
gambit, Black continues with his rapid
development, threatens Whites Knight
on e5 and prepares to castle.
6 Nxc6
White takes care of the threat on his
Knight by exchanging it for Blacks
Knight.
6 bxc6
Black recovers his Knight.

Robert M. Snyder

7 d3
White reinforces the defense of his e
Pawn, frees his Bishop on c1, and
opens up d2 for his Knight. It wouldnt
be wise for White to go Pawn grabbing
with 7 Qxc6+ Bd7 8 Qa6 Nxe4 9 d4
0-0 as Blacks overwhelming lead in
development gives him the advantage.
7 0-0

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{P)wdW)P)}
{$NGwIBdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 15. Position after 7 0-0.

Black removes his King from the center


and brings his Rook into play where it
may easily be moved to the half open
e file.
8 Bg5?
This aggressive pin is over-ambitious.
White should have completed his
kingside development with 8 Be2,
planning to meet 8 Re8 with 9 Nd2
and White is slightly better. White will
soon be able to castle and Black will not

17

have quite enough compensation for


his sacrificed Pawn.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
8 h6
Black attacks and threatens Whites
Bishop. This will force White either
to make an unfavorable exchange of
his Bishop for Blacks Knight or to lose
time and retreat his Bishop.
9 Bxf6
White solves the problem of his Bishop
being threatened by exchanging it for
Blacks Knight. If White tries to avoid
the exchange by retreating with 9
Bh4, then the game might continue 9
dxe4 10 dxe4 (if 10 Bxf6, then 10
Qxf6 11 dxe4 Bc5 and now 12 f3
Qg5! or 12 Qc2 Rd8! with a sizable
advantage for Black in both cases) g5
11 Bg3 Nxe4 and Black recovers his
Pawn with a superior position. White
doesnt play 12 Qxe4?? because 12
Re8 pins the Queen.
9 Qxf6
Black recovers his piece and brings his
Queen into play actively.

18

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

10 Be2?
White develops his Bishop. However, it
would be more accurate to develop the
Knight with 10 Nd2. The reason for
this will become apparent after Blacks
next move. After 10 Nd2 a good move
for Black is to bring his Rook onto the
half open b file and attack Whites b
Pawn with 10 Rb8. The game would
then be approximately even.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

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{dw)Pdwdw}
{P)wdB)P)}
{$NdwIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 16. Position after 10 Be2.

10 Qg5!
Black now threatens 11 Qc1+ and
11 Qxg2. If White had played 10
Nd2, these threats would not have
occurred.
11 Nd2
White develops his Knight, which
prevents 11 Qc1+ and supports

placing his Bishop on f3 after Blacks


next move. If White plays 11 0-0?, then
11 Bh3 12 Bf3 Qf4! 13 Rd1 Qxh2+
and White would be in bad shape.
11 Qxg2
Black recovers his Pawn and threatens
Whites Rook on h1.
12 Bf3
White defends his Rook and attacks
Blacks Queen. Though the Queen is
driven away from her menacing location
on g2, she will soon be causing serious
problems for White.
12 Qh3
Black gets his Queen out of attack
while tying down Whites pieces to the
defense of his Bishop on f3 and h
Pawn.
13 0-0-0

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{P)wHw)w)}
{dwIRdwdR}
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Diagram 17. Position after 13 0-0-0.

Robert M. Snyder

19

White removes his King from the


center and heads toward relative safety
on the queenside. Without castling, it
wouldnt be long before Whites King is
in serious trouble.
White hopes to be able to muster some
counter-play on the kingside by using
his open g file and taking advantage
of Blacks weak queenside Pawns.
However, it will be demonstrated that
Blacks active Queen and Bishop pair
are going to be more than White can
handle.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

suddenly it is White who would stand


better!
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

13 Bf4

White defends his f Pawn and tries


to bring his Queen to a more active
location by moving her to the center.

Black pins Whites Knight threatening


to win Whites Bishop with 14 Qxf3
or 14 Bxd2+ 15 Rxd2 Qxf3.
14 Be2
White saves his Bishop by removing
it from the attack by Blacks Queen. If
White tries to complicate matters by
attacking Blacks Rook on a8 with 14
Qxc6, then Black would have played 14
Bxd2+ 15 Kxd2 (if 15 Rxd2, then
15 Qxf3 threatening Whites Rook
on h1) Rb8 threatening 16 Qxf3
and 16 Rxb2+.
White now threatens to play 15 exd5
with a discovered attack by the White
Queen on Blacks Bishop on f4, and

14 Qh4!
A key move! Black repositions his
Queen so that 15 exd5?? would be met
by 15 Bxd2+ followed by 16
Qxa4 winning Whites Queen. This
move also threatens Whites Pawn on
f2 and clears the h3 square for
possible use by Blacks Bishop.
15 Qd4

15 Re8
The placement of a Rook on the half
open e file, which pins Whites e
Pawn, is a natural move. Another
continuation that would give Black
an advantage is 15 dxe4 16 Rhg1
(threatening 16 Qxg7++) Bg5 17
Qxe4 Qxf2 18 Rg2 Qf5 19 Kb1 (going
Pawn grabbing with 19 Qxc6 Rb8 20
Qxc7 would give Black a position worth
well more than the sacrificed Pawn after
20 Be6) Rb8.

20

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

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Diagram 18. Position after 15 Re8.

16 Kc2
White removes the menacing pin from
his Knight. It would be safer for White
to hide his King with 16 Kb1 Rb8 17
Ka1. After 17 Ka1 the game might
continue 17 Be5 18 Qe3 Bd6 19
Qd4 Qf4 and Blacks Bishop pair and
more active pieces give him the edge.
16 dxe4
This gives White an opportunity to
sacrifice a Pawn to activate his pieces.
Therefore, it would be more accurate to
increase pressure on the queenside with
16 Rb8. The game might continue
17 Rhg1 (threatening 18 Qxg7++) Be5
18 Qc5 Qf6 with Blacks Bishop pair
and more active pieces giving him a
nice advantage.
Blacks extra Pawn would only give him a
minimal advantage in the endgame that
results after 16 Bxd2 17 Rxd2 dxe4 18
Rg1 exd3+ 19 Bxd3 Qxd4 20 cxd4 Be6.

17 dxe4?
This leads to a major advantage for
Black. Therefore, White would do
better to sacrifice a Pawn to activate
his pieces with 17 Rhg1 (threatening
18 Qxg7++) exd3+ 18 Bxd3 Bg5. Even
though White doesnt have enough
compensation for his Pawn this would
give him a better chance of survival
than the move played in the game.
17 Bf5
An interesting way of getting the Bishop
actively developed. Black uses a pin to
attack Whites e Pawn with a second
piece and places the Bishop on the same
diagonal as Whites King.
A strong alternative would be to drive
Whites Queen out of the center with
17 c5!. After 17 c5, if White plays
18 Qd3 (or 18 Qxc5 18 Bxd2 19
Kxd2 Qxe4 and White is in bad shape),
then Black ends up with a great game
after 18 Bb7 19 f3 Red8.
18 Qc5?
White plays aggressively by attacking
Blacks Bishop on f5 and unprotected
Pawn on c6. However, this removes
the Queen as a defender of Whites e
Pawn and White will not have time to
capture Blacks c Pawn. It would be
better to place a Rook on the half open
g file with 18 Rhg1 and threaten

Robert M. Snyder

mate. But, after 18 Bg6, Black still


retains his enormous pressure.
Capturing Blacks Bishop with 18 exf5
allows Blacks Rook to penetrate the
Kings position and gives Black a vastly
superior endgame after 18 Rxe2 19
Rhg1 Bg5 20 Qxh4 Bxh4.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

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{rdwdrdkd}
{0w0wdp0w}
{wdpdwdw0}
{dw!wdbdw}
{wdwdPgw1}
{dw)wdwdw}
{P)KHB)w)}
{dwdRdwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 19. Position after 18 Qc5.

18 Bg6!
Black gets his Bishop out of attack
while maintaining pressure on Whites
e Pawn and on the h7-b1 diagonal.
This is stronger than immediately
breaking the ice and winning a Pawn
with 18 Bxe4+ 19 Nxe4 Rxe4 20
Bd3 Re5 21 Qd4.
19 f3
White reinforces the defense of his e
Pawn and relieves his Queen of the

21

defense of the f Pawn. But, Whites


false sense of security is soon broken.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
19 Bxd2
Black strips White of an important
defender of his e Pawn.
20 Kxd2
White decides to use his King to
recover his piece instead of the Rook.
However, White could offer more
resistance by playing 20 Rxd2 Bxe4+
21 Kc1 (not 21 fxe4 because of 21
Qxe4+ forking Whites King and
Rook). But, after 21 Qf4!, pinning
Whites Rook and threatening to pile
up on it with 22 Rad8, White is
still in bad shape.
20 Rad8+

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{wdwdPdw1}
{dw)wdPdw}
{P)wIBdw)}
{dwdRdwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 20. Position after 20 Rad8+.

22

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Black brings his Rook into play to join


the attack on Whites King.
21 Ke3
White uses his King aggressively and
tries to reinforce his center Pawn.
Any hopes that the f and e Pawns
will act as a shield for his King will
quickly dissipate. But, White would
be in trouble no matter what he did
as illustrated by the following possible
continuations:
1. 21 Kc2 Bxe4+! 22 fxe4 Qxe4+ 23
Bd3 Qg2+ 24 Kb1 Rxd3 25 Qxa7
Re2.
2. 21 Kc1 Qf4+ 22 Kb1 Bxe4+! 23
fxe4 Qxe4+ 24 Ka1 Qxe2.
3. 21 Bd3 Rxe4! 22 fxe4 Qxe4 23
Kc2 Rxd3 24 Rxd3 (if 24 Kb3 then
24 Rxd1 25 Rxd1 Qc2+ 26 Ka3
Qxd1) Qxh1.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
21 Rxd1
This exchange relieves Black of the
burden of tying a piece down to the
defense of his Rook on d8 and leaves
Whites pieces in a position that allows
Black to make an effective sacrifice.

22 Bxd1
White recovers his Rook. White would
last longer with 22 Rxd1 Bxe4! 23 fxe4
Qxe4+ 24 Kd2 Qxe2+ 25 Kc1 Qxh2
26 Qxa7 Re2.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
22 Bxe4!
Black cracks open the position and
exposes Whites King to a deadly attack.

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{wdwdrdkd}
{0w0wdp0w}
{wdpdwdw0}
{dw!wdwdw}
{wdwdbdw1}
{dw)wIPdw}
{P)wdwdw)}
{dwdBdwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 21. Position after 22 Bxe4.

23 Kd2
Whites King tries to make a run for
it. If 23 Qd4 then 23 Bf5+ 24 Kd2
Rd8 wins Whites Queen. Or, if 23
fxe4, then 23 Qxe4+ followed by 24
Qxh1.
23 Rd8+
Black brings his Rook into the attack.

Robert M. Snyder

24 Ke2
White attempts to find the safest
hiding place for his King. But, there is
no escape! If 24 Kc1, then 24 Qf4+
Qe3 25 Qxe3++. Or, if 24 Ke3, then
24 Rd3+ 25 Ke2 Qf4! leaves Whites
King helpless.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
24 Bxf3+!

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{wdw4wdkd}
{0w0wdp0w}
{wdpdwdw0}
{dw!wdwdw}
{wdwdwdw1}
{dw)wdbdw}
{P)wdKdw)}
{dwdBdwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 22. Position after 24 Bxf3.

Though Black has several ways to win,


this move quickly exposes Whites King
to attack and finishes the game.
White resigned here because if 25 Kxf3,
the game might continue 25 Rd3+
26 Kg2 (or 26 Ke2 Qe4+ transposes)
Qe4+ 27 Kf2 Rd2+ (or munching on
the Rook with 27 Qxh1 would
certainly do the trick) 28 Kg3 g5!
and White is defenseless against the
impending mate.

23

LESSON 4

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4
White frees his Bishop on the c1-h6
diagonal, allows his Queen to exert
pressure in the center, and threatens
Blacks Pawn on e5. This aggressive
move will lead to one of numerous
possible openings.

Weathering the Storm


Anthony Jasaitis vs. Robert Snyder
Chicago, 1973
Opening: Gring Gambit
More often than not, accepting a gambit
Pawn means that you must accept an
inferior position. In the Gring gambit,
White sacrifices a Pawn to gain space
and a lead in development. However,
if Black is well prepared and willing to
weather the storm, he should survive
and emerge with the advantage.
The opening part of this game is well
described above. The psychology
involved in being the attacker when
offering a gambit often makes it such
a burden that the player who plays the
gambit will over-extend himself against
a solid defense. Therefore, it sometimes
pays to offer a return of the gambit
material at a critical part of the game.
This can sometimes be the key to a
refutation.
In this game White refuses the return of
the Pawn and attempts to push forward
with his attack at all costs. Before long,
it is Black who has the extra material
and the attack.

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{rdb1kgn4}
{0p0pdp0p}
{wdndwdwd}
{dwdw0wdw}
{wdw)Pdwd}
{dwdwdNdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$NGQIBdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 23. Position after 3 d4.

3 exd4
Exchanging Pawns in the center is
Blacks best way of relieving the pressure
on his e Pawn.
4 c3
White initiates the Goring Gambit by
using his c Pawn to attack Blacks
Pawn on d4. The most common
move played here is 4 Nxd4, which
leads to the Scotch Gameplayed in
LESSON FIVE.

-24-

Robert M. Snyder

Another possibility for White here is


the natural developing move 4 Bc4,
which may transpose into the Max
Lange attack after 4 Nf6, or the
Giuoco Piano after 4 Bc5 5 c3 Nf6.
One variation, which is worthwhile to
look at, due to its independent nature,
is 4 Bc4 Bc5 5 0-0 d6 6 c3 Bg4 7 Qb3
Bxf3 8 Bxf7+ Kf8 9 gxf3 Nf6, and now
Blacks lead in development gives him
the advantage.

25

5 Bc4

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{rdb1kgn4}
{0p0pdp0p}
{wdndwdwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdBdPdwd}
{dw0wdNdw}
{P)wdW)P)}
{$NGQIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 24. Position after 5 Bc4.

4 dxc3
This is the most commonly played
move here. Black takes care of the threat
on his Pawn on d4 by accepting the
gambit.
There are some excellent ways of
declining the gambit that give Black a
comfortable game:
1. The most common way to decline
the gambit is 4 d5, which might
continue 5 exd5 Qxd5 6 cxd4 Bb4+
7 Nc3 Nf6 8 Be2 Qa5 9 Bd2 0-0
10 0-0 Bg4, with an even game.
2. A not very well known but effective
way to decline the gambit is 4
Nge7, which might continue 5
Bc4 (if 5 cxd4, then 5 d5 6 e5
Bg4 7 Be2 Nf5 with even chances)
d5 6 exd5 Nxd5 7 0-0 Nb6 8 Bb5
dxc3 9 Nd4 Bd7 10 Bxc6 bxc6 11
Nxc3 Be7 with an even game.

White develops his Bishop to the


active a2-g8 diagonal where it applies
pressure on the weak f7 square.
White is willing to go all out and offer
a second gambit Pawn.
A common alternative for White here is
to gambit one Pawn and develop with 5
Nxc3, which might continue 5 Bb4
6 Bc4 d6 7 0-0 (if 7 Qb3, then 7
Bxc3+ 8 bxc3 Qe7 9 0-0 Nf6 10 Bd5 00 11 Bg5 Ne5 and White doesnt have
enough compensation for his sacrificed
Pawn) Bxc3 8 bxc3 Nf6 9 Bg5 (if 9
e5, then 9 Nxe5 10 Nxe5 dxe5 11
Qxd8+ Kxd8 12 Re1 Be6 13 Bxe6 fxe6
14 Rxe5 Ke7 and White doesnt have
enough for his Pawn) 0-0 10 Re1 Bg4
and Blacks extra Pawn is worth more
than Whites better position.

26

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

5 Nf6

7 Qd7

Black develops his Knight and attacks


Whites unprotected e Pawn. Here is
the point where Black should be willing
to accept the second gambit Pawn with
5 cxb2. White clearly doesnt have
enough compensation for two Pawns
after 6 Bxb2 d6 7 0-0 Be6.

This is Blacks only good move. Black


defends his Pawn on f7. Blocking
the Bishop on c8 is part of the cost
of being a Pawn ahead. Defending the
Pawn with 7 Qe7 is inferior due to
8 Bg5 with the plan of meeting 8 h6
with 9 Nd5! Qxe4+ 10 Kf1 and White
has a position worth a lot more than
two Pawns.

6 Nxc3
White recovers a Pawn while developing
his Knight.
6 d6
This solid move frees the Bishop on the
c8-h3 diagonal and helps Black secure
the important e5 square. Another
reasonable move for Black is to develop
his Bishop and pin Whites Knight with
6 Bb4.
7 Qb3
This move is thematic. White attacks
Blacks weak point on f7 (threatening
8 Bxf7+) and restrains Blacks Bishop
on c8 to defending his Pawn on b7.
An immediate attack on f7 by 7 Ng5
is met by 7 Ne5.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

8 Ng5

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{rdbdkgw4}
{0p0qdp0p}
{wdn0whwd}
{dwdwdwHw}
{wdBdPdwd}
{dQHwdwdw}
{P)wdW)P)}
{$wGwIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 25. Position after 8 Ng5.

White increases pressure on Blacks


weak f7 square threatening 9 Bxf7+.
If White plays less actively with 8 0-0,
then Black would exchange his Knight
for Whites active Bishop by 8 Na5 9
Qb5 Nxc4 10 Qxc4 Be7.
8 Ne5
Black posts his Knight actively, defends
his Pawn on f7, and attacks Whites
Bishop on c4.

Robert M. Snyder

9 Bb5
In most cases this would be an idle
attack that loses time by making Black
drive the Bishop away with 9 c6.
But, in this instance, the attack on
Blacks Queen will give White time to
counter by attacking Blacks Knight on
e5 with 10 f4.
To better understand this move it
should be pointed out that, if given the
move, Black would gladly exchange his
Knight on e5 for Whites Bishop on
c4. If White immediately retreats his
Bishop with 9 Be2, then Black drives
Whites aggressively posted Knight back
with 9 h6 10 Nf3.
9 c6
Black blocks Whites attack on his
Queen while attacking Whites Bishop
on b5.
10 f4
White attacks Blacks Knight with the
idea of forcing it from its central post.
Placing a Pawn on f4 also gains more
control of the center and increases
attacking chances on the kingside.

27

10 Neg4

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdbdkgw4}
{0pdqdp0p}
{wdp0whwd}
{dBdwdwHw}
{wdwdP)nd}
{dQHwdwdw}
{P)wdWdP)}
{$wGwIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 26. Position after 10 Neg4.

Black gets his Knight out of attack and


tries to keep it as actively posted as
possible. However, the less aggressive 10
Ng6 is not as bad as theory suggests.
After 10 Ng6 the game might
continue 11 Bc4 (if 11 Bd3, then 11
h6 12 Nf3 Be7 and if White prepares
to castle queenside with 13 Bd2, then
Black throws a monkey wrench into the
works with 13 Qg4!) d5 12 Nxd5 (if
12 exd5, then 12 Bc5! 13 dxc6 Qe7+
14 Kf1 0-0) Nxd5 (not 12 cxd5??
because 13 Bb5 wins Blacks Queen) 13
exd5 Bc5 14 dxc6 Qe7+ 15 Kf1 0-0 16
Bd2 bxc6 with about even chances.
11 h3
White attacks Blacks aggressively placed
Knight.
Two other possibilities are:
1. If White preserves his Bishop with
11 Be2, the game might continue

28

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

11 h6 12 Nf3 d5 13 h3 (if 13
e5, then 13 Ne4!) dxe4 14 Ng1
Nf2 15 Kxf2 Bc5+ 16 Kg3 (if 16
Kf1, then 16 0-0 17 Na4 Bd4)
Qf5 17 Kh2 h5 and Black has two
Pawns and a lot of pressure for the
piece.
2. Not as strong for White would be
to attack Blacks f Pawn with
11 Bc4, which might continue 11
d5 12 Nxd5 Nxd5 (not 12
cxd5?? because 13 Bb5 wins Blacks
Queen) 13 exd5 h6 14 Ne4 Qe7
and Black is clearly better after
either 15 Bd3 Nf6 or 15 Kd2
Qb4+.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
11 cxb5
Black eliminates Whites aggressive
Bishop. The apparently weak, doubled
b Pawn that is created will actually
become a nuisance to White.
12 hxg4
White recovers his piece.
12 b4
Black attacks Whites Knight on c3
and offers his weak Pawn as a sacrifice.
Black has some interesting ideas here.
If White accepts the sacrifice with 13

Qxb4, Black has the opportunity to


take advantage of Whites Queen being
exposed to attack by the Bishop on
the f8-a3 diagonal. This would occur
after striking at the center with 13
d5. If White doesnt capture the Pawn
on b4, he has the choice of either
allowing his Knight to retreat to a less
active location or allowing it to be
exchanged for Blacks Knight on d5.
13 e5?

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{rdbdkgw4}
{0pdqdp0p}
{wdw0whwd}
{dwdw)wHw}
{w0wdw)Pd}
{dQHwdwdw}
{P)wdWdPd}
{$wGwIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 27. Position after 13 e5.

White plays too aggressivelytrying


to attack when his opponent has a
reasonably solid position. Here is
where the psychology of having played
a gambit has a negative effect. White
feels that, since he sacrificed a Pawn, he
must attack. The problem is that White
doesnt have an attack at this point.
It would be better for White to either
accept the Pawn with 13 Qxb4, which
might continue 13 d5 14 Qb3 d4
15 Nd5 Nxd5 16 exd5 Be7, or take the
natural outpost for his Knight with 13

Robert M. Snyder

Nd5, which might continue 13 b6


(also playable is 13 Nxd5 14 Qxd5
h6) 14 Nxf6+ gxf6 15 Nxh7 Be7. In
either case Black would stand slightly
better.
13 dxe5
Black opens up the diagonal for his
Bishop on f8. This also breaks up and
isolates Whites Pawns.
14 fxe5
White recovers the Pawn.
14 bxc3
Black eliminates Whites potentially
active Knight and continues to favorably
open up lines.

29

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdbdkgw4}
{0pdqdpdp}
{wdwdw0wd}
{dwdwdwHw}
{wdwdwdPd}
{dw!wdwdw}
{P)wdWdPd}
{$wGwIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 28. Position after 16 Qxc3.

16 Qe7+
Black attacks Whites exposed King
in the center. This move also defends
Blacks Pawn on f6 and opens the
c8-h3 diagonal for his Bishop. A good
alternative for Black is 16 Qxg4.
However, this is a more complicated
line after 17 Qxf6.

15 exf6
White recovers his Knight.
15 gxf6
Black eliminates Whites menacing
Pawn and threatens Whites Knight.
16 Qxc3
White recovers his Pawn and pins
Blacks Pawn on f6.

17 Be3?
On the surface this developing move
may look natural. However, it ties
down Whites Queen to defending the
Bishop when the Queen already has
the important task of pinning Blacks
Pawn on f6. In effect, Whites Queen
becomes overworked.
Whites best move here is 17 Kf1.
However, after 17 Kf1 Black has a
substantial advantage after 17

30

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Bxg4 18 Be3 (with Whites King on


f1 the Queen doesnt need to defend
the Bishop on e3 because Whites
Rook at a1 has access to the e file)
Qe5.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
17 fxg5!
This wins Whites Knight.
18 0-0
White had nothing better than to
remove his King from the center and
unpin his Bishop. White would go
down quickly after 18 Qxh8 Qxe3+ 19
Kf1 b6! (threatening 20 Ba6++) 20
g3 Qf3+ 21 Ke1 (if 21 Kg1, then 22
Qxg3+ Kf1 23 Ba6++) Qxh1+.
18 Rg8
Black gets his Rook out of attack.
However, it is nice when a forced
move is also a constructive move. The
Rook will come nicely into play after
this.

19 Bd4

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdbdkgrd}
{0pdw1pdp}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwdwdw0w}
{wdwGwdPd}
{dw!wdwdw}
{P)wdWdPd}
{$wdwdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 29. Position after 19 Bd4.

White centralizes his Bishop and opens


up the e file. White hopes to take
advantage of Blacks uncastled King.
However, White will soon come to
realize that his own King is not as secure
as he thinks. Blacks extra material will be
overpowering when it comes into play.
19 Be6
Black chooses the safest continuation
by developing a piece and shielding
his King along the e file. However,
Black could have easily gotten away
with Pawn grabbing after 19 Bxg4
20 Rae1 Be6.
20 Kh1
This is a waste of time. Whites King
will be exposed to attack along the h
file. It is more constructive for White to
bring the inactive Rook into play with
20 Rae1.

Robert M. Snyder

See if you can find Blacks best move


here without looking at the next move
in the game.
20 Rg6
Black brings his Rook into play where it
will be able to attack along the h file.
21 Rfe1
White brings his Rook into play on the
important center file.

31

22 Qd6
Black pins Whites Bishop and attacks
the h2 square. Immediately attacking
on the h file with 22 Rh6+ 23 Kg1
Qd6 is also good.
23 Rad1
White brings his other Rook into play
on a central file while unpinning his
Bishop.
23 Rh6+

21 Rc8
Black brings his other Rook into play
on an open file and threatens Whites
Queen. The immediate attack on
Whites King with 21 Rh6+ is also
good.
22 Qd3
White gets his Queen out of attack
while trying to keep her as active as
possible.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdrdkgwd}
{0pdw1pdp}
{wdwdbdrd}
{dwdwdw0w}
{wdwGwdPd}
{dwdQdwdw}
{P)wdWdPd}
{$wdw$wdK}
vllllllllV
Diagram 30. Position after 22 Qd3.

Black begins his assault on Whites King.


24 Kg1
This is Whites only move to get out of
check without losing his Queen.
24 Qh2+
Black continues his assault on Whites
King; he penetrates Whites kingside
position with his Queen and drives
Whites King out into the open.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdrdkgwd}
{0pdwdpdp}
{wdwdbdw4}
{dwdwdw0w}
{wdwGwdPd}
{dwdQdwdw}
{P)wdWdP1}
{dwdR$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 31. Position after 24 Qh2.

32

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

25 Kf2
White gets his King out of attack. It
makes little difference if the King goes
to f1. Black now has a choice of several
good moves to polish White off.
25 Qf4+
Black has maneuvered his Queen to
a great attacking post before bringing
his Bishop into play on the b8-h2
diagonal.
26 Kg1
The alternative, 26 Qf3 (26 Ke2 would
lose Whites Queen after 26 Bxg4+)
loses quickly after 26 Rc2+ 27 Kg1
(if 27 Re2, then 27 Rxe2+ 28 Kxe2
Bxg4 wins Whites Queen) Qh2+ 28
Kf1 Rf6!!. The Rook cannot be captured
(if 29 Qxf6, then 29 Qxg2++; or if
29 Bxf6, then 29 Qh1++).
26 Bd6

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdrdkdwd}
{0pdwdpdp}
{wdwgbdw4}
{dwdwdw0w}
{wdwGw1Pd}
{dwdQdwdw}
{P)wdWdPd}
{dwdR$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 32. Position after 26 Bd6.

Black brings his Bishop into the


attack and threatens 27 Rh1+! 28
Kxh1 Qh2++. White is a Bishop and
Pawn behind and has to face Blacks
overwhelming attack. White resigned.

LESSON 5

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4 exd4 4 Nxd4

cuuuuuuuuC
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{0p0pdp0p}
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{wdwHPdwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$NGQIBdR}
vllllllllV

Pressure on the e File


Chigorin vs. Schiffers
St. Petersburg, 1880, Match, Game 6
Opening: Scotch Game
Mikhail Chigorin was considered
to be the strongest player in Russia
during the late 1800s. He played
matches for the World Championship
against William Steinitz in 1889 and
1892.
Emanuel Schiffers was considered the
next best player in Russia during the
same period.
White sacrifices a Pawn to open his
e file and gain time to build up a
King side attack. Throughout this
game Whites use of pressure along
the e file plays a critical role in
achieving victory. This game is also
a good example of when you should
advance Pawns in front of your own
castled King. The game ends with an
exchange sacrifice to expose Blacks
King followed by a nice Queen
sacrifice to force mate.

Diagram 33. Position after 4 Nxd4.

White recovers his Pawn and posts his


Knight in the center.
4 Bc5
Black develops his Bishop and threatens
Whites Knight on d4. Another
popular move here is for Black to
develop his Knight and attack Whites
e Pawn with 4 Nf6.
After 4 Nf6 White has two common
replies:
1. He can immediately capture
Blacks Knight on c6 with the
idea of attacking and driving
away Blacks Knight on f6 by
5 Nxc6 bxc6 6 e5. Blacks best
move here is to pin and threaten
Whites e Pawn with 6 Qe7.
This will result in both Queens
blocking their kingside Bishops
after 7 Qe2. Black wants to take
advantage of the fact that Whites
kingside Bishop would be the one

-33-

34

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

that is more effectively developed.


Often players dont want to make
any move that violates a basic
principle. However, as a general
rule, it is good to consider a move
that violates a general principle if it
forces your opponent to also violate
a general principle. You must
evaluate who loses the most!
After 4 Nf6 5 Nxc6 bxc6 6
e5 Qe7 7 Qe2, the game might
continue 7 Nd5 8 c4 Ba6 9
b3 Qh4 (this aggressive move
frees the Bishop on the f8-a3
diagonal and can lead to some
interesting tactical possibilities)
10 a3 (if 10 Bb2, then 10 Bb4+
is good) Bc5 11 Qf3 Nb6 12 Bb2
Rb8 13 g3 Qe7 14 Bc3 f6 with
approximate equality.
2. The other common reply for
White, after 4 Nf6, is to develop
his Knight toward the center and
defend his Pawn with 5 Nc3.
Blacks most aggressive treatment
is to threaten Whites e Pawn by
aggressively developing his Bishop
and pinning Whites Knight with
5 Bb4. Since White would
like to develop his Bishop to d3
and defend his e Pawn without
hanging his Knight on d4 he
first exchanges his Knight with 6
Nxc6.
After 4 Nf6 5 Nc3 Bb4 6 Nxc6,
the game might continue 6

bxc6 7 Bd3 d5 8 exd5 cxd5 9 00 0-0 10 Bg5 (White threatens to


undermine the defense of Blacks
d Pawn with 11 Bxf6) c6 11 Qf3
Bd6 12 Bxf6 (or if 12 Rae1, then
12 Rb8 13 Nd1 Be6 with an
equal game) Qxf6 13 Qxf6 gxf6 14
Ne2 Be6 15 b3 Rfe8 16 Nd4 c5 17
Nxe6 fxe6 18 f4 Kg7 19 c4 d4 with
an even game.
5 Be3
White develops his Bishop and defends
his Knight on d4 while threatening 6
Nxc6 followed by 7 Bxc5. Less popular
but playable is 5 Nxc6 (also if 5 Nb3,
then 5 Bb6 6 a4 a6 7 Nc3 d6 8 Nd5
Ba7 and now either 9 Be3 Bxe3 10
Nxe3 Nf6 11 Bd3 0-0 12 0-0 Re8, or
9 Be2 Nf6 10 0-0 Nxd5 11 exd5 Ne5
12 Nd4 0-0) when a good continuation
for Black is 5 Qf6 6 Qd2 dxc6 7
Nc3 Be6 8 Qf4 Qxf4 9 Bxf4 0-0-0 10
Bd3 Ne7 11 Bg3 Ng6 12 f4 Rhe8 13
Ne2 Bg4 14 h3 Bh5 and now best is 15
f5 Bxe2 16 Kxe2 Ne5, but not 15 Bh2
as Black comes out on top after 15
Nh4 16 g4 f5!.
5 Qf6
Black eliminates Whites threat of 6
Nxc6 followed by 7 Bxc5 and threatens
Whites Knight on d4.

Robert M. Snyder

6 c3
White defends his Knight on d4 and
increases his foothold in the center.
6 Nge7

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdbdkdw4}
{0p0php0p}
{wdndw1wd}
{dwgwdwdw}
{wdwHPdwd}
{dw)wGwdw}
{P)wdW)P)}
{$NdQIBdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 34. Position after 6 Nge7.

Black develops his Knight while


opening up the possibility of castling
and supporting a strike at the center by
placing a Pawn on d5.
7 Bc4
White develops his Bishop to the a2g8 diagonal and clears the way for
castling.
7 d6
Black frees his Bishop on the c8-h3
diagonal while he defends his Bishop
on c5 and covers the e5 square. A
more aggressive alternative for Black is
to play 7 0-0 and keep open the
option of striking at the center with
d5. After 7 0-0, the game might

35

continue 8 0-0 Ne5 9 Be2 d5 and


now if 10 Nd2, then 10 Bb6 11 a4
N5c6, or if 10 f4, then 10 N5c6 11
e5 Qh4.
8 f4
White plays aggressively in trying
to gain more control of the center
and kingside. This move has the
drawback of creating a pin on Whites
own Knight on d4. However, the
alternative of immediately castling
with 8 0-0 is ok for Black after 8
Ne5 9 Be2 Qg6.
8 Qg6
Black attacks Whites unprotected e
and g Pawns. This will give White
the opportunity to sacrifice a Pawn to
gain time and open up lines. It would
be safer for Black to play 8 0-0 9 0-0
Be6 with a comfortable game.
9 0-0
White removes his King from the center
and activates his Rook on the kingside.
Attempting to defend both the e and
g Pawns with 9 Qf3 is weak because
of 9 Bg4, with a clear advantage for
Black.

36

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

9 Qxe4

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdbdkdw4}
{0p0whp0p}
{wdn0wdwd}
{dwgwdwdw}
{wdBHq)wd}
{dw)wGwdw}
{P)wdWdP)}
{$NdQdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 35. Position after 9 Qxe4.

Black accepts the sacrifice. White


would have a slight edge if Black
declined the gambit after 9 0-0 10
Nd2.
10 Re1
White brings his Rook to the open
e file to take advantage of Blacks
uncastled King and Queen on e4.
10 Qg6?
Black removes his Queen from her
exposed location on the e file.
However, this is inaccurate because it
will allow White to play a combination
which will greatly increase Whites
pressure on the e file.
It would be better for Black to play 10
Bxd4 11 cxd4 0-0 12 Nc3 Qg6.
White would then certainly have a
lot of play for his Pawn. However,
Blacks position would be a lot better

here than after the move played in the


game. If Black castled with 10 0-0,
White would have played 11 Bd3 Qd5
12 c4.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
11 Nxc6
This Knight exchange allows for a
Bishop exchange, which opens up the
e file for Whites Rook.
11 Bxe3+
Black must exchange Bishops to avoid
getting tripled, isolated Pawns. If 11
bxc6, then 12 Bxc5 dxc5 13 Qe2
threatening 14 Qe7++.
12 Rxe3
White recovers his Bishop.
12 bxc6
Black recovers his Knight. See if
you can find Whites best move here
without looking at the next move in
the game.

Robert M. Snyder

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdbdkdw4}
{0w0whp0p}
{wdp0wdqd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdBdw)wd}
{dw)w$wdw}
{P)wdWdP)}
{$NdQdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 36. Position after 12 bxc6.

13 Qe2
White increases the pressure on the e
file threatening Blacks pinned Knight.
13 Qf6
Black brings a second defender to
protect his Knight. See if you can find
Whites best move here without looking
at the next move in the game.
14 Nd2
White develops his Knight and frees his
Rook on a1. White is now threatening
to win quickly with 15 Rae1 or 15 Ne4.
14 d5
This move is necessary. Black drives
Whites Bishop away from its attack
on the important e6 square. This
allows Black to post his Bishop on e6
to limit Whites attack on the e file.

37

Also, the move prevents Whites Knight


from going to e4.
15 Bd3

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdbdkdw4}
{0w0whp0p}
{wdpdw1wd}
{dwdpdwdw}
{wdwdw)wd}
{dw)B$wdw}
{P)wHQdP)}
{$wdwdwIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 37. Position after 15 Bd3.

White gets his Bishop out of attack


finding an excellent new home on the
b1-h7 diagonal. The Bishop also covers
the important f5 square, restricting its
use by Black and supporting a possible
advance of Whites f Pawn.
15 Be6
Black develops his Bishop and blocks
Whites attack along the e file.
16 Rf1
White defends his f Pawn and prepares
support for its advance to f5. A good
alternative for White is to sacrifice the f
Pawn to open lines and get tremendous
pressure with 16 f5. After 16 f5 the game
might continue 16 Nxf5 (not 16
Bxf5?? because 17 Bxf5 wins a piece)

38

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

17 Rf1 g6 18 Kh1 (not 18 g4 right


away because of 18 Qg5 threatening
Whites Rook on e3 and pinning the
g Pawn) h5 19 Bxf5 gxf5 20 Qa6! 0-0
21 Qxc6 and White stands considerably
better due to having more active pieces, a
far superior Pawn structure and a superior
Knight against Blacks bad Bishop. Blacks
extra Pawn will not count for much in
this situation.
16 g6
Black does his best to cover the critical
f5 square.
17 Nb3
White continues to bring all of his
pieces to assist with the build-up. From
b3 the Knight is taking advantage of
Blacks dark square weaknesses on d4
and c5. Both of these squares are
potentially good posts for the Knight.
17 0-0

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdw4kd}
{0w0whpdp}
{wdpdb1pd}
{dwdpdwdw}
{wdwdw)wd}
{dN)B$wdw}
{P)wdQdP)}
{dwdwdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 38. Position after 17 0-0.

Black removes his King from the center


and off of the e file. See if you can
find Whites best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.
18 g4!
White continues his build-up on the
kingside by initiating a Pawn storm.
White is not afraid to open up his
own Kings position by advancing his
kingside Pawns. I have had students
miss a strong attack because they are
overly concerned about weakening their
own castled position. As a general rule,
It is reasonable to consider advancing the
Pawns in front of your own castled King, if
your initiative is strong enough to prevent
your opponent from attacking you. This
position is a good example of where this
applies. You will note that Blacks pieces
are restricted and Whites King is in no
danger of being attacked. However,
in more complicated situations good
judgment is necessary.
18 Rae8?
This is a good example of choosing the
wrong Rook. Indeed Black needs to
brace himself the best he can against
Whites impending attack along the e
file. White plans to support this attack
with such moves as posting the Knight
on c5, which attacks Blacks Bishop
on e6 a third time, and the thematic

Robert M. Snyder

break by advancing his f Pawn to


f5.
With 18 Rae8 Black has created some
problems that could have been resolved
with 18 Rfe8. One problem is that
Blacks Rook on f8 has no mobility
and is cramped. Another problem
is that now there is no possibility of
moving Blacks King to f8 to support
his pieces on e8 and e7. Even
though 18 Rfe8 would be a better
choice Black would still be in a lot of
trouble after 19 f5.
19 Nc5
White occupies the awesome c5
outpost with his Knight and attacks
Blacks Bishop a third time. This is a
natural outpost for a Knight in such
positions. Black has a bad Bishop on the
opposite color of the Knights outpost
on c5. Also, the Knight cannot be
attacked by any of Blacks Pawns.
White has an even stronger and more
forceful move here. I often tell my
students, If you see a good move, look
again; there may even be a stronger
move! He can immediately crack Black
open with 19 f5. After 19 f5 the game
might continue 19 gxf5 20 gxf5 Bd7
(if 20 Bc8, then 21 Re1 wins) 21
Nc5 Nxf5 22 Rxe8 Rxe8 23 Qg4+ Qg7
24 Qxg7+ Kxg7 25 Nxd7 and White is
winning.

39

19 d4?
Black plays aggressively and attempts
to counter-attack by attacking Whites
Rook and opening lines in the center.
However, White will quickly demonstrate
the inaccuracy of this move.
Blacks most stubborn defense required
that he get his Bishop out of attack and
retreat it with 19 Bc8. However,
Black would have a horrible position
and be in serious trouble after 20 f5
gxf5 21 Bxf5 Qd6 22 Nb3 threatening
23 Bxc8.
20 g5
White attacks Blacks Queen, driving
her to a less active post and away from
the protection of Blacks Bishop.
20 Qh8
This is an ugly location for a Queen.
Black could last a little longer with 20
Qg7. After 20 Qg7 the game
might continue 21 Nxe6 fxe6 22 Rxe6
dxc3 23 Bc4 Kh8 23 bxc3 and Black is
dying. Whites plan consists of winning
Blacks Knight on e7 by playing
moves like Re4 (attacking f7 with
the Bishop to keep Black from moving
his Rook there to defend the pinned
Knight) followed by either Re1 or even
Rd1 with the idea of Rd7.

40

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

See if you can find Whites best move


here without looking at the next move
in the game.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdr4k1}
{0w0whpdp}
{wdpdbdpd}
{dwHwdw)w}
{wdw0w)wd}
{dw)B$wdw}
{P)wdQdw)}
{dwdwdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 39. Position after 20 Qh8.

21 Rxe6!
White sacrifices the exchange to crack
open the position and allow for a quick
and devastating penetration. This will
fully take advantage of Blacks exposed
King and inactive Queen.
21 fxe6
Black must recapture to avoid massive
material loss.
22 Qxe6+
Whites Queen penetrates, beginning the
assault on Blacks King and continuing
the pressure along the e file.
22 Kg7
Black gets his King out of attack. If 22
Rf7, then 23 Bc4 Qg7 24 f5 is crushing.

23 Re1
White certainly had a choice of ways
to proceed from here (other moves
that would win easily were 23 Qd7 or
23 Bc4). White chooses to resume his
attack on the e file, which will turn
out to be most colorful!
23 dxc3

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdr4w1}
{0w0whwip}
{wdpdQdpd}
{dwHwdw)w}
{wdwdw)wd}
{dw0Bdwdw}
{P)wdwdw)}
{dwdw$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 40. Position after 23 dxc3.

Anything that Black might have done


here would end in quick defeat. So
Black, in effect, does nothing to enhance
his position and allows a brilliant finish.
If 23 Rxf4, then 24 Qe5+; or if 23
Nd5, then 24 Qd7+.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
24 Qxe7+!
It would be nice if we could finish all
of our games like this! White sacrifices

Robert M. Snyder

41

his Queen to expose Blacks King to a


quick mate.

pieces are brought into play to finish off


Black.

24 Rxe7

26 Rf7

Taking Whites Queen will delay mate


the longest. If 24 Rf7, then 25 Ne6+
Kg8 26 Qxe8+ Rf8 27 Qxf8++; or if 24
Kg8, then 25 Bc4+ Rf7 26 Qxf7++.

This is Blacks only legal move to get


out of check.

25 Rxe7+
White captures Blacks Rook continuing
the attack against Blacks King.
25 Kg8

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdw4k1}
{0w0w$wdp}
{wdpdwdpd}
{dwHwdw)w}
{wdwdw)wd}
{dw0Bdwdw}
{P)wdwdw)}
{dwdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 41. Position after 25 Kg8.

Blacks only alternative, 25 Rf7,


allows mate in the same number of
moves after 26 Ne6+ Kg8 27 Re8+ Rf8
28 Rxf8++.
26 Bc4+
White brings his Bishop into the assault
on Blacks King. Note that all of Whites

27 Re8+
White forces Blacks King to move to
his final resting place!
27 Kg7
Once again, this is Blacks only legal
move to get out of check.
28 Ne6++

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdRdw1}
{0w0wdrip}
{wdpdNdpd}
{dwdwdw)w}
{wdBdw)wd}
{dw0wdwdw}
{P)wdwdw)}
{dwdwdwIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 42. Position after 28 Ne6.

Black is checkmated!

LESSON 6

3 Bc5
Black develops his Bishop to the a7g1 diagonal. This and 3 Nf6 are the
two most common moves played here.
Examples of the Two Knights Defense
(3 Nf6) are found in LESSONS
FIVE and SIX in my book Unbeatable
Chess Lessons.

Overextended Pieces
D. Parniani vs. Robert Snyder
Los Angeles, 1973
Opening: Giuoco Piano
This game contains a nice example of
how to take advantage of overextended
minor pieces. White aggressively posts
a Bishop on b5 and a Knight on g5
only to find these pieces under attack
with their retreat cut off.
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1kgn4}
{0p0pdp0p}
{wdndwdwd}
{dwdw0wdw}
{wdBdPdwd}
{dwdwdNdw}
{P)P)W)P)}
{$NGQIwdR}
vllllllllV

4 c3
This is the most common and active
move. White prepares to support the
placement of a Pawn on d4. Less
active is 4 d3, which is found along
with analysis of the Evans Gambit (4
b4) in LESSON SEVEN in Unbeatable
Chess Lessons.
4 Nf6

Diagram 43. Position after 3 Bc4.

White develops his Bishop to the long


a2-g8 diagonal and applies pressure
to the f7 square. This is certainly not
as popular as playing the Ruy Lopez (3
Bb5) at the Master level. However, this
move is not uncommon at the amateur
level. Therefore, it is important to be
prepared to meet it.

Black develops his Knight toward the


center and attacks Whites unprotected
e Pawn. White gets a small edge if
Black plays less actively with 4 Qe7,
which might continue 5 d4 Bb6 6 0-0
(or 6 Bg5 Nf6 7 d5) d6 7 h3 Nf6 8
Re1 0-0 (or 8 h6 9 a4 a6 10 Be3) 9
Na3 h6 10 Nc2. Also, if 4 d6, then
White gets a strong Pawn center after 5
d4 exd4 6 cxd4.

-42-

Robert M. Snyder

5 0-0?

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1kdw4}
{0p0pdp0p}
{wdndwhwd}
{dwgw0wdw}
{wdBdPdwd}
{dw)wdNdw}
{P)w)W)P)}
{$NGQdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 44. Position after 5 0-0.

White immediately removes his King


from the center. However, this allows
Black to break-up Whites center and
obtain a good game. The usual move
here, 5 d4, will be covered in LESSON
SEVEN.
White could also play passively and
defend his e Pawn and free his
queenside pieces with 5 d3. After 5 d3
a typical continuation is 5 d6 6 0-0
(or 6 b4 Bb6 7 a4 a6 8 0-0 0-0 9 Nbd2
Ne7 10 Bb3 Ng6 11 Nc4 Ba7 with an
equal game) 0-0 7 Bb3 a6 8 Nbd2 Ba7
9 Nc4 h6 10 Be3 b5 11 Ncd2 Na5 12
Bxa7 Rxa7 13 d4 Re8 14 Bc2 exd4 15
cxd4 c5 with an equal game.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
5 Nxe4
Black captures Whites important e
Pawn and breaks-up Whites center.

43

6 d4
White boldly strikes at the center,
attacks Blacks Bishop on c5 and
Pawn on e5, and frees his queenside
pieces. White must play aggressively or
Black will simply be a Pawn ahead.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
6 d5!
Two can play at this game! Black
counters in the center using his d
Pawn to attack Whites Bishop on c4,
defend his Knight on e4, and free his
queenside pieces.
7 Bb5
White gets his Bishop out of attack
and pins Blacks Knight on c6 that
protects Blacks e Pawn. If White had
played 7 dxc5, I planned on playing 7
dxc4 8 Qxd8+ (if 8 Qe2, then 8
Qd3! gives Black the advantage) Kxd8
9 Rd1+ Ke7 10 Re1 f5 and White is a
Pawn down without compensation.
7 exd4
Black takes care of the threat on his e
Pawn by exchanging it before getting
his Bishop on c5 out of attack.

44

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

8 cxd4

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1kdw4}
{0p0wdp0p}
{wdndwdwd}
{dBgpdwdw}
{wdw)ndwd}
{dwdwdNdw}
{P)wdW)P)}
{$NGQdRIw}
vllllllllV

9 0-0

White recovers his Pawn, maintains


a Pawn in the center and renews his
threat to capture Blacks Bishop. See
if you can find Blacks best move here
without looking at the next move in the
game.

Black ignores Whites attack on his d


Pawn and gets his King out of the center
and into safety. There is no need to
directly protect the d Pawn because,
after 9 0-0, if White captures the
Pawn with 10 Nxd5, Black would play
10 Bxh7+ followed by 11 Qxd5.
Tempting, but second best, is to
exchange Knights with 9 Nxc3
10 bxc3 0-0. The idea of making
even exchanges when ahead a Pawn is
good. However, this would strengthen
Whites Pawn center by allowing him to
capture toward the center and Whites
d Pawn would no longer be isolated.
Therefore, Black is patient and will wait
for favorable exchanges on his terms.

8 Bd6

10 h3

Black gets his Bishop out of attack


by placing it on the active b8-h2
diagonal (where it covers the important
e5 square and applies pressure on
h2).

This move prevents the possibility of


Blacks Bishop from pinning Whites
Knight on f3 and also threatens 11
Nxd5. If White exchanges Knights with
10 Nxe4, the game might continue 10
dxe4 11 Bxc6 bxc6 12 Ng5 Qe7
(not 12 f5?? because of 13 Qb3+)
13 Re1 f5 and, though Black has
doubled isolated c Pawns, his extra
Pawn and Bishop pair give him a major
advantage.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

Diagram 45. Position after 8 cxd4.

9 Nc3
White develops his Knight to its most
natural square, challenges Blacks
actively posted Knight on e4 and
attacks Blacks Pawn on d5. See if you
can find Blacks best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.

Robert M. Snyder

10 Ne7
This move has several good ideas
behind it:
1. Black can move his Pawn to c6
where it attacks Whites Bishop on
b5 and reinforces his d Pawn.
2. The Knight can be maneuvered
to potentially active posts on the
kingside.
3. It removes the possibility of doubling
Blacks Pawns by exchanging the
White Bishop for Blacks Knight on
c6.
4. It protects the Pawn at d5.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1w4kd}
{0p0whp0p}
{wdwgwdwd}
{dBdpdwdw}
{wdw)ndwd}
{dwHwdNdP}
{P)wdW)Pd}
{$wGQdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 46. Position after 10 Ne7.

11 Nxe4?
Whites idea is to give Black a weak
overextended Pawn on e4 and then
use his Knight and Rook to attack it.
This is a wonderful idea, if the Pawn
is weak and can be captured. However,

45

the Pawn on e4 will become a major


contributing factor to Whites downfall
because Black is able to defend it using
an elaborate series of moves.
Whites best idea is to reposition his
overextended Bishop and attack Blacks
actively posted Knight with 11 Bd3,
which might continue 11 Nxc3 (this
exchange is better here than on move 9
because Black, being a Pawn ahead, will
be able to seek further exchanges) 12
bxc3 Bf5challenging Whites Bishop
on d3.
11 dxe4
Black recovers his piece and threatens
Whites Knight on f3.
12 Ng5
White gets his Knight out of attack and
continues with his plan of attacking
Blacks Pawn on e4.
12 Bf5
Black completes his minor piece
development and defends his e
Pawn. Not 12 f5??, because of 13
Qb3+.

46

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

13 Re1

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdw1w4kd}
{0p0whp0p}
{wdwgwdwd}
{dBdwdbHw}
{wdw)pdwd}
{dwdwdwdP}
{P)wdW)Pd}
{$wGQ$wIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 47. Position after 13 Re1.

White brings his Rook to the half open


e file and attacks Blacks e Pawn a
second time. At a glance it may appear
that Blacks e Pawn is lost. However,
Black has a nice resource that brings his
pieces to life and saves the Pawn.
If White attacks Blacks e Pawn with
13 Qe2, then Black remains a solid
Pawn ahead after 13 c6 14 Bc4 Bc7
15 Nxe4 (if 15 Rd1, then 15 Qd6
16 g3 Rae8 17 Nxe4 Qg6) Qxd4.
Offering to exchange Pawns with 13
f3 leaves Whites kingside weak on
the dark squares and gives Black an
opportunity to return the Pawn for a
major positional advantage; 13 e3!
14 Bxe3 Nd5 15 Bc1 (if 15 Qd2, then
15 Bb4 16 Qf2 Nxe3 17 Qxe3 Qd5)
c6 16 Bc4 Qb6 and Black has pressure
on Whites isolated d Pawn and a nice
lead in development.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

13 Bb4!
Black counters by attacking Whites
Rook on e1 and opening up the d
file for his Queen.
14 Re2
White gets his Rook out of attack while
maintaining his attack on Blacks e
Pawn. See if you can find Blacks best
move here without looking at the next
move in the game.
14 Qd5
The main idea behind Blacks last
move now becomes apparent. Black
centralizes his Queen, defends his e
Pawn, and attacks Whites unprotected
Bishop on b5.
15 Qa4?
On the surface this move looks good.
It defends Whites Bishop and attacks
Blacks Bishop. The problem is that
Whites Queen now occupies the a4
square, which was the Bishops only
retreat square. White now has a Bishop
on b5 and Knight on g5 that are
overextended. Currently these pieces
have no retreat available to them.
This brings us to the question of what
White should have done here. The
answer is simple! The circumstances
dictate that he should retreat his
Bishop with 15 Ba4, which would give

Robert M. Snyder

him the possibility of repositioning it


on b3. This would have certainly
been an improvement for White over
the move played (though objectively
White would have still been lost after
15 Nc6 16 Bxc6 Qxc6). Blacks
extra Pawn, Bishop-pair, and superior
position would be too much for White
to handle.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdw4kd}
{0p0whp0p}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dBdqdbHw}
{Qgw)pdwd}
{dwdwdwdP}
{P)wdR)Pd}
{$wGwdwIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 48. Position after 15 Qa4.

15 a5!
Black defends his Bishop on b4 and
threatens to win Whites Bishop on
b5 with 16 c6, or Whites Knight
on g5 with 16 h6.
16 f3
White decides to deal with the problem
of his overextended Knight by attacking
Blacks e Pawn and threatening 16
fxe4. White would have lasted longer

47

with 16 a3 c6 17 axb4 cxb5 18 Qa2


Qxd4, although being a couple of
Pawns down certainly didnt appeal to
White.
16 exf3
Black eliminates the threat on his e
Pawn by exchanging it.
17 Nxf3
White recovers the Pawn. White has
solved the problem of his overextended
Knight, but not his overextended
Bishop on b5.
17 c6
Black attacks Whites Bishop on b5;
it has nowhere to go.
18 Re5

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdw4kd}
{dpdwhp0p}
{wdpdwdwd}
{0Bdq$bdw}
{Qgw)wdwd}
{dwdwdNdP}
{P)wdwdPd}
{$wGwdwIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 49. Position after 18 Re5.

White plays aggressively by attacking


Blacks Queen and attempting to open

48

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

a retreat for the Bishop on b5. But,


there is no time for this.
18 cxb5
Because this capture attacks Whites
Queen, he wins Whites Bishop.
19 Qd1
White decides not to trade Queens and
win Blacks Pawn on b5 with 19 Qxb5
Qxb5 20 Rxb5 Be4 since he would be a
full piece down with an inferior position.
19 Qd7
Black gets his Queen out of attack and
defends his Pawn on b5.

Black brings his Knight into play and


attacks Whites Rook and d Pawn.
Being a piece ahead, Black is willing to
give up his extra Pawn to simplify and
go into an easily won endgame.
21 Rxb5
White gets his Rook out of attack while
capturing Blacks Pawn.
21 Nxd4
Black captures Whites Pawn and
attacks Whites Queen and Rook; this
forces further simplifying exchanges.
22 Nxd4
White eliminates the menacing Knight.

20 Qe2
White brings his Queen into play, attacks
Blacks Pawn on b5 a second time and
applies pressure on the e file.

22 Qxd4+
Black recovers his piece.
23 Be3

20 Nc6

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdw4kd}
{dpdqdp0p}
{wdndwdwd}
{0pdw$bdw}
{wgw)wdwd}
{dwdwdNdP}
{P)wdQdPd}
{$wGwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 50. Position after 20 Nc6.

White finally develops this Bishop,


gets his King out of check, and attacks
Blacks Queen.

Robert M. Snyder

23 Qd3

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdw4kd}
{dpdwdp0p}
{wdwdwdwd}
{0Rdwdbdw}
{wgwdwdwd}
{dwdqGwdP}
{P)wdQdPd}
{$wdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 51. Position after 23 Qd3.

Black gets his Queen out of attack and


forces an exchange of Queens because
of his attack on Whites Queen and
Rook. White resigned here. After 24
Qxd3 Bxd3 25 Rxb7 White would be
a full piece down in the endgame. At
the master level, resigning in such a
situation is common. However, in most
scholastic tournaments the chance for
mistakes is great enough to make it
unwise to resign.

49

LESSON 7
Refuting an Inferior Opening
R. Cornelis vs. Robert Snyder
Fresno, 1972
Opening: Giuoco Piano

5 exd4

The Mller variation of the Giuoco


Piano was considered sound for over a
hundred years. However, nowadays this
variation is considered to be inferior
due to the modern treatment used in
this game. An opening played by White
is generally considered to be refuted
when Black can get an advantage with
precise play.
This game also contains an instructive
Knight endgame where one side is a
Pawn ahead with a massive queenside
Pawn majority.
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4 Bc5 4 c3
Nf6 5 d4

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{rdb1kdw4}
{0p0pdp0p}
{wdndwhwd}
{dwgw0wdw}
{wdB)Pdwd}
{dw)wdNdw}
{P)wdW)P)}
{$NGQIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 52. Position after 5 d4.

White follows through with the idea


behind 4 c3 by placing a Pawn on d4
to attack in the center. White now
threatens Blacks Bishop on c5 and
Pawn on e5. This is considered the
sharpest way to fight for the center.

Black gets rid of the threat on his e


Pawn by exchanging it before getting
his Bishop on c5 out of attack. Weak
would be 5 Bb6? because of 6 dxe5
Ng4 (if 6 Nxe4??, then 7 Qd5) 7
Bxf7+ Kxf7 8 Ng5+ followed by 9
Qxg4.
6 cxd4
White recovers his Pawn and threatens
Blacks Bishop on c5.
The aggressive attack on Blacks
Knight by 6 e5 doesnt pose a
significant problem for Black. After
6 e5 the game might continue 6
d5 (not 6 Ne4 because 7 Bd5! is
strong) 7 Bb5 Ne4 8 cxd4 Be7 (or 8
Bb6 is good enough for equality) 9
Nc3 0-0 10 Bd3 f5 11 exf6e.p. Bxf6!
(an improvement over Steinitzs 11
Nxf6 when White stands slightly better
after 12 h3! restricting Blacks use of
the important g4 square) 12 Be3
Bf5 13 Qb3 Kh8 with approximately
even chances.
Also, immediate castling, with 6 0-0,
doesnt offer a problem for Black after

-50-

Robert M. Snyder

6 Nxe4 7 cxd4 d5! 8 dxc5 (8 Bb5


transposes into the game in LESSON
SIX) dxc4 9 Qxd8+ (if 9 Qe2, then
9 Qd3 10 Re1 f5 11 Nc3 0-0 12
Nxe4 fxe4 13 Qxe4 Bf5 and now 14
Qh4 Rae8 and Black is slightly better,
or 14 Qf4 Qd5! planning to meet 15
Qxc7 with 15 Be4) Kxd8 10 Rd1+
Bd7 11 Be3 Kc8 12 Nbd2 (if 12 Rc1,
then 12 Be6 and now 13 Nbd2
Nxd2 14 Nxd2 Ne5, or 13 Na3 Nb4
14 Nxc4 Nd3 15 Rc2 Nexc5) Nxd2
13 Rxd2 Re8 14 Rc1 b5 and Black is
better.
6 Bb4+
Black gets his Bishop out of attack
and attacks Whites King. The passive
retreat of the Bishop with 6
Bb6? will give White a considerable
advantage after 7 d5 Ne7 (if 7 Na5,
White gets a great position after 8 Bd3
threatening to win Whites Knight
with 9 b4) 8 e5 Ng4 9 d6! cxd6 (if
9 Nxf2, then 10 Qb3 planning to
meet 10 Nxh1? with 11 Bxf7+ Kf8
12 Bg5) 10 exd6 Nxf2 11 Qb3 f6 (if
11 Ne4, then 12 Bxf7+ Kf8 13 Bh5
Nxd6 14 Rf1 and Black is dying) 12
Rf1 Nf5 13 Bf4! and Black is tied up
hand and foot!

51

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1kdw4}
{0p0pdp0p}
{wdndwhwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wgB)Pdwd}
{dwdwdNdw}
{P)wdW)P)}
{$NGQIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 53. Position after 6 Bb4+.

7 Nc3
This was considered to be Whites most
dynamic move. White actively develops
his Knight and offers his e Pawn as a
gambit. For many years this move was
very popular until Grandmaster Lajos
Portisch knocked the steam out of it
by demonstrating that Black obtains a
clear advantage in the main line.
Other possible continuations are:
1. 7 Nbd2 d5 8 exd5 Nxd5 9 0-0 0-0
is equal.
2. 7 Kf1 d5 8 exd5 Nxd5 9 Nc3 (if
9 Ng5 then 9 0-0 and now 10
a3 Ba5 planning to meet 11 Nxh7
with 11 Re8!, or 10 Nc3 Nf6)
Nxc3 10 bxc3 Bxc3 11 Bxf7+ (if
White offers his Rook with 11
Qb3?, then 11 Bxa1 12 Bxf7+
Kf8 13 Ba3+ Ne7 14 Ne5 Qxd4 15
Bh5 Qf4 16 Qd5 and Black throws
a monkey wrench into Whites
attack and will be ahead in material

52

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

when the smoke clears after 16


Bg4!, with possible continuations
being 17 Bxe7+ Kxe7 18 Qc5+
Kf6 19 Nxg4+ Ke6, or 17 Nxg4
g6) Kxf7 12 Qb3+ Be6 13 Qxc3
Bd5 and Black stands better.
3. 7 Bd2 Bxd2+ 8 Nbxd2 d5 9 exd5
Nxd5 (White has an isolated
d Pawn but has a small spatial
advantage and active piece play
in most variations) 10 Qb3 (if 10
0-0, then 10 0-0 11 Ne5 and
the game is even after either 11
Nxe5 12 dxe5 Be6 13 Qb3 Nf4,
or 11 Nxd4 12 Nb3 Nxb3 13
Bxd5 Qf6 14 Bxf7+ Rxf7 15 Qxb3
Qxe5 16 Rae1 Be6 17 Qxe6 Qxe6
18 Rxe6 Rd8) Nce7 11 0-0 0-0 12
Rfe1 c6 with approximate equality
in these variations:
13 a4 Qb6 14 a5 Qxb3 15
Nxb3 Rd8 16 Nc5 Rb8.
13 Ne5 Qb6 14 Ndf3
Qxb3 15 Bxb3 Rd8.
13 Ne4 Nb6 14 Nc5 (if
14 Bd3, then 14 Nf5
15 Qc3 h6 16 Rad1 Nd6
17 Ne5 Nxe4 18 Bxe4
Be6) Nxc4 15 Qxc4 b6
16 Nd3 a5 17 Nf4 Qd6.
White has an advantage in
space in compensation for
an isolated d Pawn and a
Knight versus a Bishop.

7 Nxe4
Black accepts the gambit and takes
advantage of the pin on Whites Knight
on c3 while liquidating Whites Pawn
center and attacking Whites Knight on
c3 a second time.
8 0-0
White ignores the two pieces attacking
his Knight on c3, removes his King
from the center, and prepares to bring
his Rook to the critical e file. Other
moves here would leave White in sad
shape. If White tries defending his
Knight while attacking Blacks f
Pawn a second time with 8 Qb3 then
Black simply plays 8 0-0.
8 Bxc3
Black removes Whites menacing
Knight on c3. This is stronger than
8 Nxc3 9 bxc3 with the possible
continuations:
1. 9 d5 10 cxb4 dxc4 11 Re1+
Ne7 12 Qa4+! c6 13 b5 0-0 14 Ba3
cxb5 15 Qxb5 Be6 16 Ng5 Re8 17
Nxe6 fxe6 18 Bxe7 Rxe7 19 Qxc4
Rc8 20 Qd3.
2. 9 Bxc3 10 Ba3 d5 (if 10
Bxa1?, then 11 Re1+ Ne7 12 Bxe7)
11 Bb5 Bxa1 12 Re1+ Be6 13 Qa4
Qb8 14 Ne5 Bc3 15 Bxc6+ bxc6
16 Qxc6+ Kd8 17 Qxc3 Qb6 18
Bc5 and Whites position is worth

Robert M. Snyder

more than the sacrificed material.


A couple possible continuations
are:
18 Qb7 19 Qg3 Re8 20
Qxg7 Qb2 21 Qxh7 Qxa2 22
Qd3 Qa4 23 Rc1 Rb8 24 Bxa7
Rb7 25 Bc5.
18 Qa6 19 Bb4 f6 20 Rc1
Qb7 21 Qc5 fxe5 22 Qe7+
Kc8 23 Qxe6+ Kb8 24 Qxe5.
9 d5
This move was first suggested by Jrgen
Mller back in 1898. White attacks
Blacks Knight on c6, and prevents
Black from playing his natural freeing
move, by placing his Pawn on d5.
The natural looking move here is to
recover the piece with 9 bxc3. However,
Black gets the advantage after 9
d5defending his Knight on e4,
attacking Whites Bishop on c4 and
freeing his Bishop on c8.

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{rdb1kdw4}
{0p0pdp0p}
{wdndwdwd}
{dwdPdwdw}
{wdBdndwd}
{dwgwdNdw}
{P)wdW)P)}
{$wGQdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 54. Position after 9 d5.

53

9 Bf6
This is the strongest move in this
position. Black gets his Bishop out of
attack and keeps it on the active a1-h8
diagonal. On f6 the Bishop covers the
important e7 square and aids in the
defense of the kingside.
Getting the Knight out of attack and
bringing it into the center with 9
Ne5 is now considered to be an inferior
move since White obtains some pressure
for his sacrificed Pawn after 9 Ne5
10 bxc3 Nxc4 11 Qd4 f5,
Black can try to hold onto the extra
Knight with 11 Ncd6, but this
gives White the advantage after 12
Qxg7 Qf6 13 Qxf6 Nxf6 14 Re1+
Nfe4 15 Nd2 f5 16 f3 0-0 17 fxe4
Nxe4 18 Nxe4 fxe4 19 Rxe4 d6 20
Bh6.
If Black immediately removes his
King from the center with 11
0-0, then 12 Qxe4 Nd6 13 Qd3
gives White a nice spatial advantage
to compensate for the sacrificed
Pawn.
12 Qxc4 d6 13 Nd4 0-0 14 f3 Nc5 15
Ba3 b6 16 Bxc5 bxc5 17 Nc6 Qf6 18
Rfe1 Bd7 19 Re7 Rf7 20 Re6 Qg5 (if
20 Bxe6, then 21 dxe6 Rff8 22 e7+
Rf7 23 Re1 Re8 24 Re6 Qg5 25 Nd8)
21 Rae1 f4 22 a4 Kh8 23 R6e4.

54

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

10 Re1
White brings his Rook into play and
pins Blacks unprotected Knight. The
less patient recovery of Whites piece
with 10 dxc6 clearly favors Black after
10 bxc6 11 Re1 0-0 planning to
meet 12 Rxe4 with 12 d5.
10 Ne7
Black gets his Knight out of attack
and shields his King on the e file.
If Black immediately removed his
King from the center with 10 0-0,
he loses the opportunity to blockade
Whites d Pawn after 11 Rxe4 Ne7
(11 Na5 12 Bd3 leaves Blacks
Knight on a5 misplaced) 12 d6.
After 12 d6 the game might continue
12 cxd6 13 Bg5 d5 14 Bxd5 Nxd5
15 Qxd5 d6 16 Rd4 Re8 17 Bxf6
Qxf6 18 Rad1 and Whites position is
worth a Pawn.
Certainly not 10 Ne5?? because of
11 Nxe5 Bxe5 12 Rxe4 d6 13 f4 and
Black loses a Bishop.
11 Rxe4
White recovers his Knight.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1kdw4}
{0p0php0p}
{wdwdwgwd}
{dwdPdwdw}
{wdBdRdwd}
{dwdwdNdw}
{P)wdW)P)}
{$wGQdwIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 55. Position after 11 Rxe4.

11 d6
Black frees his Bishop on the c8-h3
diagonal and prevents Whites Pawn
from going to d6.
12 Bg5
White develops his last minor piece
and threatens to double and isolate
Blacks kingside Pawns with 13 Bxf6
gxf6. Interesting is a variation called the
Bayonet Attack by 12 g4. Black does
well to return the Pawn with 12 0-0
13 g5 Be5 14 Nxe5 dxe5 15 Rxe5 Ng6
16 Re1 Qd7! (with the idea of 17
b5 followed by 18 Bb7 attacking
Whites isolated d Pawn) and now if
17 Be3, then 17 b5 planning to meet
18 Bb3? with 18 Qh3! threatening
19 Nh4.

Robert M. Snyder

12 Bxg5
Black eliminates Whites threat to
exchange on f6 by initiating the
Bishop exchange first. Attacking Whites
Rook with 12 Bf5 is weak because
of 13 Bb5+ Kf8 14 Re3 and White has
more than enough compensation for
his Pawn.
13 Nxg5
White recovers his Bishop. See if
you can find Blacks best move here
without looking at the next move in
the game.
13 h6!
Black forces Whites hand by threatening
Whites aggressively placed Knight. This
is the move that Portisch has shown gives
Black the advantage, thereby refuting
the Mller Variation.
Weak would be 13 Bf5? because of
14 Qf3! Bxe4 (if 14 Qd7, then 15
Bb5! Qxb5 16 Qxf5; or if 14 0-0,
then 15 Rxe7 Qxe7 16 Qxf5) 15 Qxf7+
Kd7 16 Qe6+ Ke8 17 Qxe4 Qd7 18
Re1 threatening 19 Bb5.

55

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1kdw4}
{0p0whp0w}
{wdw0wdw0}
{dwdPdwHw}
{wdBdRdwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{P)wdW)P)}
{$wdQdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 56. Position after 13 h6.

Immediately getting the King out of the


center with 13 0-0 doesnt give Black
any advantage after 14 Nxh7! Kxh7 (or
if 14 Bf5, then 15 Rxe7 Qxe7 16
Nxf8 Rxf8 with an even game) 15 Qh5+
Kg8 16 Rh4 f5 (if 16 f6, then 17 g4!
Re8 18 Bd3 with a sufficient attack for
the piece) 17 Qh7+ Kf7 18 Rh6 Rg8
19 Re1 Kf8 (if 19 Qf8, then 20 Bb5
Rh8 21 Qxh8 gxh6 22 Qh7+ Kf6 23
Rxe7 Qxe7 24 Qxh6+ with a drawn
game) 20 Rh3 Bd7 21 Rhe3 Nc8 22
Bd3 g6 24 h4 Rg7 24 Qh8+ Rg8 25
Qh7 with a drawn game.
14 Bb5+
With the d Pawn blocking Whites
Bishop on the a2-g8 diagonal, White
repositions his Bishop with an attack
on Blacks King. Since White is a Pawn
down he must play actively and attempt
to obtain counter-play. A passive retreat
of the Knight with 14 Nf3 leaves White
without enough compensation for the

56

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Pawn after 14 0-0. Also, 14 Qh5 is


met by 14 0-0 15 Rae1 Ng6 16 Nf3
(not 16 Nxf7?, because of 16 Qf6!)
Qf6 17 Nd4 Bd7 with a clear advantage
for Black.
The most common move played here is
14 Qe2. White will give up his Knight
on g5 and then triple on the e
file to force Black to return the piece.
However, in this line White will not
obtain enough compensation for his
sacrificed Pawn. After 14 Qe2 the game
might continue 14 hxg5 15 Re1 Be6
16 dxe6 f6 17 Re3 (this is considered
to be the main line, it requires precise
play on the part of Blackhowever, a
reasonable reply for White is 17 Rd4,
with the possible continuation 17
c6 18 Bd3 d5 19 h3 Qb6 20 Rg4 0-0-0
21 b4 Kb8 22 a4 Qc7 23 a5 Qd6 and
Blacks extra Pawn is worth more than
Whites extra space) c6 (if 17 d5,
then 18 Rh3 Rxh3 19 gxh3 g6 20 Qf3!
Qd6 21 Qxf6) 18 Rh3 Rxh3 (not 18
Rf8?, because of 19 Rh7, planning
to meet 19 d5 with 20 Rxg7 Rh8
21 Qf3 Qa5 22 Rd1 f5 23 Qe3, or 19
g6 with 20 Bd3 and now if 20
Qa5, then 21 b4, or if 20 Qb6, then
21 Bxg6+! Nxg6 22 Qh5 Rg8 23 Re7+!
Kd8 24 Rd7+ Kc8 25 Qh7) 19 gxh3
(threatening mate in four beginning
with 20 Qh5+) g6 (Black keeps Whites
Queen out of h5 with the plan of 20
Qa5 followed by 21 0-0-0) 20
Qd2 (if 20 Bd3, then 20 Qa5) Kf8

(a good alternative is 20 d5 21 Bd3


Qd6 and Black is clearly better) 21 h4
gxh4 22 Qh6+ (If 22 Re4, then 22
g5 23 Qc3 Kg7 24 Rg4 Kh6 planning
to meet 25 Qxf6+ with 25 Ng6)
Kg8 23 Re3 (perhaps the lesser of evils
for White is 23 b4, which prevents
Black from moving his Queen to a5,
although Black still stands clearly better
after 23 a5 24 Bd3 Qf8 25 Qxh4 b5
26 a3 axb4 27 axb4 f5) Qa5 24 Qxh4
Kg7 25 Rh3 Qg5+ 26 Qxg5 fxg5 and
White has little chance of surviving the
ending because he is a Pawn down with
an overextended Pawn on e6.
14 Bd7
Black develops his last minor piece
while challenging Whites Bishop. If
Black played 14 c6, then White ends
up with the better game after 15 Nxf7!
(stronger than 15 dxc6 0-0!) Kxf7 16
Qf3+ Nf5 (if 16 Bf5, then 19 Rae1)
17 dxc6.
15 Qe2
White defends his Bishop on b5 and
increases pressure on the e file with
the threat of 16 Bxd7+ Qxd7 17 Re1.
15 Bxb5
Black trades Bishops in keeping with
the idea of making even exchanges when
ahead in material. For the moment, this

Robert M. Snyder

will also remove Whites Queen from


applying pressure on the e file.

57

See if you can find Blacks best move


here without looking at the next move
in the game.

16 Qxb5+
White recovers the Bishop.
16 Qd7
Black gets his King out of check by
activating his Queen and challenging
Whites Queen.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdkdw4}
{0p0qhp0w}
{wdw0wdw0}
{dQdPdwHw}
{wdwdRdwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{P)wdw)P)}
{$wdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 57. Position after 16 Qd7.

17 Qe2
White gets his Queen out of attack and
keeps up the pressure on the e file by
attacking Blacks pinned Knight. White
is now threatening 18 Re1. Whites
Knight would have no escape if he plays
17 Qxd7+ Kxd7 18 Nxf7 Rhf8.
If 17 Qxb7, Black comes out a Pawn
ahead after 17 0-0 18 Rae1 Rab8!
19 Qxa7 Nxd5 20 Nf3 (if 20 Qd4, then
20 Qf5 21 Nf3 Rb4 22 Nh4 Qg5
23 Qd1 Rxb2) Rxb2 21 Qd4 Qb5.

17 Kf8
White breaks the pin on his Knight by
removing his King from the e file.
Black now threatens to win Whites
Knight (with 18 hxg5) and d
Pawn (with 18 Nxd5). Immediately
capturing Whites Knight with 17
hxg5 would have allowed Whites Rook
to penetrate to the 7th rank after 18 Re1
0-0 19 Rxe7.
18 Re1
White has nothing better than to
continue with his build-up on the e
file and give up his d Pawn. If 18
Qh5, then Black comes out on top after
18 Qf5 19 Rae1 Ng8! 20 f4 g6.
Trying to expose Blacks King with a
Knight sacrifice will prove unsound
after 18 Nxf7 Kxf7 19 Re1 Ng8! (not 19
Nxd5?? because of 20 Qh5+ forking
King and Knight) 20 Re6 Kf8! and
White is unable to make any progress.
In Portischs important theoretical game
his opponent tried 21 f4 Nf6! 22 Re7
Re8 23 Rxe8+ Qxe8 24 Qf2 Qb5 and
then resigned since he is a piece down
without any compensation.

58

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

18 Nxd5
Black gets his Knight out of attack
and wins a second Pawn. With all of
Whites pieces in play he certainly has
some compensation, but not enough
for two Pawns.
19 Nh3?
White gets his Knight out of attack.
The idea of posting it on h3 instead
of f3 is to keep the d1-h5 diagonal
open for Whites Queen. However, it
is more important to bring the Knight
to a more centralized location with 19
Nf3 where it would also be defending
the Rook on e1. The significance of
this will become apparent as the game
continues.
After 19 Nf3 Black would continue
with 19 c6 and now:
1. If 20 Qd3, then 20 g6 21
Qd4 Kg8 22 Kf1 Kh7 23 Rh4
f6.
2. If 20 Kf1, then 20 g6 21
h4 Kg7 22 h5 Nf6 23 Re7
Rae8 24 Rxd7 Rxe2 25 Rxf7+
Kxf7 26 hxg6+ Kxg6 27 Rxe2
Re8 and Black is a Pawn up
with a superior position in the
endgame.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdwiw4}
{0p0qdp0w}
{wdw0wdw0}
{dwdndwdw}
{wdwdRdwd}
{dwdwdwdN}
{P)wdQ)P)}
{dwdw$wIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 58. Position after 19 Nh3.

19 Nf6!
Black repositions his Knight, covers the
important e8 square, and threatens
Whites Rook. It may look dangerous
to invite Whites Rook to penetrate to
the 7th rank. However, this is all part of
Blacks plan!
20 Re7
White gets his Rook out of attack while
posting it actively on the 7th rank and
attacking Blacks Queen. See if you can
find Blacks best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.
20 Re8!
This move is the key idea behind Blacks
last move. Black threatens Whites
aggressively posted Rook and counter
attacks on the e file. Black wants to
force exchanges to simplify the game
and relieve Whites pressure.

Robert M. Snyder

21 Rxd7?

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{wdwdriw4}
{0p0Rdp0w}
{wdw0whw0}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwdwdwdN}
{P)wdQ)P)}
{dwdw$wIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 59. Position after 21 Rxd7.

This will result in White going into


a lost endgame. White would have a
better chance by limiting the exchanges
and trying to maintain some degree of
pressure with 21 Rxe8+ Qxe8 22 Qd2
Qd7 23 Nf4. However, in the end
Blacks two extra Pawns would prevail.

59

after 22 Nxd7 Black would be two


Pawns ahead.
22 Kxf7
Black captures Whites menacing Rook.
23 Rxe2

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{wdwdwdw4}
{0p0wdk0w}
{wdw0whw0}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwdwdwdN}
{P)wdR)P)}
{dwdwdwIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 60. Position after 23 Rxe2.

Black recovers the Queen. Here is where


it becomes clear why White should
have posted his Knight on f3 back on
move 19 where it would be protecting
the Rook on e1. If the Knight was on
f3, White would be able to continue
with 22 Rxc7.

White recovers his Rook. Black has


reached a won endgame. Blacks
advantages include being a Pawn ahead,
having his extra Pawn on the queenside
creating a massive queenside Pawn
majority, and having a more active
King and Knight.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

22 Rxf7+

23 Re8

White uses a desperado to recover


one of the two Pawns. If White recovers
his Rook right away with 22 Rxe2, then

It is to Blacks advantage to offer


further exchanges. Black challenges
Whites Rook and contests control of
the important e file. He eliminates

21 Rxe2

60

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Whites control of the e file so that


Blacks King will be able to head toward
the center to support the advance of his
center and queenside Pawns.
24 Kf1
White brings his King into play and
defends his Rook.
24 Rxe2
Black exchanges Rooks clearing the way
for his King to be able to move toward
the center.
25 Kxe2
White recovers his Rook and brings his
King further into play.
25 Ke6
Black centralizes his King. Blacks plan
will be to advance his massive majority
of Pawns in the center and queenside.
Blacks King will be able to support their
advance and at the same time prevent
White from accomplishing anything
significant on the kingside where he has
the Pawn majority.
26 Kf3
White would have offered more
resistance by getting his Knight into
play with 26 Nf4+ Kf5 27 g3. White
should have kept his King on e2

rather than bringing him toward the


kingside.

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{wdwdwdwd}
{0p0wdw0w}
{wdw0khw0}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwdwdKdN}
{P)wdw)P)}
{dwdwdwdw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 61. Position after 26 Kf3.

26 Ke5
Black continues with his plan of
centralizing his King before beginning
the advance of his center and queenside
Pawns.
27 Nf4
White finally gets his inactive Knight
into play.
27 d5
Black advances his dangerous passed
center Pawn.
28 Ne2
Ideally Black would like to penetrate
with his King through the center and
get to c2 where he will be able to
support the advance of the d Pawn
and threaten Whites queenside Pawns.

Robert M. Snyder

Therefore, White is attempting to set


up a barrier to keep Blacks King out.
If 28 Nd3+, the game might continue
28 Kd4 29 Nf4 g5 30 Ne6+ Kd3 31
Nxc7 Kc2 with a winning position.
28 c5
Black brings up the reserves! If White
sits around and does nothing Blacks
Pawn advance will win easily.
29 h3
This move prevents the entry of Blacks
Knight to g4 in the event that White
moves his King to e3. Whites best
chance is to try to obtain counterplay
with his Knight and kingside Pawn
majority.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdwdwd}
{0pdwdw0w}
{wdwdwhw0}
{dw0piwdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwdwdKdP}
{P)wdN)Pd}
{dwdwdwdw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 62. Position after 29 h3.

29 b5
Blacks Pawn mass grows as he continues
to bring up more reserves!

61

30 Nf4
White finally decides to use his Knight
actively in an attempt to obtain some
counter-play.
30 c4
Black continues his queenside Pawn
march with an eventual Queen in mind.
31 Ng6+
White is trying to find greener pastures
for his Knight to graze. However, the
game has long since been decided.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
31 Kd4
Blacks King is advanced to support his
Pawns and attack Whites queenside
Pawns.
32 Ne7

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{wdwdwdwd}
{0wdwHw0w}
{wdwdwhw0}
{dpdpdwdw}
{wdpiwdwd}
{dwdwdKdP}
{P)wdw)Pd}
{dwdwdwdw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 63. Position after 32 Ne7.

62

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Whites Knight continues to wander,


looking for some kind of counter-play.
However, keeping Blacks King out of
d3 with 32 Ke2 would have allowed
him to last a little longer. After 32 Ke2,
one easy way for Black to win would
be to play 32 b4 with the idea of 33
c3.
32 Kd3
Blacks King continues to penetrate,
opens up d4 for his Pawn, and prepares
to attack Whites queenside Pawns.
33 Nc6
Whites Knight is doing its best to try
to rescue a hopeless situation on the
queenside. The Knight attacks Blacks
unprotected a Pawn and covers some
of the squares to which Blacks Pawns
want to move.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
33 Kc2
This is Blacks most direct winning
method. Blacks King attacks White
b Pawn and will assist in supporting
his queenside Pawns further. Black
doesnt mind temporarily sacrificing
some Pawns to win Whites Knight.

34 Nxa7
White has nothing better to do than to
give his Knight some Pawns for his last
supper!
34 Kxb2
Black clears the way for the advance of
his c Pawn by moving his King out of
the way and removing the b Pawn.
35 Nxb5

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwdwdw0w}
{wdwdwhw0}
{dNdpdwdw}
{wdpdwdwd}
{dwdwdKdP}
{Piwdw)Pd}
{dwdwdwdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 64. Position after 35 Nxb5.

Whites Knight eats his second Pawn


and prepares to sacrifice himself to stop
Blacks c Pawn from Queening.
35 c3
This forces White to give up his Knight
to prevent the c Pawn from Queening
and will result in White being a full
Knight down.
White resigned here.

LESSON 8

3 Nd4

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{rdb1kgn4}
{0p0pdp0p}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dBdw0wdw}
{wdwhPdwd}
{dwdwdNdw}
{P)P)W)P)}
{$NGQIwdR}
vllllllllV

Taking Advantage of an Out


of Play Queen
Kindermann vs. Tatai
Budapest, 1987
Opening: Ruy Lopez
Black starts off by playing an inferior
variation of the Ruy Lopez and gives
White the advantage out of the opening.
Then, in the face of Whites kingside
build-up, Blacks places the Queen out
of play on the queenside. By the time
she gets over to the kingside to assist it
is too late.
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5
White initiates the Ruy Lopez by
developing his Bishop and attacking
Blacks Knight on c6, which indirectly
applies pressure to Blacks e Pawn.
This is the most common move played
here.

Diagram 65. Position after 3 Nd4.

This is known as Birds Defense. It is


rarely seen at the Master level today and
would actually be better named Birds
Attack because of its aggressive nature.
On d4 the Knight threatens Whites
Bishop on b5. One of its drawbacks
is that Black moves the same piece twice
in a row and neglects development of
the minor pieces. A second drawback is
that Black obtains doubled Pawns.
Blacks plan is to have the doubled Pawn
on d4 block Whites natural placement
of a Pawn on d4 and prevent White
from being able to develop his Knight
to c3. Overall, Blacks disadvantages
outweigh these advantages. White, with
proper play, will obtain an advantage in
this opening.
Blacks most common move, 3 a6
will be examined in LESSONS TEN,
ELEVEN & TWELVE and were

-63-

64

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

covered in LESSONS NINE, TEN,


ELEVEN & TWELVE in Unbeatable
Chess Lessons. Of other common third
moves for Black: 3 d6 will be
covered in LESSON NINE and 3
Bc5 is covered in LESSON EIGHT in
Unbeatable Chess Lessons.
4 Nxd4
It is clearly best to eliminate Blacks
aggressively posted Knight and double
Blacks Pawns.
4 exd4
Black recovers his Knight.
5 0-0
White gets his King out of the center
and into safety behind a protective
wall of Pawns. This is Whites least
committing move and leaves open the
greatest number of options.
5 Bc5
Black develops his Bishop and reinforces
his Pawn on d4. If Black immediately
drives Whites Bishop back with 5
c6, the game might continue 6 Bc4
Nf6 7 Re1 d6 8 c3 Ng4 9 h3 Ne5 10
d3 Nxc4 11 dxc4 dxc3 12 Nxc3 Be7
13 Bf4 0-0 14 Qd3 Be6 15 Rad1 Qa5
16 Nd5! cxd5 (if 16 Bh4, then 17
g3 cxd5 18 cxd5) 17 exd5 Qxa2 18

b3 Qb2 19 Qg3 and White is clearly


better.
6 d3

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1kdn4}
{0p0pdp0p}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dBgwdwdw}
{wdw0Pdwd}
{dwdPdwdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$NGQdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 66. Position after 6 d3.

Simple and good. White frees his


Bishop on the c1-h6 diagonal, opens
d2 for possible use by his Knight and
protects his e Pawn.
6 c6
Black attacks Whites Bishop on b5,
gains support for a Pawn on d5 and
opens the d8-a5 diagonal for possible
use by his Queen. If Black plays less
actively and develops his Knight with 6
Ne7, then the game might continue
7 Qh5 Bb6 8 Bg5 0-0 9 Bc4 Qe8 10
Nd2 d6 (if 10 Kh8, then 11 e5!) 11
f4 Kh8 12 Bxe7 Qxe7 13 f5 with a clear
advantage for White.

Robert M. Snyder

7 Ba4
White gets his Bishop out of attack
and places it where it has the option
of being repositioned to either b3 or
c2. However, 7 Bc4 was also playable;
White would stand slightly better.
7 Ne7
Black develops his Knight to where
it supports his Pawn going to d5.
Developing the Knight to its more
natural square by 7 Nf6 is weaker
because of 8 e5 Nd5 9 Nd2 d6 10 Ne4.
Another possibility, and Blacks best
move here, is 7 d6, which could
continue with 8 Nd2 Nf6 9 Nb3 Bb6
(or 9 Nd7 10 c3 dxc3 11 bxc3 Bb6
12 d4 0-0 13 Nd2 Re8 14 Re1) 10 Bg5
Qe7 11 Nd2 0-0 12 f4 Re8 13 Bb3
Bc7 14 Nf3 and White stands slightly
better.

65

Bishop on the a2-g8 diagonal with 9


Bb3, which might continue 9 d5 10
exd5 Nxd5 11 Re1+ Kf7 (or if 11
Kf8, then 12 Qh5 g6 13 Qh6+ Kg8 14
Nd2 Bf8 15 Qh3 Bg7 16 Nf3) 12 Nd2
g6 13 Nf3 Kg7 14 Bxd5 Qxd5 15 Re5
Qd6 16 b4! Bxb4 17 Bb2 c5 18 a3 Ba5
19 Rxc5 and Black is in trouble.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1kdw4}
{0pdwhp0p}
{wdpdwdwd}
{dwgpdwdw}
{Bdw0P)wd}
{dwdPdwdw}
{P)PdWdP)}
{$NGQdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 67. Position after 8 d5.

8 f4

9 f5!

White plays aggressively to increase both


his control of the center and attacking
chances on the kingside. White plans to
use his f Pawn to cramp Blacks pieces
and spearhead an attack.

White continues with his plan of using


the f Pawn to spearhead an attack on
the kingside. This move cramps Black
by blocking the h3-c8 diagonal of
his Bishop and opening the c1-h6
diagonal for Whites Bishop. Black must
also concern himself with the possibility
of White advancing the Pawn to f6.

8 d5
Black counter-attacks in the center by
attacking Whites e Pawn and freeing
his Bishop on the c8-h3 diagonal. If 8
f5, then White would reposition his

66

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

9 f6
Black decides to Blockade Whites f
Pawn and attempts to secure the e5
and g5 squares. The drawback of this
move is that it weakens the h5-e8
diagonal. Other possibilities are:
1. 9 0-0 10 f6 gxf6 11 Qh5 and
Blacks weak Pawns and open
King position give White a nice
advantage.
2. 9 g6 10 f6 Ng8 11 exd5 b5 (or
if 11 Qxd5, then 12 Bb3 Qd8
13 Qe1+ Kf8 14 Nd2) 12 Qe1+
Kf8 13 b4 Bb6 14 Bb3 cxd5 15
Bxd5! and White is winning (15
Qxd5? 16 Bh6+! Nxh6 17 Qe7+
Kg8 18 Qe8++).
3. 9 dxe4 10 dxe4 0-0 (if 10
Qd6, then 11 Bb3 is strong) 11
Bb3 Bd6 12 Qh5 and White is
clearly better.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the best move
in the game.
10 Qh5+
White takes advantage of the weakened
h5-e8 diagonal by bringing his Queen
to an active post and forcing Black to
lose the ability to castle.
10 Kf8
This is the safest way to get the King
out of check. Trying to avoid moving

the King with 10 g6 loses a Pawn


and leaves Blacks King still exposed to
attack after 11 fxg6 Nxg6 12 exd5.
11 Kh1
White removes his King from the same
diagonal (g1-a7) as Blacks Bishop.
The idea is to allow White to attack
Blacks Pawn on d4 by placing a Pawn
on c3. However, simple development
with 11 Nd2 is stronger.
11 Bd7
Black completes his minor piece
development and plans to maneuver
this Bishop to defend on the kingside
and drive Whites Queen away from
her active post on h5. Another
reasonable plan for Black is to expand
on the queenside with 11 a5 12 c3
b5, though White still has a substantial
advantage after 13 Bd1 planning to
reposition his Bishop on f3.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdw1wiw4}
{0pdbhw0p}
{wdpdw0wd}
{dwgpdPdQ}
{Bdw0Pdwd}
{dwdPdwdw}
{P)PdWdP)}
{$NGwdRdK}
vllllllllV

Diagram 68. Position after 11 Bd7.

Robert M. Snyder

12 c3
White follows through with his plan of
applying pressure in the center. It would
also be good to continue developing
with 12 Nd2.
12 Be8
Black uses his Bishop to drive Whites
Queen away from her active post on
h5 while maneuvering it to a better
defensive location on the kingside.
13 Qh4
White gets his Queen out of attack,
keeps her actively posted on the kingside
and covers the center. From h4 the
Queen applies pressure to Blacks h
Pawn and the Pawn on f6 plus she
adds protection to the e Pawn. A
good alternative was 13 Qf3 where the
Queen would be actively posted and
exert pressure on d5.
13 dxe4
Black eliminates his doubled Pawns
and opens the g8-a2 diagonal for use
by his Bishop.
14 dxe4
White recovers his Pawn.

67

14 Qb6

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdbiw4}
{0pdwhw0p}
{w1pdw0wd}
{dwgwdPdw}
{Bdw0Pdw!}
{dw)wdwdw}
{P)wdWdP)}
{$NGwdRdK}
vllllllllV

Diagram 69. Position after 14 Qb6.

Black seeks counter-play on the


queenside. He threatens to fork Whites
Rook and Bishop with 15 Qa6, ties
Whites Bishop on c1 to the defense of
his b Pawn, and gives more mobility
to the Rook on a8. The drawback to
this plan is that Blacks Queen is further
removed from defense of the kingside.
It would be more accurate for Black
to delay committing his Queen and
continue maneuvering his Bishop to a
more active location with 14 Bf7.
15 Bb3
White removes his Bishop from its
unprotected location on a4 and places
it on the open a2-g8 diagonal. White
is now threatening 16 Qxf6+! gxf6 17
Bh6++.

68

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

15 Bf7

16 dxc3

Black brings his Bishop into play


challenging Whites active Bishop on
the h2-g8 diagonal. This is also in
keeping with the general rule of making
even exchanges when you are being
attacked or have a cramped position.
White has a significant positional
advantage even though Black has all of
his minor pieces developed and White
only has one minor piece developed.
Blacks difficulty is in coordinating the
effective use of his pieces: Blacks King
is in an awkward position after losing
the ability to castle and being stuck in
the center. Blacks Queen is not in a
good position to assist against Whites
kingside attack because she is out of
play on the kingside. Blacks Rook at
h8 is trapped and unable to connect
with the other pieces for defense.

Black opens the a7-g1 diagonal where


his Queen and Bishop are concentrated
and isolates Whites queenside Pawns.

16 Nd2
White continues with a natural
development of his Knight. However,
stronger is to immediately go for the
attack with 16 e5. After 16 e5 the game
might continue 16 Nd5 (16 fxe5
17 f6, or 16 Bxb3 16 exf6 busts
Black wide open in either case) 17 e6
Be8 18 Bh6! (threatening 19 Bxd5 with
the plan to meet 19 cxd5 with 20
Qxf6+) Kg8 19 cxd4 Bxd4 20 Nc3 and
Black is in sad shape.

17 bxc3
White recovers his Pawn.
17 Qa6?

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdwiw4}
{0pdwhb0p}
{qdpdw0wd}
{dwgwdPdw}
{wdwdPdw!}
{dB)wdwdw}
{PdwHWdP)}
{$wGwdRdK}
vllllllllV

Diagram 70. Position after 17 Qa6.

Black pins Whites a Pawn, attacks


Whites Rook on f1, and threatens to
win material with 18 Bxb3. However,
this gives White the opportunity to
easily defend against this simple threat
and leave Blacks Queen terribly out
of play. Instead, Black should prevent
White from moving his Pawn to e5
by repositioning his Bishop with 17
Bd6. The game might continue 18
Bxf7 Kxf7 19 Nc4 Qc7 20 Qh5+ Kf8
21 Be3 with a substantial positional
advantage for White.

Robert M. Snyder

69

18 Re1?

20 Qh5+

White meets Blacks threat of playing


18 Bxb3 by removing his Rook from
attack by Whites Queen. However,
White missed a quick win with 18 e5!,
because of the continuation 18 Bxb3
(or if 18 Nd5, then 19 c4 Ne3 20
exf6 Rg8 21 Ne4 Nxf1 22 Nxc5 Qa5
23 Qd4! Qd8 24 Qe4 and its curtains!)
19 exf6 Rg8 20 axb3! Qxa1 21 Ne4
Qa2 22 fxe7+ Bxe7 23 Bg5 Bxg5 24
Nxg5 with a crushing attack.

Whites Queen now comes back to


the active attacking post on h5 and
takes advantage of Blacks white square
weaknesses. This move also drives
Blacks King back to f8 where he
cuts off communication between his
Rooks.

18 Re8
Black attempts to defend on the
kingside by bringing his Rook into play
on the e file. However, Blacks more
serious problem is that his Queen is far
removed from helping on the kingside.
Therefore, it would have been prudent
to get the Queen back into play with
18 Qd3. After 18 Qd3 the game
might continue 19 Nf3 Bxb3 20 axb3
Qxc3 21 Bd2 Qxb3 22 Rab1 Qf7
23 Rxb7 and White still has a clear
advantage.
19 Bxf7
White removes one of Blacks important
kingside defenders leaving him weakened
on the White squares.
19 Kxf7
Black recovers the Bishop.

20 Kf8
Black gets his King out of attack while
defending his Rook on e8. Not 20
g6??, because of 21 fxg6+ hxg6 22
Qxc5.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdriw4}
{0pdwhw0p}
{qdpdw0wd}
{dwgwdPdQ}
{wdwdPdwd}
{dw)wdwdw}
{PdwHWdP)}
{$wGw$wdK}
vllllllllV

Diagram 71. Position after 20 Kf8.

21 Nb3
White attacks Blacks Bishop on c5
and opens the c1-h6 diagonal for his
Bishop. Once again, commencing an
immediate attack with the e Pawn
is stronger. After 21 e5, White has
attacking plans whether Black captures
or not:

70

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

1. 21 Nd5 22 e6 Re7 23 Ne4 Qc4


24 Nxc5 Qxc5 25 c4! Nc7 (or if
25 Qxc4, then 26 Ba3) 26 a4
threatening 27 Ba3.
2. 21 fxe5 22 f6 Ng6 (if 22
gxf6, then 23 Ne4) 23 Ne4 Qc4 24
fxg7+ Kxf7 25 Bh6+ Kg8 26 Nf6+
Kf7 27 Rf1 and the end is near for
Black.
21 Qc4
Black defends his Bishop and begins to
get his Queen back into play.
22 Bf4
White develops his Bishop to the h3b8 diagonal and connects his Rooks
on the first rank.
22 Ba3?
Black shouldnt remove his Bishop from
the important a7-g1 diagonal, which
would keep Whites Knight out of d4.
Better is 22 Bb6, though after 23
Rad1 White retains a nice advantage.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

23 Nd4

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdriw4}
{0pdwhw0p}
{wdpdw0wd}
{dwdwdPdQ}
{wdqHPGwd}
{gw)wdwdw}
{PdwdWdP)}
{$wdw$wdK}
vllllllllV
Diagram 72. Position after 23 Nd4.

Whites Knight joins in on the attack


against Blacks King threatening 24
Ne6+.
23 Qf7
Ah! Finally, Blacks Queen comes to
the kingside in an attempt to rescue
the situation. But, at this point Black
only delays the inevitable. If Black plays
23 g6, then White would continue
with 24 fxg6 Nxg6 25 Nf5! planning to
meet 25 Nxf4 with 26 Qh6+ Kf7 27
Qxf4 and Black has a lost position.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
24 Ne6+
Whites Knight sinks into its killer
outpost and continues the assault
against Blacks King.

Robert M. Snyder

24 Kg8

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdrdk4}
{0pdwhq0p}
{wdpdN0wd}
{dwdwdPdQ}
{wdwdPGwd}
{gw)wdwdw}
{PdwdWdP)}
{$wdw$wdK}
vllllllllV

Diagram 73. Position after 24 Kg8.

Black gets his King out of attack in this


forced situation. See if you can find
Whites best move here without looking
at the next move in the game
25 Qd1!
This is an awesome repositioning move!
White avoids the Queen exchange and
threatens to win Blacks Bishop with 26
Qb3.
25 Ng6
Black attempts to complicate matters
and gain some breathing space.
Other tries also fail:
1. If 25 Nc8, then 26 Nd8
planning to meet 26 Qc4 with
27 Qd7.
2. If 25 b6, then 26 Nd8 Qc4 (26
Qf8? 27 Qb3+) 27 Qd7 Kf8
28 Rad1 with the idea of cracking

71

Black open with 29 e5 and Black


is dying.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
26 Nd8

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwHrdk4}
{0pdwdq0p}
{wdpdw0nd}
{dwdwdPdw}
{wdwdPGwd}
{gw)wdwdw}
{PdwdWdP)}
{$wdQ$wdK}
vllllllllV
Diagram 74. Position after 26 Nd8.

This move attacks Blacks Queen and


leaves Blacks Knight under attack on
g6. Black has no defense and resigned
here:
1. If 26 Qc4, then simply 27
fxg6.
2. If 26 Qe7, then Black is losing
badly after 27 Qb3+ Kf8 28 Ne6+
Kg8 29 Nc7+ Kf8 30 fxg6.

LESSON 9

person. Many people jokingly called


him the strongest chess player in the
world. In spite of his loss to Tarrasch in
this game he ended up placing fourth
in the Dresden tournament.

A Deep Opening Trap


Tarrasch vs. Marco
Dresden, 1892
Opening: Ruy Lopez

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 d6

Black uses the Steinitz Variation of the


Ruy Lopez, an opening that commits
Black to a cramped position. For this
reason it is rarely seen at the Master level
today. This game is a good example of
how Whites Bishop on b5 indirectly
applies pressure to Blacks Pawn on
e5.
Black falls into a deep opening trap after
making what appears to be a perfectly
normal and safe move. Little did Black
dream that castling would result in the
loss of material.
Siegbert Tarrasch (1862-1934), was a
dedicated medical doctor who was also
a very successful tournament player, a
challenger for the world championship
and the author of the famous books
The Game of Chess and Three Hundred
Games of Chess. His quote, the threat is
stronger than the execution is often true
in practice. However, in this game the
opposite is true. By underestimating
and not reacting to Whites threat on
e5 the execution of the threat wins.
Georg Marco (1863-1923), an Austrian
Master, was a large and very muscular

Known as the Steinitz Variation, Black


subjects him self to a cramped position
from the start by restricting his Bishop
on f8. This move adds protection
to Blacks Pawn on e5 and frees his
Bishop on the c8-h3 diagonal.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1kgn4}
{0p0wdp0p}
{wdn0wdwd}
{dBdw0wdw}
{wdwdPdwd}
{dwdwdNdw}
{P)P)W)P)}
{$NGQIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 75. Position after 3 d6.

4 d4
Against passive play, and when given the
opportunity, take command of the center!
White frees his Bishop on the c1-h6
diagonal, allows his Queen to exert
pressure along the d file and threatens
Blacks e Pawn.

-72-

Robert M. Snyder

73

4 Bd7

5 Nf6

Black develops his Bishop while at the


same time defending and breaking the
pin on his Knight at c6. If Black tries
4 exd4, then White gets a good game
with either:
1. 5 Nxd4 Bd7 6 Nc3 transposing
into main lines, or
2. 5 Qxd4 Bd7 (or if 5 Nge7, then
6 Bg5 a6 7 Bxc6+ Nxc6 8 Qd2 Be7
9 Nc3 Bxg5 10 Nxg5 0-0 11 0-00) 6 Bxc6 Bxc6 7 Nc3 Nf6 8 Bg5
Be7 9 0-0-0 0-0 10 Rhe1 Re8 11
Kb1.

Black continues with his minor piece


development and attacks Whites
unprotected e Pawn.

5 0-0
White removes his King from the
center and activates his kingside Rook.
An excellent alternative is the straightforward developing move 5 Nc3, which
might continue 5 exd4 (or if 5
Nf6, then 6 Bxc6 Bxc6 7 Qd3 exd4
8 Nxd4 Bd7 9 Bg5 Be7 10 0-0-0) 6
Nxd4 g6 (or if 6 Nf6, then 7 0-0
Be7 8 Bxc6 bxc6 9 Qf3 0-0 10 Re1 Re8
11 Bg5) 7 Be3 Bg7 8 Qd2 Nf6 9 Bxc6
bxc6 10 Bh6 and now:
1. If 10 0-0, then 11 Bxg7 Kxg7
12 0-0-0 Re8 13 f3 Rb8 14 g4.
2. If 10 Bxh6, then 11 Qxh6 Ng4
12 Qd2 Qh4 13 g3 Qh3 14 f3 0-0
15 0-0-0 and White stands better
in both variations.

6 Nc3

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{rdw1kgw4}
{0p0bdp0p}
{wdn0whwd}
{dBdw0wdw}
{wdw)Pdwd}
{dwHwdNdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$wGQdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 76. Position after 6 Nc3.

White also continues with this minor


piece development and defends his e
Pawn. A very attempting approach may
be to drive back Blacks Knight with 5
d5. This would certainly give White a
nice spatial advantage. However, after 5
d5 Ne7 it is difficult to take advantage
of it. The problem is that the position
becomes closed.
As a general rule: When you already have
an advantage in space, releasing pressure
on the opponent and closing off lines makes
it more difficult to exploit your advantage.
6 Be7
Black continues with his minor piece
development and prepares to castle.

74

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

7 Re1

8 Bxc6

White brings his Rook to the center file


and reinforces his e Pawn. This is a
safe and sound idea in many variations
of the Ruy Lopez.

This is the beginning of a long


combination that wins at least a Pawn.
White removes an important defender
of Blacks Pawn on e5.

7 0-0?

8 Bxc6

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdw1w4kd}
{0p0bgp0p}
{wdn0whwd}
{dBdw0wdw}
{wdw)Pdwd}
{dwHwdNdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$wGQ$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 77. Position after 7 0-0.

Black gets his King into safety, but


neglects responding to Whites pressure
on his e Pawn. It would be better
for Black to release the tension on his
e Pawn with 7 exd4 8 Nxd4 0-0,
transposing into the analysis to Whites
fifth move. The move Marco plays falls
into the famous Dresden Trap (also
known as the Tarrasch Trap). Of course,
the trap got its name from this game.
Tarrasch prepared the analysis in
advance and waited for someone to get
this position so he could spring it on
them.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

Black recovers his piece, brings his


Bishop into play, and attacks Whites
Pawn on e4. See if you can find
Whites best move here without looking
at the next move in the game.
9 dxe5
White captures and wins Blacks e
Pawn.
9 dxe5

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdw1w4kd}
{0p0wgp0p}
{wdbdwhwd}
{dwdw0wdw}
{wdwdPdwd}
{dwHwdNdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$wGQ$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 78. Position after 9 dxe5.

Black removes the threat on his Knight


and attempts to avoid the loss of a
Pawn by capturing Whites e Pawn.
See if you can find Whites best move

Robert M. Snyder

75

here without looking at the next move


in the game.

concede the loss of a Pawn and retreat


his Bishop with 11 Bd7.

10 Qxd8

12 Nxe4

White initiates the Queen exchange


to avoid allowing Black to make the
exchange; this would require White to
recapture and remove a piece from the
defense of his e Pawn.
It would be a mistake to immediately
capture Blacks e Pawn with 10 Nxe5
because of 10 Qxd1 11 Rxd1 Bxe4
12 Nxe4 Nxe4 13 Re1 Nd6 and Black
has avoided the loss of a Pawn with an
almost equal position.

White continues with his planned


combination, which will result in the
win of at least the exchange (where
a Knight or Bishop is exchanged
for a Rook). With this move White
anticipates Blacks recapture. It results
in a Blacks Knight and Bishop being
lined up on e file. They will then
become targets for Whites Rook on
e1.
12 Nxe4

10 Raxd8
Black recovers his Queen and brings
his Rook onto the open d file. It will
become apparent as to why recapturing
with the queenside Rook and keeping
the other Rook on the f file is best,
but only when we get to move 15!
11 Nxe5
White wins Blacks e Pawn and
threatens to double and isolate Blacks
Pawns with 12 Nxc6.
11 Bxe4?
Black is under the illusion that he can
recover his Pawn. Blacks attempt to
avoid losing a Pawn will result in the
loss of even more material. Black should

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{wdw4w4kd}
{0p0wgp0p}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwdwHwdw}
{wdwdndwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$wGw$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 79. Position after 12 Nxe4.

Black recovers his piece. See if you can


find Whites best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.
13 Nd3!
This is the key move behind the trap!
White blocks Blacks Rook on the d

76

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

file and now Whites Rook is free to have


a meal along the e file where Blacks
unprotected Knight and Bishop reside.
Capturing Whites Knight immediately
with 13 Rxe4?? would have resulted in
a back rank mate after 13 Rd1+ 14
Re1 Rxe1++.
13 f5
Black defends his Knight on e4. It
was threatened by Whites Rook. See
if you can find Whites best move here
without looking at the next move in the
game.
14 f3
White attacks Blacks Knight and it
cannot move because of Blacks Bishop
being unprotected on e7.
14 Bc5+
Black removes his Bishop from the e
file. At a glance, this counter-attack
may appear to save the day for Black.
However, a deeper look will reveal
that White has a series of moves with
the final moves being a Bishop fork
combined with a Pawn attack that wins
the exchange. Perhaps the lesser of the
evils would be to obtain two Pawns
for a Knight with 14 Bh4 15 g3
Nxg3 16 hxg3 Bxg3. But, Black would
have immediately sentenced himself to
slower death.

See if you can find Whites best move


here without looking at the next move
in the game.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdw4w4kd}
{0p0wdw0p}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwgwdpdw}
{wdwdndwd}
{dwdNdPdw}
{P)PdWdP)}
{$wGw$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 80. Position after 14 Bc5.

15 Nxc5
After Black recaptures, his Knight on
c5 and Rook on f8 will be set up
for a nice fork. This brings us back to
Blacks 10th move where he had a choice
of which Rook to use for the recapture.
Note that if White now played 15
Kf1, then Black could play 15 Bb6
planning to meet 16 fxe4 with 16
fxe4+ (ah!the purpose of having the
Rook on the f file becomes clear) 17
Nf4 e3 18 g3 g5 and Black recovers his
piece and lives!
15 Nxc5
Black recovers his piece. See if you can
find Whites best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.

Robert M. Snyder

16 Bg5

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{wdw4w4kd}
{0p0wdw0p}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwhwdpGw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwdwdPdw}
{P)PdWdP)}
{$wdw$wIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 81. Position after 16 Bg5.

Whites Bishop springs into action; it


attacks Blacks Rook on d8, and it
threatens to fork Blacks Rook on f8
and the Knight by 17 Be7.
16 Rd5
Black gets his Rook out of attack and
defends his Knight. See if you can find
Whites best move here without looking
at the next move in the game.
17 Be7
White attacks Blacks Rook on f8 and
Knight on c5.
The proper order of moves is important.
If White first tries to keep Blacks Rook
away from the defense of his Knight
with 17 c4, then Black is left with some
resources after 17 Rd4 planning to
meet 18 Be7 with 18 Nd3.

77

17 Re8
Black gets his Rook out of attack. See
if you can find Whites best move here
without looking at the next move in the
game.
18 c4

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{wdwdrdkd}
{0p0wGw0p}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwhrdpdw}
{wdPdwdwd}
{dwdwdPdw}
{P)wdWdP)}
{$wdw$wIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 82. Position after 18 c4.

White threatens Blacks Rook, which


is the only defender of Blacks Knight
on c5. This results in the win of the
exchange. At the master level, especially
in the endgame, this is a lost position.
Black resigned here.
If Black played on, his best move would
be 18 Kf7. This is met by 19 cxd5
Rxe7 20 Rac1.

LESSON 10

This is Blacks most common move


here. Black attacks Whites Bishop and
forces it to either capture on c6 or
retreat.

Surprise Diagonals
Jasper Rom vs. Robert Snyder
July, 2001
Opening: Ruy Lopez

4 Bxc6

Blacks Bishops come into play with


devastating effect on two occasions.
Often the most natural and common
development of a Bishop is best.
However, Blacks apparently dormant
Bishop suddenly springs to life on an
unsuspected diagonal and forces the win
of the exchange. This game also shows
how to take advantage of a misplaced
Rook in the opening.
A careful study of the analysis in this
game will reveal a couple of excellent
ways to handle the Exchange Variation
of the Ruy Lopez.
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6

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{rdb1kgn4}
{dp0pdp0p}
{pdndwdwd}
{dBdw0wdw}
{wdwdPdwd}
{dwdwdNdw}
{P)P)W)P)}
{$NGQIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 83. Position after 3 a6.

White initiates the Exchange Variation.


White exchanges his Bishop for Blacks
Knight and doubles Blacks Pawns. In
return for having doubled Pawns, Black
has the Bishop pair.
Whites most common move, 4 Ba4 will
be examined in LESSONS ELEVEN &
TWELVE and is covered in LESSONS
TEN, ELEVEN & TWELVE in
Unbeatable Chess Lessons.
4 dxc6
Black recovers his piece. Usually it is
best to capture toward the center, but
here it is more important for Black
to free his Queen on the d file and
Bishop on the c8-h3 diagonal. If
Black captures toward the center with 4
bxc6, White is clearly better after 5
Nc3 d6 6 d4 f6 (or if 6 exd4, then 7
Nxd4 Bd7 8 0-0 Nf6 9 Qf3) 7 Be3 Ne7
8 0-0 Ng6 9 Qd3.
5 0-0
White gets his King out of the center
and activates his Rook. This move is
considered best by theory and threatens
6 Nxe5.

-78-

Robert M. Snyder

We will now examine some other


possible moves for White:
1. 5 Nxe5 is weak because of 5
Qd4 6 Nf3 Qxe4+ 7 Qe2 Qxe2+ 8
Kxe2.
2. 5 d4 exd4 6 Qxd4 (if 6 Nxd4?, then
6 c5 followed by exchanging
Queens after Whites Knight
moves) Qxd4 7 Nxd4 Bd7 8 Be3
0-0-0 9 Nd2 (or if 9 Nc3, then 9
Re8 10 0-0-0 Bb4 11 Nde2 f5
12 exf5 Bxf5 13 a3 Bd6 with about
even chances) Ne7 10 0-0-0 Ng6
with an even game.
3. 5 Nc3 f6 6 d4 exd4 7 Nxd4 (or if 7
Qxd4, then 7 Qxd4 8 Nxd4 c5
9 Nde2 Be6 10 Nf4 Bf7 11 Nfd5
0-0-0 12 Bf4 Ne7! planning to
meet 13 Nxc7 with 13 g5 14
Bg3 f5 15 Be5 Rg8, and 13 0-0-0
with 13 Nxd5 14 Nxd5 Bxd5
15 Rxd5 Rxd5 16 exd5 c4 with a
fairly even endgame) c5 8 Nde2
Qxd1+ 9 Nxd1 Be6 10 Bf4 0-00 11 Ne3 Ne7 12 Rd1 Rxd1+ 13
Kxd1 g5 14 Bg3 Bg7 with an even
game.

79

5 Qd6

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdbdkgn4}
{dp0wdp0p}
{pdp1wdwd}
{dwdw0wdw}
{wdwdPdwd}
{dwdwdNdw}
{P)P)W)P)}
{$NGQdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 84. Position after 5 Qd6.

Black defends his e Pawn with his


Queen. This also begins to clear the
way for the possibility of Black castling
on the queenside. From d6 the Queen
has the ability to quickly reposition
herself on the kingside.
Another interesting line that I like to
show to my students begins with 5
Bg4. Black uses a pin to take care of the
threat on his e Pawn. This leads to
some very instructive tactics. After 5
Bg4, the line continues 6 h3 h5 (weak
is 6 Bxf3 because after 7 Qxf3 Black
still has his doubled Pawns but no longer
has the Bishop pair as compensation) 7
d3 (not 7 hxg4? because of 7 hxg4
planning to meet 8 Nxe5? with 8
Qh4 9 f4 g3 and White cannot prevent
mateafter 7 d3 White is threatening
8 hxg4 hxg4 9 Ng5) Qf6 8 Nbd2 (again
not 8 hxg4? because of 8 hxg4 9

80

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Ng5 Qh6, and not 8 Bg5?? because 8


Bxf3 wins a piece) Ne7 9 Re1 Ng6
10 d4 (if 10 hxg4, then 10 hxg4 11
Nh2 Bc5!) Bd6 11 hxg4 hxg4 12 Nh2
Rxh2 13 Qxg4,
If White tries 13 Kxh2, Black plays
13 Qxf2 threatening 14 Ke7
followed by 15 Rh8++. So,
after 13 Kxh2 Qxf2 we have the
following interesting possibilities:
14 Re2 exd4+ 15 e5 Bxe5+ 16
Kh1 Qh4+ 17 Kg1 0-0-0.
14 Qe2 exd4+ 15 e5 Bxe5+
16 Kh1 Qh4+ 17 Kg1 Qh2+
18 Kf1 Qh1+ 19 Kf2 g3+ 20
Kf3 Qh5+ 21 Ke4 f5+ 22 Kd3
Nf4+.
Rh4 14 Qf5 Rf4! 15 Qxf6 Rxf6 16 Nf3
Re6 and Blacks active pieces provide
compensation for his doubled Pawns.
6 d3
White frees his Bishop on the c1-h6
diagonal, gives his Knight the option
of going to d2 and defends his e
Pawn. We will now take a look at other
possible lines:
1. 6 c3 Bg4 is covered in LESSON
NINE in Unbeatable Chess Lessons.
2. 6 d4. Black ends up with a
comfortable game after 6 exd4
7 Nxd4 Bd7 8 Be3 (or if 8 Nc3,
then 8 0-0-0 9 Be3 Qg6 10 Qe2
Nh6 11 Rad1 Bd6 12 f3 Rhe8) 00-0 9 Nd2 Nh6 10 f3 f5.

And if 6 exd4 7 Qxd4, then 7


Bg4 planning to meet:
8 Be3 with 8 Bxf3 9 Qxd6
cxd6 10 gxf3 Ne7 11 Nc3
Ng6.
8 Qe3 with 8 Ne7 9 Nbd2
Ng6 10 h3 Bd7 11 Nc4 Qc5
12 Qxc5 Bxc5 13 Be3 Be7.
3. 6 Na3 b5 7 c3 c5 8 Nc2 Ne7 9 d4
(or if 9 a4, then 9 b4 10 Ne3
Nc6) cxd4 10 cxd4 exd4 11 Nfxd4
c5 12 Nb3 Qxd1 13 Rxd1 Nc6 14
Be3 c4 15 Nc5 f5 is approximately
even.

6 f6
Black reinforces his e Pawn and
prevents White from moving his
Knight to g5 to attack Blacks Bishop
if it develops to e6. This also allows
for support of the advance of Blacks g
Pawn if Black wants to execute a Pawn
storm after castling queenside.
A stronger alternative for Black is to
immediately develop with 6 Ne7,
which has two main lines:
1. 7 Be3 Ng6 8 Nbd2 Be7 9 d4 (if 9
Qe2, then 9 0-0 10 Nc4 Qe6 is
equal) exd4 10 Nxd4 (if 10 Nc4,
then 10 Qb4 11 Qxd4 c5 12
Qd3 Be6 13 b3 0-0 and Black
stands slightly better) Ne5 11 h3
c5 12 N4b3 (or 12 Ne2 0-0 with
an even game) b6 13 f4 Nc6 with
approximate equality.

Robert M. Snyder

2. 7 Nbd2 Ng6 8 Nc4 Qf6 9 d4 (or


if 9 Bg5, then 9 Qe6 10 Bd2
Bc5 and now either 11 Be3 or 11
b4 allows 11 Be7 with an equal
game) exd4 10 Bg5 Qe6 11 Qxd4
f6 12 Rad1 Be7 13 Be3 0-0 with an
even game.
7 Be3
White develops his Bishop to its most
active and available post. Developing
the Knight by 7 Nbd2 is not as strong
for White. After 7 Nbd2 the game
might continue 7 Be6 8 Nc4 Qd7
9 Be3 Ne7 10 Qe2 Ng6 11 Rfd1 (if 11
d4, then 11 Bg4 planning to meet
12 dxe5 with 12 Nh4 threatening
13 Bxf3 14 gxf3 Qh3 with mate to
follow on g2) Bf7 12 h3 Be7 13 d4
Qe6 14 Ncd2 0-0 with an even game.
7 c5

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdbdkgn4}
{dp0wdw0p}
{pdw1w0wd}
{dw0w0wdw}
{wdwdPdwd}
{dwdPGNdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$NdQdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 85. Position after 7 c5.

Black increases his foothold on the


important d4 square and opens

81

c6 for possible use by his Knight.


Aggressive development by 7 Bg4
(to pin Whites Knight on f3) favors
White. After 7 Bg4 the game might
continue 8 h3 Bh5 (or if 8 Be6, then
9 d4 0-0-0 10 Nbd2 Ne7 11 dxe5 fxe5
12 Qe2 Ng6 13 Rfd1) 9 Qe2 0-0-0 10
Nbd2 and Whites lead in development
combined with the coming queenside
Pawn storm gives him the advantage.
8 a4
The logic behind this move for White
is to post a Knight on c4 and restrain
Black from being able to drive the
Knight away with b5. However, it
would be better for White to continue
to develop with 8 Nbd2, this might
continue 8 Be6 9 Nc4 Qc6 10 Nfd2
Ne7 11 a4 b6 (if 11 Ng6, then 12
Na5 is strong) 12 f4 exf4 13 Bxf4 Ng6
14 Qh5 and White stands slightly
better.
8 Ne7
Black develops his Knight. From e7
he has the option of moving toward
c6 to cover the queenside and attack
the important d4 square, or going
to g6 to attack f4 and assist on the
kingside. The fact that Blacks Bishop
on f8 is blocked is only a temporary
problem.

82

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

9 Qe2
Whites Queen is actively posted on
e2; this adds coverage to the c4
square and allows the Rooks to be
connected on the first rank after the
Knight on b1 is developed. A good
alternative is to continue with normal
development with 9 Nbd2 with the
idea of going to c4. After 9 Nbd2
Black would do best to continue with
his plan to maneuver his Knight to
cover d4 by 9 Nc6 with an equal
game.
9 Nc6
Black brings his Knight toward the
queenside where it attacks the important
d4 square.
10 c3
White attempts to keep Blacks
Knight out of d4 by attacking the
square with his Pawn. However, since
this weakens the Pawn on d3 it is
better to continue developing with 10
Nbd2 Be6 11 Nc4 Qd7 with an equal
game.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdbdkgw4}
{dp0wdw0p}
{pdn1w0wd}
{dw0w0wdw}
{PdwdPdwd}
{dw)PGNdw}
{w)wdQ)P)}
{$NdwdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 86. Position after 10 c3.

10 Be6
Black develops his Bishop to the g8-a2
diagonal. An even stronger alternative
is to take advantage of Whites weak d
Pawn by playing 10 f5. After 10
f5 Black would be clearly better after
either 11 exf5 Bxf5 or 11 Na3 f4 12
Nc4 Qf6.
11 Rd1
White defends his weak d Pawn
in anticipation of Black increasing
the pressure on it along the d file.
However, since the Rook becomes a
target on d1 it would be better to
play 11 Na3 0-0-0 12 Rfd1 Bb3 13
Nc4 Qd7 14 Rd2 Be7 where Blacks
advantage is minimal.
See if you can find Blacks best move
without looking at the next move in the
game.

Robert M. Snyder

11 Bb3
Black takes advantage of Whites white
square weaknesses and the hole on b3.
Black now attacks Whites Rook and
forces it to move to an inferior square.
12 Rd2

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdkgw4}
{dp0wdw0p}
{pdn1w0wd}
{dw0w0wdw}
{PdwdPdwd}
{db)PGNdw}
{w)w$Q)P)}
{$NdwdwIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 87. Position after 12 Rd2.

Whites Rook is awkwardly placed here;


it is more likely to become a target and
cuts off the retreat of Whites Bishop
on e3. Better is 12 Rc1, but after 12
0-0-0 Black still has the superior
position.
12 Nd4
Blacks Knight takes the strong outpost
on d4, attacks Whites Queen and
threatens to go to c2. This isnt a true
sacrifice since Black can immediately
recover his piece. Note that this move
wouldnt have been possible if White

83

had played 12 Rc1 leaving a retreat


open for his Bishop on e3.
Also strong here for Black is 12 Qe6
planning to meet 13 a5 with 13 Bd6,
or 13 d4 with 13 Na5. In either case
Black has a clear advantage.
13 Bxd4
White has no choice but to eliminate
Blacks aggressive Knight. The other
reasonable alternative, 13 cxd4, also
gives Black a clear advantage. After 13
cxd4 the game might continue 13
cxd4 14 Bxd4 exd4 15 Na3 Qd7 16
Nc2 c5 17 a5 Bd6 18 Ra3 Be6 and
Black has two Bishops against two
Knights. If White gets pushy here and
plays 19 e5, Black can sacrifice a couple
of Pawns for a nice attack after 19
Bc7 20 exf6 0-0 21 fxg7 Rf5.
13 cxd4
Black recovers his piece, undoubles
his Pawns and opens up the f8-a3
diagonal. Black is clearly better. He has
the Bishop pair and more space.
As previously mentioned Whites Rook
is in an awkward position, blocks the
use of the d2 square and is a possible
target.

84

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

14 Nh4?

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{rdwdkgw4}
{dp0wdw0p}
{pdw1w0wd}
{dwdw0wdw}
{Pdw0PdwH}
{db)Pdwdw}
{w)w$Q)P)}
{$NdwdwIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 88. Position after 14 Nh4.

Whites idea of opening up the d1-h5


diagonal for his Queen and attacking the
f5 and g6 squares with his Knight
serves little constructive purpose. White
needed to concern himself with more
important matters at hand, which will
be pointed out in the coming moves. It
will soon become apparent that opening
up the e2 square with 14 Qe1 would
be better.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
14 g6!
At first glance it may appear that the
reasons for this move are to block the
h5-e8 diagonal and to prevent Blacks
Knight from being able to enter f5.
However, a second look will reveal that
the real reason for this move is to free

Blacks Bishop on f8 so that it can go


to h6.
15 c4
White is attempting to trap Blacks
Bishop on b3 by cutting off its retreat.
However, White would have stood a
better chance of survival after 15 cxd4
exd4 16 Qf1 Qb4.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
15 Qb4
This move quickly kills any ideas White
has of trapping Blacks Bishop on b3.
At b4 Blacks Queen:
1. Attacks Whites a Pawn a second
time.
2. Defends the Bishop on b3.
3. Applies pressure along the a5-e1
diagonal.
4. Attacks Whites Rook on d2.
5. Has potential threats of a back rank
mate on e1.
16 a5
White eliminates the threat on his a
Pawn. See if you can find Blacks best
move here without looking at the next
move in the game.

Robert M. Snyder

16 Bh6

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdkdw4}
{dp0wdwdp}
{pdwdw0pg}
{)wdw0wdw}
{w1P0PdwH}
{dbdPdwdw}
{w)w$Q)P)}
{$NdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 89. Position after 16 Bh6.

Black attacks Whites Rook and wins


the exchange. White resigned here.

85

LESSON 11

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1kgn4}
{dp0pdp0p}
{pdndwdwd}
{dwdw0wdw}
{BdwdPdwd}
{dwdwdNdw}
{P)P)W)P)}
{$NGQIwdR}
vllllllllV

Surviving the
Marshall Gambit
Badzarani vs. Malinin
Correspondence, 1991-1993
Opening: Ruy Lopez
The Marshall Gambit is one of the
most complicated and deeply analyzed
openings. It is still seen at the Master
level today and it offers Black an
opportunity, at the cost of a Pawn,
to have the initiative against the Ruy
Lopez.
White must play carefully because
some of the lines are very sharp and the
slightest slip can be fatal. In practice,
the Marshall is not easy to handle.
However, with careful play and an
understanding of the critical lines of this
opening, White can survive and have a
small advantage. This game contains
instructive tactics in both the opening
and middlegame. Hang on and enjoy
the ride!

Diagram 90. Position after 4 Ba4.

White gets his Bishop out of attack and


maintains pressure along the a4-e8
diagonal. It would be weak to play 4
Bc4? because, after 4 Nf6, Black can
head into similar variations of the Two
Knights Defense where his extra Pawn
move (a6) will be useful.
4 Nf6
Black develops his Knight with an
attack on Whites e Pawn. If Black
plays 4 d6, White comes out on top
after 5 0-0 Bd7 (or if 5 Bg4, then 6
h3 h5 7 d4 b5 8 Bb3 Nxd4 9 hxg4 hxg4
10 Ng5 Nh6 11 Bd5 c6 12 c3 cxd5 13
cxd4 Be7 14 Qd2 dxe4 15 dxe5) 6 d4
Nf6 (or if 6 b5, then 7 Bb3 exd4 8
a4) 7 c3 Be7 (or if 7 g6, then 8 Re1
Qe7 9 Nbd2 Bg7 10 Nf1 0-0 11 Ng3)
8 Re1 0-0 9 Nbd2 Re8 10 h3 Bf8 11 a3
g6 12 Bb3 Bg7 13 Ba2.

-86-

Robert M. Snyder

87

5 0-0

6 b5

White removes his King from the center


and activates his Rook. Less common
variations are:
1. 5 Bxc6 dxc6 6 d3 Bd6 7 Nbd2
Be6.
2. 5 d4 exd4 6 0-0 Be7 7 e5 (or if 7
Re1, then 7 0-0 8 e5 Ne8) Ne4
8 Nxd4 Nxd4 9 Qxd4 Nc5.
3. 5 Nc3 b5 6 Bb3 Be7.

Black defends against Whites threat to


capture his Knight on c6 by driving
away Whites Bishop.

5 Be7
Black develops his Bishop and shields
his King on the e file. The Open
Variation with 5 Nxe4 is covered
in LESSON TEN in Unbeatable Chess
Lessons.
6 Re1
White uses his Rook to defend his e
Pawn and to keep open the option of
gaining a nice Pawn center by moving
his Pawns to c3 followed by d4.
White now threatens to win a Pawn
with 7 Bxc6 followed by 8 Nxe5.
Some less common variations are:
1. 6 Bxc6 dxc6 7 d3 Nd7 8 Nbd2 0-0
9 Nc4 f6.
2. 6 Qe2 b5 7 Bb3 0-0 8 c3 and now
Black has the choice of offering a
gambit with 8 d5, or being more
conservative and playing 8 d6.

7 Bb3

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{dBdwdNdw}
{P)P)W)P)}
{$NGQ$wIw}
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Diagram 91. Position after 7 Bb3.

White gets his Bishop out of attack.


7 0-0
Black removes his King from the
center and keeps open the option of
where he will place his d Pawn. The
alternative7 d6 (which frequently
transposes into 7 0-0) will be covered
in LESSON TWELVE and is covered
in LESSONS ELEVEN and TWELVE
in Unbeatable Chess Lesson.
8 c3
White opens a retreat for his Bishop
on c2 and prepares to support the
placement of a Pawn on d4. If White
played 8 a4 (threatening 9 axb5), Black

88

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

achieves easy equality after 8 Bb7 9


d3 d6 10 Nc3 Na5 11 Ba2 b4 12 Ne2
c5.
8 d5
Black initiates the Marshall Gambit
(also called the Marshall Attack).
Here 8 d6, mentioned on Blacks last
move, would transpose into main Ruy
Lopez lines. A frequently repeated story
is that the famous American Champion
Frank Marshall spent years preparing to
use this new move against the soon to
be World Champion Jose Capablanca.
Marshall finally got his chance to
play it against Capablanca in 1918 at
New Yorks Manhattan Chess Clubs
Master Tournament. Unfortunately for
Marshall, after all that preparation, he
lost.
Black aggressively attacks in the center
with 8 d5, threatens Whites e
Pawn and frees his Bishop on the c8h3 diagonal. Black is willing to sacrifice
a Pawn to obtain lasting pressure and
attacking chances on the kingside.
9 exd5
White removes the threat on his e
Pawn by exchanging it for Blacks d
Pawn and threatens Blacks Knight on
c6. This also opens up Whites Rook
on the e file and attacks Blacks e
Pawn a second time. Whites only hope

to obtain an advantage is to accept


Blacks gambit.
Passive defense of the e Pawn by 9 d3
gives Black a comfortable game after 9
dxe4 10 dxe4 Qxd1 11 Bxd1 Bb7
12 Nbd2 Rfd8.
White also fails to get an advantage
with an aggressive attack in the center
by 9 d4. After 9 exd4 10 exd5 (if 10
e5, then 10 Ne4 11 Nxd4 Nxe5 12
f3 c5 13 fxe4 cxd4 and now either 14
exd5 Bd6 15 Bf4 Re8, or 14 Bxd5 dxc3
planning to meet 15 Bxa8 with 15
Bc5+ 16 Kh1 Nd3 17 Qe2 Bg4 18 Qf1
cxb2 19 Bxb2 Nf2+ 20 Kg1 Nxe4+
21 Kh1 Ng3+ 22 hxg3 Qg5) Nxd5
11 cxd4 Bg4 12 h3 Bh5 13 Nc3 Nb6
Black has an even game.

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{dB)wdNdw}
{P)w)W)P)}
{$NGQ$wIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 92. Position after 9 exd5.

9 Nxd5
Black recovers his Pawn and posts his
Knight actively in the center. White
gets a clear advantage after 9 e4 10
dxc6 exf3 11 d4 fxg2 12 Qf3.

Robert M. Snyder

89

10 Nxe5

11 c6

White accepts the gambit Pawn and


threatens Blacks Knight on c6.
White has to take the Pawn now or the
opportunity disappears and Black gets a
comfortable game.

This is the most constructive way of


taking care of Whites threat on the
Knight. Black defends his Knight with
a second piece thereby maintaining it at
the active post on d5.
Other moves are inferior:
1. 11 Nf6 (the Knight intends to
maneuver to the strong attacking
post on g4) 12 d4 Bd6 13 Re1
Ng4 14 h3 Qh4 15 Qf3 Nxf2
(objectively best is 15 h5,
though White has a clear advantage
after 16 Re2) 16 Bd2 (weaker is 16
Qxf2 because of 16 Bh2+ 17
Kf1 Bg3, but not 16 Bg3?? 17
Qxf7+!) Bb7 17 Qxb7 Nd3 18 Re2
Qg3 19 Kf1 Qh2 (if 19 Nf4,
then 20 Re3! Qh2 21 Qc6!) 20
g4 Qxh3+ 21 Qg2 and White is
winning.
2. 11 Bb7 (Blacks Bishop actually
offers greater tactical possibilities
on the c8-h3 diagonal) 12 d4
Qd7 13 Nd2 Nf4 14 Ne4 Ng6 15
Nc5 Bxc5 16 Rxc5 Rae8 17 Bd2
and Black has little to show for
Whites extra Pawn and Bishop
pair.
3. 11 Nb6 (moving the Knight
further away from the kingside is
not in keeping with Blacks idea
of a kingside attack and makes
Whites job of defense on the

10 Nxe5
Black takes care of the threat on his
Knight by exchanging it and drawing
Whites Rook out to the middle of the
board where it will be a target. Threats
against Whites Rook on e5 will give
Black an extra tempo and thereby gain
time to obtain attacking chances on the
kingside.
11 Rxe5

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{P)w)W)P)}
{$NGQdwIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 93. Position after 11 Rxe5.

White recovers his Knight and threatens


Blacks Knight. See if you can find
Blacks best move here without looking
at the next move in the game.

90

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

kingside easier) 12 d4 Bd6 13 Bg5


Qd7 14 Re1 Bb7 15 Nd2 Rae8 16
Be3 Nd5 17 Qh5. Black doesnt
have enough compensation for his
sacrificed Pawn.
4. 11 Nf4 (an overaggressive
attempt to use the Knight to attack
on the Kingside results in Black
obtaining no attacking chances at
all for his sacrificed Pawn) 12 d4
Ng6 13 Rh5 Bb7 14 Qg4.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
12 d4
This is certainly Whites most natural
move. White frees his Bishop on c1,
opens up d2 for use by his Knight
and occupies the center with a Pawn.
12 Bd6
Black attacks Whites Rook and
repositions his Bishop on the more
active b8-h2 diagonal. Blacks two
Bishops are aiming at the Kingside to
assist Blacks Queen with an assault on
Whites King.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

13 Re1

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{dB)wdwdw}
{P)wdW)P)}
{$NGQ$wIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 94. Position after 13 Re1.

White gets his Rook out of attack. On


e1 the Rook retains its use along the
e file, but it is no longer a target for
Blacks minor pieces.
13 Qh4
The assault begins! Black brings his
Queen to the attack on the kingside
and threatens Whites h Pawn. White
must play very precisely over the next
several moves to avoid giving Black the
advantage.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
14 g3
White blocks Blacks Bishop from its
attack on the h Pawn while attacking
Blacks Queen. This weakens the white
squares in front of Whites King, but is
the lesser evil.

Robert M. Snyder

If White plays 14 h3?, Black has a nice


Bishop sacrifice with 14 Bxh3; the
game might continue 15 gxh3 (if 15
Bxd5, then 15 cxd5 16 f4 Rae8
with an attack worth more than the
sacrificed piece) Qxh3 (threatening 16
Bh2+ 17 Kh1 Bg3+ 18 Kg1 Qh2+
19 Kf1 Qxf2++) 16 Re5 Bxe5 17 dxe5
Rae8 18 Bxd5 cxd5 19 Bf4 Re6 and
Black has a clear advantage.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
14 Qh3
Black gets his Queen out of attack and
posts her aggressively where she can
assist in the attack on Whites kingside
(she covers g2, g3 and h2). See
if you can find Whites best move here
without looking at the next move in the
game.
15 Be3

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{wdw)wdwd}
{dB)wGw)q}
{P)wdW)w)}
{$NdQ$wIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 95. Position after 15 Be3.

91

White develops his Bishop to a square


where it is not a target or in the way
of his minor piece development. Other
moves are inferior as pointed out in the
following possibilities:
1. 15 Re4 (White brings his Rook
into the center of the board with
the possibility of going to h4
to dislodge Blacks actively posted
Queen) g5 (planning to meet 16
Bxg5? with 16 Qf5 forking
Rook and Bishop) and now Black
gets excellent pressure for his Pawn
after either 16 Nd2 f5, or 16 Qf3
Bf5.
2. 15 Qf3 Bg4 16 Qg2 Qh5 17 Bxd5
(not 17 Nd2 because of 17 Rae8
and White is in serious trouble)
cxd5 18 f4 Rae8 and Black has
more than enough compensation
for his Pawn.
3. 15 Qd3 Bf5 16 Qf1 Qh5 17 Be3
Bh3 (17 Rae8 is also playable)
18 Bd1 Qf5 19 Qe2 Rae8 20 Nd2
(If 20 Qf3, then 20 Qd3 21
Bb3 Nxe3 22 fxe3 Re6) c5 21 a3
cxd4 22 cxd4 Nf4 23 Qf3 Qg6 and
Black has enough pressure for his
Pawn.
4. 15 Nd2 Bg4 16 Nf3 (if 16 f3, then
16 Bxg3 with a winning attack)
Qh5 17 Kg2 Rae8 18 Rxe8 Rxe8
19 h4 Qf5 and White is in very
bad shape.
5. 15 Bxd5 cxd5 16 Qf3 Bf5 17
Qxd5 Rae8 18 Bd2 Bd3 19 Na3

92

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Bxa3 20 bxa3 Bc4 21 Qf3 Rxe1+


22 Rxe1 Bxa2 with Bishops of
opposite colors and Whites white
square weaknesses making the
likely outcome a draw.
6. 15 Bg5 (the Bishop is a target here
and it results in a loss of time for
White) Bg4 16 Qd3 Qh5 17 Be3
Rae8 and Black has gained an
important tempo in the main line.
7. 15 Bc2 Bg4 16 Qd3 Rae8 17 Be3
f5 and Blacks attack is worth more
than a Pawn.
8. 15 a4 Bg4 16 Qd3 Rae8 17 Be3
Nxe3 18 Rxe3 Bf4 19 Rxe8 Rxe8
20 Na3 Re2 21 Qxe2 Bxe2 22 Re1
Kf8 23 Rxe2 Bc1 and Black stands
better.
15 Bg4
Black develops his Bishop and attacks
Whites Queen. Blacks Bishop aims at
taking advantage of Whites white square
weaknesses. White must continue to be
precise or suffer immediate disaster.
If Black tries to weaken Whites kingside
with 15 h5, then White comes
out on top after 16 Qf3 h4 17 Bxd5
cxd5 18 Qxd5 hxg3 19 hxg3 Bxg3 20
Qg2 Qxg2+ 21 Kxg2 Bd6 22 Nd2
f5 23 a4. Black doesnt have enough
compensation for his Pawn.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

16 Qd3
This is Whites only move to avoid a
quick loss. If White played 16 Qd2??,
Black has a forced mate after 16
Bf3. When I show this position to my
students it isnt uncommon for them to
try to block the attack on the Queen
and attack Blacks Bishop with 16 f3??.
However, this loses quickly after 16
Bxg3! 17 hxg3 (if 17 fxg4, then 17
Qxh2+ 18 Kf1 Nxe3+ 19 Rxe3 Qf2++)
Qxg3+ 18 Kf1 Bxf3.
16 Rae8
Black brings in his last piece to
concentrate his attack on the kingside.
Not only does this Rook apply pressure
on the open e file, Black has the
possibility of bringing it into the attack
along the sixth rank by placing it on
e6. Black placed the queenside Rook
on the e file, instead of his Rook
on f8, because the Rook on f8 is
already effectively placed to support the
advance of his f Pawn.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
17 Nd2
White completes his minor piece
development and connects his Rooks
on the first rank.

Robert M. Snyder

17 Re6
This is known as the Spassky
Variation. Along the sixth rank the
Rook can be shifted to directly assist
with the kingside attack.
It is less popular to immediately begin
the assault on the kingside with 17
f5. After 17 f5 the game might
continue 18 f4 Kh8 (if 18 g5, then
19 Qf1 Qh5 20 Qg2) 19 Bxd5 cxd5 20
Qf1 Qh5 21 a4 bxa4 (if 21 g5, then
22 axb5 axb5 23 fxg5 Rxe3 24 Rxe3
f4 25 gxf4 Bxf4 26 Rg3 Qxg5 27 Kh1
Bd6 28 Qg2 Bxg3 29 Qxg3 h5 30 Rf1)
22 Rxa4 g5 23 Raa1 Re6 24 fxg5 Rfe8
25 Qf2 f4 26 gxf4 Bh3 27 Kh1. Blacks
position is certainly not worth being
three Pawns down.
18 a4
White attacks Blacks Pawn minority
on the queenside with the idea of
possible counter-play along the a
file. Whites plan is to hold the fort
on the kingside while pursuing a
counter attack on the queenside and
in the center. Whites Bishop on the
a2-g8 diagonal is especially effective
in restraining Blacks piece activity
through the use of pins. Blacks Pawn
on c6 is stressed by having to defend
pieces on both b5 and d5. Between
Whites counter-play and extra Pawn
in exchange for Blacks attack, White
in theory has an edge. In practice

93

though, Black often gets just enough


pressure to obtain a draw, and if White
plays inaccurately punishment can be
swift.

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{wdwdw4kd}
{dwdwdp0p}
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{Pdw)wdbd}
{dB)QGw)q}
{w)wHW)w)}
{$wdw$wIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 96. Position after 18 a4.

18 b4?
Black takes valuable time from his
attack on the kingside in an attempt to
relieve the pressure created by Whites
counter-attack on the queenside.
Although this move relieves Whites
pressure on the a file and releases
some of the tension on Blacks c
Pawn, it makes Blacks a Pawn a
target by opening the f1-a6 diagonal.
However, the main problem with this
move is that Black cannot afford to
lose time when he has sacrificed a
Pawn to obtain attacking chances on
the kingside.
We will examine some other possibilities:
1. 18 f5. Bringing the Pawn into
play to spearhead the attack is
Blacks most common move. Black
threatens to crack open Whites

94

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

position with 19 f4. The main


line continues with Whites next
move; it challenges Blacks Queen
and prepares to support the
blockade of Blacks f Pawn. 19
Qf1 Qh5 20 f4 bxa4,
Now if 20 g5, then 21 axb5
axb5 22 Bxd5 cxd5 and now
White gains the advantage
with either:
23 fxg5 Rxe3 24 Rxe3
f4 25 Rf3 Bxf3 26 Qxf3
Qxf3 27 Nxf3 fxg3 28
Kg2 gxh2 29 Nxh2 Bxh2
30 Kxh2 Rf2+ 31 Kg3
Rxb2 32 Kf4, or
23 Qg2 Rfe8 24 Qxd5
Qf7 25 Ra8 Kg7 26 Rxe8
Qxe8 27 Ra1 Bb8 28 Bf2
gxf4 29 Ra8 Rb6 30 Qc5.
21 Rxa4 Rfe8,
Now inferior for Black are
either:
21 g5 22 Rxa6 gxf4 23
Bxf4 Bxf4 24 Rxe6 Bxd2
25 Bxd5 cxd5 26 Qg2 f4
27 Qxd2 Bxe6 28 Rxe6
fxg3 29 hxg3, or
21 Rb8 22 Bxd5 cxd5
23 Rxa6 Qe8 24 Bf2 Qd7
25 Rxe6 Qxe6 26 c4 dxc4
27 Rc6!, or
21 Kh8 22 Bxd5 cxd5
23 Rxa6 Rfe8 24 Qb5
Rh6 25 h3 Bxh3 26 Bf2.

22 Qf2 g5 23 fxg5 f4 24 gxf4 Bh3


25 Rxa6 Bxf4 26 Qxf4 Nxf4 27
Bxf4 Qg4+ 28 Bg3 Qxg5 29 Ne4
Qf5 30 Nf2 and White stands
better.
2. 18 Qh5. Black repositions his
Queen to reinforce his threatened
position in the center. However,
White comes out on top after 19
axb5 axb5 20 Bxd5! Qxd5 21 c4
bxc4 (if 21 Qh5, then 22 cxb5
cxb5 23 Ra5) 22 Qxc4 Qh5 23
Ra6 Rfe8 24 Rxc6 Rh6 25 h4 Rg6
26 Rb6 Bd7 27 Qe2 Qf5 28 Qf3
Qa5 29 Qb7.
3. 18 Nxe3. Black clears the way
for his Rook to apply pressure on
the h file. However, Blacks attack
runs out of steam after 19 Rxe3
Rh6 20 Nf1 Qh5 21 axb5 axb5 22
Bd1 f5 23 f4 g5 24 fxg5 Qxg5 25
Bxg4 Qxg4 26 Qe2 Qg6 27 Re1.
4. 18 bxa4 19 Rxa4 f5 20 Qf1 Qh5
(if 20 f4, then White ends up
having a nice advantage with four
Pawns for a piece in the endgame
after 21 Qxh3 Bxh3 22 Rxa6 fxe3
23 Rxe3 Nxe3 24 Rxc6) 21 f4 and
we have transposed into variation
#1 above.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

Robert M. Snyder

95

19 Qf1

20 c4?

White repositions his Queen to


dislodge Blacks actively posted Queen
and defend the kingside.
Going Pawn grabbing with 19 Qxa6?
would be a costly mistake after 19
Nxe3 20 Rxe3 Rxe3 21 fxe3 Bxg3 22
hxg3 Qxg3+ 23 Kh1 (if 23 Kf1, then
23 Qxe3) Qh3+ 24 Kg1 Qxe3+.
Exchanging on d5 leaves Black with
more pressure than he deserves for his
Pawn after 19 Bxd5 cxd5 20 Qf1 Qh5
21 c4 dxc4 22 Qxc4 Rg6.
And, finally, if White tries to imme
diately dislodge Blacks Knight on d5
without first moving his Queen to f1
by playing 19 c4, then Black has the
strong reply 19 Bf4!, planning to
meet 20 cxd5 (here 20 Qf1 is better,
however Black is clearly better after 20
Nxe3 21 Qxh3 Bxh3 22 d5 Nxd5)
with 20 Rh6 21 Qe4 Qxh2+ 22 Kf1
Bxe3 23 Rxe3 Rf6 24 f3 Bf5 25 Qe5
Bh3+ 26 Ke1 Qg1+ 27 Ke2 Qxa1 and
Black is winning.

White threatens and drives Blacks


Knight out of the center. However,
White misses his opportunity to win
a second Pawn by playing 20 Qxa6.
Blacks pressure would not be sufficient
for two Pawns. After 20 Qxa6 the game
might continue 20 Rg6 (if 20
Rfe8, then 21 a5 bxc3 22 bxc3 Bf4
23 Bc4; or if 20 Rb8, then 21 a5 is
strong) 21 Qa5 Bc7 22 Qa7 bxc3 23
bxc3 Bb6 24 Qa6 Bc7 25 Bxd5 cxd5 26
Qb5 planning to meet 26 Rb8 with
27 Bf4! and Black is in trouble.

19 Qh5

White recovers his piece and challenges


Blacks Rook on the open e file. If
White recaptured by 21 fxe3, then
Black gets a lot of pressure with an
attack on Whites center Pawns by 21
c5 22 Bd1 Rfe8 23 Bxg4 Qxg4 24
Qf3 Qg5.

Because Black has sacrificed a Pawn,


he naturally avoids allowing White to
simplify by trading Queens. Therefore,
weaker for Black would be 19 Qxf1+
20 Kxf1 bxc3 21 bxc3 Rb8 22 Bc4 and
Black has little to show for the Pawn.

20 Nxe3
Black takes care of the threat on his
Knight by making an even exchange.
The exchange obtains the Bishop pair
and is necessary since the Knight doesnt
have a good square for retreat. Blacks
Bishop pair and initiative will now be
worth his sacrificed Pawn.
21 Rxe3

96

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

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{dwdwdp0p}
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{P0P)wdbd}
{dBdw$w)w}
{w)wHW)w)}
{$wdwdQIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 97. Position after 21 Rxe3.

21 Rh6
Black avoids exchanging Rooks on the
e file and threatens 22 Qxh7++.

23 dxc5
White eliminates the attack on his
d Pawn by exchanging it for Blacks
Pawn. However, this activates Blacks
black-square Bishop and gives Black
more than enough compensation for
his Pawn. It would be better to return
the Pawn with 23 Ree1 cxd4 24 Bd1,
though Black stands better.
Getting the d Pawn out of attack
with 23 d5 allows Blacks black-square
Bishop to come to life with 23 Be5,
planning to meet 24 Rb1 with 24
Bd4.
23 Bxc5

22 Qg2
White defends his h Pawn and
places his Queen on the long h1-a8
diagonal. White now threatens to play
23 c5, which would reopen the a2-g8
diagonal for his Bishop, attack Blacks
Bishop on d6 and restrict Blacks c
Pawn.
The move played in the game is stronger
than weakening Whites kingside Pawns
with 22 h4, which Black would have
met with 22 c5.
22 c5
Black attacks Whites unprotected d
Pawn and prevents White from playing
23 c5.

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{P0Pdwdbd}
{dBdw$w)w}
{w)wHW)Q)}
{$wdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 98. Position after 23 Bxc5.

Black recovers his Pawn and threatens


Whites Rook on e3.
24 Rd3
White gets his Rook out of attack and
now threatens to fork Blacks Queen
and Bishop by 25 Rd5.

Robert M. Snyder

24 Bh3
This only drives Whites Queen to a
better square. It would be much stronger
for Black to reposition his Rook and
take command of the e file with 24
Re6!, planning to meet 25 Rd5 with 25
Qh6 (the attack on Whites Knight
on d2 prevents White from winning
a piece). Black would then stand clearly
better; he would have a great position
worth more than a Pawn.
25 Qf3
White gets his Queen out of attack
and challenges Blacks Queen. Here
either 25 Qb7? or 25 Qd5? would have
allowed 25 Bf5 attacking Whites
Rook and threatening 26 Qxh2+.
25 Qe5?

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{dwgw1wdw}
{P0Pdwdwd}
{dBdRdQ)b}
{w)wHW)w)}
{$wdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 99. Position after 25 Qe5.

Black repositions his Queen with


an attack on Whites b Pawn and
threatens 26 Rf6. Black misses his

97

opportunity to repeat the position with


25 Bg4 26 Qg2, which would have
allowed him to then play 26 Re6!,
transposing into what he should have
done back on move 24. Certainly after
25 Bg4 26 Qg2, if Black is content
with a draw, he could continue to repeat
the position with 26 Bh3.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
26 Rd5
White must play aggressively or Blacks
position will become overwhelming.
White actively posts his Rook and
attacks Blacks Queen and Bishop on
c5.
If White plays 26 Ne4, Black would play
26 Re6! threatening Whites Knight
and pinning it (now 27 Nxc5?? loses to
27 Qe1+! 28 Rxe1 Rxe1++).
26 Qxb2
Black uses his Queen aggressively to
recover his Pawn while threatening
Whites Rook on a1. Black is also
threatening a skewer with 27 Rf6. A
reasonable and safe alternative for Black
is to get his Queen out of attack and
defend his Bishop on c5 with 26
Qe7. After 26 Qe7 the game might
continue 27 Bc2 Be6 28 Rh5 Rxh5
29 Qxh5 g6 30 Qe2 Bd4 31 Rb1 Qf6

98

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

and Blacks position is worth at least a


Pawn.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
27 Rb1
White gets rid of the threat on his Rook
and uses the Rook to threaten Blacks
aggressively posted Queen. Not 27
Rd1 or 27 Re1 because of 27 Rf6
and after the Queen moves then 28
Bxf2+.
27 Re8?
Black shifts the wrong Rook onto the
open e file. At a glance, since the Rook
on h6 is already in play, it would
seem logical to bring the inactive Rook
into play. However, it will soon become
apparent that the Rook on h6 will be
shut out in the critical variation that
should have saved Black.

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{wdwdrdkd}
{dwdwdp0p}
{pdwdwdw4}
{dwgRdwdw}
{P0Pdwdwd}
{dBdwdQ)b}
{w1wHW)w)}
{dRdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 100. Position after 27 Re8.

Lets now examine the correct move,


27 Re6!. After 27 Re6! if 28
Qd1?, Black has a nice piece sacrifice
with 28 Qf6! (threatening 29
Qxf2+ 30 Kh1 Qg2++) 29 Rxc5 Rfe8
(White cannot keep Blacks Rook from
penetrating to e2 with an attack on
f2) and now a possible continuation
containing the most important ideas
behind this position might be 30 Rd5
Re2 31 f3 g6 (Black takes the time out
to make a move that prevents a backrank mate against his own King and
frees his pieces for the final assault
on Whites KingBlacks immediate
threat is 32 Qc3 followed by 33
Qe3+) 32 Rc1 Rg2+ 33 Kh1 Ree2 34
Nf1 Rgf2 and it is curtains!
Therefore, after 27 Re6!, White
must settle for equality by 28 Qd3 Qc3
29 Bc2 Qxd3 30 Bxd3 Be7 31 Nb3.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
28 Qd1
White relieves his Rook of having to
defend the critical e1 square against
Blacks Rook on the e file (not 28
Rxb2?? because of 28 Re1+ 29 Nf1
Rxf1++). Blacks Queen and the Bishop
on c5 are now threatened. Because
of these two threats Black has nothing
better than to sacrifice his Bishop in an

Robert M. Snyder

attempt to get as much counter-play as


possible for his lost piece.
It now becomes apparent why Black
used the wrong Rook on move 27. If
Black now played 28 Qf6, then after
29 Rxc5 Black is unable to double his
Rooks on the e file, which is the key
ingredient behind the piece sacrifice
shown in the analysis to Blacks 27th
move.
28 Bxf2+
Since Black is forced to lose a piece he
at least gets a Pawn for it and exposes
Whites King to attack.
29 Kxf2
White wins Blacks Bishop.
29 Rf6+

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{wdwdrdkd}
{dwdwdp0p}
{pdwdw4wd}
{dwdRdwdw}
{P0Pdwdwd}
{dBdwdw)b}
{w1wHWIw)}
{dRdQdwdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 101. Position after 29 Rf6.

Black brings his Rook into the attack on


Whites King. However, Black would

99

have maintained more pressure with 29


Qf6+ 30 Kg1 Qe7.
30 Kg1
White gets his King out of attack and
retreats to relative safety.
30 Qc3
Black gets his Queen out of attack.
From c3 she threatens to support an
attack with 31 Qe3+ 32 Kh1 Rf2.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
31 Qe2!
This is Whites only winning move!
White prevents 31 Qe3+ while
threatening 32 Qxe8++. Black cannot
take Whites Queen with 31 Rxe2??
because of 32 Rd8+ Re8 33 Rxe8++.
31 Kf8
Black defends his Rook and threatens
32 Rxe2. If 31 Rfe6, then 32 Ne4
(attacking Blacks Queen, which has
nowhere to move) planning to meet 32
Rxe4 with 33 Qxe4 Rxe4? 34 Rd8+
Re8 35 Rxe8++.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

100

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

32 Ne4
Once again, White is left with only one
good move. Any other move would be
disastrous for White (such as 32 Qd3??
Qxd3 33 Rxd3 Bf5). With 32 Ne4
White blocks the attack on his Queen
while threatening 33 Nxc3.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdriwd}
{dwdwdp0p}
{pdwdw4wd}
{dwdRdwdw}
{P0PdNdwd}
{dB1wdw)b}
{wdwdQdw)}
{dRdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 102. Position after 32 Ne4.

32 Rxe4
Black tries a desperate sacrifice in a last
ditch effort to keep his attack alive.
However, Blacks efforts to successfully
use the e file in his attack will be
quickly thwarted due to his own King
being exposed to attack.
Black realized that a less aggressive
approach would lead to a lost endgame
where he is a piece down. An example
of this would be 32 Bg4 33 Nxc3
Bxe2 34 Nxe2 Rxe2 35 Bd1 Re1+ 36
Kg2 Rb6 37 c5 Rb8 38 c6 Re7 39 Rc5.
Black would have suffered a slow but
sure death. Sometimes lasting longer
isnt your best practical chance. When

you are losing: the attempt to complicate


matters and give your opponent some rope
to hang himself with is a wise decision.
33 Qxe4
White recaptures and is now a Rook
ahead.
33 Re6
Black continues with his idea of threa
tening Whites Queen and attacking
along the e file. Unfortunately for
Black, this leads to nothing.
34 Qd3

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{wdwdwiwd}
{dwdwdp0p}
{pdwdrdwd}
{dwdRdwdw}
{P0Pdwdwd}
{dB1Qdw)b}
{wdwdwdw)}
{dRdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 103. Position after 34 Qd3.

White gets his Queen out of attack and


threatens to exchange Queens. Since
Black is down a Rook he finds such an
exchange about as popular as having a
piranha in his bath tub! Also, White
would have won easily after 34 Qf4.

Robert M. Snyder

34 Re1+
Black continues with what he envisions
as his last hopean attack on Whites
King.
35 Kf2
White gets his King out of attack and
avoids the pitfall35 Rxe1?? Qxe1+
36 Qf1 Qxf1++.
35 Qxd3
Even though Black wants to avoid
an exchange of Queens he hopes that
White simply recaptures with 36 Rxd3
and allows 36 Rxb1; it would then
be Black who is winning. See if you can
find Whites best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.
36 Rxe1!

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{wdwdwiwd}
{dwdwdp0p}
{pdwdwdwd}
{dwdRdwdw}
{P0Pdwdwd}
{dBdqdw)b}
{wdwdwIw)}
{dwdw$wdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 104. Position after 36 Rxe1.

This move is the show stopper!


Black resigned here. Blacks Queen
is threatened and if she avoids being

101

captured with a move like 36 Qxb3,


then White plays 37 Rd8++.

LESSON 12

Black defends his e Pawn with a


Pawn and therefore relieves the Knight
from its defense. As a result, Black now
threatens to play 8 Na5 and exchange
his Knight for Whites good Lopez
Bishop. This move also frees Blacks
Bishop on the c8-h3 diagonal.

Allowing an Isolated Pawn


for Active Piece Play
Jorge Brittencourt vs Robert Snyder
2001
Opening: Ruy Lopez

8 c3

In the last game Black gave up a Pawn


to obtain attacking chances; in this
game Black allows his opponent to give
him an isolated d Pawn on an open
file in exchange for active piece play. In
what seems to be from out of nowhere,
Blacks pieces suddenly jump into play
on the kingside in a well coordinated
attack.
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4
Nf6 5 0-0 Be7 6 Re1 b5 7 Bb3 d6

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{rdb1kdw4}
{dw0wgp0p}
{pdn0whwd}
{dpdw0wdw}
{wdwdPdwd}
{dBdwdNdw}
{P)P)W)P)}
{$NGQ$wIw}
vllllllllV

White prepares support for the placement


of a Pawn on d4 and opens up c2 as
a retreat square for his Bishop.
The immediate 8 d4 is premature. After
8 d4 Black could set up the Noahs Ark
Trap with 8 exd4 and if 9 Nxd4? (9
Bd5 is best), then 8 Nxd4 9 Qxd4 c5
11 Qc3 c4. However, a good sequence
for Black after 8 d4 is 8 Nxd4 9
Nxd4 exd4 and now:
if 10 Bd5 (10 Qxd4? would fall
into the Noahs Ark Trap after 10
c5), then 10 Nxd5 11 exd5
0-0 12 Qxd4 Bf6, or
if 10 a4, then 10 Bb7.
If White tries attacking on the flank
with 8 a4, the game might continue 8
Bg4 9 c3 0-0 10 h3 Bxf3 11 Qxf3
Na5 12 Bc2 c5 13 d3 b4 14 Nd2
Rb8 15 Rb1 Nd7 16 Nf1 Bg5 with
approximate equality.

Diagram 105. Position after 7 d6.

-102-

Robert M. Snyder

8 0-0

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{rdb1w4kd}
{dw0wgp0p}
{pdn0whwd}
{dpdw0wdw}
{wdwdPdwd}
{dB)wdNdw}
{P)w)W)P)}
{$NGQ$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 106. Position after 8 0-0.

Black removes his King from the center


and brings his Rook to a more active
location.
9 h3
Before striking at the center with his
d Pawn, White prevents Blacks
Bishop from going to g4 and pinning
his Knight. Passive play such as 9 d3
gives Black a comfortable game after 9
Na5 10 Bc2 c5 11 Nbd2 Nc6 12
Nf1 Re8 13 Ne3 Bf8 14 a4 Bb7.
If 9 d4, Black has a strong pin with the
move 9 Bg4. Possible continuations
are:
1. 10 d5 Na5 11 Bc2 c6 12 dxc6 (if 12
h3, then 12 Bc8! 13 dxc6 Qc7)
Qc7 13 Nbd2 Qxc6 14 h3 Be6 15
Nf1 Nc4 with an equal game.
2. 10 Be3 exd4 11 cxd4 d5 (also
playable is 11 Na5 12 Bc2 c5)
12 e5 Ne4 13 Nc3 Nxc3 14 bxc3
Qd7 15 h3 Bh5 16 Bc2 (if 16 Bf4,

103

then 16 Na5 17 Bc2 and now


either 17 Qe6 or 17 Nc4
18 Qb1 Kh8) f5 17 exf6e.p. Bxf6
18 Qd3 Bg6 19 Qd2 Be4 with an
equal game.
3. 10 h3 Bxf3 11 gxf3 Na5 12 Bc2
Nh5 13 f4 Nxf4 14 Bxf4 exf4 15
Qg4 Qc8! 16 Qf3 c5 and Black
stands better.
9 Na5
Black drives Whites Lopez Bishop off
of the a2-g8 diagonal and frees his c
Pawn. The Breyer Variation with 9
Nb8 is covered in LESSON TWELVE
in Unbeatable Chess Lessons.
10 Bc2
White preserves his important Lopez
Bishop by retreating it (White didnt
want to allow 10 Nxb3).
10 c5
This further attacks the important d4
square, frees Blacks Queen along the
d8-a5 diagonal and expands space on
the queenside (thematic with Blacks
idea to obtain counter-play on the
queenside).
11 d4
White continues to build his Pawn
center, attacks Blacks e Pawn a
second time, and frees his queenside

104

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

pieces. Passive play with 11 d3 gives


Black a comfortable game after 11
Qc7 12 Nbd2 Bd7 13 Nf1 Rfe8 14
Ne3 Rac8.
11 Nd7

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{rdb1w4kd}
{dwdngp0p}
{pdw0wdwd}
{hp0w0wdw}
{wdw)Pdwd}
{dw)wdNdP}
{P)BdW)Pd}
{$NGQ$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 107. Position after 11 Nd7.

This is known as the Keres Variation.


The most common move here, 11
Qc7, is covered in LESSON ELEVEN
in Unbeatable Chess Lessons.
Black uses his Knight to defend his
e Pawn a second time and posts his
Knight where it has possible uses on the
queenside. This also opens f6 for use
by Blacks Bishop.
12 Nbd2
This is the most commonly played
move here. White develops his Knight
where it can go to either f1 or b3.
We will now examine some other
possibilities for White:
1. 12 dxc5. This immediate exchange
releases tension in the center and

gives Black easy equality after 12


dxc5 13 Nbd2 Bb7 (this is an
improvement over 13 f6) 14
Nf1 (if 14 Qe2, then 14 Qc7
15 Nf1 Nc4 16 b3 Nd6 17 c4
Rfe8 18 Bb2 b4 19 Rad1 Bf8 20
Ng3 a5) Nc4 15 Ng3 Nd6 16 Qe2
Qc7 with a comfortable game for
Black.
2. 12 b3. This quiet move is somewhat
slow. However, it eliminates
the possibility of Blacks Knight
entering c4. The game might
continue 12 exd4 13 cxd4
Nc6 14 Nc3 Bf6 15 Be3 cxd4 16
Nxd4 Nxd4 17 Bxd4 Bb7 18 Ne2
(if 18 Nd5, then 18 Bxd5 19
exd5 Bxd4 20 Qxd4 Qg5; or if 18
Bxf6, then Qxf6 19 Re3 Rac8 20
Rd3 Rfd8) Re8 (here 18 Rc8
is a good alternative) 19 Ng3 g6
20 Qd2 Be5 with approximate
equality.
3. 12 a4. Attacking and seeking
counter-play on the flank doesnt
present Black with any problems
after 12 Bb7 13 Nbd2 Re8 14
Nf1 exd4 15 cxd4 Bf6 16 axb5
axb5 17 Qd3 c4 with an equal
game.
4. 12 d5. Locking up the center gives
Black possibilities of the thematic
break with f5. The game might
continue 12 Nb6 13 g4 (if 13
b3 or 13 Nbd2, then 13 f5) h5
14 Nh2 (if 14 gxh5, then 14

Robert M. Snyder

105

13 Nc6

Bxh3 with the idea of f5) hxg4


15 hxg4 Bg5 16 Nd2 g6 17 Ndf3
Bxc1 18 Qxc1 Kg7 and Black
stands better.
5. 12 Bd3. This is a slow positional
move with the ideas of hindering
Blacks Knight from going to c4
and removing the Bishop from
possible attack along the c file.
Here Black can simply develop
with 12 Bb7, or play more
aggressively and open lines with 12
exd4 13 cxd4 Nc6 14 Nc3 (if
14 Bf1, then 14 Bf6 is strong)
Bf6 15 dxc5 dxc5 16 a4 b4 17
Nd5 Nde5 18 Nxe5 Bxe5 with
approximate equality.

Black continues with his plan of


repositioning his Knight and applying
pressure in the center on d4 and
e5. The Knight now also has access
to b4.

12 cxd4

14 Nf1

Blacks plan is to bring the Knight


back to c6 and again apply pressure
in the center. If Black immediately
played 12 Nc6, then White would
play 13 d5 attacking and embarrassing
Blacks Knight on c6, which doesnt
have a good square for retreat. By first
exchanging the c Pawns Black opens
up the b4 square for his Knight.

White continues with his thematic


Knight maneuver and reopens the d
file for his Queen that now defends
his d Pawn. At f1 the Knight has
opportunities of being repositioned on
either e3 or g3.
Another common line for White is
14 Nb3 with the following possible
continuation 14 a5 15 Bd3,
If 15 Be3, then 15 a4 and now:
16 Nbd2 Bf6 17 d5 Nb4 18
Bb1 Nc5 19 Nf1 Nba6 20
Qd2 Bd7, or
16 Nc1 Bb7 17 Bd3 exd4 18
Nxd4 Nxd4 19 Bxd4 Bf6 20
Ne2 Re8.

13 cxd4
White recovers his Pawn.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1w4kd}
{dwdngp0p}
{pdn0wdwd}
{dpdw0wdw}
{wdw)Pdwd}
{dwdwdNdP}
{P)BHW)Pd}
{$wGQ$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 108. Position after 13 Nc6.

106

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Ba6 16 d5 (if 16 Be3, then 16 a4


17 Nc1 exd4 18 Nxd4 Nxd4 19 Bxd4
Ne5 20 Bf1 Nc6 21 Be3 Bf6 22 Nd3
Bb7) Nb4 17 Bf1 a4 18 Nbd4 exd4 19
a3 Nxd5 20 exd5 d3! 21 Bxd3 Bf6 22
Rb1 Nc5 23 Bc2 Bb7 24 Nd4 Re8 25
Rxe8+ Qxe8.
Another possibility for White is to close
the center and attack Blacks Knight
on c6 with 14 d5. The game might
continue 14 Nb4 15 Bb1 a5 16 Nf1
(Black doesnt mind having his Knight
driven back with 16 a3 Na6 because it
has possibilities of being repositioned
the Knight on b4 ends up being
nicely repositioned after 16 Qe2 Rb8
17 a3 Na6 18 Bd3 Nac5) Rb8 17 g4
(or if 17 Ng3, then 17 Nc5 18 Be3
Nba6) Na6 18 Ng3 g6 19 Kh2 Nac5
with a comfortable game for Black.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
14 exd4
Black is willing to accept an isolated
d Pawn on an open file in exchange
for active piece play. This move opens
up the e5 square for his Knight and
will bring Whites Queen out to d4.
On d4 Whites Queen will become a
target to some tactical possibilities by
Black.

15 Nxd4
White recovers his Pawn while bringing
his Knight to the center where it
threatens Blacks Knight on c6. See
if you can find Blacks best move here
without looking at the next move in the
game.
15 Nxd4
Black gets his Knight out of attack and
continues with his plan to bring Whites
Queen out to d4.
16 Qxd4
White recovers his Knight. Although the
Queen is actively posted in the center
of the board and applies immediate
pressure on Blacks isolated d Pawn,
the Queen will also be a target of some
nice tactical threats by Black.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
16 Ne5
Black posts his Knight actively in the
center where it attacks the critical
f3 and c4 squares and allows
Blacks Queen to aid in the defense
of the isolated d Pawn. As a result,
Blacks Bishop is free from the task of
defending the d Pawn and can to go
to f6. With the Bishop on f6, Black

Robert M. Snyder

threatens a discovered attack on Whites


Queen with Nf3+.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1w4kd}
{dwdwgp0p}
{pdw0wdwd}
{dpdwhwdw}
{wdw!Pdwd}
{dwdwdwdP}
{P)BdW)Pd}
{$wGw$NIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 109. Position after 16 Ne5.

17 Ne3?
Grandmaster (and former US
Champion) Nick DeFirmian played the
same move against me in a tournament
many years ago. This sacrifices a
Pawn, but doesnt give White enough
compensation. Blacks simple tactical
threat was overlooked here and White
is forced to save face by claiming it was
a sacrifice. We will now examine what
theory considers Whites most logical
moves:
1. 17 Qd1. White removes his Queen
from the center. The game might
continue 17 Bf6 18 Ne3 Be6
19 Nd5 (if 19 a4, then 19 Nc4)
Bxd5 20 exd5 (if 20 Qxd5, then
20 Rc8 21 Bb3 Nc4 22 Re2
Rc5 23 Qd1 d5 and Black stands
slightly better) Nc4 21 a4 Qa5 22
Ra2 Rfe8 23 Rf1 (if 23 Be4, then
23 bxa4 24 Rxa4 Qb5 is equal)

107

Rac8 24 Bf5 (if 24 Bb1, then 24


b4) Rc7 25 b3 Ne5 with an even
game.
2. 17 Rd1. White increases pressure
on the d file. The game might
continue 17 Bb7 18 Ng3 (if 18
Ne3, then 18 Rc8) Bf6 19 Qxd6
Qc8 20 Qd2 Rd8 21 Qe2 Qc4 22
Rxd8+ Rxd8 and Black has enough
play for his sacrificed Pawn.
3. 17 f4. White drives Blacks Knight
from the center and claims more
space. However, White weakens
himself on the kingside. The game
might continue 17 Nc6 18 Qf2
(if 18 Qd1, then 18 Bf6 19 Ne3
Be6) Bh4 19 g3 Bf6 20 Rd1 Qc7
21 Kh2 (if 21 Ne3, then 21
Bd4) Bb7 22 Bb1 (if 22 Ne3, then
22 Nd4 23 Bd3 Rac8) Rfe8 23
Qc2 g6 24 Ne3 Bg7 25 Nd5 Qd8,
planning to meet 26 Qf2 with 26
Na5 27 Nb6 Rb8, or 26 Be3
with 26 Ne7 27 Bb6 Qd7 and
Black stands better in both cases.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
17 Bxh3!
Black takes advantage of Whites
overworked g Pawn to win a Pawn.
White cannot play 18 gxh3?? because
of 18 Nf3+. White will obtain

108

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

some pressure, but not quite a Pawns


worth.
18 Nd5
White takes the strong natural outpost
for his Knight. White would obtain
more compensation for his Pawn by
expanding on the kingside and driving
Blacks Knight out of the center with
18 f4. After 18 f4 the game might
continue 18 Nc6 (getting the
Knight out of attack and threatening
Whites centrally located Queen) 19
Qc3 (White now threatens 20 Qxc6
and 20 gxh3) Bd7 20 Nd5 Rc8 21
Qd3 f5 22 Be3 Bh4 23 Nb6 Bxe1 24
Nxc8 Nb4 25 Qb3+ d5 26 Rxe1 Nxc2
27 Qxc2 Bxc8 28 exd5 Qxd5 and
Black stands better.
18 Be6
Sooner or later the Pawn on g2 was
going to threaten to capture Blacks
Bishop on h3. Since the Bishop has
already performed its task by winning
Whites h Pawn, it is repositioned on
an active square. Another good move
for Black would be to attack Whites
Bishop on c2 with 18 Rc8,
planning to meet 19 Bb3 with 19
Be6.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdw1w4kd}
{dwdwgp0p}
{pdw0bdwd}
{dpdNhwdw}
{wdw!Pdwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{P)BdW)Pd}
{$wGw$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 110. Position after 18 Be6.

19 Nxe7+?
This is a bad strategic choice. White
couldnt resist the temptation to
exchange a Knight for a Bishop and
obtain the Bishop pair. Obtaining
the Bishop pair in an open position is
generally a good choice, but here there
are too many drawbacks:
1. The exchange gives up a very
strongly posted Knight for Blacks
less active Bishop.
2. Blacks Queen is brought to a more
active post and connects Blacks
Rooks on his first rank.
3. White cannot afford to make
exchanges when he needs to
maintain pressure for his sacrificed
Pawn.
A logical plan would be for White to
apply more pressure with a developing
move such as 19 Be3 Rc8, or 19 a4
which might continue 19 Bf6 20
Qd1 (weak would be 20 Nxf6+ Qxf6

Robert M. Snyder

21 Qxd6 Rac8 planning to meet 22


Bb1 with 23 Nf3+! 24 gxf3 Rxc1
25 Rxc1 Qg5+ forking King and Rook,
or 22 Bd1 with 22 Rfd8 with the
idea of 23 Nd3 after Whites Queen
moves) Rc8 21 Bb3 bxa4 22 Bxa4 Ng4.
However, in either of these cases Black
still gets a nice advantage.

109

21 Re2?

Black recovers the piece.

White uses his Rook to defend his


threatened Bishop. However, the Rook
itself will become a target on e2. There
are times when crawling on your belly
gives the best chance of survival and this
is one of those cases! White would have
done best to retreat his Bishop with 21
Bd1 even though he would be in sad
shape after 21 Qf6 22 Be3 Rfd8 23
f4 Qh4 24 Rf1 Ng4.

20 b3

21 Qf6

White prevents the use of c4 by


Blacks pieces and opens up the c1a3 diagonal for use by his Bishop. See
if you can find Blacks best move here
without looking at the next move in the
game.

This is Whites first hint that a kingside


attack is brewing. Black brings his Queen
toward the kingside and threatens to
win Whites Queen with 22 Nf3+.
Black could have also pursued an attack
with 21 Bg4 22 Rd2 Bf3!.

20 Rac8

22 Bb2

19 Qxe7

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdrdw4kd}
{dwdw1p0p}
{pdw0bdwd}
{dpdwhwdw}
{wdw!Pdwd}
{dPdwdwdw}
{PdBdW)Pd}
{$wGw$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 111. Position after 20 Rac8.

Black places his Rook on the open c file


and threatens Whites Bishop on c2.

White finally completes his minor piece


development and defends his Queen in
answer to Blacks threat. If White had
played 22 Be3, Black would have won
nicely after 22 Nf3+! 23 gxf3 Qxf3
threatening to set up a forced mate
with 24 Bh3 and to capture Whites
unprotected Rook on e2.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

110

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

22 Bg4

24 Kf1

Blacks Bishop joins the attack on the


kingside and threatens Whites Rook
on e2.

Whites King makes a run for it! This


will avoid mate, but not massive
material loss. See if you can find Blacks
best move here without looking at the
next move in the game.

23 Rd2
White gets his Rook out of attack and
maintains the protection of his Bishop
on c2. White would continue to get
chewed up after 23 f3 Bxf3!.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdrdw4kd}
{dwdwdp0p}
{pdw0w1wd}
{dpdwhwdw}
{wdw!Pdbd}
{dPdwdwdw}
{PGB$W)Pd}
{$wdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 112. Position after 23 Rd2.

23 Bf3!!
Black sinks his Bishop deep into the
enemy camp with devastating effect. Of
course the Bishop cannot be captured
with 24 gxf3 because of 24 Nxf3+
forking the King and Queen. Blacks
immediate threat is to force mate with
24 Qg5 25 g3 Qh5 followed by 26
Qh1++.

24 Qg5

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{$wdwdKdw}
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Diagram 113. Position after 24 Qg5.

Black threatens 25 Qxg2+ 26 Ke1


Qg1++.
White has these choices:
1. If 25 gxf3, then 25 Nxf3 forking
Queen and Rook.
2. If White continues to make a run
for it with 25 Ke1, then 25
Qxg2 26 Bd3 Qh1+ 27 Bf1 Bg2 28
Ke2 (if 28 Rd3, then 28 Rc2)
Qh5+ 29 Ke1 (if 29 Ke3, then 29
Qf3++, or if 29 f3, then 29
Qxf3+ 30 Ke1 Qxf1++) Nf3+ 30
Kd1 Nxd4+. White resigned here.

LESSON 13

1 e4 d5

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Exploiting Small Advantages


in Development and Space
Zapata vs. Welling
2002
Opening: Scandinavian Defense
White obtains a small advantage in
space and a lead in development. The
lesson in this game nicely demonstrates
how to build on small advantages.
At one point White goes astray by
making a couple of inferior moves,
but Black misses his opportunities to
greatly reduce Whites advantage. Even
these imperfections on Whites part
allow for some pointers that makes
this game even more instructive.
White eventually gains control of an
important central file with his Rook;
this is then used to assist in Blacks
execution. After some nice tactical
threats, Whites potential use of the
Philidors Legacy mate allows him to
force a quick win.

Diagram 114. Position after 1 d5.

This is known as the Scandinavian


or Center Counter Defense. Black
immediately strikes at the center, frees
his Bishop on the c8-h3 diagonal,
opens his Queen on the d file, and
attacks Whites e Pawn. The drawback
is that after White captures Blacks d
Pawn, Black (in order to recover his
Pawn) must either bring his Queen
out early and lose a tempo or move his
Knight twice by going to f6 and then
d5.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
2 exd5
It is clearly best for White to eliminate
Blacks d Pawn and force Black to use
valuable time to recover it.

-111-

112

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

2 Qxd5
Black immediately recovers his Pawn.
Black is willing to lose a tempo in
exchange for freeing his Bishop on c8.
He plans to reposition his Queen where
she will be out of the wayyet continue
to exert pressure in the center.
Another common move here for Black
is to develop his Knight and attack
Whites Pawn on d5 with 2 Nf6.
After 2 Nf6 White gets a good game
with 3 d4 (occupying the center with a
Pawn and freeing his Bishop on c1),
which might continue 3 Nxd5,
If 3 Bg4, then 4 f3 Bf5 5 Bb5+
Nbd7 6 c4 and now:
if 6 e6, then 7 dxe6 Bxe6
8 d5 Bf5 9 Nc3 Bc5 10 Qe2+
Kf8 (if 10 Qe7, then 11
Qxe7+ Bxe7 12 Nge2) 11 Be3
Qe7 12 Bf4! Re8 13 0-0-0
Qd8 14 Qf1.
if 6 a6, then 7 Bxd7+ Qxd7
8 Ne2 e6 9 dxe6 Qxe6 10 b3
0-0-0 11 0-0 Bc5 12 Kh1 Qd7
13 Bb2 Rhe8 14 Re1.
4 Nf3 Bg4 (if 4 g6, then 5 Be2 Bg7
6 0-0 0-0 7 c4 Nb6 8 Nc3 Nc6 9 d5
Ne5 10 Qb3) 5 Be2 Nc6 6 0-0 e6 7 c4
Nb6 8 Nc3 Bxf3 9 Bxf3 Nxc4 10 Re1
Be7 11 d5 N6e5 12 Be2 Nb6 13 Bh5.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

3 Nc3

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Diagram 115. Position after 3 Nc3.

White develops his Knight toward the


center and threatens Blacks Queen.
3 Qa5
Black gets his Queen out of the center
and off to the side where she is less
exposed to attack. From a5 the Queen
still exerts pressure on the center and
can be quickly shifted to the kingside.
Moving the Queen to another location
is considered inferior. We now examine
other possible continuations:
1. 3 Qe5+?. This move is not
uncommon
among
weaker
playersthe saying, patzer sees a
check; patzer gives a check applies
heretherefore we shall give it
a quick look. 4 Be2 Bg4 5 d4
Bxe2 6 Ngxe2 and White has a
considerable lead in development.
2. 3 Qd6 4 d4 Nf6 5 Nf3 a6,
If 5 Bg4, then 6 h3 and
now:

Robert M. Snyder

if 6 Bh5, then 7 g4 Bg6


8 Ne5 Nbd7 8 Nxg6 hxg6
9 Qf3 c6 10 Be3, or
if 6 Bxf3 then 7 Qxf3
c6 8 Be3 e6 9 0-0-0 Qc7
10 g4 Nbd7 11 Bd3 Be7
12 g5 Nd5 13 Nxd5 cxd5
14 h4.
6 Bd3 Bg4 (or if 6 g6, then 7
0-0 Bg7 8 Be3 0-0 9 Re1) 7 0-0
Nbd7 8 h3 Bh5 9 Re1 c6 (if 9
e6, then 10 g4 Bg6 11 d5 Bxd3
12 dxe6 fxe6 13 Qxd3 0-0-0 14
Qxd6 Bxd6 15 Rxe6) 10 Ne4 Qc7
(if 10 Nxe4, then 11 Rxe4 Nf6
12 Rh4 Bxf3 13 Qxf3) 11 Bg5 e6
12 c4 and White has a nice spatial
advantage.
3. 3 Qd8. This is the second most
commonly played move. 4 d4 Nf6
5 Nf3 Bg4 (if 5 c6, then 6 Bc4
Bf5 7 Ne5 e6 8 g4 Bg6 9 h4 Bb4 10
f3 Nd5 11 Bxd5 cxd5 12 h5 f6 13
Nxg6 hxg6 14 Qd3 Bxc3+ 15 bxc3
f5 16 Bf4 Nc6 17 0-0-0 and White
stands clearly better) 6 h3 Bh5 (if
6 Bxf3, then White gets the
Bishop pair and a spatial advantage
after 7 Qxf3 c6 8 Be3 e6 9 Bd3
Nbd7 10 0-0) 7 g4 Bg6 8 Ne5 e6 9
Bg2 c6 10 h4 (threatening 11 h5)
Bb4 11 0-0 Nd5 (if 11 Bxc3,
then 12 bxc3 Nd5 13 c4; or if 11
Nbd7, then 12 Qe2 is strong)
12 Nxd5 exd5 13 h5 f6 14 c3 fxe5
(if 14 Be7, then 15 Nxg6 hxg6

113

16 hxg6 with a clear advantage for


White) 15 cxb4 Bf7 16 dxe5 and
White is up a Pawn with a good
position.
4 d4
White occupies the center with a Pawn
and frees his Bishop on the c1-h6
diagonal.
4 Nf6
Black develops his Knight toward the
center. If Black immediately strikes at
the center with 4 e5, then a possible
continuation is 5 dxe5 Nc6 6 Nf3 Bb4
7 Bd2 Bg4 8 a3 Nd4 9 Bb5+ c6 10 0-0
Bxf3 11 axb4 Bxd1 12 bxa5 Bxc2 13
Ba4 with a clear advantage for White.
5 Nf3

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Diagram 116. Position after 5 Nf3.

White develops his Knight toward the


center. From f3 the Knight also has
access to the strong natural outpost on

114

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

e5, where it commonly goes in this


opening.
5 c6
This is the standard move here. Black
opens up the d8-a5 diagonal as a
retreat for his Queen and covers the
potentially important d5 and b5
squares. This move is an admission that
his Queen still is still a possible target
for White. This happens in variations
where Whites Bishop is placed on d2
or his Knight on c4.
We will now examine some other
possible continuations:
1. 5 Bf5 (this would transpose into
5 c6 6 Bc4 Bf5 7 Bd2) 6 Bc4 c6
7 Bd2 e6,
If 7 Qc7, then 8 Nh4 and
now:
if 8 Bg4, then 9 f3 Bh5 10
Qe2, or
if 8 Bg6 then 9 Nxg6 hxg6
10 Qf3 e6 11 0-0-0 Nbd7 12
Bg5 0-0-0 13 Ne4.
8 Qe2 Bb4 9 0-0-0 Nbd7 10 a3
Bxc3 11 Bxc3 Qc7 12 Ne5 and
White has a nice spatial advantage.
2. 5 Nc6 6 Bb5 Bd7 (if 6 Ne4
or 6 Nd5, then 7 Qd3 Nxc3 8
bxc6 a6 9 Bxc6+ bxc6 10 Ne5 f6
11 Nc4 Qf5 12 Ba3 Rb8 13 h3
Kf7 14 Ne3 Qxd3 15 cxd3 e5 16
Bxf8 Rxf8 17 dxe5 fxe5 18 0-0)

7 Bd2 0-0-0 8 a4 Qb6 9 Be3 and


White stands clearly better.
3. 5 Bg4 6 h3 Bh5 7 g4 Bg6 8
Ne5 e6 9 Bg2 c6 10 h4 Be4 (if 10
Bb4, then 11 Bd2 Qb6 12 h5
Qxd4 13 Nf3 Qxg4 14 hxg6 Qxg2
15 Rg1 Qh3 16 gxf7+ Ke7 17
Rxg7 Qh1+ 18 Rg1 Qh5 19 Qe2)
11 Bxe4 Nxe4 12 Qf3 Nd6 13 Bf4
f6 14 Nd3 Nb5 (if 14 Nd7,
then 15 0-0-0 0-0-0 16 Rhe1) 15
0-0 Nxd4 (if 15 Nxc3, then 16
bxc3 Nd7 17 Rfe1 0-0-0 18 Rxe6
Qxc3 19 Rb1) 16 Qe4 Qd8 17
Rad1 and Whites position is worth
more than a Pawn.
6 Ne5
White takes the strong and natural
outpost for his Knight. A good
alternative would be 6 Bc4 Bf5 7 Bd2
transposing into Variation #1 to Blacks
5th move.
6 Be6
This is certainly not the most natural
square for the Bishop. Black contests
Whites Bishops use of the a2-g8
diagonal. Although the Bishop on e6
blocks the use of his e Pawn, Blacks
plan is to use e6 only as a temporary
parking place.

Robert M. Snyder

The most common move here is the


natural development of the Bishop
with 6 Bf5, which might continue 7
Bc4 e6 8 g4 Bg6 9 h4 Nbd7 10 Nxd7
Nxd7 11 h5 Be4 12 0-0 Bd5 13 Nxd5
cxd5 14 Bd3 Bd6 15 c3 and White is
slightly better. If 6 Nbd7, White is
clearly better after 7 Nc4 Qc7 8 Qf3!
Nb6 9 Bf4 Qd8 10 Be5.
7 Bc4
White develops his Bishop, challenges
Blacks Bishop on e6 and threatens 8
Bxe6 dxe6 to double and isolate Blacks
Pawns. Even though this will allow
Black to exchange his problem Bishop
on e6, White will have a slight lead
in development and an advantage in
space.
White would have only a slight
advantage after 7 Bd3 Nbd7 8 Nxd7
Bxd7 9 0-0 Bg4 10 Qe1.

115

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{$wGQIwdR}
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Diagram 117. Position after 8 Nxc4.

8 Qd8
Black gets his Queen out of attack and
places her where she will not be easily
exposed to further attack. If 8 Qc7,
then White gets a great game after 9 00 e6 10 Qf3 (with the idea of 11 Bf4)
Bd6 12 Nxd6+ Qxd6 13 Rd1 Nbd7 14
a3.
9 0-0

7 Bxc4

White removes his King from the center


and activates his kingside Rook.

Black eliminates Whites threat to


exchange on e6 by exchanging
Bishops first.

9 e6

8 Nxc4
White recovers his Bishop.

Black frees his Bishop on the f8-a3


diagonal and increases his foothold on
the important d5 square. Weaker is 9
g6 10 Re1 Bg7 11 Bg5 (also playable
for White is to apply pressure on the
e file with 11 Qe2 and Black has a
choice of giving up a Pawn for partial
compensation with 11 0-0 12 Qxe7

116

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Qxd4 13 Qxb7 Nbd7, or accepting an


inferior position with 11 b5 12 Ne5
0-0 13 Be3) 0-0 12 Ne5 Nbd7 13 Qf3
and White stands clearly better.
10 Bg5
White completes his minor piece
development and pins Blacks Knight
on f6. Whites lead in development
and advantage in space give him the
advantage.
10 Be7
Black develops his Bishop, breaks the
pin on his Knight and clears the way to
castle on the kingside.
11 Re1

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Diagram 118. Position after 11 Re1.

White places his Rook on the half open


e file. He continues to use his spatial
advantage to bring new pieces into
play and apply maximum pressure on
Blacks camp.

11 Nbd7
Black completes his minor piece
development by bringing his Knight
toward the center. Here is where the
order of moves for development is
important. It would be slightly better for
Black to maintain his attack on Whites
e Pawn with his Queen and play 11
0-0. White could not now bring his
Queen into play with 12 Qf3 because
of 12 Qxd4. Therefore, after 11
0-0 the game might continue 12 Ne5
Nbd7 13 Qf3 Nxe5 14 dxe5 Nd5 15
Bxe7 Nxe7 16 Ne4 and though White
still stands better, the position Black
achieves is preferable to the position
obtained by the move in the game.
12 Qf3
White brings his Queen into play where
she will apply pressure on the kingside
and in the center.
12 0-0
Black takes the safest course and
removes his King from the center. An
interesting alternative is to force an
exchange of Knights by challenging
Whites Knight on c4 and attacking
Whites d Pawn with 12 Nb6. The
game might continue 13 Nxb6 Qxb6
14 Ne4! Qxd4 (slightly better is 14
Nxe4 15 Bxe7 Nd2 16 Qf4 Kxe7 17
Qg5+ Kf8 18 Qxd2 and White is better)

Robert M. Snyder

15 Rad1 Qxb2 16 Rb1 Qa3 (here 16


Qxa2 takes the Pawn grabbing too
far after either 17 Rxb7 or 17 Bxf6 gxf6
18 Rxb7) 17 Nxf6+ gxf6 18 Qxa3 Bxa3
19 Bxf6 Rg8 20 Rxb7 and White has a
substantial positional advantage.
13 Rad1
White brings his Rook to a more active
central file and completes the activation
of all of his pieces. Whites position
certainly has all of the ingredients for
what would go into completing what
could be defined as the opening. In
contrast, Black may have developed all
of his minor pieces but his major pieces
(Queen and Rooks) remain passively
located on their original squares. The
manner in which White exploits his
advantages in space and development
will prove instructive.

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Diagram 119. Position after 13 Rad1.

117

13 Nd5
Black centralizes his Knight and seeks
exchanges in an attempt, through
simplification, to minimize Whites
positional advantages. As a result of this
discovered attack, Black now threatens
Whites aggressively posted Bishop with
14 Bxg5.
14 Bxe7
White gets rid of the threat on his
Bishop by exchanging it for Blacks
Bishop. Black is forced to recapture
with his Knight, which still leaves him
in a somewhat restricted position.
14 Nxe7
Black recovers his Bishop. Black would
lose a Pawn after 14 Qxe7? 15 Nxd5
cxd5 16 Qxd5.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
15 Ne4
White posts his Knight on a strong
square by centralizing it. This will also
clear the c3 square for possible use by
Whites c Pawn.
15 Nf5
If Black hopes to survive, he cannot
take on a totally passive role. Therefore,

118

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Blacks Knight is posted actively where


it applies pressure to Whites e Pawn,
covers the weak d6 square and assists
on the kingside.
16 c3

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17 Nc5
White wants to avoid further
simplifying exchanges. However, this
will give Black an opportunity to post
his Queen strongly in the center and
challenge Whites Queen. Therefore, a
better alternative for White is 17 Nxf6+
Qxf6 18 a4 planning to meet either 18
Qg5 or 18 Rfd8 with 19 a5 when
White expands on the queenside and
restrains Blacks queenside play.
17 b6

White reinforces his d Pawn and


strengthens his center. White is in no
rush to push forward yet and takes the
time afforded to him by his extra space
and nicely developed pieces to continue
building a stronger position.

Black gets his b Pawn out of attack


and drives Whites Knight away from its
active post on c5. More to the point
would have been 17 Qd5. This would
nicely centralize Blacks Queen, challenge
Whites Queen and attack Whites
unprotected Knight on c4. Though,
after 17 Qd5, White would still gain
the better position with 18 Ne5.

16 Nf6

18 Na6?

Black logically brings his Knight to assist


with matters on the kingside, challenges
Whites active Knight on e4 and offers
further simplifying exchanges.
Illogical for Black would be to move
the Knight toward the wrong side of
the board with 16 Nb6, this would
allow White to strengthen his position
with 17 Ne5.

The Knight goes astray! It is awkwardly


posted at the edge on the board. It should
have kept a centralized post with 18 Ne4,
planning to meet 18 Nxe4 with 19
Rxe4 Qd5 20 Qe2. White would then
still have a nice positional advantage.

Diagram 120. Position after 16 c3.

18 Qc8?
Black returns the favor by using his Queen
to passively attack and drive Blacks

Robert M. Snyder

Knight to a better square! As pointed


out in the analysis to Blacks 17th move,
once again it is correct to centralize the
Queen by 18 Qd5 with the plan of
meeting either 19 Qe2 with 19 Nh4,
or 19 Ne5 with 19 Qxf3 resulting in a
compromise of Whites advantage.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

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Diagram 121. Position after 18 Qc8.

19 Nb4
White gets his Knight out of attack and
threatens Blacks c Pawn.
19 c5
Black counter-punches by using his
threatened c Pawn to attack Whites
Knight and d Pawn while opening
the c file for his Queen. However,
opening up the position only makes
Blacks situation worse. Black would be
better off by taking care of the threat on
his c Pawn through centralizing his

119

Knight with 19 Nd5. After 19


Nd5, White has the comfortable choice
between allowing for a Knight exchange
with 20 a3 Nxb4 21 axb4, or of avoiding
the Knight exchange with 20 Nd3. In
either case, White has a nice advantage.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
20 dxc5
White eliminates Blacks menacing c
Pawn.
20 Qxc5
Black recovers his Pawn and brings his
Queen into play by threatening Whites
Knight on c4. See if you can find
Whites best move here without looking
at the next move in the game.
21 Ne5

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Diagram 122. Position after 21 Ne5.

White gets his Knight out of attack and


retakes the strong central outpost.

120

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

21 Rad8
Black challenges Whites Rook on the
open d file. However, Blacks Rook
on d8 becomes a target for White. It
would be better for Black to reposition
his Knight with 21 Ne7 to cover
c6 and with the eventual idea of
challenging Whites active Knight on
e5. After 21 Ne7, the game might
continue 22 h3 a5 23 Nbc6 Nxc6 24
Qxc6 with White still retaining a nice
advantage.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
22 Nbc6
White sinks his Knight deep into the
enemy camp where it attacks Blacks
Rook on d8 and supports Whites
other Knight on e5. This will force
Blacks Rook to move and allow White
to maintain control of the important
d file.
22 Rxd1
Black exchanges his threatened Rook.
If Black played 22 Rd5, then White
would threaten the Rook once again
with 23 c4. Backing away from the d
file and applying pressure on Whites
Knight on c6 with 22 Rc8 would
quickly end in disaster for Black after
23 b4 Qb5 24 Nxa7.

23 Rxd1

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{dwdRdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 123. Position after 23 Rxd1.

White recovers his Rook and dominates


the important open d file. Whites
control of the open d file, actively
situated pieces and queenside Pawn
majority all add up to give White a
substantial advantage.
23 a5?
This turns an inferior position into a
lost game. Black completely misses
Whites subtle threat, which will now be
executed. Blacks move is a total waste
of time and accomplishes nothing since
the a Pawn wasnt threatened and the
move doesnt prevent the advance of
Whites b Pawn. It will soon become
apparent that Black should have created
luft (a breathing square) for his King
with 23 h6; the game might continue
24 b4 Qb5 25 c4 (25 g4? is weak
because of 25 Nh4 26 Qg3 Qe2!)
Qa6 26 Rd2 b5 27 c5. Black would end

Robert M. Snyder

121

up with a grossly inferior position, but


this is preferable to the text move.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

Black gets his Queen out of attack and


tries to post her as actively as possible.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

24 b4!

26 g4!

This is the beginning of Whites plan


to drive away Blacks two pieces from
covering the critical e7 square. With
this move Blacks Queen is first driven
away from covering e7.

White now threatens Blacks last


remaining defender of the critical e7
square.

24 axb4
Black exchanges his a Pawn, which
is attacked twice, before getting his
Queen out of attack.
25 cxb4
White recovers his Pawn and continues
with his threat on Blacks Queen.
25 Qc2

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{dwdRdwIw}
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Diagram 124. Position after 25 Qc2.

26 Nxg4
Black sacrifices his Knight for the
menacing g4 Pawn with a plan
to recover the piece. The point of
removing Blacks pieces from covering
the e7 square can now be clarified by
showing what would happen if Black
attacked Whites Queen with 26
Nh4. White would now have a forced
mate after 27 Ne7+ Kh8 28 Nxf7+
Rxf7 29 Rd8+ Rf8 30 Rxf8+ Ng8 31
Rxg8++. If Black played 26 Nh6,
then 27 g5 wins.
27 Qxg4
White wins Blacks Knight.

122

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

27 f6

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Diagram 125. Position after 27 f6.

Black hopes to recover his piece by


attacking Whites Knight on e5,
which is the only piece defending
Whites attacked Knight on c6. See
if you can find Whites best move here
without looking at the next move in the
game.
28 Ne7+!

here without looking at the next move


in the game.
29 Qxe6+
This is the point behind Whites
previous move. Whites Queen can now
capture a Pawn and move in to assist
with final execution.
29 Kh8

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{PdqdW)w)}
{dwdRdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 126. Position after 29 Kh8.

This is a nice tactical shot forcing


a quick win! Black has a choice of
capturing the Knight, which allows the
entry of Blacks Queen into the attack,
or allowing a quick mate.

Black gets his King out of attack. The


only other move, 29 Rf7, allows 30
Rd8++. See if you can find Whites best
move here without looking at the next
move in the game.

28 Nxe7

30 Rd8!

Black has nothing better than to


remove the intruder. The alternative,
28 Kh8 allows a quick mate after 29
Nf7+! Rxf7 30 Rd8+ Rf8 31 Rxf8++.
See if you can find Whites best move

The final blow! White now threatens 31


Rxf8+. Black would allow the Philidors
Legacy mate (a type of Smothered
mate) if he captures Whites Rook with
30 Rxd8, then White plays 31 Nf7+

Robert M. Snyder

Kg8 32 Nh6+ Kh8 33 Qg8+! Rxg8 34


Nf7++.
30 Qc1+
Black has nothing better to do than to
temporarily harass Whites King. Black
would also quickly run out of checks
after 30 Qb1+ 31 Kg2 Qe4+ 32
Kh3.
31 Kg2
White gets his King out of check.
31 Qg5+
Black continues to harass Whites King
as long as he can.
32 Kf1

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{wdw$w4wi}
{dwdwhw0p}
{w0wdQ0wd}
{dwdwHw1w}
{w)wdwdwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{PdwdW)w)}
{dwdwdKdw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 127. Position after 32 Kf1.

White begins to maneuver his King


to where Black will run out of checks.
Black resigned here. Black realized that
he will run out of checks after 32
Qc1+ 33 Ke2 Qc2+ 34 Kf3 Qc3+ 35

123

Kg2, when Whites threat of 36 Rxf8+


cannot be adequately metif 35
Rg8, then 36 Nf7++, and 35 Rxd8
allows the Philidors Legacy mate given
after Whites 30th move.

LESSON 14

center, then strike at it with his e or


c Pawn.

The Bad Bishop

2 d4
Minic vs. Hulak
Yugoslavia, 1974
Opening: Pirc Defense

White occupies the center with a second


Pawn and frees the Bishop on the c1h6 diagonal. This is Whites best move.

After making a mistake in the opening,


Black allows White to pile up on his
pinned Knight. This results in Black
being a Pawn down, having an isolated
d Pawn on an open file, and a Bad
Bishop. Blacks dark-square weakness
on the kingside gives White additional
chances for attack and allows White to
polish off his opponent quickly.

2 Bg7

1 e4 g6

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{dwdwdwdw}
{wdwdPdwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{P)P)W)P)}
{$NGQIBHR}
vllllllllV

Black completes his fianchetto and allows


the Bishop to apply pressure directly to
the center on the h8-a1 diagonal.
3 Nc3
White develops his Knight toward the
center. This defends the e Pawn, which
will be attacked when Black eventually
develops his Knight to f6. White
avoids developing his other Knight to
f3 first since White wants to retain
the option of using his f Pawn and/or
developing that Knight to e2.
3 d6

Diagram 128. Position after 1 g6.

Black initiates the Modern Defense. It


often, as in this case, transposes into
the Pirc Defense. Black prepares to
fianchetto his Bishop to g7. Blacks
plan is to allow White to build a Pawn
-124-

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{rhb1kdn4}
{0p0w0pgp}
{wdw0wdpd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdw)Pdwd}
{dwHwdwdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$wGQIBHR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 129. Position after 3 d6.

Robert M. Snyder

125

This move is thematic in the Modern


and Pirc Defenses. The most obvious
ideas behind this move are:
1. It frees the Bishop on the c8-h3
diagonal.
2. It opens up d7 for possible use by
Blacks Knight.
3. It covers the important e5 square
before developing a Knight to f6.
4. It prepares support for a possible
counter action in the center by
placing a Pawn on e5 or c5.
If 3 Nf6?, then 4 e5 planning to meet
4 Ng8 (4 Nh5?? 5 g4) with 5 Bc4.

Nf3, which might continue 4 Nf6 5


Be2 0-0 6 0-0 c6 7 Re1 Qc7 8 e5 dxe5
9 Nxe5 Be6 10 Bf4 Qc8 11 Bc4 Bxc4
12 Nxc4 Re8 13 Qf3 Na6 14 Rad1 and
White stands better.

4 Nge2

White prepares to fianchetto his Bishop


to g2. This move will also add support
for the placement of a Pawn on f4
(common in some variations).

I often recommend this lesser known


idea to my students. White plans to
fianchetto his Bishop to g2 and, as
a result, doesnt mind blocking the
Bishop on the f1-a6 diagonal. By
developing the Knight to e2, instead
of f3, White retains the possibility of
moving his Pawn to f4. However, the
main lines briefly examined in the next
two paragraphs are good enough to give
White some advantage.
White could continue to build a massive
center with 4 f4. After 4 f4 a possible
continuation is 4 Nf6 5 Nf3 0-0 6
Bd3 Nc6 7 0-0 and White will retain a
spatial advantage with Black getting some
counter-play against Whites center.
Another common possibility for White
is straightforward development with 4

4 Nf6
Black develops his Knight toward the
center, puts pressure on Whites Pawn on
e4 and clears the way for castling. With
the Knight on f6 we have officially
transposed into the Pirc Defense.
5 g3

5 0-0
Black removes his King from the center.
6 Bg2

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{wdw)Pdwd}
{dwHwdw)w}
{P)PdN)B)}
{$wGQIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 130. Position after 6 Bg2.

126

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

White develops his Bishop, completes


his fianchetto and clears the way to
castle. This position could also have
arisen from 1 e4 d6 2 d4 Nf6 (the Pirc
Defense) 3 Nc3 g6 4 g3 Bg7 5 Bg2 0-0
6 Nge2.
6 e5
This is the most common move played
here. Black places a Pawn in the center,
blockades the possible advance of
Whites e Pawn and creates pressure
on Whites d Pawn.
We will now examine some other
possibilities for Black:
1. 6 Nbd7 7 0-0 c5 8 dxc5 Nxc5 9
Nf4 Bg4 10 Qe1 Bd7 11 Qe2 Bc6
12 Rd1 and White stands lightly
better.
2. 6 c6 7 0-0 e5 8 h3 (also playable
is 8 a4 planning to meet 8 a5
with 9 h3 Re8 10 Bg5 Nbd7 11
Qd2) Nbd7 9 Be3 Re8 10 f4 and
White stands clearly better.
3. 6 c5 7 dxc5 dxc5 8 Qxd8 Rxd8
9 e5 Nfd7 10 f4 and White stands
clearly better.
4. 6 Nc6 7 0-0 e5 8 dxe5 transposes
into the actual game.
5. 6 Na6 7 0-0 c5 8 e5 Ne8 9 Bf4
cxd4 10 Qxd4 Nc5 11 Qe3 Ne6
12 Rad1 Nxf4 13 Nxf4 and White
stands better.

7 0-0
White gets his King out of the center
and activates his kingside Rook.
7 Nc6
Black develops his Knight toward the
center, reinforces his e Pawn and puts
pressure on Whites Pawn on d4.
8 dxe5
White releases the tension on his d
Pawn and opens the d file to his favor.
8 dxe5
Black recovers his Pawn and maintains
a Pawn in the center. If 8 Nxe5, then
White gets a good game after 9 f4 Nc6
10 h3 Re8 11 Be3 Be6 12 Qd3 a6 13
a3 h6 14 Rad1.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
9 Bg5
White completes his minor piece
development and pins Blacks Knight
on f6. White now threatens to win
a Pawn with 10 Qxd8 Nxd8 (if 10
Rxd8, then 11 Nd5) 11 Bxf6 Bxf6 12
Nd5 Bg7 13 Nxc7.

Robert M. Snyder

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{rdb1w4kd}
{0p0wdpgp}
{wdndwhpd}
{dwdw0wGw}
{wdwdPdwd}
{dwHwdw)w}
{P)PdN)B)}
{$wdQdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 131. Position after 9 Bg5.

9 Nd4
Black is in no mood to just sit back and
watch the show. He posts his Knight
aggressively and, if given the move,
would drive back Whites Bishop with
10 h6.
What seems to be the natural developing
move of 9 Be6 is met by 10 Nd5
Bxd5 11 exd5 Ne7 12 c4 h6 13 Bxf6
Bxf6 14 Re1 Bg7 15 Qb3 Rb8 16 Rad1
with a clear advantage for White. Also,
if Black exchanges Queens with 9
Qxd1, then White clearly comes out
on top after 10 Raxd1 h6 11 Be3 Be6
12 Nd5.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
10 Nxd4
White eliminates Blacks actively posted
Knight by exchanging.

127

10 exd4?
Black recovers his Knight and threatens
Whites Knight on c3. However, this
drives Whites Knight to a stronger
square. It would be better for Black to
recapture with his Queen and eliminate
the menacing pin on his Knight with
the offer of an exchange of Queens by
10 Qxd4. After 10 Qxd4 White
would still have the better game after
11 h3 c6 12 Qf3 Qd6 13 Rad1 Qe7
14 Qe3.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
11 Nd5
White gets his Knight out of attack and
increases pressure on Blacks pinned
Knight. White is now threatening to
attack Blacks Knight on f6 a third
time with either 12 Qf3 or 12 e5.
11 c6?

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{0pdwdpgp}
{wdpdwhpd}
{dwdNdwGw}
{wdw0Pdwd}
{dwdwdw)w}
{P)Pdw)B)}
{$wdQdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 132. Position after 11 c6.

128

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

This second mistake will turn an


inferior position into a lost game for
Black. Black attacks Whites aggressively
posted Knight and plans to meet 12
Nxf6+ with 12 Bxf6 13 Bxf6 Qxf6
leaving White with only a slight edge.
Blacks best continuation is 11 Be6
12 Qf3 Bxd5 13 exd5 Qd6 14 Bf4 Qb6
15 c4 Nd7 16 Qb3 and White stands
better. See if you can find Whites best
move here without looking at the next
move in the game.
12 e5!
White continues to pile up on Blacks
pinned Knight threatening to win it
with either 13 Nxf6+, 13 exf6 or 13
Bxf6.
12 cxd5
To avoid the loss of a piece, Black had no
choice but to capture Whites menacing
Knight. See if you can find Whites best
move here without looking at the next
move in the game.
13 Qxd4!
White wins a Pawn and uses his Queen
to continue the pile up on Blacks
pinned Knight. This also begins to put
pressure on Blacks weak isolated d
Pawn.

13 Be6
Black gets his last minor piece developed
and adds protection to his weak d
Pawn.
14 Bxf6
White recovers his Knight using his
Bishop to attack Blacks Queen and
challenge Blacks dark squared Bishop.

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{rdw1w4kd}
{0pdwdpgp}
{wdwdbGpd}
{dwdp)wdw}
{wdw!wdwd}
{dwdwdw)w}
{P)Pdw)B)}
{$wdwdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 133. Position after 14 Bxf6.

14 Bxf6
Black removes Whites aggressively
posted Bishop and creates an interesting
situation by bringing Whites Pawn
to f6. The resulting Pawn on f6 is
somewhat of a double edged sword.
Black hopes that this Pawn, which is far
removed from being protected by other
Pawns, will be weak and eventually
captured. However, without a Black
squared Bishop on the kingside, Black
is extremely weak on the dark squares

Robert M. Snyder

and the Pawn on f6 will allow Black


to have potentially dangerous threats.
15 exf6
White recovers his Bishop. Black has
what is called a Bad Bishop because
most of his Pawns are on the same
color as his Bishop and this restricts
its movement. Some players would
jokingly call this Bishop a tall Pawn! It
is stuck in a defensive role, defending
Blacks weak isolated Pawn on d4.
Whites plan should consist of applying
pressure to the weak d Pawn and
trying to capitalize on potential mate
threats created by Blacks dark squared
weakness on the kingside.
15 b6?
Black takes time to eliminate the attack
on his a Pawn. This puts a pin on his
d Pawn (along the h1-a8 diagonal)
giving White a nice opportunity to
take advantage of it. Black should have
played more aggressively with 15
Rc8 planning to meet 16 c3 with 16
b5.
16 Rad1
White continues with his plan of
increasing pressure on Blacks weak d
Pawn by bringing his Rook into play on
the half open d file. However, even
stronger is 16 c4! planning to meet 16

129

dxc4 with 17 Qf4. After 17 Qf4


White would be threatening 18 Bxa8
and 18 Rad1 (if the Queen gets out of
attack, then White would force mate
with 19 Qh6).
16 Rc8
Black brings his Rook onto the half
open c file, threatens Whites c
Pawn, prevents the c Pawn from
advancing to c4 and removes the pin
on the d Pawn. The Rook also has
possibilities of defending the d Pawn
by going to c5 or counter attacking
by going to c4.
17 c3
White removes the threat on his c
Pawn and further secures the d4
square. The ideas of restraint and attack
are in full play here against Blacks
isolated d Pawn.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdr1w4kd}
{0wdwdpdp}
{w0wdb)pd}
{dwdpdwdw}
{wdw!wdwd}
{dw)wdw)w}
{P)wdw)B)}
{dwdRdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 134. Position after 17 c3.

130

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

17 Rc5
Black adds a third defender to his
isolated d Pawn.
18 Qf4
Whites Queen now attacks h6. This
ties Blacks Queen to d8 since she
must keep Whites Pawn on f6 under
attack (if Whites Queen goes to h6
threatening mate, Black saves himself
with Qxf6). This move also opens up
d4 for possible use by Whites Rook.
Also good for White is 18 Qh4. This
move attacks the critical hole on h6
and keeps open the option of Whites
f Pawn advancing to f4. From f4
the Pawn has possibilities (depending
on what Black does) of going to f5
or being used in conjunction with
the advance of Whites g Pawn to
spearhead an attack.
18 h6
Black seeks to eliminate the hole on
h6 and relieve his Queen of the
troublesome task of being tied down on
d8. One way for a player to eliminate a
hole is to occupy it with a Pawn!
19 h4
White brings his h Pawn into the
attack on the kingside. If White played
19 Qxh6, Black would defend with 19

Qxf6. Black would still be lost, but


could offer more resistance.
19 Kh7

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{0wdwdpdk}
{w0wdb)p0}
{dw4pdwdw}
{wdwdw!w)}
{dw)wdw)w}
{P)wdw)Bd}
{dwdRdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 135. Position after 19 Kh7.

Black uses his King to defend on h6.


Blacks Queen has now been freed!
However, White now has a variety
of ways to proceed to secure victory.
Whites plan now is to improve the
location of his Rooks and Bishop,
possibly use the h and g Pawns to
spearhead the opening of lines and to
provoke Black to further weaken his
kingside.
Black avoided weakening his kingside
further with 19 h5?. After this move,
Whites plan would be to play 20 Rfe1
to be followed by an attack with the
threat of sacrifices against Blacks h
Pawn with moves like Re5 and Bf3.
20 Rd4
White prepares to double his Rooks on
the d file and increase the pressure

Robert M. Snyder

on Blacks weak d Pawn. Other


winning moves for White were 20 h5
(immediately using the h Pawn to
open lines on the kingside) or 20 Rfe1
(bringing the less active Rook onto the
open e file).
20 Re8
Black brings his inactive Rook onto the
open e file. Black would have lasted
longer by offering a Queen trade with
20 Qb8. After 20 Qb8 White
could play 21 Qxb8 Rxb8 22 Rfd1 and
Blacks fate is sealed.
21 Rfd1
White completes his plan of doubling
his Rooks on the d file and is now
threatening to attack Blacks d Pawn
a fourth time with 22 c4.
Also winning for White is to bring a
Rook into play on the open e file with
21 Re1.

131

22 Qc8
Black unpins his d Pawn and threatens
Whites Bishop with 23 dxe4. Black
at this point is willing to give up the
fight for his weak d Pawn.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdqdrdwd}
{0wdwdpdk}
{wdwdb)p0}
{dp4pdwdw}
{wdw$B!w)}
{dw)wdw)w}
{P)wdw)wd}
{dwdRdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 136. Position after 22 Qc8.

23 Bf3

Black attacks the c4 square to restrain


the advance of Whites c Pawn.

Once again, White had other ways to


win:
1. Winning the d Pawn with 23
Bxd5 would have led to a won
endgame after 23 Bxd5 24 Rxd5
Rxd5 25 Rxd5.
2. Even stronger than the text move
in the game is maintaining the pin
on Blacks g Pawn by 23 Bd3
with the plan of playing 24 h5.

22 Be4

23 Rd8

Whites Bishop jumps right into the


center, pins Blacks g Pawn and
prepares to continue the attack with 23
h5.

It is difficult to find constructive moves


for Black in this position. Therefore, it
is understandable and logical that Black

21 b5

132

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

now decides to reinforce his d Pawn


since White opted not to win it.
24 g4
White brings his g Pawn to assist with
the assault on the kingside. However,
it would be stronger to immediately
provoke Black to weaken on the
kingside with 24 h5 g5 25 Qe3.

25 a6?
This move is too slow and does nothing
to stymie Whites kingside attack. Black
should have challenged Whites Rook
on d4 by 25 Rc4 with the plan of
meeting 26 Re5 with 26 Rxd4, which
would slow down Whites attack.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

24 Qc6
Black adds another defender to his d
Pawn. The idea is to free the Rook on
c5 from being tied down to the d
Pawn. Then the Rook may go to c4
challenging Whites Rook in an attempt
to relieve some of the pressure.
25 Re1

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{dp4pdwdw}
{wdw$w!P)}
{dw)wdBdw}
{P)wdw)wd}
{dwdw$wIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 137. Position after 25 Re1.

White plans to relocate the Rook on


e5 where it will not only keep the
pressure on Blacks d Pawn but will
assist in the attack on the kingside.

26 Re5
White continues with his plan to bring
his Rook to an awesome central post
where it not only applies pressure to
Blacks weak d Pawn but also assists
with the kingside attack. White would
like to play 27 Be4! (if 27 dxe4, then
28 Rxd8 wins easily), threatening 28
Qxh6+! Kxh6 29 Rh5+! gxh5 30 g5++
(a problem like finish!), or 28 Rh5 also
forcing mate.
26 Qc7
Black prevents Whites threat of 27 Be4
by defending his Rook on d8. Black
also sets up a defensive Queen exchange
if Whites Rook on e5 should move.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

Robert M. Snyder

133

27 Be2

28 Rh5!

White plans to reposition his Bishop on


the b1-h7 diagonal by going to d3.

Black resigned here.


Whites immediate threat is 29 Qxh6+
Kg8 30 Qh8++ or 30 Qg7++.
If 28 gxh5, then 29 Bd3+ planning
to meet 29 Kg8 with 30 Qxh6
followed by 31 Qg7++.

27 Qd7?

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdw4wdwd}
{dwdqdpdk}
{pdwdb)p0}
{dp4p$wdw}
{wdw$w!P)}
{dw)wdwdw}
{P)wdB)wd}
{dwdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 138. Position after 27 Qd7.

It would be better for Black to retain


his Queen on the b8-h2 diagonal
to allow a Queen exchange if Whites
Rook on e5 moved. However, even
with better defense Blacks game would
quickly collapse. If 27 Rg8, then 28
h5 g5 29 Bd3+ Kh8 30 Qe3 and Black
has no satisfactory way of defending
this position. Whites plan of playing
31 Bb1 followed by 32 Qd3 and 33
Qh7++ is devastating.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

LESSON 15

2 g6
Black transposes into the Modern
Defense by preparing to fianchetto
his Bishop to g7. If Black played 2
d5, this would be the Caro-Kann,
covered in LESSON THIRTEEN in
Unbeatable Chess Lessons.

Taking Advantage of an
Uncommitted King
Robert Snyder vs. Sergey Kalinitchew
2001
Opening: Modern Defense

3 Nc3

White obtains an advantage in space


along with the Bishop pair early
in the opening. Black ends up in a
situation where castling on either
side is dangerous. White then takes
command of the c file and the threat
of penetration forces Blacks King from
the center. Whites focus then shifts
to the kingside where Blacks King is
exposed to attack. After obtaining an
outside passed h Pawn, it is advanced
to assist in the final execution of Blacks
King.

White develops his Knight toward the


center and defends his e Pawn. Since
there is a distinct possibility of this
Pawn being attacked by either Blacks
Pawn going to d5 or Knight going to
f6 in the near future, this is Whites
most logical and least committing
developing move.

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{rhb1kgn4}
{0pdp0pdp}
{wdpdwdpd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdw)Pdwd}
{dwHwdwdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$wGQIBHR}
vllllllllV

1 e4 c6
This starts off as a Caro-Kann Defense,
but quickly transposes into the Modern
Defense.
2 d4
White isnt challenged in the center so
he takes command of it with his d
Pawn.

Diagram 139. Position after 3 Nc3.

3 Bg7
Black completes his fianchetto and
directly attacks the center with his
Bishop.

-134-

Robert M. Snyder

135

4 Nf3

5 Be2

White develops his Knight toward


the center. Once again this is the least
committing move for White. More
often than not it is easier to establish
where you want to place your Knights
than your Bishops. And, f3 and c3
(f6 and c6 for Black) are, more often
than not, the most natural squares for
development of your Knights.

White develops his Bishop and opens


up the possibility of castling on the
kingside. Since Blacks Bishop is likely
to go to g4 Whites Bishop will be
effective on e2.

4 d6
Black frees his Bishop on the c8-h3
diagonal, opens up d7 for his Knight
and covers the important e5 square.
If Black plays more aggressively with 4
d5, then White would prevent the
pin of his Knight on f3 with 5 h3,
which might then continue 5 dxe4
(if 5 Nf6, then 6 e5 and now 6
Nfd7 7 Bd3 Nf8 8 0-0 Ne6 9 Ne2, or
6 Ne4 7 Nxe4 dxe4 8 Ng5 c5 9 e6
Bxe6 10 Nxe6 fxe6 11 dxc5 and White
stands clearly better in both variations)
6 Nxe4 Nd7 (if 6 Bf5, then 7 Ng3
Be6 8 Be2 c5 9 dxc5 Qxd1+ 10 Bxd1
Nd7 11 Be2 Nxc5 12 0-0 Nf6 13 Be3
Rc8 14 c3 0-0 15 Nd4 Bd7 16 Rfd1
and White stands better) 7 Bc4 Ngf6 8
Nxf6+ Nxf6 9 0-0 0-0 10 Re1 Bf5 11
c3 Qc7 12 Qe2 Rfe8 13 Ne5 Nd5 14
Qf3 and White is better.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rhb1kdn4}
{0pdw0pgp}
{wdp0wdpd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdw)Pdwd}
{dwHwdNdw}
{P)PdB)P)}
{$wGQIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 140. Position after 5 Be2.

5 Bg4
This is the only decent square for this
Bishop. Therefore, Black gets the Bishop
developed before blocking the c8-h3
diagonal (when he develops his Knight
to d7). A reasonable alternative is 5
Nf6, which might continue 6 0-0
0-0 7 Re1 transposing into main lines
of the Pirc.
6 h3
White attacks Blacks Bishop and forces
it to either retreat to an inferior square
or be exchanged for Whites Knight.
Also good is 6 0-0 Nd7 7 Re1.

136

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

6 Bxf3
Black takes care of the threat on his
Bishop by exchanging it for Whites
Knight.
7 Bxf3
White recovers his piece. White has a
very comfortable game because he has
both a spatial advantage and the Bishop
pair.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdw1kdn4}
{0pdn0pgp}
{wdp0wdpd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdw)Pdwd}
{dwHwGBdP}
{P)Pdw)Pd}
{$wdQIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 141. Position after 8 Be3.

7 Nd7

8 e6

Black develops his queenside Knight


to its most active available square.
Also playable is 7 Qb6, which
might continue 8 Ne2 Nf6 9 0-0
Nbd7 10 c3 0-0 11 Qc2 and White
stands better.

Black opens up the e7 square for


his Knight and adds support for the
placement of a Pawn on d5. However,
at this point there is nothing wrong
with the straightforward development
of the Knight with 8 Ngf6, which
might continue 9 Qd3 0-0 10 0-0 Qc7
11 Rfe1 and White stands better.

8 Be3
White develops his Bishop, completes
his minor piece development and adds
a second defender to his d Pawn.
White also keeps open the choice
of which side to castle. However, it
would be reasonable for White to
castle right away with 8 0-0, which
might continue 8 Ngf6 9 Re1 00 10 Qd3 Qa5 11 Be3 and White
stands better.

9 Qd3
Whites Queen is placed on a more
active post and opens up the possibility
of castling queenside.
9 Ne7
Black completes his minor piece
development. If Black develops his
Knight to f6, it is a potential target
for Whites Pawns. If 9 Ngf6, the
game might continue 10 0-0-0 0-0 11
g4 d5 12 g5 dxe4 13 Nxe4 Nxe4 14
Qxe4. White would not only have a

Robert M. Snyder

nice spatial advantage and the Bishop


pair but also attacking chances on the
kingside. Whites plan in this instance
is to advance his h Pawn.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
10 h4!

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{0pdnhpgp}
{wdp0pdpd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdw)Pdw)}
{dwHQGBdw}
{P)Pdw)Pd}
{$wdwIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 142. Position after 10 h4.

White takes advantage of the absence


of a Black Knight at f6 (which would
cover the h5 and g4 squares) to
expand on the kingside. Black now lacks
a comfortable place to locate his King.
If 10 0-0, White gets a strong attack
after 11 h5. If Black castles queenside
with 10 Qa5 11 h5 0-0-0, then
White has a good game after 12 h6.
10 h5
Black restrains the advance of Whites
h Pawn at the expense of weakening
his kingside. After this, Black must put
aside any thoughts of castling kingside

137

because White would have the natural


break of moving a Pawn to g4.
11 0-0-0
White removes his King from the
center and brings his queenside Rook
into play.
White is nicely situated to continue
his expansion in the center and on the
kingside.
11 d5
Black finally places a Pawn in the center
with the idea of restricting Whites
expansion. A move to be considered
here is 11 Qa5 to bring the Queen
actively into play and clear the way for
queenside castling. After 11 Qa5 the
game might continue 12 Kb1 0-0-0 13
Rhe1 and White is clearly better.
12 Kb1
This consolidating move has two ideas
behind it:
1. It shores-up the safety of Whites
King by moving him even further
away from the center and adds
protection to the a Pawn. This
is an often used idea when castling
queenside.
2. It is part of a long term plan by
White to open up c1 for use by a
Rook if his c Pawn is advanced.

138

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

12 Nb6

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{rdw1kdw4}
{0pdwhpgw}
{whpdpdpd}
{dwdpdwdp}
{wdw)Pdw)}
{dwHQGBdw}
{P)Pdw)Pd}
{dKdRdwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 143. Position after 12 Nb6.

Blacks Knight heads toward the strong


outpost on c4. Blacks idea is that
White will need to weaken himself
(move a Pawn to b3) on the queenside
to prevent the Knight from staying on
c4. However, White will later turn
the Pawn on b3 into a strong point.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
13 Bg5
White takes advantage of Blacks darksquare weaknesses by repositioning his
Bishop and pinning Blacks Knight on
e7. White is not concerned about
Black driving his Bishop back with 13
f6 because this would block out his
own Bishop along the h8-a1 diagonal
and drive Whites Bishop to the h2b8 diagonal after 14 Bf4.

13 Qc7
Black brings his Queen to a more
active square, places her on the b8-h2
diagonal and unpins his Knight.
14 e5
The reasons behind this move are:
1. It shuts down the b8-h2 diagonal
for Blacks Queen and the h8-a1
diagonal for Blacks Bishop.
2. It gains a strong foothold on Blacks
weak f6 square.
The weak points of this move are:
1. Black now has an opportunity
to prepare to strike at the base of
Whites Pawn chain with his c
Pawn.
2. Blacks Knight has the f5 square
available to it.
It would be more accurate to maintain
the tension in the center and increase
pressure on the potentially open e file
with 14 Rhe1.
14 Nc4
Black immediately takes the outpost for
his Knight. Instead, Black should have
prepared to strike at Whites Pawn base
with his c Pawn by playing 14 a6,
which might continue 15 Ne2 c5 16
c3 although White still stands better. It
would be weak to play 14 c5 because
of 15 Nb5 Qc6 16 Nd6+.

Robert M. Snyder

15 Na4
White attacks the c5 square. This
restrains the advance of Blacks c Pawn
and makes c5 a potential post for
Whites Knight. The move also allows
for the advance of Whites c Pawn.
However, it would be slightly stronger
to drive Blacks Knight away with 15 b3
Nb6 16 g4 hxg4 17 Bxg4.

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{rdwdkdw4}
{0p1whpgw}
{wdpdpdpd}
{dwdp)wGp}
{Ndn)wdw)}
{dwdQdBdw}
{P)Pdw)Pd}
{dKdRdwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 144. Position after 15 Na4.

139

Pawn will support the placement of a


Pawn on c4.
16 Na5
Black gets his Knight out of attack.
White would also come out on top
after 16 Na3+ 17 Kb2 Nb5 18 c3
(18 c4? Nxd4!).
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
17 Rhe1
White brings his Rook to the active
central file and reinforces the e Pawn.
This is in anticipation of the possibility
of Black trying to undermine the
defense of Whites e Pawn by moving
his Pawn to c5.

15 b6

17 Nf5

Black prevents Whites Knight from


entering c5 and supports the possible
placement of a Pawn on c5. However,
it would be better for Black to bring his
other Knight into play with 15 Nf5,
which might continue 16 b3 Na3+ (if
16 Nb6, then 17 Nc5) 17 Kc1 with
White maintaining some advantage.

Blacks Knight finally comes to life and


occupies the strong post on f5. From
there it applies pressure to Whites d
and h Pawns. See if you can find
Whites best move here without looking
at the next move in the game.

16 b3
Blacks Knight is driven away from its
active post on c4 and Whites b

18 Nb2
White repositions his Knight to where
it can support the placement of a Pawn
on c4 or possibly go to d3. Whites
Pawn break points are on c4 and
g4. Often timing is important and

140

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

White wants to be sure that proper


preparations have been made for either
break.
Black has the same problems as before;
his King remains in the center where
White is strongly situated and White
has a spatial advantage as well as the
Bishop pair. Currently the Bishop pair
isnt a significant advantage because of
the closed position, but in the long run
this position is likely to open up.

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{rdwdkdw4}
{0w1wdpgw}
{w0pdpdpd}
{hwdp)nGp}
{wdw)wdw)}
{dPdQdBdw}
{PHPdw)Pd}
{dKdR$wdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 145. Position after 18 Nb2.

18 Nb7?
This is too slow. Black should have
tried to prevent White from playing
c4 with 18 b5. The game might
continue 19 g4! hxg4 (if 19 Nxh4,
then 20 Be2 hxg4 21 Rh1 Nf5 22
Rxh8+ Bxh8 23 Rh1 Bg7 24 Bxg4 and
Black is in bad shape) 20 Bxg4 Nh6 21
Bh3 and White stands better.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

19 c4
White puts his plan in action. He
restrains Blacks queenside Pawns,
applies pressure in the center and
plans to open and use the c file to his
advantage.
19 Rc8
Black realizes that White will have an
opportunity to open the c file and
place a Rook on it. Therefore, Black
brings his Rook onto the c file in an
attempt to contest it. However, you
dont need to look too deep to see that
White will win control of the file.
20 cxd5
White continues with his plan of
opening up the c file for his Rook.
20 cxd5
Black recovers his Pawn and seems to
dominate the recently opened c file.
However, Blacks occupation of the c
file will be short lived. Black is losing
after 20 exd5 21 g4 hxg4 (if 21
Ne7, then 22 gxh5 gxh5 23 Qe2 and
Blacks h Pawn falls or White continues
to build pressure with 23 Rg1) 22 Bxg4
Qd7 23 h5 Qe6 24 Qa6.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

Robert M. Snyder

21 Rc1

22 Qxc8

White attacks Blacks Queen and


continues with his plan to take control
of the c file.

Black recovers his Rook.

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{wdrdkdw4}
{0n1wdpgw}
{w0wdpdpd}
{dwdp)nGp}
{wdw)wdw)}
{dPdQdBdw}
{PHwdw)Pd}
{dK$w$wdw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 146. Position after 21 Rc1.

21 Qd7
Black gets his Queen out of attack,
keeps his Rook on c8 protected and
covers the e8-a4 diagonal. Immediate
disaster would result after 21 Qb8?
22 Qb5+ Kf8 23 Rxc8+ Qxc8 24 Rc1
Qe8 (if 24 Qb8, then 24 Qd7) 25
Qa6 planning to meet 25 Qb8 with
26 Qxa7!.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
22 Rxc8+
White removes Blacks Rook from the
c file and sets up Blacks Queen as a
target once again.

141

23 Rc1
White attacks Blacks Queen and takes
command of the open c file.
23 Qd7
Black gets his Queen out of attack and
covers the e8-a4 diagonal. Once again
23 Qb8 would result in immediate
disaster after 24 Qb5+ Kf8 25 Qd7. See
if you can find Whites best move here
without looking at the next move in the
game.

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{0ndqdpgw}
{w0wdpdpd}
{dwdp)nGp}
{wdw)wdw)}
{dPdQdBdw}
{PHwdw)Pd}
{dK$wdwdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 147. Position after 23 Qd7.

24 Be2!
White repositions his Bishop on the
active f1-a6 diagonal threatening 25
Qb5 followed by penetrating on the c
file.

142

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

24 0-0
Due to Whites threat of 25 Qb5, Black
is compelled to remove his King from
the center. See if you can find Whites
best move here without looking at the
next move in the game.
25 g4
Now that Black committed his King by
castling, White shifts his attack to the
kingside. White attacks Blacks Knight
and h Pawn. This leads to the opening
of lines against Blacks weakened castled
position.
25 hxg4
Black removes Whites menacing g
Pawn.
26 Bxg4

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{0ndqdpgw}
{w0wdpdpd}
{dwdp)nGw}
{wdw)wdB)}
{dPdQdwdw}
{PHwdw)sd}
{dK$wdwdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 148. Position after 26 Bxg4.

White recovers his Pawn with the threat


of opening more lines and further

breaking up Blacks kingside by an


advance of his h Pawn.
26 Rc8?
The c file will be almost useless to
Black. This gives White valuable time
to shift his Rook to the attack on the
kingside. Blacks only chance for survival
is 26 f6 27 exf6 Bxf6 28 Bxf6 Rxf6
29 Qe2! Nbd6 (if 29 Nxd4? or 29
Nxh4?, then 30 Qe5 wins) 30 Qe5
with a very difficult position for Black.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
27 Rh1
White avoids an exchange of Rooks
and shifts his Rook to the attack on the
kingside. White now threatens to open
up more lines on the kingside with 28
h5.
27 Qc7
Black attempts to get counter-play
by applying pressure along the open
c file and to Whites Pawn on e5.
White must concern himself with
the possibility of Black sacrificing his
Knight on d4 followed by capturing
the e Pawn.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

Robert M. Snyder

143

28 Bxf5

29 Kf8

White removes Blacks strongly posted


Knight, which is applying pressure to
Whites d Pawn.

Black removes his King from the attack


along the g file. If 29 Kh7, then
White wins after 30 Qe2 Rh8 31 Bf6
Rg8 32 Qh5+ Bh6 33 Qxh6+! Kxh6
34 Rxg8 (threatening 35 Rh8+ Kg6 36
h5++) f4 (if 34 Kh5, then 35 f3) 35
h5 (threatening 36 Rh8++) Kxh5 36
Nd3 (threatening 37 Nxf4+ Kh6 38
Rh8++) Kh6 37 Nxf4 and Black must
lose his Queen to avoid 38 Rh8++ (i.e.
37 Qd8 38 Bxd8).
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

28 gxf5
Black recovers his piece. Recapturing
with 28 exf5 was the lesser of two
evils. This would leave Black with a
weak isolated d Pawn and White with
a strong attack after 29 h5.

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{wdrdwdkd}
{0n1wdpgw}
{w0wdpdwd}
{dwdp)pGw}
{wdw)wdw)}
{dPdQdwdw}
{PHwdw)sd}
{dKdwdwdR}
vllllllllV

30 h5
Whites outside passed Pawn is used
to assist in the attack. As it gets closer
to the 8th rank it will have threats of
Queening.

Diagram 149. Position after 28 gxf5.

29 Rg1
Whites Rook is placed on the open g
file, aiming at Blacks exposed King.
White threatens 30 Bf6 or 30 Bh6.
Slightly more accurate for White is the
zwischenzug (a German word meaning
in-between move) 29 Rc1 to first
drive Blacks Queen off the c file and
then, after 29 Qd7, to play 30 Rg1.
In either case Black is lost at this point.

30 Qc3
Black attempts to slow down Whites
attack by challenging his Queen. Blacks
situation would be hopeless after 30
Bh8 31 h6 f6 32 Bxf6 Bxf6 33 exf6
Qh2 34 Qg3.
31 h6
White ignores Blacks Queen and
threatens Blacks Bishop with the deadly
advance of his h Pawn.

144

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

31 Bh8
Black resists the loss of material for as
long as possible by getting his Bishop
out of attack and setting up a blockade
on Blacks passed h Pawn. See if you
can find Whites best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.

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{wdrdwiwg}
{0ndwdpdw}
{w0wdpdw)}
{dwdp)pGw}
{wdw)wdwd}
{dP1Qdwdw}
{PHwdw)sd}
{dKdwdw$w}
vllllllllV

Diagram 150. Position after 31 Bh8.

32 Bf6
White attacks Blacks Bishop, which has
no way of being defended, and opens
the g file for his Rook. White plans to
exchange Bishops and clear the way for
the advance of his h Pawn.

covers the e7 and g7 squares. This


allows White to set up mating threats
against Blacks King. At this point Black
is dead in the water and can do nothing
except to wait for death to occur.
33 Qxd3+
This frees Blacks Rook from being
tied down to the defense of his Queen.
However, the Queen exchange will
do nothing to help matters on the
kingside.
34 Nxd3

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{0ndwdpdw}
{w0wdp)w)}
{dwdpdpdw}
{wdw)wdwd}
{dPdNdwdw}
{Pdwdw)sd}
{dKdwdw$w}
vllllllllV

Diagram 151. Position after 34 Nxd3.

White recovers his Queen.


32 Bxf6
Once again, Black resists the loss of
material by exchanging his threatened
Bishop.
33 exf6
White recovers his Bishop and brings
a Pawn to f6. On f6 Whites Pawn

34 Rc3
Black tries to distract White from
advancing his h Pawn by attacking
Whites unprotected Knight on c3.
Trying to make a run for it with 34
Ke8 allows Whites Pawn to Queen
after 35 Rg8+ Kd7 36 h7.

Robert M. Snyder

See if you can find Whites best move


here without looking at the next move
in the game.
35 h7
White ignores the attack on his Knight
and continues with his plan to advance
his h Pawn with the threat of 36
Rg8++.
35 Rxd3
This is Blacks way of resigning since it
would be ridiculous to play on after 35
Ke8 36 h8=Q+.
36 Rg8++

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{wdwdwiRd}
{0ndwdpdP}
{w0wdp)wd}
{dwdpdpdw}
{wdw)wdwd}
{dPdrdwdw}
{Pdwdw)sd}
{dKdwdwdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 152. Position after 36 Rg8.

Also 36 h8=Q++ or 36 h8=R++ would


have done the trick!

145

LESSON 16

is to provoke White to overextend his


Pawn center, which will then become
a target.
Whites plan is to obtain a strong Pawn
center and a spatial advantage. White
must be careful because it is easy to lose
control of the Pawns and allow Blacks
plan to become successful.

Position Under Siege


Sax vs. Hecht
Amsterdam, 1972
Opening: Alekhines Defense
White uses his e Pawn to create
a wedge in the enemy camp and to
cramp Blacks game. White provokes
Black to weaken on the kingside. After
Black makes the mistake of castling on
the kingside he ends up in a position
where he can do little but wait for
Whites assault. After a sloppy defense
by Black, White delivers a devastating
blow by sacrificing a piece to expose
Blacks King to a deadly attack.
1 e4 Nf6

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{dwdwdwdw}
{wdwdPdwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{P)P)W)P)}
{$NGQIBHR}
vllllllllV

2 e5
White gets his Pawn out of attack and
threatens Blacks Knight on f6. This
aggressive move is Whites only realistic
attempt to get a significant advantage
out of the opening. Whites only other
reasonable move, 2 Nc3, allows Black
to transpose into the Vienna Game with
2 e5 or obtain approximate equality
with 2 d5. After 2 d5 the game
might continue 3 e5 (if 3 exd5, then 3
Nxd5 4 Bc4 Nb6 5 Bb3 Nc6 6 Nf3
Bf5 7 a4 a5 8 0-0 e6 9 d4 Be7) d4 4
exf6 dxc3 5 fxg7 cxd2+ 6 Bxd2 Bxg7.
2 Nd5

Diagram 153. Position after 1 Nf6.

Black initiates Alekhines Defense.


Black develops his Knight and
threatens Whites e Pawn. Blacks idea

Black gets his Knight out of attack.


This is the only good active square for
the Knight. If 2 Ne4, Blacks Knight
is in danger of being trapped after 3 d4.
A possible continuation might be 3
e6 (if 3 f6, then 4 Bd3 d5 5 Nc3
planning to meet 5 Bf5 with 6 Qf3,
or 5 f5 with 6 Nce2 or 5 Nxc3?
with 6 Qh5+) 4 Nh3 h6 (if 4 Nc6,

-146-

Robert M. Snyder

then 5 Bd3 is strong) 5 Qg4 d5 6 f3 h5


7 Qf4 g5 8 Nxg5 Nxg5 9 Qxg5.
3 d4
White occupies the center with another
Pawn, frees his queenside pieces and
provides protection to Whites advanced
e Pawn. Black holds his own after 3
Nc3 Nxc3 and now if 4 bxc3 or 4 dxc3,
then 4 d6.
3 d6

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{dwdn)wdw}
{wdw)wdwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$NGQIBHR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 154. Position after 3 d6.

Black applies pressure to Whites Pawn


center by attacking Whites e Pawn
and freeing his Bishop on the c8-h3
diagonal. It would be a mistake to
immediately develop the other Knight
with 3 Nc6? because 4 c4 Nb6
(better is 4 Ndb4 5 Nf3 e6 6 Nc3
d5 7 a3 Na6 8 cxd5 exd5 9 Bd3 though
White has a substantial positional
advantage) 5 d5 Nxe5 6 c5 Nbc4 7
Qd4 b5 8 cxb6e.p. c5 9 Qc3 and one
of the Knights must die!

147

4 Bc4
White develops his Bishop and
threatens Blacks Knight on d5. The
most common move played here is 4
Nf3, which will be covered in LESSON
EIGHTEEN.
Whites most aggressive move 4 c4
leads to the Four Pawns or Chase
Variation after 4 Nb6 5 f4. White
obtains a massive Pawn center, which
can be effectively attacked by Black.
After 4 c4 Nb6 5 f4 the game might
continue 5 dxe5 6 fxe5 Nc6 7 Be3
Bf5 8 Nc3 e6 9 Nf3 Qd7 10 Be2 0-0-0
11 0-0 Bg4 12 c5 Nd5 13 Nxd5 Qxd5
14 Ng5 Bxe2 15 Qxe2 Nxd4 16 Bxd4
Qxd4+ 17 Kh1 Qd2 18 Qxd2 Rxd2 19
Rxf7 Bxc5 20 Nxe6 Bb6 with a fairly
even game.
4 Nb6
Black gets his Knight out of attack and
threatens Whites Bishop on c4. We
will examine some other possibilities
for Black:
1. 4 dxe5 5 dxe5 e6 6 Nf3 Nc6
7 0-0 Be7 8 Qe2 0-0 9 Re1 and
Black has an extremely cramped
and uncomfortable position.
2. 4 e6. Blocking the c8-h3
diagonal for the Bishop leads to a
difficult game for Black after 5 Nf3
Be7 6 0-0 0-0 7 Re1 Nc6 8 c3 and
White is clearly better.

148

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

3. 4 c6. Of the three alternatives


given to the text move, this is
the strongest. The game might
continue 5 Nf3 Bg4 6 h3 Bxf3 7
Qxf3 e6 8 Qg3 dxe5 9 dxe5 Nd7
10 0-0 Qc7 11 Re1 0-0-0 12 Nd2
and White stands slightly better.
5 Bb3
White gets his Bishop out of attack,
keeps it on the long a2-g8 diagonal
and continues to apply pressure on
Blacks f Pawn.
5 dxe5
This is Blacks most aggressive and
forcing variation. He opens the d file
for his Queen and threatens Whites
d Pawn. Blacks less aggressive choices
favor White:
1. 5 Nc6. This allows White to
make a strong Pawn sacrifice to
cramp Blacks game and give Black
a weak Pawn on e6. The game
might continue 6 e6! fxe6 7 Nf3 e5
(Black is willing to return the Pawn
to gain some freedom) 8 dxe5 d5 9
Nc3 e6 (if 9 Bg4, then 10 Nxd5
e6 11 Bg5 Bxf3 12 gxf3 Qxg5 13
Nxc7+ Kf7 14 Bxe6+ Kg6 15 f4
Qg2 16 f5+ Kh6 17 Qd2+ and
White is winning) 10 Ne2 Bc5 11
c3 0-0 12 Nf4 and White stands
clearly better.

After 5 Nc6 6 e6! fxe6 7 Nf3,


Blacks other choices are:
a. 7 Na5 8 Ng5 Nxb3 9 axb3
Nd5 10 0-0 g6 11 Qf3 Nf6 12
Re1 Be7 13 Nc3 0-0 14 Nxe6
Bxe6 15 Rxe6 Qd7 16 Qh3
d5.
b. 7 d5 8 Nc3 g6 9 h4 Bg7 10
h5 e5 11 Nxe5 Nxe5 12 dxe5
Bxe5 13 Nxd5 Nxd5 14 Qxd5
Qxd5 15 Bxd5 c6 16 Bb3.
c. 7 g6 8 Ng5 and now:
if 8 d5, then 9 Qf3 Nxd4
10 Qf7+ Kd7 11 c3 Nxb3 12
axb3 Bh6 13 Qxe6+ Ke8 14
Qf7+ Kd7 15 Qf3.
if 8 Bg7 then 9 Bxe6 Rf8 10
d5 Nd4 11 0-0.
2. 5 Bf5. This allows White to take
advantage of Blacks weak points
on f7 and b7 with 6 Qf3 Qc8 7
Bxf7+ Kxf7 8 g4 e6 9 gxf5 exf5 10
Nh3 Nc6 11 Qb3+ d5 12 Be3 a5
13 a3 and White is clearly better.
3. 5 e6. Black blocks his Bishop
on the c8-h3 diagonal and
makes it easy for Whites to get an
advantage. A possible continuation
is 6 Nf3 Nc6 7 Qe2 dxe5 8 dxe5
Nd4 9 Nxd4 Qxd4 10 0-0 Bd7 11
Nc3 Bc6 12 Rd1 Qc5 13 Bf4.
4. 5 g6. This allows White to take
advantage of Blacks weakness on
f7 and provoke Black to move
his d Pawn a second time. 6 Qf3

Robert M. Snyder

d5 7 Ne2 Bg7 8 0-0 0-0 9 Re1 and


White has a clear advantage.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rhb1kgw4}
{0p0w0p0p}
{whwdwdwd}
{dwdw0wdw}
{wdw)wdwd}
{dBdwdwdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$NGQIwHR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 155. Position after 5 dxe5.

149

Blacks Bishop on the c8-h3 diagonal,


but this is the lesser of two evils.
If 6 g6, White would play 7 Qxe5
threatening Blacks Rook, which would
give Black the unpleasant choice of
either weakening his kingside with 7
f6 8 Qe3 or losing his ability to castle
on the kingside with 7 Rg8 8 Nc3.
7 dxe5
White recovers his Pawn. Whites
aggressively placed Pawn on e5 will
cramp Blacks position. Black hopes to
be able to attack the Pawn on e5 and
make it a target.

6 Qh5

7 Nc6

White removes his Queen from the d


file before recovering his Pawn. White
now threatens 7 Bxf7+ Kd7 8 Qxe5. As
a general rule, bringing out the Queen
aggressively this early in the game isnt
recommended. However, in this case
Whites Queen isnt an easy target for
Black and she will give White some
attacking chances on the kingside.
Not 6 dxe5? because White would lose
his ability to castle after 6 Qxd1+ 7
Kxd1.

Black develops his Knight toward the


center and applies pressure to the Pawn
on e5. Blacks common alternative
7 a5 (threatening to win Whites
Bishop with 8 a4) will be covered
in LESSON SEVENTEEN. If 7
c5 (threatening to win Whites Bishop
with 8 c4), then 8 c3 gives White a
comfortable game.

6 e6
Black defends against the threat on his
f Pawn by blocking Whites Bishop on
the a2-g8 diagonal. This also blocks

8 Nf3
White develops his Knight toward the
center, reinforces the defense of his e
Pawn, and clears the way for castling on
the kingside.

150

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

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{rdb1kgw4}
{0p0wdp0p}
{whndpdwd}
{dwdw)wdQ}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dBdwdNdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$NGwIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 156. Position after 8 Nf3.

8 g6
At the expense of weakening the dark
squares on the kingside Black drives
Whites Queen away from her strong
post on h5 and from the defense of
the Pawn on e5.
It would be better for Black to play 8
a5, threatening 9 a4. After 8
a5 the game might continue 9 a4 Nd4
(if 9 Bb4+, then 10 Nbd2 Nd4 11
Nxd4 Bxd2+ 12 Bxd2 Qxd4 13 0-0-0)
10 Nxd4 Qxd4 11 0-0 g6 12 Qg5 Bg7
13 Re1 h6 14 Qg3 Nd7 15 c3 Qc5 16
Bf4 and White has a clear advantage.
White is clearly better after 8 Nd4 9
Nc3 Nxf3+ 10 Qxf3 Qd4 11 Bf4 Bd7
12 Rd1 Qc5 13 0-0.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

9 Qg4
White gets his Queen out of attack and
keeps her actively posted. On g4 she
covers the entire 4th rank and continues
to apply pressure on the kingside.
9 h6
At the expense of further weakening his
kingside, Black prevents the possible
entry of Whites Bishop on g5. There
are often trade offs and these must be
carefully balanced when weakening
your Pawn structure.
Blacks alternative to weakening his
kingside is to fianchetto and increase
pressure on Whites e Pawn with 9
Bg7. However, after 9 Bg7, Black
ends up weakening his kingside further
anyway after 10 Bg5 Ne7 11 Nc3 h6
12 Rd1 Bd7 13 Be3.
10 Nc3
White develops his Knight toward the
center where it restricts Blacks use of
d5 and has the potential of going
to e4 to increase pressure on Blacks
weak dark squares.
10 Bg7
Black completes his fianchetto with the
threat of 11 Nxe5. As mentioned
previously Blacks plan is to seek
counter-play by attacking Whites
advanced e Pawn.

Robert M. Snyder

11 Bf4

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{rdb1kdw4}
{0p0wdpgw}
{whndpdp0}
{dwdw)wdw}
{wdwdwGQd}
{dBHwdNdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$wdwIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 157. Position after 11 Bf4.

White develops his last minor piece and


defends his threatened e Pawn. This
also allows White to bring his Rook
into play on the open d file at a time
of his choosing.
A slightly stronger alternative is to
reinforce the e Pawn with 11 Qg3,
planning to meet 11 Qe7 with 12
Be3 Bd7 13 0-0 0-0-0 14 Rfe1 and
White is clearly better.
11 Qe7
Black brings his Queen to a more active
square and removes her from the open
d file where she is likely to be a target
to a Rook.
12 0-0
White removes his King from the
center and connects his Rooks on the
first rank.

151

12 0-0?
This is a real mistake! Black castles
right into his weakened position on the
kingside. It would be far more logical
to prepare to remove the King from
the center by castling on the queenside
with 12 Bd7, though White is clearly
dominant in the center and kingside
after 13 a4 Na5 14 Be3. As far as the
queenside goes, Black does not have
any advantage there as compensation.
13 Qg3
Since Black is in such a restricted
position, White wants to further
improve his position before tying to
force matters. In anticipation of a
possible build up against his Pawn on
e5, White defends the Pawn again
and removes the Queen from the h3c8 diagonal. With Whites Queen
on g4 (along the h3-c8 diagonal)
Black has the possibility of posting his
Knight on d5 and if captured, then
Black can recapture with his e Pawn
with a discovered attack on Whites
Queen. A good alternative for White is
to bring his Rook to the open d file
and attack the d5 square a third time
with 13 Rad1, which might continue
13 a5 14 a4 Nd7 15 Rfe1.

152

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

13 a5
Black tries to get counter-play on the
queenside and threatens to win Whites
Bishop with 14 a4. See if you can
find Whites best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.
14 a4

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{rdbdw4kd}
{dp0w1pgw}
{whndpdp0}
{0wdw)wdw}
{PdwdwGwd}
{dBHwdN!w}
{w)PdW)P)}
{$wdwdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 158. Position after 14 a4.

White prevents Black from winning his


Bishop by stopping Blacks a Pawn
from advancing. Black is in a difficult
situation. It is hard for him to find a
constructive plan and the state of his
position can best be described as under
siege. It is in situations like this where
patience, combined with a careful and
stubborn defense, is required in order to
have any chance of survival.
14 Qb4?
This overaggressive move misplaces the
Queen. She played a better role on e7
to defend the kingside. Black should try

to improve the location of his Knight


on b6 by attacking Blacks e Pawn
with 14 Nd7. After 14 Nd7, the
game might continue 15 Rfe1 Nc5 16
Bc4 Nb4 17 Re2. Though White is
clearly better here, Black would be in
better shape than after the move played
in the game.
15 Rfe1
White activates a Rook and adds
protection to his Pawn on e5. This
move also covers the e4 square and
supports the possible centralization of
Whites Knight on that square.
A strong alternative for White is to
attack Blacks weak Pawn on c7 with
15 Nb5. This would force Black to
either defend his c Pawn by retreating
his Queen (and losing time) with 15
Qe7 or to offer the Pawn as a sacrifice.
15 Nd4?
Black continues to play inaccurately.
Black seeks to relieve pressure by
exchanging Knights. However, this
gives White an opportunity to gain
more time and increase the pressure on
Black.
A less aggressive, but more accurate,
defense by Black is 15 Rd8. The
game might continue 16 Ne4 Nd7 17
Rad1 leaving Black with a cramped
position. See if you can find Whites

Robert M. Snyder

move here without looking at the next


move in the game.
16 Nxd4
White removes Blacks menacing
Knight and draws Blacks Queen onto
the open d file where she will become
a target.
16 Qxd4
Black recovers his Knight. See if you
can find Whites next move here
without looking at the next move in
the game.

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{rdbdw4kd}
{dp0wdpgw}
{whwdpdp0}
{0wdw)wdw}
{Pdw1wGwd}
{dBHwdw!w}
{w)PdW)P)}
{$wdw$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 159. Position after 16 Qxd4.

17 Rad1
White brings his Rook onto the open
d file and threatens Blacks exposed
Queen.
17 Qb4
Black gets his Queen out of attack.
Weaker would be 17 Qc5 because

153

White would have gained even more


time by attacking Blacks Queen again
with 18 Ne4.
See if you can find Whites next move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
18 Ne4!
White ignores the attack on his a
Pawn and brings his Knight to the
attack on the kingside. On e4 the
Knight covers the critical f6 and g5
squares. White now threatens to invade
with 19 Nf6+ or 19 Qh4.
18 Nd5
Blacks Knight tries to come to the
rescue of the situation on the kingside
by covering the f6 square and
attacking Whites Bishop on f4. If
Black played 18 Nd7, White would
continue with 19 Qh4 h5 (not 20
g5? because of 21 Bxg5 hxg5 22 Qxg5
with the crushing threat of 23 Nf6+)
20 Qg5 with a devastating kingside
attack.
If Black went Pawn grabbing with 18
Nxa4?, he would have been quickly
punished after 19 Bd2 Qb5 20 Bxa4
Qxa4 21 Qh4 with the threats of 22
Nf6+ (winning Blacks Queen with a
discovered attack) and 22 Bxh6.

154

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

19 Bd2

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{rdbdw4kd}
{dp0wdpgw}
{wdwdpdp0}
{0wdn)wdw}
{P1wdNdwd}
{dBdwdw!w}
{w)PGW)P)}
{dwdR$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 160. Position after 19 Bd2.

White gets his Bishop out of attack and


drives Blacks Queen to a less active
square.
19 Qb6
Black gets his Queen out of attack. A
retreat of the Queen to e7 would lead
to a lost position after 19 Qe7 20
Bxd5 exd5 21 Nf6+ Bxf6 22 exf6 Qxf6
23 Bxh6.
20 Qh4
White repositions his Queen and
attacks Blacks dark-square weakness on
the kingside. Whites immediate threat
is 21 Bxh6. This threat provokes Black
to further weaken the Pawn shield
around his King.

20 g5?
Black would last longer after 20
h5 21 Nf6+ Nxf6 22 exf6 Bh8 23
Bc3. Although, in the long run, Black
should not survive Whites terrific bind.
Black is also dying after 20 Bxe5 21
Bxh6 Bg7 (if 21 Re8, then 22 Bg5 is
strong) 22 Be3 Nxe3 23 Ng5! Re8 24
Rxe3 with an overwhelming attack.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
21 Bxg5!

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{dp0wdpgw}
{w1wdpdw0}
{0wdn)wGw}
{PdwdNdw!}
{dBdwdwdw}
{w)PdW)P)}
{dwdR$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 161. Position after 21 Bxg5.

This sacrifice cracks Blacks castled


position open by stripping the King of
his Pawn shield. Whites biggest threat
is 22 Nf6+.

Robert M. Snyder

21 hxg5
Black had little choice but to remove
Blacks Bishop before it did more damage.
22 Nxg5
White continues to strip Blacks King of
his Pawn shield and brings his Knight
directly into the attack. White is now
threatening 23 Qh7++.
22 Re8
Black defends against the mate threat
by opening up an escape for Blacks
King on f8.
23 Re4
White begins to maneuver his Rook
toward the kingside so it can join the
attack. Black is helpless against the
impending disaster. At this point White
has a variety of ways to win.
23 Bd7
Black finally gets his last minor piece
developed and connects his Rooks.
However, it is too late to do any good.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

155

24 Rg4

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{dp0bdpgw}
{w1wdpdwd}
{0wdn)wHw}
{PdwdwdR!}
{dBdwdwdw}
{w)PdW)P)}
{dwdRdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 162. Position after 24 Rg4.

White brings his Rook directly into


the assault This is enough to convince
Black to give up. Black resigned here.
If 24 Bc6, then 25 Qh7+ Kf8 26
Nxf7! Ke7 (if 26 Kxf7 then 27
Qxg7++) 27 Rxg7. Or if 24 Re7,
then White wins brilliantly with 25
Qh7+ Kf8 26 Qh8+! Bxh8 27 Nh7+
Ke8 28 Rg8++.

LESSON 17

8 a4

Sacrificing on f6 Against
the Castled King
Sax vs. Ghinda
Bath, 1973
Opening: Alekhines Defense
Just as in the last Lesson, Whites builds a
kingside attack which is one of the ideas
of this variation of Alekhines defense.
This game is similar to LESSON
FIFTEEEN in Unbeatable Chess Lessons.
White offers a Knight sacrifice on f6
against the castled King.
1 e4 Nf6 2 e5 Nd5 3 d4 d6 4 Bc4
Nb6 5 Bb3 dxe5 6 Qh5 e6 7 dxe5 a5

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{whwdpdwd}
{0wdw)wdQ}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dBdwdwdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$NGwIwHR}
vllllllllV

White blocks the advance of Blacks a


Pawn. Playing 8 c3 to open a retreat for
Whites Bishop on b3 is weak because
of 8 Qd3.
A good alternative for White is to open
the a2 square as a retreat for the
Bishop with 8 a3. After 8 a3 the game
might continue 8 a4 (if 8 Nc6,
then 9 Nc3 g6 10 Qe2 Nd4 11 Qe4)
9 Ba2 Nc6 10 Nc3 Ra5 11 f4 Bc5 (if
11 Nd4, then 12 Qd1 is strong) 12
Nf3 Nd4 (if 12 Nd5, then 13 Nxd5
exd5 14 Bd2 Rb5 15 Bc3 0-0 16 0-0-0
gives White a clear advantage) 13 Nxd4
Qxd4 14 Qf3 0-0 15 Ne2 Qd7 16 Bd2
Ra8 17 Nc3 with the idea of 18 0-0-0
and White stands clearly better.
8 Na6
Black develops his Knight to a
temporary location at the edge of the
board with the idea of moving it to
c5 where it will attack Whites Bishop
on b3 and Pawn on a4. Here 8
Nc6 9 Nf3 would transpose into the
analysis to Blacks 8th move in LESSON
SIXTEEN.
9 Nf3

Diagram 163. Position after 7 a5.

Up to this point the moves were the same


as in LESSON SIXTEEN. Black plays
aggressively on the queenside and threatens
to win Whites Bishop with 8 a4.

White develops his Knight, defends his


e Pawn and prepares the possibility of
castling kingside.

-156-

Robert M. Snyder

9 Nc5
Black follows through with his plan
to bring his Knight into play with
an attack on Blacks Bishop at b3
and Pawn on a4. Black would only
weaken the dark squares on his kingside
after 9 g6 10 Qh3.

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{rdb1kgw4}
{dp0wdp0p}
{whwdpdwd}
{0whw)wdQ}
{Pdwdwdwd}
{dBdwdNdw}
{w)PdW)P)}
{$NGwIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 164. Position after 9 Nc5.

10 Ba2
White preserves his Bishop pair and
prevents Black from doubling his
Pawns by 10 Nxb3. This is done at
the cost of losing a tempo and White
must be willing to sacrifice his a
Pawn.
A superior alternative for White is to
continue to develop with 10 0-0 and
allow Black to capture on b3. After
10 0-0 the game might continue 10
Nxb3 11 cxb3 Bd7 (if 11 Qd3,
then 12 Nc3 Qg6 13 Qxg6 hxg6 14
Nb5 Nd5 15 Rd1 threatening 16
Rxd5 exd5 17 Nxc7+) 12 Nc3 Be7 13
Rd1. Whites spatial advantage more

157

than compensates him for the doubled


Pawns and for having a Knight versus
a Bishop.
10 Bd7
Black develops his Bishop and attacks
Whites a Pawn with a third piece.
Immediately going Pawn grabbing with
10 Nbxa4, or 10 Ncxa4, gives
White more than enough play for his
Pawn after 11 0-0.
11 Nc3
White develops his Knight toward the
center and continues to ignore the
attack on his a Pawn. Taking the time
to defend it with 11 b3? blocks Whites
Bishop on the a2-g8 diagonal and
gives Black a good game after 11
Bc6.
11 Nbxa4

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{dp0bdp0p}
{wdwdpdwd}
{0whw)wdQ}
{ndwdwdwd}
{dwHwdNdw}
{B)PdW)P)}
{$wGwIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 165. Position after 11 Nbxa4.

158

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Black accepts the Pawn sacrifice and


threatens to double and isolate Whites
Pawns with 12 Nxc3 13 bxc3.
12 Bg5
White develops his Bishop and threatens
Blacks Queen. Also playable is 12 Ng5,
which might continue 12 g6 (if 12
Qe7, then 13 Nxa4 g6 14 Qe2 Bxa4
15 0-0) 13 Qf3 Qe7 14 Nge4 and
White has sufficient compensation for
his sacrificed Pawn.
12 Be7
Black defends against the threat on
his Queen while getting his last minor
piece developed. If 12 Qc8, then the
game might continue 13 Nxa4 Nxa4 14
Rb1 Bc6 15 0-0 and Whites position is
worth a Pawn.
13 Nxa4
White initiates the exchange of Knights
to avoid having Black capture on c3
(which would give White doubled,
isolated c Pawns).

13 Nxa4

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{rdw1kdw4}
{dp0bgp0p}
{wdwdpdwd}
{0wdw)wGQ}
{ndwdwdwd}
{dwdwdNdw}
{B)PdW)P)}
{$wdwIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 166. Position after 13 Nxa4.

Black recovers his Knight and attacks


Whites unprotected b Pawn.
14 Rd1?
White could recover his Pawn with
an even game after 14 Bxe6 Bxe6 15
Rxa4 c5 16 Bxe7 Qxe7. Instead, White
attempts to keep the pressure in return
for his sacrificed material by pinning
Blacks Bishop on d7 with the threat
of 15 Bxe6.
14 Nc5?
The idea of this move is to return the
Knight to its more active post and
defend the e6 square. However, this
is too slow and will give White more
than enough compensation for his
sacrificed Pawn. If Black tried to grab
another Pawn with 14 Nxb2?, then
White would have the strong reply 14
Bxe6! attacking Blacks pinned Bishop

Robert M. Snyder

on d7 and threatening mate with 15


Qxf7++.
Black should have played 14 Bxg5
15 Nxg5 Qe7 and White doesnt have
enough compensation for his Pawn.
White could initiate a series of exchanges
to recover his Pawn after 15 Qe7 by
16 Qxf7+ Qxf7 17 Nxf7 Nxb2 18 Rd4
(if 18 Nxh8, then 18 Nxd1 19 Kxd1
Ke7 20 Ng6+ hxg6 and Black is a Pawn
upBlacks outside passed a Pawn
compensates for his doubled, isolated
g Pawns) Rf8 19 Ng5 Rd8 20 Bxe6
h6 21 Bxd7+ Rxd7 22 Nf3 Rxd4 23
Nxd4 Ke7 23 Ke2 Nc4 gives Black a
clear advantage in the endgame due
to his queenside Pawn majority, more
active pieces and Whites e Pawn
being overextended.
15 Be3
White doesnt give Black any opportunity
to try to simply by exchanging Bishops
on g5. He threatens 16 Bxc5 Bxc5 17
Bxe6.
15 0-0
Black eliminates the threat created by
the pin on his f Pawn by removing
his King from the center.
16 c3
This opens the b1-h7 diagonal for
Whites Bishop.

159

16 Qe8
Black places his Queen on the same
diagonal (e8-h5) as Whites Queen to
meet 17 Bb1 (threatening 18 Qxh7++)
with 17 f5. See if you can find
Whites best move without looking at
the next move in the game.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdq4kd}
{dp0bgp0p}
{wdwdpdwd}
{0whw)wdQ}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dw)wGNdw}
{B)wdW)P)}
{dwdRIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 167. Position after 16 Qe8.

17 Bxc5
White plans to maneuver his Knight to
the strong central post on e4. White
first removes Blacks Knight from its
attack on e4 and draws Blacks Bishop
from away from its attack on g5
(where the Bishop could be exchanged
for Whites Knight when it goes there).
If White immediately plays 17 Ng5,
Black would play 17 Bxg5 18 Qxg5
(if 18 Bxg5, then 18 Ba4 19 Rd4
Bc2) Ba4 19 Rd4 Rd8 and Whites
advantage is minimal.

160

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

17 Bxc5
Black recovers his piece. See if you can
find Whites best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.
18 Ng5
White threatens 19 Qxh7++, which
forces Black to weaken on the kingside.

Black gets his Bishop out of attack and


covers the critical f6 square. If 19
Bb6?, then 20 Nf6+! gxf6 21 exf6
and Black is defenseless against the
impending mate.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
20 Nf6+!

18 h6
Black prevents 19 Qxh7++ and attacks
Whites Knight.

Even with Blacks Bishop covering f6


White penetrates on f6 and offers the
Knight sacrifice.

19 Ne4

20 Bxf6

White gets his Knight out of attack,


centralizes it and attacks Blacks
unprotected Bishop on c5. From
e4 the Knight attacks Blacks weak
f6 square.

The Knight had to be eliminated.


Blacks game would quickly collapse
after 20 gxf6 as Whites Rook would
swing into the attack after 21 Rd3
planning to meet 21 f5 with 22
Qxh6 threatening mate in 2 with 23
Rg3+ or mate in 3 with 23 Rh3.

19 Be7

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdq4kd}
{dp0bgp0w}
{wdwdpdw0}
{0wdw)wdQ}
{wdwdNdwd}
{dw)wdwdw}
{B)wdW)P)}
{dwdRIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 168. Position after 19 Be7.

21 exf6
White recovers his piece and brings his
Pawn to f6 to assist in the kingside
attack. White now threatens to continue
his attack by bringing his Rook to the
kingside with 22 Rd3 followed by 23
Rg3. White also has a secondary threat,
which is to open up Blacks King and
recover his sacrificed Pawn with 22 fxg7
Kxg7 23 Qe5+ f6 24 Qxc7.

Robert M. Snyder

21 Ra6

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdq4kd}
{dp0bdp0w}
{rdwdp)w0}
{0wdwdwdQ}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dw)wdwdw}
{B)wdW)P)}
{dwdRIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 169. Position after 21 Ra6.

Blacks plan is to bring his inactive Rook


into play to defend on the kingside
with 22 e5. Black is willing to return
Whites sacrificed Pawn with hopes of
improving his position.
Being able to defend properly in a
difficult position is just as important as
being able to conduct a good attack. In
practice most successful attacks dont
force a mate before winning material.
In most cases the defender surrenders
material to stop or slow down the
opponents attack. This should be
resisted unless giving up material is
absolutely necessary. However, it will
be shown that other attempts to defend
this position satisfactorily would not
be successful. Evaluations like this
certainly require sound judgment that
can be learned only through practice
and the study of complete games such
as those provided in this book and in
Unbeatable Chess Lessons. We will now

161

examine other possible defenses for


Black.
One possibility for Black would be
to relieve his g Pawn of the task of
defending his Pawn on h6 with 21
Kh7. The idea here is to meet 22 fxg7
with 22 Rg8 followed by recovery of
the g Pawn by 23 Rxg7. Therefore,
after 21 Kh7 White should keep up
the pressure with 22 Bb1+ g6 23 Rd4
Rg8 24 0-0 Bc6 25 Rh4 Qf8 26 Re1.
Black ends up in bad shape here.
Another attempt to defend this position
would be for Black to get his Bishop
into play along the h7-b1 diagonal
where it could defend on the kingside
while gaining time by attacking Whites
Rook with 21 Ba4. After 21 Ba4
Black would plan to meet 22 Rd4 with
22 Bc2 23 fxg7 Kxg7 24 Rh4 Rh8
and Black is holding the fort. Therefore,
after 21 Ba4 White should provoke
Black to further weaken himself with
22 Qg4 (threatening 23 Qxg7++) g6 23
Rd4 Bc2 (if 23 Bb5?, then 24 Qh3
h5 25 Qe3 Kh7 26 Rh4 with threats of
27 Qg5 and 27 Rxh5+ gxh5 28 Qg5)
24 Qe2 Bf5 25 Qe3 g5 (if 25 Kh7,
then 26 Rh4 h5 28 Qg5) 26 Rh4! Qc6
27 f3 with a strong attack.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

162

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

22 fxg7
White opens up Blacks castled position
and sets up a Queen fork.
22 Kxg7
Black recovers the Pawn and removes
the threat to his Rook. See if you can
find Whites best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.
23 Qe5+
White forks Blacks King and unprotected
c Pawn.
23 Kh7
Black gets his King out of check and
removes him from the open g file.
Black hopes to be able to use the open
g file for his Rook in the future.
24 Qxc7

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdq4wd}
{dp!bdpdk}
{rdwdpdw0}
{0wdwdwdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dw)wdwdw}
{B)wdW)P)}
{dwdRIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 170. Position after 24 Qxc7.

White recovers his Pawn and threatens


Blacks Bishop and unprotected b
Pawn.
24 Bc8?
Black gets his Bishop out of attack with
a passive retreat and defends his b
Pawn. Black should have played more
aggressively and prevented White from
castling with 24 Bb5. If White wins
a Pawn with 25 Qxb7 Qc6 26 Qxc6
Bxc6, Blacks active pieces gives him
survival chances in the endgame.
Therefore, after 24 Bb5, White
should avoid Pawn grabbing and
continue with 25 Bb1+ Kh8 26 c4 Bc6
27 Qf4 Kg7 28 Rd3 f5 29 0-0 with a
considerable positional advantage for
White due to his more active pieces
and the somewhat exposed condition
of Blacks King.
25 0-0
White removes his King from the center
and activates his kingside Rook.
25 Rg8
Black activates his Rook by placing it
on the half open g file.
26 Bb1+
White attacks Blacks King and places his
Bishop on the open b1-h7 diagonal.
The Bishop will be very effective on this

Robert M. Snyder

163

diagonal to take advantage of Blacks


somewhat exposed King.

pin on Blacks Rook when it interposes


and leave Blacks first rank exposed.

26 Kh8

27 Rg7

Black gets his King out of check. He,


understandably, doesnt want to block
the g file, but this will allow White to
set up a pin on Blacks Rook and gain
time to force Black to further weaken
his position.
Black should have chosen the lesser of
two evils and gone ahead and blocked
his Rook on the g file with 26 Kg7
planning to meet 27 Qe5+ with 27
f6. Though after 28 Qg3+ Black should
not survive.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

This is Blacks only decent move. Not


27 f6?? because of 28 Qxf6+ Rg7 29
Rd8.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

27 Qe5+

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdbdqdri}
{dpdwdpdw}
{rdwdpdw0}
{0wdw!wdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dw)wdwdw}
{w)wdW)P)}
{dBdRdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 171. Position after 27 Qe5.

Whites Queen swings into the attack


against Blacks King. This will place a

28 Rd4!
Black must realize that the end is near.
White brings his Rook into play with
two ideas:
1. White wants to double his Rooks
with 29 Rfd1 and then play either
30 Rg4 or 30 Rd8.
2. White is threatening to attack
Blacks h Pawn with 29 Rh4.
28 f6
Black attacks Whites Queen with the
idea of removing the menacing pin on
his Rook.
If Black plays 28 f5 (trying to block
Whites Bishop on the b1-h7 diagonal
and covering the g4 square), White
wins easily after 29 Bxf5.
29 Qf4
Simple and good! White takes care of
the threat to his Queen, threatens Blacks
unprotected h Pawn and threatens to

164

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

double Rooks with 30 Rfd1. This is


stronger than 29 Qxf6 e5 30 Rd8.
29 e5
Black chose the most aggressive way
to die. He attacks Whites Queen and
Rook and opens the c8-h3 diagonal
for his Bishop. White would be winning
easily after 29 f5 30 Qxh6+ Kg8 31
Rfd1 Bd7 32 Ba2.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
30 Qxh6+
White gets his Queen out of attack,
attacks Blacks King, wins a Pawn and
opens the h file. Quite a lot for one
simple move!

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdbdqdwi}
{dpdwdw4w}
{rdwdw0w!}
{0wdw0wdw}
{wdw$wdwd}
{dw)wdwdw}
{w)wdW)P)}
{dBdwdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 172. Position after 30 Qxh6.

30 Kg8
Black gets his King out of check. Not
30 Rh7? because of 31 Qxh7++.

31 Rd2
White gets his Rook out of attack
and retains the possibility of doubling
Rooks on the d file. However, a more
aggressive (and faster) way to win is 31
Rh4 threatening 32 Qh8+ Kf7 33 Bg6+
Rxg6 (if 33 Kxg6?, then 34 Qh5++)
34 Rh7+.
After 31 Rh4 the game might continue
31 Kf8 (if 31 Bd7, then 32 Rd1
Kf7 33 Qxg7+! Kxg7 34 Rxd7+ Qxd7
35 Rh7+ followed by 36 Rxd7) 32 Ba2
with the following possibilities:
1. 32 Qg6 33 Qxg6 Rxg6 34 Rh8+
Ke7 35 Rxc8.
2. 32 Be6 33 Rg4! Qf7 (if 33
Bxg4, then 34 Qh8+) 34 Bxe6
Rxe6 35 Rd1 Re8 36 Rd7! Qxd7
37 Qh8+.
31 f5
This is Blacks best attempt to defend.
The Rook is opened on the 6th rank
with a discovered attack on Whites
Queen and Whites Bishop is blocked
on the b1-h7 diagonal.
32 Qh4
White controls the d8 square. This
threatens to win Blacks Queen with a
pin by 32 Rd8.

Robert M. Snyder

32 Kf7

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdbdqdwd}
{dpdwdk4w}
{rdwdwdwd}
{0wdw0pdw}
{wdwdwdw!}
{dw)wdwdw}
{w)w$W)P)}
{dBdwdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 173. Position after 32 Kf7.

Black could have offered more resistance


and prevented the penetration of
Whites Rook on the d file with 32
Rd7. The game might continue 33
Rxd7 Bxd7 (if 33 Qxd7, then 34
Ba2+ Kg7 35 Qg3+ Kf6 36 f4 exf4
37 Qg8 Rd6 38 h4 Rd1 39 Qf8+ Kg6
40 Bf7+) 34 Rd1 Kg7 35 Qc4 Rc6 36
Qd5.
33 f3
There is no need to take time and make
this passive move. White should have
just barreled forward with 33 Rd8 Qc6
34 g3 Be6 35 Qh5+ Ke7 36 Qh8 Rf7
37 Rfd1.
33 Rag6
Black brings his queenside Rook to aid
on the kingside where it applies pressure
on the g file and on Whites g Pawn.
If 33 Qe7, a possible continuation

165

might be 34 Qh5+ Kf6 35 f4 exf4 36


Qh8 Bd7 37 Rd4 Rd6 38 Qh6+ Rg6
39 Qxf4 and White is winning.
34 Re1
White brings his Rook into play by
tying down Blacks Queen to the
defense of his e Pawn and threatens
35 Ba2+ Be6 36 Rxe5.
34 Qe6
Black brings his Queen to a more active
location and prevents White from
playing 35 Ba2+.
35 Qd8
Whites Queen penetrates deep into
Blacks camp. White is a Pawn ahead,
Blacks pieces are poorly coordinated,
and Blacks King is relatively exposed to
attack. White threatens to win Blacks
Queen with 36 Rd6 Qxd6 (if 36
Qe8, then 37 Ba2+ Kf8 38 Rf6+ Rxf6
39 Qxf6+ Rf7 40 Qh8+ Ke7 41 Rxe5+)
37 Ba2+.
35 Rg8?
This results in massive material loss.
Black would last longer with 35
Qb6+ 36 Qxb6 Rxb6 37 Rxe5.
However, allowing White to obtain an
easily won endgame without attempting
to put up a fight probably didnt appeal
to Black.

166

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

See if you can find Whites best move


here without looking at the next move
in the game.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdb!wdrd}
{dpdwdkdw}
{wdwdqdrd}
{0wdw0pdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dw)wdPdw}
{w)w$WdP)}
{dBdw$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 174. Position after 35 Rg8.

36 Qc7+
White attacks Blacks King. Black is
left with no satisfactory way of meeting
this assault on his King and must lose
material.
36 Kf6
Black gets his King out of attack.
Interposing with 36 Qe7 allows 37
Ba2+ Re6 (if 37 Be6, then 38 Rd7!)
38 Qxe5 winning easily.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
37 Rd6
White pins and wins Blacks Queen.
Black really has nothing to show for his
material loss.

37 Rxg2+
Black wins a Pawn and attacks Whites
King. Black must hope for White to
blunder.
38 Kh1
White safely tucks his King away in
the corner. However, even if White
blundered and played 38 Kf1?, White
would still be winning after 38 Rg1+
39 Ke2 (Black would get the miracle he
wanted after 39 Kf2?? R8g2+ 40 Ke3
Rxe1+ 41 Kd3 Rd1+ 42 Ke3 f4+ 43
Ke4 Re2++) Rxe1+ 40 Kxe1 Rg1+ 41
Ke2 Rxb1 42 Rxe6+ Bxe6 43 Qxb7.
38 Rxb2

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdbdwdrd}
{dp!wdwdw}
{wdw$qiwd}
{0wdw0pdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dw)wdPdw}
{w4wdWdw)}
{dBdw$wdK}
vllllllllV

Diagram 175. Position after 38 Rxb2.

Black grabs a Pawn and hopes to have


time to double Rooks on Whites 2nd
rank. Of course, there will be no time
for this to happen.

Robert M. Snyder

39 Rxe6+
White wins Blacks Queen.
39 Bxe6
Black gets Whites Rook in return for
the loss of his Queen.
40 Qxe5+
White gives Black no time to breathe
and now wins Blacks Bishop.
Black resigned here.

167

LESSON 18

played line. The natural development


of this Knight reinforces Whites d
and e Pawns.

Junior Champion Kasparov


in Action

4 g6

Kasparov vs. Palatnik


1978
Opening: Alekhines Defense
Garry Kasparov was only 15 years old
when this game was played. He became
USSR Junior Champion in 1976 and
World Junior Champion in 1980.
He went on to become the World
Champion in 1985.
In this game Kasparov gains control
of the center and provokes Black to
weaken on the kingside. He then
sacrifices two Bishops to expose Blacks
King to a deadly attack.
1 e4 Nf6 2 e5 Nd5 3 d4 d6 4 Nf3

cuuuuuuuuC
{rhb1kgw4}
{0p0w0p0p}
{wdw0wdwd}
{dwdn)wdw}
{wdw)wdwd}
{dwdwdNdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$NGQIBdR}
vllllllllV

Black prepares to fianchetto his Bishop


to g7 and apply pressure directly
to Whites Pawn chain in the center.
Blacks most common move here is to
pin Whites Knight on f3 with 4
Bg4, which might continue 5 Be2 e6
(or if 5 c6, then 6 c4 Nb6 7 Nbd2
dxe5 8 Nxe5 Bxe2 9 Qxe2 N8d7 10
Ndf3) 6 0-0 Be7 7 c4 Nb6 8 Nc3 0-0 9
Be3 N8d7 10 exd6 cxd6 11 Nd2 Bxe2
12 Qxe2 and White stands slightly
better.
5 Bc4
White develops his Bishop and attacks
Blacks Knight on d5. The idea
behind this move is not much different
from Whites fourth move in LESSON
SIXTEEN AND SEVENTEEN.
5 Nb6

Diagram 176. Position after 4 Nf3.

This move initiates the Modern


Variation, which is the most commonly

Black gets his Knight out of attack


while threatening Whites Bishop on
c4. Black could also maintain the
Knight on d5 by protecting it with
5 c6, which might continue 6 0-0
Bg7 7 exd6 Qxd6 8 Re1 0-0 (or if 8
Bg4, then 9 Nbd2 0-0 10 h3 Bxf3
11 Nxf3 Nd7 12 Bb3 e6 13 Bg5) 9

-168-

Robert M. Snyder

Bg5 Re8 10 Nbd2 Bg4 11 h3 Bxf3 12


Nxf3 Nd7 13 Bh4 and White stands
better.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
6 Bb3
White gets his Bishop out of attack and
retains it on the a2-g8 diagonal with
pressure on the weak f7 square.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rhb1kgw4}
{0p0w0pdp}
{whw0wdpd}
{dwdw)wdw}
{wdw)wdwd}
{dBdwdNdw}
{P)PdW)P)}
{$NGQIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 177. Position after 6 Bb3.

6 a5
Black plays aggressively on the queenside
and threatens to win Whites Bishop
with 7 a4. The most common move
played here is for Black to complete his
fianchetto and apply pressure on Whites
e Pawn with 6 Bg7. This would
transpose back into this game after 7
a4 a5 8 Ng5, or White might continue
with 7 Ng5 e6 8 Qf3 Qe7 9 Ne4 dxe5
10 Bg5 Qb4+ 11 c3 Qa5 12 Bf6 Bxf6

169

13 Qxf6 0-0 14 Qxe5 Qxe5 15 dxe5


and White stands slightly better.
7 a4
White blocks the advance of Blacks a
Pawn.
7 Bg7
Black completes his fianchetto, applies
pressure to Whites e Pawn and clears
the way to castle. Black now threatens
to play 8 dxe5 9 Nxe5 Bxe5 10 dxe5
Qxd1+ 11 Kxd1 Nc6.
8 Ng5
White threatens Blacks f Pawn with
the idea of provoking Black to move his
e Pawn, which weakens Blacks dark
squares on the kingside and blocks his
Bishop on the c8-h3 diagonal. This
also opens up f3 for possible use by
Whites Queen.
White would have a slight edge after 8
Qe2, removing the Queen from the d
file and reinforcing the Pawn on e5.
However, White prefers to play more
aggressively.

170

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

8 e6

cuuuuuuuuC
{rhb1kdw4}
{dp0wdpgp}
{whw0pdpd}
{0wdw)wHw}
{Pdw)wdwd}
{dBdwdwdw}
{w)PdW)P)}
{$NGQIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 178. Position after 8 e6.

Black defends against the threat on his


f Pawn by blocking Whites Bishop
on the a2-g8 diagonal. Black is again
threatening to play 9 dxe5.
If 8 d5, then 9 0-0 0-0 10 Re1 Nc6
11 c3 and White stands better.
Immediately castling might look
tempting. However, White would have
obtained a clear advantage after 8 00 with 9 e6!.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
9 f4
White defends and strengthens his
Pawn on e5. Maintaining the Pawn
on e5 is important since it blocks
Blacks Bishop on g7, attacks d6
and attacks the hole on f6.

9 dxe5
Black opens the d file with the idea
of obtaining pressure on Whites d
Pawn. If 9 0-0, then 10 0-0 Nc6 11
c3 and White stands clearly better.
10 fxe5
White recovers the Pawn and opens
the f file to apply pressure on Blacks
backward f Pawn. Certainly not 10
dxe5? because of 10 Qxd1+ 11 Kxd1
Nc6 and White has lost his ability to
castle and the initiative.
10 c5
Black attacks the base of Whites
center Pawn chain with the idea of
undermining Whites protection of his
e Pawn. Other moves here also give
White the better game:
1. 10 0-0 11 Nf3 planning to meet
11 c5 with 12 Bg5.
2. 10 f6 11 exf6 Bxf6 12 Nf3.
3. 10 h6 11 Nf3 c5 12 c3 Nc6 13
0-0 0-0 14 Be3 cxd4 15 cxd4 Nd5
16 Bf2 b6 17 Bc4.
11 0-0?
White removes his King from the
center while threatening Blacks Pawn
on f7. This very natural looking move
has been considered best by theory.
However, this is not Whites strongest
move here. White should play 11 Qf3,

Robert M. Snyder

removing the Queen from the d file


(this allows a possible dxc5 without a
Queen exchange) and threatening 12
Qxf7++. White gets a clear advantage
after 11 Qf3 0-0 12 dxc5 N6d7 13
Qh3 h6 (or if 13 h5, then 14 g4
Qc7 15 gxh5 Qxe5+ 16 Be3 gxh5 17
c3 Nxc5 18 Bc2) 14 Ne4 Qc7 15 Be3
Qxe5 16 Nbd2.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rhb1kdw4}
{dpdwdpgp}
{whwdpdpd}
{0w0w)wHw}
{Pdw)wdwd}
{dBdwdwdw}
{w)PdWdP)}
{$NGQdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 179. Position after 11 0-0.

In the book Gary Kasparovs Fighting


Chess (Henry Holt, 1995) Kasparov
gives, as being more precise, the
moves 11 c3 cxd4 12 0-0! etc. After
12 0-0 13 cxd4 Nc6 14 Nf3 f6 15
Nc3 (15 exf6 Qxf6 16 Be3 Nd5 17 Bf2
Qf4 with approximate equality) fxe5
16 Bg5 Qd7 17 dxe5 Qxd1 18 Raxd1
Nxe5 19 Nxe5 Rxf1+ 20 Kxf1 Bxe5
21 Be3 (if 21 Bd8, then 21 Bxc3
22 bxc3 Nd5 23 Bxd5 exd5 24 Rxd5
b5!) Bxc3 22 Rd8+ Kf7 23 bxc3 Nd7
a position is reached where White has
the Bishop pair and a good position
in return for his sacrificed Pawn. A
possible continuation might be 24 Ke1

171

b6 25 Bd1 (if 25 Rh8, then 25 Nf8


26 Bxb6 Rb8 27 Bc5 Nd7 28 Bd4 Rxb3
29 Rxh7+ Ke8 30 Rh8+ Nf8 31 Bg7
Bb7 32 Rxf8+ Ke7 reaching a drawn
Bishops of opposite color endgame)
Ke7 26 Bg5+ Kd6 27 Bf3 Rb8 28 Bg4
Kc7 29 Rh8 Bb7 30 Rxh7 Re8 31 Bf4+
Kc8 32 g3 Bc6 33 Bd1 e5 34 Be3 b5
and though White stands better, even
with correct play Blacks chances of
survival are excellent. White may still
hold the advantage, but Kasparovs
short analytical comment does not
begin to examine the problems arising
after 12 0-0.
The majority of opening books contain
lines and analysis based mostly on games
played by strong players. Far too often
these games are simply quoted without
a serious move-by-move analysis being
made by the author. This results in
many errors in opening books (not to
mention the analysis found in many
game collections). The point is that
you shouldnt take the written word
as gospel. Though no one is perfect,
as author of this book and Unbeatable
Chess Lessons, I have gone over every
single move carefully to assure my
readers of the highest quality of analysis
possible.
11 0-0?
Black takes care of the threat to his
f Pawn and removes his King from

172

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

the center. However, Black missed his


opportunity to exchange down into
and endgame with likely prospects of a
draw with 11 Qxd4+ 12 Qxd4 cxd4
13 Rxf7 (if 13 Nxf7, then 13 0-0)
Bxe5 14 Rf1 Nc6.
12 c3
White defends his d Pawn creating a
long Pawn chain from b2 to e5. White
wanted to exploit his advantage in space
and avoid the Pawn imbalance that
would result after 12 dxc5 Qxd1 13
Rxd1 N6d7 14 Ne4 Nxe5. However,
White would still stand better.
12 Nc6?
Black develops his Knight and applies
pressure on Whites d Pawn. However,
this is too slow and will give White
valuable time to reposition his Knight.
Black should play 12 cxd4 13 cxd4
Nc6 and transpose into the analysis
given after Whites 11th move in this
game (with 11 c3).
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

This move also opens up g5 and h6


for Whites dark squared Bishop.
13 Nd7
Black repositions his Knight, defends
his Pawn on c5 and increases pressure
on Whites Pawn on e5.
If 13 cxd4, then 14 Bg5! Qc7 15
cxd4 and White has a tremendous bind
on Blacks dark squared weaknesses.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
14 Be3
Simplicity at its best! White continues
with straightforward development and
reinforces the defense of his d Pawn.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1w4kd}
{dpdndpgp}
{wdndpdpd}
{0w0w)wdw}
{Pdw)Ndwd}
{dB)wGwdw}
{w)wdWdP)}
{$NdQdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 180. Position after 14 Be3.

13 Ne4!
This is an awesome post for the Knight!
From e4 it threatens Blacks Pawn on
c5 and takes advantage of Blacks dark
squared weaknesses on f6 and d6.

14 Ne7
Blacks position is somewhat restricted
and it isnt easy for him to find a
constructive plan. Black decides to try

Robert M. Snyder

to take advantage of his strong points


the White squares on f5 and d5
and repositions his Knight accordingly.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
15 Bg5!
In chess the pin is mightier than the
sword! White doesnt mind moving
the same piece twice in a rowthe
situation has changed! White pins
Blacks Knight and ties down Blacks
Queen to its defense. Furthermore,
White increases his foothold on Blacks
weak f6 square and, if given the time,
will bring his Queen into play on the
kingside.
15 cxd4
This exchange brings the base of Whites
center Pawn chain to d4. This makes
it easier to apply pressure on Whites
d Pawn.
16 cxd4
White recovers his Pawn while
keeping his Pawn on e5 sufficiently
protected.
16 h6
Black, at the expense of weakening
himself on the kingside, begins to
drive Whites Bishop off of the h4-d8

173

diagonal to remove the menacing pin.


See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
17 Bh4

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1w4kd}
{dpdnhpgw}
{wdwdpdp0}
{0wdw)wdw}
{Pdw)NdwG}
{dBdwdwdw}
{w)wdWdP)}
{$NdQdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 181. Position after 17 Bh4.

White maintains the pin on Blacks


Knight. This will force Black to weaken
himself even further to drive the Bishop
off of the h4-d8 diagonal.
17 g5
Black continues with his plan of driving
Whites Bishop off of the h4-d8
diagonal. See if you can find Whites
best move here without looking at the
next move in the game.
18 Bf2
White gets his Bishop out of attack.
On f2 the Bishop defends Whites
backward d Pawn and can be

174

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

repositioned on the c1-h6 diagonal


by going to e3.
It would be premature to sacrifice the
Bishop with 18 Bxg5? because of 18
hxg5 19 Nxg5 Bh6 20 Qh5 Bxg5 21
Qxg5+ Ng6.
18 Ng6
At a glance it may appear that it is a
good idea to post the Knight on g6
because Black has weakened himself
on the kingside. However, the Knight
is misplaced. From g6 the Knight
doesnt cover Blacks weak dark squares.
Correct is 18 Nb6 19 Nbc3 Nbd5.
This hardly comes close to resolving
Blacks problems, but the central post
on d5 allows the Knight to reach its
potential in this situation.
19 Nbc3
White completes his minor piece deve
lopment by moving the Knight toward
the center. This also releases Whites
queenside Rook along the first rank.
19 Qe7
Black places his Queen on a more active
post where she covers d6 (a square
where Whites Knight has potential to
invade) and two good diagonals. On
e7 she also covers Blacks second rank,
which might be useful in the defense of
the kingside.

20 Bc2

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdbdw4kd}
{dpdn1pgw}
{wdwdpdn0}
{0wdw)w0w}
{Pdw)Ndwd}
{dwHwdwdw}
{w)BdWGP)}
{$wdQdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 182. Position after 20 Bc2.

White moves his Bishop from one good


diagonal (a2-g8) to another (b1h7). Although both of these diagonals
are excellent for the Bishop it would be
logical to delay relocating the Bishop.
A more accurate move would be to
improve the location of the Bishop on
f2 by putting pressure on Blacks g
Pawn and opening up the f file with 20
Be3. White would have had a substantial
positional advantage after 20 Be3 b6 21
Nd6 Ba6 22 Rf2 Rad8 23 Nce4.
20 b6
Black frees his Bishop along the c8-a6
diagonal.
21 Be3
White opens the f file for his Rook and
applies pressure to Blacks g Pawn.

Robert M. Snyder

21 Ba6
Black develops his Bishop to the a6f1 diagonal and threatens Whites
Rook on f1. Developing the Bishop
to b7 would have made it a target for
Whites Knight after 22 Nd6.
22 Rf2
White gets his Rook out of attack and
maintains it on the half-open f file.
Much weaker is 22 Rf3, since the Rook
would be a possible target for Blacks
Knight going to h4 and block Whites
Queen on the d1-h5 diagonal. White
now threatens to invade with 23 Qh5
followed by 24 Bxg5.
22 Nh8?

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdw4kh}
{dwdn1pgw}
{b0wdpdw0}
{0wdw)w0w}
{Pdw)Ndwd}
{dwHwGwdw}
{w)BdW$P)}
{$wdQdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 183. Position after 22 Nh8.

Black anticipates that White will place


his Queen on h5. In order to meet 24
Qh5 with 24 f5, without hanging
the Knight on g6, he hides it in the
corner! This passive retreat will lose

175

valuable time. Stronger is 23 f5


24 Nd6 Rad8. In some variations it
now becomes clear that when Black
advances his f Pawn Whites Bishop
at c2 should have been left on the
a2-g8 diagonal.
23 Bxg5
White sacrifices his Bishop to open
lines and expose Blacks King to attack.
Why no exclamation point to Whites
23rd move? This is because this wasnt
Whites only clear way to win.
White could have used a Pawn to open
up the position with 23 h4 gxh4 (if 23
f5, then 24 exf6e.p and now 24
Nxf6 25 hxg5 Nxe4 26 Bxe4, or 24
Bxf6 25 Qh5) 24 Qh5 (White is
threatening win with 25 Bxh6 or 25
Bg5) f5 25 exf6e.p. Nxf6 26 Nxf6+
Bxf6 (if 26 Rxf6, then 27 Nd5!
exd5 28 Qxd5+ followed by 29 Qxa8+)
and now the subtle move 27 Rf4! with
decisive threats such as 28 Rg4+ or the
simple 28 Qxh6.
23 hxg5
Black accepts the Bishop sacrifice. Not
accepting the sacrifice with 23 f6
allows White to win easily with 24
Bh4.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

176

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

24 Qh5
Whites Queen swings into the attack
on the kingside and attacks Blacks
Pawn on g5 a second time as well
as the critical h7 square. Whites
immediate threat is 25 Nf6+ Nxf6 26
exf6 and Black must lose his Queen
due to Whites threats of mate on h7
and 27 fxe7.
24 f5

25 Rf7

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{rdwdwdkh}
{dwdn1rgw}
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{0wdw)pHQ}
{Pdw)wdwd}
{dwHwdwdw}
{w)BdW$P)}
{$wdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 184. Position after 25 Rf7.

On f7 Blacks backward Pawn was very


cramping. Therefore, Black aggressively
advances the Pawn in an attempt to
relieve the pressure. This allows Blacks
Queen to defend the kingside along his
second rank while opening up f7 for
possible use by his Rook.
If 24 f6, White obtains a winning
position after 25 Nxg5 Rf7 26 Nxf7
Nxf7 27 Bh7+ Kf8 28 Ne4 Rd8 29 g4
Bd3 30 Rc1. Also, if 24 Rfc8, then
25 Nxg5 Ra7 (or 25 Nf8 26 Nce4 is
strong) 26 Bh7+ Kf8 27 Bg6 and Black
will not survive.

This defends against Whites mate


threat by opening up the f8 square as
an escape for Blacks King. Black isnt
worried about White exchanging his
Knight for the Rook with 26 Nxf7?
Nxf7 as White would lose most of his
initiative. If 25 Nf6, then White
could have won brilliantly with 26
Nd5! with the following possible
continuation 26 exd5 27 Bxf5 Rf7
28 Qh3 Ra7 29 Be6.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

25 Nxg5

26 Bxf5!

White wins Blacks g Pawn and


continues the attack on the kingside
with the threat of 26 Qh7++.

This second Bishop sacrifice cracks


open Blacks position and takes
advantage of Blacks e Pawn being an
overworked defender (Blacks e Pawn
was defending his Pawn on f5 and
preventing the entry of Whites Knight
into d5). White now threatens 27

Robert M. Snyder

Bxe6 as well as 27 Qh7+ Kf8 28 Nxe6+


Kf8 29 Nd5 and Black is crushed.
26 Rxf5
Black has nothing better than to
accept the sacrifice and remove Whites
menacing Bishop. Capturing the
Bishop with 26 exf5 allows the entry
of Whites Knight after 27 Nd5. If 26
Nf8, then White is winning after 27
Bh7+ Nxh7 28 Qxh7+ Kf8 29 Nxf7
Nxf7 30 Ne4.

177

Blacks Queen with devastating effect.


Black is crushed.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdwdkh}
{dwdn1wgw}
{b0wdwdwd}
{0wdN)pHQ}
{Pdw)wdwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{w)wdWdP)}
{$wdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 185. Position after 28 Nd5.

27 Rxf5

28 Qe8

White continues to open lines for his


pieces. This exchange will remove
Blacks e Pawn from covering the
important d5 square. White is now
threatening 28 Qh7++.

There is no other good square for


Blacks Queen to get out of attack. If 28
Qf8, then 29 Qh7++. If 28 Qd8,
then 29 Qh7+ Kf8 30 Ne6+ wins.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

27 exf5
Black recovers the Rook. If 27 Nf8,
then 28 Rxf8+ Bxf8 (28 Kxf8 29
Qf3+ forking King and Rook) 29 Nce4
threatening 30 Nf6+.
See if you can find Whites best move
without looking at the next move in the
game.
28 Nd5
This is the point behind Whites
sacrifice on move 26. Whites Knight
now comes into play and threatens

29 Qh7+
White gets his Queen out of attack and
attacks Blacks King.
29 Kf8
This is Blacks only legal move to get his
King out of check. See if you can find
Whites best move here without looking
at the next move in the game.

178

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

30 Qxf5+
White continues his attack on Blacks
King, wins a Pawn and opens up the
f file for use by his Rook. This is
stronger than 30 Nc7 Qg6 31 Qxg6
Nxg6 32 Nge6+ Kf7 33 Nxg7 Rd8 34
Nxf5 and White has four Pawns against
Blacks Bishop.
30 Kg8
Black does his best to hide his King.
White would have won quickly after 30
Nf7 31 Ne6+ Kg8 32 Qg6.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
31 Qh7+

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdqdkh}
{dwdndwgQ}
{b0wdwdwd}
{0wdN)wHw}
{Pdw)wdwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{w)wdWdP)}
{$wdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 186. Position after 31 Qh7

White forces Blacks King right back


onto the open f file (which he opened
on move 30). Pursuing the attack on
the King is stronger than the fork with
31 Nc7 that still leads to a won game

for White after 31 Qg6 32 Qxd7


Qxg5 33 Nxa8.
31 Kf8
Again Black is left with only one legal
move to get his King out of check.
White now has a choice of two moves
that force a quick win.
See if you can find one of these moves
without looking at the next move in the
game.
32 Ra3
White plans to attack Blacks King
along the f file. Immediately playing
32 Rf1+?? allows 32 Bxf1. White
can now shift his Rook to f3.
The other move that wins quickly for
White is 32 Nf4 threatening 33 Nge6+.
After 32 Nf4, if Black plays 32 Bc4
to cover e6, then White has the
killer reply 33 Rf1! and its curtains for
Black.
32 Rc8
Black is resourceful and gives himself the
best practical chance in a lost position.
Black brings his Rook onto the open c
file and threatens to convert a lost game
into a won game with 33 Rc1+ 34
Kf2 Rf1+ 35 Kg3 (if 35 Ke3, then 35
Nxe5!) Nf7.

Robert M. Snyder

See if you can find Whites best move


here without looking at the next move
in the game.
33 Rf3+
White follows through with his plan to
attack Blacks King on the f file.

179

34 Qg6
Black attempts get White to exchange
Queens to stop some of the threats on
the kingside. See if you can find Whites
best move here without looking at the
next move in the game.
35 Rxf6+

33 Nf6
Black gets his King out of check and
threatens 34 Rc1+ 35 Kf2 Rf1+ 36
Kg3 (or 36 Ke3) Rxf3+ 37 gxf3 Nxh7.

This is Whites most efficient method


of execution. White opens up Blacks
King to further attack. Certainly moves
like 35 Ne6+ or 35 exf6 would have
also won.

34 h3
White takes time out from his attack
to open up h2 as an escape square
for his King (if Black now plays 34
Rc8+, White can safely tuck his King
away with 35 Kh2). There is no serious
way for Black to defend this position.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdrdqiwh}
{dwdwdwgQ}
{b0wdwhwd}
{0wdN)wHw}
{Pdw)wdwd}
{dwdwdRdP}
{w)wdWdPd}
{dwdwdwIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 187. Position after 34 h3.

35 Bxf6
Black captures Whites Rook which was
attacking Blacks King and Queen. See
if you can find Whites best move here
without looking at the next move in the
game.
36 Ne6+
This is the key move behind Whites
35th move. Whites Knights jump in for
the kill by attacking Blacks King!
36 Ke8
This is Blacks only legal move to get his
King out of check.

180

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

37 Nxf6+

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdrdkdwh}
{dwdwdwdQ}
{b0wdNHqd}
{0wdw)wdw}
{Pdw)wdwd}
{dwdwdwdP}
{w)wdWdPd}
{dwdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 188. Position after 37 Nxf6.

Black must lose his Queen with 37


Qxf6 38 exf6. Black resigned here.

LESSON 19
Fighting the Sicilian
Gross vs. Zrzavy
Czechoslovakia, 1980
Opening: Sicilian Defense
The Sicilian Defense is one of the most
popular and analyzed replies to 1 e4. The
usual variations that result after 1 e4 c5
2 Nf3 followed by 3 d4 provide White
with many deep and complex lines to
learn that do not give White any clear
advantage. The downside is that the
average player doesnt have unlimited
time to study just one opening.
Therefore, it makes sense for you to
study one or two specialized variations
that are sound and likely to take your
opponents into lines that they arent well
prepared for.
This is why I start most of my beginning
and intermediate students with 1 e4
c5 2 f4 and later introduce them to
what is called the Snyder Sicilian with
1 e4 c5 2 b3. Due to the popularity
and success created by my use of this
line in tournament play I was asked to
write a book on it, the latest edition of
which was published in 1984. In this
game I will provide analysis of the most
important lines in the Snyder defense to
the Sicilian. The Snyder defense has been
used by International Masters Moshe

Czerniak of Poland and Doug Root (a


former student of mine) of the United
States, by Grandmasters Nigel Short
of England and Heikki Westerinen of
Finland and by World Champion Boris
Spassky.
I selected the following game because it
contains important themes found in the
Snyder Sicilian as well as an instructive
execution of a kingside attack.
1 e4 c5
By placing his Pawn on c5 Black
initiates the Sicilian Defense. One
of Blacks plans is to exchange his c
Pawn for Whites center Pawn on d4
thereby opening his c file. This Pawn
advance will also give Black a choice
of placing his Queen on c7, b6
or a5 depending on how the game
progresses.
White, typically, will get most of his
play on the kingside and Blacks play
will be on the queenside. White usually
has a spatial advantage in the center
where a lively fight takes place, which
often tips the balance.

-181-

182

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

2 b3

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{rhb1kgn4}
{0pdp0p0p}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dw0wdwdw}
{wdwdPdwd}
{dPdwdwdw}
{PdP)W)P)}
{$NGQIBHR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 189. Position after 2 b3

Warum? This is a German word I


often say to my students when a move
is made with an important idea behind
itwhy? It sounds, in the German
pronunciation, like a car roaring
(varummm!), but the point is well
made.
Ninety-nine percent of players
preparing to play the Sicilian as Black
look first at 2 Nf3 and never analyze 2
b3. This makes 2 b3 a good idea with
which to surprise an opponent. In
my book Winning Chess Tournaments,
I make it clear that your first priority
is to play against the board and not
the player. Using this system is still in
keeping with my dictum. The move
is both sound and takes advantage of
the typical lack of preparation by many
opponents you will encounter. I might
restate my advice as, play against the
board first and play against the opponent
second.

Now lets get an understanding of


whats going on here. With 2 b3 White
prepares to fianchetto his Bishop to
b2. This immediately counters your
typical Dragon Sicilian player, who
exchanges Pawns in the center and uses
a fianchetto of his Bishop to g7 (1 e4
c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 dxe4 4 Nxd4 Nf6
5 Nc3 g6 followed by 6 Bg7), by
preparing to bring Whites Bishop to
the long diagonal a1-a8. Additionally,
Whites Pawn on b3 interferes with
Blacks typical counterplay on the
queenside.
2 Nf6
Black develops his Knight toward
the center and threatens Whites e
Pawn. This line is similar to Alekhines
Defense in that it provokes the advance
of Whites e Pawn, which will drive
Blacks Knight to d5. Typically,
Whites Pawn on e5 will be well
supported by Whites Bishop on b2
and a Knight on f3. Furthermore,
the Pawn on e5 will have a cramping
effect on Blacks position.
We will now examine some other
possible lines (note: some of these lines
may transpose into one another):
1. 2 d6. Black frees his Bishop
on the c8-h3 diagonal, defends
his c Pawn, and covers the e5
square. 3 Bb2 Nf6,

Robert M. Snyder

3 Nc6 is most likely to


transpose into variation #2
(see below).
3 Nd7 might continue
4 f4 e6 5 Nf3 b6 6 Bd3
Bb7 7 0-0 Ngf6 8 e5
planning to meet 8
Nd5 with 9 Be4, or 8
dxe5 with 9 fxe5 Nd5 10
Qe1 Be7 11 Nc3.
4 Bb5+ Nbd7,
if 4 Nc6, then 5 Bxc6+
bxc6 6 d3.
if 4 Bd7, then 5 Bxd7+
planning to meet 5
Nbxd7 with 6 Nc3 e6 7
f4 Be7 8 Qf3 0-0 9 Nge2,
or 5 Qxd7 with 6 Bxf6
gxf6 7 Qh5 Nc6 8 Nc3.
5 Qe2 (also playable is 5 Bxf6 gxf6
6 Nc3 a6 7 Bxd7+ Bxd7 8 Qf3
b5 9 a3 e6 10 Nge2) a6 6 Bxd7+
Bxd7 7 f4 e6 (if 7 Bc6, then 8
d3 planning to meet 8 d5 with
9 e5 Nd7 10 e6 fxe6 11 Nf3 d4
12 Ng5) 8 Nf3 Bc6 9 d3 Be7 10
Nbd2 0-0 11 0-0 b5 12 Rae1 a5 13
e5 Nd5 14 exd6 Nxf4 15 Qe5 Bf6
16 Qxc5 Bxb2 17 Qxc6 Rc8 18
Qxb5 Rxc2 19 g3 Nd5 20 Ne4 h6
(if 20 Ba3, then 21 Nd4) 21 d4
Ba3 22 Qa6 Qc8 23 Qxc8 Rfxc8
24 Rf2 Rxf2 25 Kxf2 Rd8 26 Ne5
Bxd6 27 Nxd6 Rxd6 28 Rc1 and
White stands better.

183

2. 2 Nc6. Black develops his


Knight toward the center covering
the important d4 and e5
squares. 3 Bb2 d6 (if 3 d5, then
4 exd5 Qxd5 5 Nc3 Qe5+ 6 Qe2
Qxe2+ 7 Ngxe2 Bf5 8 Nd5 0-0-0
9 Ne3 planning to meet 9 Bg6
with 10 Nf4, or 9 Bd7 with 10
d4 cxd4 11 Nxd4) 4 f4 Nf6 5 Nc3
e6,
if 5 Bg4, then 6 Be2 Bxe2
7 Qxe2 planning to meet 7
Nd4 with 8 Qd3 e6 9 Nf3
Nxf3+ 10 Qxf3 Be7 11 0-0.
if 5 a6, then 6 Nf3 e6 7 Bd3
d5 8 a3 Be7 9 0-0 0-0 10 e5.
if 5 g6, then 6 Bb5 Bg7 7
Nd5 0-0 8 Bxc6 bxc6 9 Nxf6+
exf6 10 d3 Re8 11 Ne2 d5 12
0-0.
6 Nf3 Be7 (if 6 Bd7, then 7 Bb5
a6 8 Bxc6 Bxc6 9 d3) 7 Bb5 Bd7
(if 7 0-0, then 8 Bxc6 bxc6 9
d3) 8 0-0 a6 9 Bxc6 Bxc6 10 d3
0-0 11 Qe2 with a slight edge for
White.
3. 2 e6. Black frees his Bishop
on the f8-a3 diagonal and gives
support for an early Pawn strike
at the center on d5. 3 Bb2 d5 4
exd5 exd5 5 Nf3 Nc6,
If 5 Nf6, then White has a
choice:
a. if 6 Bb5+, then 6 Bd7
7 Qe2+ Qe7 8 0-0 Qxe2
9 Bxe2 planning to meet

184

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

9 Ba7 with 10 d4 cxd4


11 Nxd4 0-0 12 Nd2 or 9
Nc6 with 10 Re1 Be7
11 d4 0-0 12 Nbd2.
b. if 6 d4, then 6 Nc6 7
Bd3 Be7 8 0-0.
6 Bb5 Nf6 (if 6 Qe7+, then 7
Be2 d4 8 0-0 with moves like c3,
Re1, and Bb5 coming in; if 6
Bd7, then 7 0-0 Nf6 8 Re1+ Be7 9
Bxf6 gxf6 10 d4; if 6 f6, then 7
0-0 Bd6 8 d4 Nge7 9 c4 dxc4 10
Bxc4; and finally if 6 Be6, then
7 0-0 Nge7 8 d4) 7 Qe2+ Be7 (if
7 Qe7, then 8 Ne5 Bd7 9 Bxc6
Bxc6 10 Nxc6 bxc6 11 Bxf6 gxf6
12 Nc3 Kd7 13 f4; or if 7 Be6,
then 8 Ng5 Qd7 9 Nxe6 Qxe6 10
Bxc6+ bxc6 11 Bxf6 gxf6 12 Nc3
with a superior endgame for White)
8 Bxf6 gxf6 9 0-0 0-0 10 Re1 and
White stands slightly better.
4. 2 e5. Black blocks the a1h8 diagonal and gains a strong
foothold on the d4 square. This
leaves Black with a weakness on
d5. 3 Bb2 Nc6 4 Nc3 Nf6 (if 4
d6, then 5 Bc4 Nf6 6 Nge2 Be7
7 0-0 0-0 8 d3 Nd4 9 a4 with the
idea of the thematic f4 Pawn break)
5 Bc4 Nxe4 6 Nxe4 d5 7 Bd3 dxe4
8 Bxe4 Nd4 9 Qh5 Qf6 10 Nf3
Bd6 11 Nxd4 exd4 (if 11 cxd4,
then 12 c3) 12 c3 g6 13 Qf3 Qxf3
14 Bxf3 d3 15 c4 0-0 16 0-0-0 and
White stands better.

5. 2 d5. This immediate Pawn


break will either lead Black into
playing an inferior gambit or
give White a comfortable lead in
development. This idea doesnt
have the same impact as it does
in the Scandinavian (1 e4 d5) or
Sicilian Grand Prix (1 e4 c5 2 f4
d5). 3 exd5 Qxd5,
White gets a good game if
Black attempts to make this
into a gambit after 3 Nf6 4
Bb5+:
if 4 Nbd7, then 5 c4 a6 6
Bxd7+ Bxd7 7 Nf3 e6 8 dxe6
Bxe6 9 d4.
if 4 Bd7, then 5 Bxd7+
Qxd7 6 c4 e6 7 Qe2 Be7 8
dxe6 Qxe6 9 Qxe6 fxe6 10
Nf3 Nc6 11 0-0 Nh5 12 Nc3
Nf4 13 Ba3 Rf8 14 Rae1.
4 Nc3 Qd8,
if 4 Qe5+, then 5 Qe2
Qxe2+ 6 Bxe2 Nf6 7 Nb5 Na6
Bb2 and White stands better.
if 4 Qd6, then 5 Bb2 Nc6
6 Ne4 Qd5 and White comes
out with the better game after
either 7 f3 Nf6 8 Bc4, or 7 Qf3
Bf5 8 Ng3.
if 4 Qe6+, then 5 Be2 Nf6
6 Nf3 Nc6 7 0-0 Qd6 8 d3
planning to meet 8 Bf5
with 9 Be3 e5 10 Nd2 0-0-0
11 Nc4 Qe6 12 Re1, or 8
Nd4 with 9 Ne4 Nxe4 10 dxe4

Robert M. Snyder

e5 11 Bc4 Be6 12 Be6 Qxe6 13


c3 Nxf3+ 14 Qxf3 and White
stands better in both lines.
5 Nf3 Nf6 6 Bb5+ Bd7 7 0-0 e6
8 Bb2 Nc6 9 Re1 Bd6 (if 9
Be7, then 10 Bxc6 Bxc6 11 Ne5)
10 Ne4 Nxe4 11 Rxe4 0-0 12 Qe2
and White stands better.
6. 2 b6. Black says, two can play
at this game! and also prepares
to fianchetto his Queens Bishop.
Blacks attack on Whites e Pawn
will be defended by constructive
development and lead to an
advantage for White. 3 Bb2 Bb7 4
Nc3 e6,
if 4 d6, then 5 Nf3 Nf6 6
d4 planning to meet 6 cxd4
with 7 Qxd4 Nc6 8 Qe3, or 6
Nxe4? with 7 Nxe4 Bxe4 8
Ng5 Bb7 9 dxc5 bxc5 10 Bc4
d5 11 Qh5 g6 12 Qf3 f6 13
Rd1.
if 4 Nc6, then 5 Nf3 e6
6 d4 cxd4 7 Nxd4 planning
to meet 7 Bc5 with 8 Nf3
Qb8 9 Qd2 Nf6 10 Qg5, or 7
Nf6 with 8 Nxc6 Bxc6 (if 8
dxc6, then 9 e5) 9 e5.
5 Nf3 a6,
if 5 Nf6, then 6 e5 Ne4 7
Nxe4 Bxe4 8 Bc4.
if 5 d6, then 6 d4 cxd4 7
Qxd4 Nc6 8 Qe3.
6 d4 cxd4 7 Qxd4 Qc7 and White
gets an edge after either 8 Be2 Nc6

185

9 Qe3 Nf6 10 0-0, or 8 Rd1 Nf6 9


a3.
7. 2 a6. Black commits early to
prevent the placement of Whites
Bishop on b5 and prepares for
queenside expansion. White stands
better after 3 Bb2 Nc6 4 Nf3 e6 5
a3 d5 6 exd5 exd5 7 d4 Nf6 8 Be2
cxd4 9 Nxd4 Bc5 10 Nxc6 bxc6 11
0-0 0-0 12 Nd2 Re8 13 Bd3 Rb8
14 Qf3.
3 e5
White gets his e Pawn out of attack
by advancing it and threatening Blacks
Knight on f6.
3 Nd5
This is the only good square to get the
Knight out of attack and still keep it in
play. Black would lose his Knight after 3
Ne4?? 4 d3 Qa5+ 5 c3 Nxc3 6 Qd2.
4 Bb2

cuuuuuuuuC
{rhb1kgw4}
{0pdp0p0p}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dw0n)wdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dPdwdwdw}
{PGP)W)P)}
{$NdQIBHR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 190. Position after 4 Bb2.

186

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Bg2 Nxd6 14 Nc3 and White


stands clearly better.

White completes his fianchetto and


reinforces his advanced Pawn on e5.
4 Nc6

5 Nf3

Black develops his Knight toward


the center and applies pressure to the
important d4 square and Whites
Pawn on e5.
Other possibilities for Black are:
1. 4 d6 5 Nf3 Nc6 6 Bb5 Bd7 (or
if 6 Nc7, then 7 Bxc6+ bxc6
8 exd6 exd6 9 0-0 Ne6 10 d4
planning to meet 10 Be7 with
11 dxc5 d5 12 b4 a5 12 a3) 7 exd6
exd6 (if 7 e6, then 8 Nc3 Bxd6
9 Ne4 Be7 10 Bxc6 Bxc6 11 Ne5
with an edge for White) 8 0-0 Be7
9 d4 Nc7 10 c4! Nxb5 11 cxb5
Nxd4 12 Nxd4 cxd4 13 Qxd4 Bf6
14 Qe4+ Be6 15 Bxf6 Qxf6 16
Qxb7 0-0 17 Nd2 and White has
an extra Pawn.
2. 4 e6 5 Nf3 and Black has a
choice:
a. 5 Be7 6 c4 Nf4 (if 6
Nc7, then 7 d4 cxd4 8 Qxd4
Nc6 9 Qe3 and White stands
clearly better) 7 h4 d6 8 g3
Ng6 9 exd6 Bf6 10 Bxf6 Qxf6
11 Nc3 with a clear advantage
for White.
b. 5 b6 6 d4 Bb7 7 c4 Nf4 8
h4 d6 9 g3 Ng6 10 h5 Ne7
11 dxc5 bxc6 12 exd6 Nf5 13

White develops his Knight toward the


center, defends his e Pawn, and covers
the important d4 square.
5 e6
Black frees his Bishop on the f8-a3
diagonal and protects the d5 square.
Blacks other possibilities are:
1. If 5 Nf4, then 6 g3 Ne6 7 Bg2
g6 8 c3 Bg7 9 d4 cxd4 10 cxd4 d5
11 0-0 0-0 12 Nc3 Nc7 13 Qd2
Bg4 14 Rac1 and White has a nice
spatial advantage.
2. If Black immediately prepares to
fianchetto his Bishop with 5 g6,
then the game might continue 6
Ng5 (threatening 7 e6) with plans
to meet:
a. 6 f6? with 7 Bc4!.
b. 6 f5 with 7 c4 Nf4 8 g3
Ne6 9 Nxe6 dxe6 10 Bg2.
c. 6 Bg7 with 7 Qf3 0-0 8
Qxd5 e6 9 Qxc5 Qxg5 10 Qe3
Qxe3+ 11 dxe3 Nxe5 12 Bd4
d5 13 Nd2.

Robert M. Snyder

6 Bb5

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdb1kgw4}
{0pdpdp0p}
{wdndpdwd}
{dB0n)wdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dPdwdNdw}
{PGP)W)P)}
{$NdQIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 191. Position after 6 Bb5.

White develops his Bishop to its most


effective square and clears the way
for castling. Often the Bishop will be
exchanged for Blacks Knight on c6
thereby doubling Blacks Pawns while
relieving the pressure on Whites e
Pawn and d4 square.
6 Be7
Black develops his Bishop to its only
good available square and prepares to
castle.
Blacks other choices are:
1. If 6 Qc7, then 7 0-0 Be7 (7
a6 8 Bxc6 Qxc6 9 d4 b5 10 c4 bxc4
11 bxc4 Ne7 12 Qd3 Bb7 13 Nbd2
clearly favors White) 8 d4 cxd4 9
Bxc6 dxc6 10 Qxd4 0-0 11 Qg4
and White stands clearly better.
2. If 6 Qb6, then 7 Bxc6 Qxc6 8
0-0 b5 9 d3 Bb7 10 Qd2 d6 11
Re1 Rd8 12 Qg5 and White stands
slightly better.

187

7 0-0
White removes his King from the center
and activates his kingside Rook.
7 0-0
Black also removes his King from the
center and brings his Rook to a more
active location.
8 Nc3
White develops his Knight toward the
center, challenges Blacks Knight on
d5 and completes his minor piece
development. From c3 the Knight
has a potential strong post on e4. Also
playable is 8 Bxc6 dxc6 (if 8 bxc6,
then 9 c4 Nf4 10 d4 cxd4 11 Qd2 Ng6
12 Qxd4) 9 d3 b5 10 Nbd2 a5 11 Ne4
and White stands slightly better.
8 Nxc3
By exchanging Knights Black prevents
White from favorably exchanging
Knights on d5 (with 9 Nxd5 exd5
10 d4) and prevents the Knight from
entering the strong post on e4.
9 Bxc3
White recovers his Knight. White
avoids 9 dxc6, which would give White
doubled Pawns and block Whites
Bishop on the a1-h8 diagonal.

188

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

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Diagram 192. Position after 9 Bxc3.

Blacks Queen is now far removed from


assisting with matters on the kingside.
More accurate would be 10 Nb4 11
d4 Nd5 12 Bb2 cxd4 13 Bxd4 fxe5 14
Qxe5 Bf6 15 Qg3 Qc7 16 Qxc7 Nxc7
17 Bd3 though White stands better
due to his spatial advantage and lead in
development. If 10 d5, then 11 Bxc6
bxc6 12 d3 and White is clearly better.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

9 f6
Black plans to exchange his f Pawn for
Whites Pawn on e5 (which cramps
Blacks game) and then bring his Bishop
to f6 (challenging Whites Bishop on
the a1-h8 diagonal). If 9 d5, then
10 Bxc6 bxc6 11 d3 a5 12 a4 Qc7 13
Qd2 and White stands better.
10 Qe2
White brings his Queen to a more active
location, provides further protection
to his Pawn on e5 and connects his
Rooks on the first rank.
10 Qb6?
Blacks idea is to tie down Whites
Queen to the defense of his Bishop on
b5 and allow his Queen to recapture
on c6 to avoid doubled Pawns should
White exchange his Bishop on c6.
The drawback of this move is that

11 Bd3
The Bishop is relocated to apply
pressure on Blacks kingside and to
relieve Whites Queen of its defense.
However, it is more accurate to first
prevent the entry of Blacks Knight to
b4 with 11 a3. After 11 a3, the game
might continue 11 fxe5 12 Nxe5
Nxe5 13 Bxe5 d6 14 Bg3 Bg6 15 Rae1
and White stands clearly better.
11 Nb4

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Diagram 193. Position after 11 Nb4.

Robert M. Snyder

Black seeks to reduce Whites positional


advantage by exchanging his Knight for
Whites Bishop on d3. Closing off
the kingside with 11 f5 would give
White a great position after 12 Bc4
Qc7 13 a4 b6 14 d4.
12 exf6
White favorably opens up lines on the
kingside.
12 Bxf6
Black recovers his Pawn. If 12
gxf6, then White would play 13 Ne5!
planning to meet 13 fxe5?? with
14 Qg4+ Kh8 (if 14 Kf7, then 15
Qh5+ leads to a quick mate) 15 Bxe5+
Bf6 16 Qh4. Therefore, after 13 Ne5!
Black does best to play 13 Nxd3 14
Nxd3 with approximate equality.
13 Bxf6
White removes Blacks good defensive
Bishop on the kingside. Otherwise,
Black threatens to defend with 13
Nxd3 14 Qxd3 Be7.
13 gxf6
Black opens up his kingside but keeps
Whites Knight out of g5. If 12
Rxf6, then White would play 13 Ng5
(threatening 14 Qh5 and 14 Bxh7+)
Nxd3 14 Qxd3 with a clear advantage.

189

14 Nh4

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Diagram 194. Position after 14 Nh4.

White opens the d1-h5 diagonal


for his Queen and threatens to win
quickly with 15 Bxh7+ Kxh7 16 Qh5+
Kg8 (or 16 Kg7) 17 Qg6+ Kh8 18
Rae1 Nd5 19 Re4 leading to mate, or
15 Qg4+ Kh8 16 Qh5 Nxd3 17 Ng6+
Kg7 18 Nxf8.
14 Nxd3
Black removes the immediate threats on
his kingside by exchanging his Knight
for Whites Bishop.
15 Qxd3
White recovers his piece and avoids
getting doubled isolated Pawns, which
would have occurred had he played 15
cxd3.
15 d5
Black increases his foothold in the center
and opens d7 for his undeveloped

190

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Bishop. See if you can find Whites best


move here without looking at the next
move in the game.
16 Rae1

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Diagram 195. Position after 16 Rae1.

White brings his inactive Rook on the


queenside into play on the half open
e file with the plan of using it to
assist on the kingside. This is rather
an interesting position. The question
may be Pawn mass or Pawn mess?
Black has a lot of Pawns massed in
and around the center. However, these
Pawns can easily become targets of
attack. With Blacks King being open
and exposed to attack, White is clearly
better here.
16 Bd7?
Black develops his Bishop and connects
his Rooks. However, this is too
slow. Black could have offered more
resistance by using his Rook actively
to defend on the kingside with 16

Rf7, planning to meet 17 Re3 with 17


Rg7 (though White still has a nice
advantage after 18 Rg3), or 17 Nf5
with 17 Kh8 (Black would lose
quickly after 17 exf5? because of 18
Re8+ and now if 18 Rf8, then 19
Qxd5+ Kg7 20 Rfe1, or if 18 Kg7,
then 19 Qg3+ Kh6 20 Rg8) 18 Qxd5!
Qc7 19 Rxe6 Bxe6 20 Qxe6 Qd7 21
Qc4 Rd8 22 d3.
17 Re3
White continues with his plan of
bringing his Rook to the third rank
with the idea of using it to attack on
the kingside. However, even stronger is
a direct assault on Blacks King with 17
Qg3+ Kf7 (if 17 Kh8, then White
wins quickly with 18 Ng6+! hxg6 19
Qxg6 e5 20 Re3 threatening 21 Qh5+
Kg7 22 Rg3+ Bg4 23 Rxg4++) 18
Qf3 Rae8 19 Qh5+ Kg8 20 Re3 Rf7
21 Qh6 (threatening 22 Rg3+ Kh8 23
Ng6+ Kg8 24 Ne5+ Kh8 25 Nxf7++)
Rg7 22 Qxf6.
17 Rf7
Black brings his Rook into play to help
shield his King against the impending
attack. See if you can find Whites best
move here without looking at the next
move in the game.

Robert M. Snyder

18 Rg3+

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vllllllllV

191

19 Rf8?

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Diagram 196. Position after 18 Rg3.

Diagram 197. Position after 19 Rf8.

White brings his Rook into the attack


against Blacks King.

Black brings his other Rook to the


kingside in an attempt to help matters
there. However, Black completely
overlooked Whites threat, which now
becomes an execution. Black should
have defended against Whites threat by
bringing his Queen toward the kingside
and defending the Pawn on d5 with
19 Qd6. However, even after 19
Qd6 White has a powerful attack after
20 Ree3 Be8 21 Rxg7+ Kxg7 22 Qf5!
Bf7 23 f4 Qd8 24 Qg4+ Kh8 25 f5.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

18 Rg7
Black continues with his plan of using
his Rook to shield his King. If 18
Kh8? then 19 Ng6+ planning to meet
19 hxg6 with 20 Qxg6 and mate
follows. Black gets into trouble if his
King tries to make a run for it with 18
Kf8. After 18 Kf8 White quickly
penetrates with 19 Qe3 Re8 20 Qh6+
Ke7 21 Rg7.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
19 Re1
White brings his inactive Rook into play
on the half-open e file. Black never
suspected that this subtle looking move
had a devastating threat behind it!

20 Nf5!
Suddenly Whites Knight comes to life!
Whites immediate threat is 21 Rxg7+
Kh8 22 Qh3 followed by 23 Qxh7++.

192

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

20 exf5
Black had no choice but to accept the
sacrifice and remove Whites menacing
Knight. If 20 Rxg3?, then 21 Qxg3+
Kf7 22 Qg7+ Ke8 23 Qe7++. If 20
Rg5, then 21 h4 will polish Black off.
21 Qxd5+
White wins Blacks d Pawn and
attacks Blacks King and loosely
defended Bishop. It is now clear why
Black should have defended his d
Pawn earlier with 19 Qd6.
21 Kh8?

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{dPdwdw$w}
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{dwdw$wIw}
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Diagram 198. Position after 21 Kh8.

Black gets his King out of check and


attempts to hide his King in the corner.
However, this will result in immediate
collapse.
Blacks best defense is 21 Rff7 22
Re7 Kf8 23 Rxg7 Rxg7 24 Rxd7 Rxd7
25 Qxd7. This would result in a lost

endgame for Black, but it is his best


practical chance.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
22 Rxg7
White removes the defender of Blacks
Bishop.
22 Bc6
Black attempts to save his Bishop by
using it to attack Blacks Queen. If
22 Kxg7, then 23 Re7+ and after
Blacks King moves White plays 24
Qxd7 winning easily.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
23 Ree7!

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{wdwdwdwd}
{dPdwdwdw}
{PdP)w)P)}
{dwdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 199. Position after 23 Ree7.

Robert M. Snyder

White has a forced mate in two moves!


Black resigned here. If 23 Bxd5,
then 24 Rxh7+ Kg8 25 Reg7++.

193

LESSON 20

Knight toward the center and prevents


White from moving his Pawn to e4.

Sacrifice on f2

2 c4
Bukhuti Gurgenidze vs Mikhail Tal
USSR Championship, 1961
Opening: Benoni Defense
Mikhail Tal was one of the best
known attacking players of all time.
Tal was born in Riga, Latvia in 1936
and was World Champion from 1960
to 1961. Bukhuti Gurgenidze was a
Grandmaster. He was born in Surami,
Georgia (USSR) in 1933.
Tal sacrifices a Knight on f2 to expose
Blacks King to attack. Tals pieces then
immediately move in for the kill.
1 d4
This is the second most popular
first move for White. In addition to
occupying the center with a Pawn
White frees his Bishop on the c1-h6
diagonal, opens d2 for possible use
by his Knight and allows his Queen to
exert pressure in the center along the
d file.
1 Nf6
This is Blacks most flexible move
giving him a variety of reasonable
continuations. Black develops his

White continues to build a Pawn center


and opens the d1-a4 diagonal for use
by his Queen. This move is consistent
with the concept of not blocking the
c Pawn in a d Pawn opening.
Other possible lines at move two:
1. White lacks enough compensation
for his Pawn in the BlackmarDiemer Gambit after 2 Nc3 d5 3
e4 dxe4 4 f3 c5 5 d5 (if 5 dxc5,
then 5 Qxd1+ 6 Kxd1 Bf5) exf3
6 Nxf3 a6 7 Bg5 Qb6.
2. Black gets a comfortable game in
the Torre Attack after 2 Bg5 Ne4 3
Bf4 (if 3 Bh4, then 3 c5 4 f3 g5
5 fxe4 hxg4 6 e3 Bh6) d5 4 e3 (or if
4 f3, then 4 Nf6 5 Nc3 e6 6 e4
Bb4 7 e5 Nfd7 8 a3 Bxc3+ 9 bxc3
c5) Bf5 5 Bd3 e6 6 Nd2 Nxd2 7
Qxd2 Bxd3 8 Qxd3 Bd6.
3. The Colle System with 2 Nf3 b6 3
e3 Bb7 4 Bd3 doesnt present Black
with any problems after 4 e6
5 0-0 c5 6 Nbd2 Nc6 7 c3 d5 8
Re1 Be7 9 dxc5 bxc5 10 e4 0-0 11
exd5 Qxd5! and now if 12 Bb1 (or
12 Bc2), then 12 Rfd8 with an
equal game.

-194-

Robert M. Snyder

2 c5

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{P)wdP)P)}
{$NGQIBHR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 200. Position after 2 c5.

Black initiates the Benoni Defense by


using his c Pawn to strike at Whites
Pawn center. Black provokes the
advance of Whites d Pawn. With
Whites Pawns stationed on c4 and
d5 Blacks thematic Pawn breaks
will be on b5 and e6. The Benoni
is a dynamic defense where a good
understanding of positional concepts is
important.
I usually recommend to my students
that they use the Nimzo-Indian (1 d4
Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4) and Queens
Indian (1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nf3 b6)
Defenses, which complement each
other. These will be covered in the next
few chapters.
3 d5
White eliminates the attack on his
d Pawn while using it to cramp
Blacks position in the center. Another
reasonable line for White is 3 Nf3 cxd4

195

4 Nxd4 e6 5 Nc3 Nc6 and White can


now either play 6 g3 Qb6 or 6 Ndb5
d5. If White played 3 dxc5, then Black
can immediately attack Whites weak
Pawn on c5 and get a comfortable
game with 3 e6.
3 e6
Black applies pressure to Whites d
Pawn and frees his Bishop on the
a3-f8 diagonal. Black can also play
the Volga Gambit (also known as the
Benko Gambit) by sacrificing a Pawn
to get pressure on the queenside with 3
b5. After 3 b5, the game might
continue 4 cxb5 a6 5 bxa6 g6 6 Nc3
Bxa6 7 e4 Bxf1 8 Kxf1 d6 9 Nf3 Bg7
10 h3 0-0 11 Kg1 Nbd7 12 Kh2, and
now Black can either play 12 Qa5
13 Re1 Rfb8 14 Qc2 Ne8 15 Bd2, or
12 Qb6 13 Re1 Rfb8 14 Kg1 Ne8
15 Re2. Although Black succeeds in
getting pressure on queenside in these
lines, it isnt enough compensation for
the sacrificed Pawn.
If Black decides to immediately
fianchetto his Bishop with 3 g6,
then the game might continue 4 Nc3
d6 5 e4 Bg7 6 Bd3 0-0 7 Nf3 e6 8 0-0
exd5 9 exd5 Bg4 10 h3 Bxf3 11 Qxf3
Nbd7 12 Qd1 Re8 11 Bd2 Ne5 12 Be2
a6 13 Qc2 and White stands better.

196

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

4 Nc3
White develops his Knight toward the
center, adds protection to his Pawn on
d5, and covers the important e4
square.
4 exd5
Black opens the e file for future use
by his Rook.
5 cxd5

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{$wGQIBHR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 201. Position after 5 cxd5.

White recovers his Pawn. Recapturing


with the Knight would allow Black
to achieve a more simplified game by
exchanging Knights after 5 Nxd5 Nxd5
with the plan of meeting 6 Qxd5 or 6
cxd5 with 6 d6.
5 d6
Black blocks the possible advance of
Whites d Pawn, frees his Bishop on

the h3-c8 diagonal and opens d7


for possible use by his Knight.
6 Nf3
White begins to mobilize his kingside
pieces by developing his Knight toward
the center.
6 g6
Black prepares to fianchetto his Bishop
to g7 and castle on the kingside.
The long h8-a1 diagonal certainly
provides a better home for the Bishop
than posting it with 6 Be7. After 6
Be7 the game might continue 7 e4
0-0 8 Be2 Nbd7 9 0-0 a6 10 a4 and
White stands better.
7 e4
White occupies the center with a second
Pawn, frees his Bishop on the f1-a6
diagonal and adds further protection to
his Pawn on d5.
7 Bg7
Black completes his fianchetto and
clears the way to castle on the kingside.

Robert M. Snyder

8 Be2

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{P)wdB)P)}
{$wGQIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 202. Position after 8 Be2.

White develops his Bishop and prepares


to castle. A reasonable alternative for
White is to develop his Bishop more
aggressively with 8 Bd3 0-0 9 0-0
a6 10 a4. There are advantages and
disadvantages to placing the Bishop
on d3 instead of e2. A good reason
behind having the Bishop on d3 is that
it would provide additional protection
to Whites e Pawn, which is soon to
be placed under further attack when
Black places his Rook on the e file. A
disadvantage of having the Bishop on
d3 is that the Bishop might become
a target if Black maneuvers a Knight
to e5. Furthermore, it is a common
idea in this opening for Black to try
to expand on the queenside with his
Pawns. In such a case the Bishop is also
more likely to be a target for Black on
d3.

197

8 0-0
Black removes his King from the center
and brings his Rook into play so it can
go to the half open e file.
9 0-0
White also removes his King from the
center and activates his kingside Rook.
9 Re8
Black places his Rook on the half open
e file and threatens to win Blacks e
Pawn with 10 Nxe4.
10 Nd2
White uses his Knight to defend against
the threat on his e Pawn. This also
frees Whites f Pawn and gives White
the possibility of posting his Knight on
c4 (a potentially very strong post,
which puts pressure on Blacks Pawn on
d6 and covers the e5 square once
again).
10 Na6
The placement of the Knight on the
edge of the board is temporary. Black
plans to reposition it on c7 where it
can support the advance of his b Pawn.
However, developing the Knight with
10 Nbd7 is the logical alternative (a
drawback being that it blocks Blacks
Bishop on c8). After 10 Nbd7 the

198

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

game might continue 11 a4 a6 12 Qc2


Rb8 13 a5 b6 14 axb6 Nxb6 15 Nb3
and White stands better.
11 Re1

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{$wGQ$wIw}
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Diagram 203. Position after 11 Re1.

White brings his Rook to a more active


location on a center file where it can
potentially add protection to Whites
e Pawn. Also playable is 11 Bb5 Bd7
12 Bxa6 bxa6 13 Qc2 and White stands
better.
11 Nc7
Black removes his Knight from the edge
of the board and begins to prepare for
the possible advance of his b Pawn.
12 a4
White immediately takes action to
restrain Blacks queenside expansion.

12 b6
Black opens the c8-a6 diagonal for
his Bishop. Since Whites last move
weakened his b4 square, Blacks
strongest plan is to maneuver the
Knight to b4 via a6. Blacks move
permits his Knight to be moved to a6
without allowing doubled isolated a
Pawns (if 12 Na6?, then 13 Bb5 Re7
14 Bxa6 bxa6 15 Nc4).
The other important point behind
Blacks last move is to be able to meet
13 a5? with 13 bxa5. After 13
bxa5 White cannot immediately recover
his Pawn with 14 Rxa5? because of 14
Ncxd5 with a discovered attack on
Whites Rook by Blacks Queen.
13 Qc2
White brings his Queen to a more
active post where she defends the e
Pawn. This will free Whites Knight on
d2 of the burden of defending the e
Pawn, which gives it the possibility of
going to the strong c4 post.
13 Ng4?
The ideas behind this move are to open
Blacks Bishop on the long h8-a1
diagonal and to attack Whites weak
f2 square. However, it would be
much stronger to maneuver the other
Knight to take advantage of the weak
b4 square with 13 Na6 14 Bb5

Robert M. Snyder

Nb4 15 Qd1 Re7 16 a5 and White still


stands better.
14 h3?

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{dwHwdwdP}
{w)QHB)Pd}
{$wGw$wIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 204. Position after 14 h3.

White only forces Black to do what he


was already planning! White misses his
opportunity to neutralize Blacks plan
and get a great game with 14 Bxg4! Bxg4
15 Nc4 Qf6 16 Qd2 Rad8 17 Qf4.
However, 14 f3?? allows Black to win
quickly with either 14 Qh4 or 14
Bd4+ 15 Kh1 Nf2+ 16 Kg1 Qh4.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
14 Nxf2!
Black sacrifices his Knight to expose
Whites King to attack. Knight
sacrifices on f2, after the King has
castled and the White Rook has left the
f file, can also be found in LESSONS
SEVENTEEN and TWENTY-THREE
in Unbeatable Chess Lessons.

199

15 Kxf2
White accepts the sacrifice by removing
the menacing Knight. Declining the
sacrifice with 15 Nb5 would leave White
in serious trouble after 15 Nxb5 16
Bxb5 Bd4. However, Whites best move
here is to decline Blacks sacrifice and get
some compensation for his Pawn with
15 Nf3. After 15 Nf3 the game might
continue 15 Bxc3 16 bxc3 Nxe4 17
Bd3 Ng3 18 Bf4 Nf5 and White is still
very much in the game. Psychologically,
it would be wise to disrupt Blacks plans
of being the aggressor by making him
the defender!
15 Qh4+
Black brings his Queen into the attack
on Whites King.
16 Kf1
White gets his King out of check while
using his King to protect his Rook on
e1. White would get checkmated
quickly after 16 g3? Bd4+ 17 Kg2 (if
17 Kf1, then 17 Qxh3++, or if 17
Kf3, then 17 Qh5+ and now if 18
Kg2, then 18 Bxh3+ 19 Kh1 Bg4+
20 Kg2 Qh3++, or if 18 g4, then 18
Qxh3+ 19 Kf4 Be3++) Qxh3+ 18 Kf3
Re5! 19 Nb5 (if 19 Kf4, then 19 g5+
20 Kf3 Bg4++) Bg4+ 20 Kf4 g5++.

200

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

See if you can find Blacks best move


here without looking at the next move
in the game.
16 Bd4
Black brings his Bishop to the assault
on Whites King and threatens 17
Qf2++.
17 Nd1

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{PdwgPdw1}
{dwdwdwdP}
{w)QHBdPd}
{$wGN$Kdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 205. Position after 17 Nd1.

White defends against the mate by


covering the f2 square with his
Knight. This is Whites only move to
prevent a mate in one.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
17 Qxh3!
White wins a second Pawn for his
sacrificed piece and penetrates Whites
kingside position with his Queen with
the threat of 18 Qh1++. White

cannot capture Blacks Queen with 18


hxg3?? because of 18 Bxh3++.
This is certainly more energetic than
17 Bxh3, which would have also left
White in a bad way.
18 Bf3
White defends against Blacks mate
threat by opening e2 as an escape
square for his King. The Bishop also
defends the e and g Pawns. White is
now threatening to win Blacks Queen
with 19 gxh3.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
18 Qh2!

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{w)QHwdP1}
{$wGN$Kdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 206. Position after 18 Qh2.

Black gets his Queen out of attack


and keeps her actively positioned in
the attack against Whites King. Many
players would be temped to directly
attack Whites King with 18 Qh1+.
However, after Whites King moves

Robert M. Snyder

with 19 Ke2 Blacks Queen is attacked


by the Rook on e1, which buys White
valuable time to defend. After 19 Ke2
the game might continue 19 Ba6+
(if 19 Qh4, then 20 Nc3 planning
to meet 20 Bf2 with 21 g3 Qxg3
22 Rh1) 20 Nc4 Qh4 21 Ne3 f5 (if 21
Bxe3, then 22 Bxe3 Nxd5 23 Rh1)
22 Kd1 fxe4 23 Be2 Rad8. Black still
would have the better game, but White
is better off in this line than after the
actual move played in the game.

201

Nd3 wins) Be6 24 Bc4 Nd3 and Black


has a won game.
If White immediately takes the c4
post for his Knight with 19 Nc4, Black
wins after 19 f5 20 Nf2 Ba6 21 a5
fxe4 22 Rxe4 Rxe4 23 Nxe4 g5 (also
23 b5 24 Ncxd6 Ne8! wins) 24 Ke1
Rf8 25 Qe2 (if 25 axb6, then 25
Rxf3! 26 Qe2 Qg1+ 27 Kd2 Re3 does
the trick) g4 26 Bxg4 Bxc4 27 Qxc4
Qh4+ 28 Kd2 Qxg4.
19 f5

19 Ne3
White gets his Knight off of the first
rank and back into play. White hopes
that the Knight will help shield his King
on the e file if the King must flee via
e2. White anticipates that Black will
post his Bishop on a6 and attack on
the a6-f1 diagonal. Therefore, White
further secures the c4 square for his
Knight to block the a6-f1 diagonal.
Here 19 Nf2 (shielding the King,
covering the h1 square, blocking
Blacks Bishop from attacking g1 and
adding further protection to Whites e
Pawn) looks much better on the surface
than it is. Black would continue with
19 Nxd5 20 Nc4 (if 20 exd5, then
20 Rxe1+ 21 Kxe1 Qg1+ 22 Nf1
Ba6 23 Nd3 Re8+ 24 Be2 Bc8! with
the idea of 25 Bg4 and Black wins)
Nb4 21 Qb3 d5 22 Ne3 dxe4 23 Be2
(if 23 Bg4, then 23 Ba6+ 24 Be2

Black seeks to open lines in the center


to take advantage of Blacks exposed
King. A good alternative is for Black to
use his Bishop on the a6-f1 diagonal
to attack Whites King with 19 Ba6+
20 Kf2 (if 20 Ndc4, then 20 f5 21
exf5 gxf5 with the idea of 22 f4)
f5 21 Ndf1 Bxf1 planning to meet 22
Rxf1 with 22 f4, or 22 Kxf1 with 22
fxe4 23 Bxe4 Qf4+ 24 Bf3 Bxe3 and
Black is two Pawns ahead.
20 Ndc4
White posts his Knight actively on c4
to block the f1-a6 diagonal, adds
additional protection to his Knight on
e3 and puts pressure on Blacks d
Pawn.
Whites King is exposed to attack on
the kingside. Therefore, an interesting
idea for White is 20 Ke2, threatening to
move his King to a safer location with

202

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

21 Kd1 (Black sacrificed a piece for two


Pawns and cannot afford to allow White
to consolidate his position). Therefore,
after 20 Ke2 Black needs to exchange
his Bishop for Whites Knight on e3
to keep Whites King exposed to attack
with 20 Bxe3 21 Kxe3 Nxd5+ 22
Kf2 Qh4+ 23 g3 Qh2+ 24 Bg2 Nf6.
This is a nice try, but White would still
be in trouble.
20 fxe4
Black opens lines against Whites exposed
King.
21 Bxe4

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{w)QdwdP1}
{$wGw$Kdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 207. Position after 21 Bxe4.

White recovers the Pawn.


21 Ba6
Black completes the development of his
minor pieces and increases the pressure
by pinning Whites Knight on c4
and freeing his queenside Rook on the

eighth rank. Blacks primary threat is


to polish White off quickly with 22
Rxe4! 23 Qxe4 Re8 planning to meet
24 Qd3 or 24 Qc2 with 24 Nxd5
and White is crushed.
22 Bf3
White does his best to try to consolidate
his position by removing his Bishop
from the attack along the e file.
22 Re5
This move gives Black the option of
either doubling his Rooks on the e file
or shifting the queenside Rook to the
f file. Additionally, it attacks Whites
weak d Pawn with a second piece.
At this point, Black has a variety of
winning continuations. Another good
choice would be to pin and attack
Whites Bishop with 22 Rf8 (with
the threats of 23 Nxd5 and 23
Rf4 with the idea of winning Whites
Knight on c4 by 24 Bxe3) and
plan to meet 23 Ke2 with 23 Rxf3!
24 Kxf3 Rf8+ 25 Ke2 (if 25 Ke4, then
25 Qh4+ forking the King and Rook
on e1) Bxe3 26 Bxe3 Qxg2+ 27 Kd1
Qxc2+ 28 Kxc2 Bxc4.
23 Ra3
White brings his inactive Rook into
play to help defend in the center along
the third rank.

Robert M. Snyder

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{rdwdwdkd}
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{PdNgwdwd}
{$wdwHBdw}
{w)QdwdP1}
{dwGw$Kdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 208. Position after 23 Ra3.

203

threat on his d Pawn. This leads to


a quick downfall. There are moves that
offer more resistance, but still result in
a lost game:
1. 24 Ke2 Bxe3 25 Rxe3 Rxe3+ 26
Bxe3 Qf4.
2. 24 b4 cxb4 25 Rd3 Bc3.
3. 24 Rd3 Rf5 25 Ke2 Rxf3 26 Kxf3
Nxd5.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

23 Rae8
Black continues with his plan of doubling
his Rooks on the e file. Black is now
threatening 24 Nxd5 planning to
meet 25 Bxd5+ with 25 Rxd5 and if
26 Nxd5?, then 26 Qg1++.
Once again a strong alternative for
Black is to place his Rook on the f
file with 23 Rf8 and threaten 24
Rxf3+ with the plan of meeting 25 gxf3
with 25 Bxc4+ 26 Qxc4 Rg5 27 Ng4
Rxg4!. After 23 Rf8 the game might
continue 24 Ke2 Rxf3 25 Kxf3 Qh5+
26 g4 (if 26 Kf2, then 26 Rf5+ 27
Kg1 Qh4 28 Rf1 Bxc4 29 Rxf5 gxf5)
Qh3+ 27 Ke2 (if 27 Kf2, then 27
Rxe3 28 Nxe3 Bxe3+ 29 Raxe3 Qh2+
30 Kf3 Qxc2) Bxe3 28 Bxe3 Qxg4+ 29
Kd2 Bxc4.
24 Bd2?
White gets his last minor piece
developed while totally ignoring the

24 Nxd5
Black wins Whites d Pawn and brings
his Knight into the attack. Black now
threatens 25 Nxe3+.
25 Bxd5+
White tries to relieve some of the
pressure by exchanging his Bishop for
Blacks Knight.
25 Rxd5

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{w)QGwdP1}
{dwdw$Kdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 209. Position after 25 Rxd5.

204

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Black recovers his piece. There is no way


for White to defend against the attack
on his King. Among Blacks many
possible continuations is the threat 26
Bc8! to cut off Whites King from
escaping on the White squares.
26 Ke2
Whites King tries to make a run for it.
White would like to hide his King on
d1. Not 26 Nxd5? because of 26
Qg1++.
26 Bxe3
Black opens up the position around
Whites King and forces the win of
material.
27 Rxe3
White recovers the piece. Not 27 Bxe3?
because of 27 Qxg2++.
27 Bxc4+

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{w)QGKdP1}
{dwdw$wdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 210. Position after 27 Bxc4+.

Black wins Whites Knight and


continues his assault on Whites King.
White resigned here.
White cannot recover his piece with 28
Qxc4 because of 28 Qxg2+ 29 Kd1
Qxd2++. And, if 28 Kd1, then Black
wins efficiently with 28 Rxe3 29
Rxe3 Qg1+ 30 Re1 Qf2 (threatening
31 Bb3!) 31 Kc1 Bb3! planning to
meet 32 Qxb3 with 32 Qxd2+ Kb1
33 Qxe1+.

LESSON 21

Black frees his Bishop on the f8-a3


diagonal and prepares support for
the possible placement of a Pawn on
d5.

Sacrifice on h7
Anatoly Karpov vs Victor Korchnoi
Moscow, 1974
Opening: Queens Indian Defense

3 Nf3
White develops a Knight toward the
center.

In the last lesson we looked at a Knight


sacrifice against an f Pawn to expose
the enemy King to attack. In this lesson
we will examine a Knight sacrifice against
an h Pawn to expose the enemy King
to attack. This is one of the shortest wins
at the World Championship level.
Note: For instructional purposes the
most common order of moves played
in this opening are given, instead of the
transposed order played in the game.
The actual move order in the game was
1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 e6 3 g3 b6 4 Bg2 Bb7
5 c4 resulting in the same position after
Whites fifth move.
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6

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{P)wdP)P)}
{$NGQIBHR}
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3 b6
This move initiates the Queens Indian
Defense. Black prepares to fianchetto
his Bishop to b7 where it will be
placed on the long a1-h8 diagonal,
or place the Bishop on a6 where it
will attack Whites c Pawn. One of
the main ideas behind the Queens
Indian Defense is to control the
important e4 square and prevent
White from occupying that square
with a Pawn.
4 g3
This is Whites most commonly
played move. White intends to
contest Blacks control of the a8-h1
diagonal by using a fianchetto on the
same diagonal. Though the Queens
Indian is generally considered a
positional opening there can be
some interesting tactics. We will now
examine some other possible fourth
moves for White:

Diagram 211. Position after 2 e6.


-205-

206

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

1. 4 e3. White adds protection to his


d Pawn and frees his Bishop on
the f1-a6 diagonal. This move
doesnt have much bite to it and
gives Black a comfortable game
after 4 Bb7 5 Bd3 d5 6 0-0
Bd6 7 b3 0-0 8 Bb2 Nbd7 9 Nc3
and now Black can equalize with
either 9 a6, or 9 dxc4 10
bxc4 e5.
2. 4 a3. White prevents Blacks Bishop
from being able to go to b4 and
prepares for the possible advance of
his b Pawn. 4 Bb7 (for 4
Be7 see LESSON NINETEEN in
Unbeatable Chess Lessons) 5 Nc3 d5
6 cxd5 (if 6 Bg5, then 6 Be7 8
e3 0-0 9 Rc1 Ne4 9 Bxe7 Qxe7 10
cxd5 exd5 11 Nxe4 dxe4 12 Nd2
Rc8 13 Be2 Nd7 14 0-0 c5) Nxd5
7 Qc2 Nxc3 8 bxc3 c5 9 e4 Nd7
10 Bf4 cxd4 11 cxd4 Rc8 with an
equal game.
3. 4 Nc3. White offers Black the
choice of transposing into the
Nimzo-Indian with 4 Bb4
or going into an independent
variation such as 4 Bb7 5 Bg5
Be7 6 Qc2 c5 7 dxc5 (if 7 e4, then
7 cxd4 8 Nxd4 Nc6 9 Nxc6
Bxc6 with approximate equality)
bxc5 8 Rd1 (if 8 e3, then 8 d6
9 Be2 h6 10 Bxf6 Bxf6 11 0-0 00) Nc6 9 e4 (if 9 e3, then 9
h6 10 Bf4 0-0 is equal) 0-0 10

Be2 d6 11 0-0 Qb6 with an equal


game.
4. 4 Nbd2. This develops the Knight
to an inferior post and blocks
Whites Bishop on c1. Black gets
a comfortable game after 4 Bb7
5 e3 c5 6 Bd3 cxd4 7 exd4 d5 8 b3
Bd6 9 0-0 0-0.
4 Bb7
Black completes his fianchetto. A
good alternative here for Black is to
attack Whites c Pawn with 4
Ba6, which might continue 5 b3 (or 5
Nbd2 d5 6 Bg2 Be7 7 0-0 0-0 8 Ne5
Bb7 is about equal) Bb4+ 6 Bd2 Be7
7 Bg2 c6 8 Bc3 Ne4 9 Bb2 d5 10 00 Nd7 11 Nbd2 f5 12 Qc2 0-0 with
approximate equality.
5 Bg2
White completes his fianchetto.
5 Be7
Black develops his Bishop to a flexible
square and prepares to castle. Black
could also play the aggressive 5
Bb4+. However, this line allows White
to develop his more awkward Bishop
and challenge Blacks Bishop with 6
Bd2.

Robert M. Snyder

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{rhw1kdw4}
{0b0pgp0p}
{w0wdphwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdP)wdwd}
{dwdwdN)w}
{P)wdP)B)}
{$NGQIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 212. Position after 5 Be7.

6 Nc3
White develops his Knight toward
the center and attacks the critical e4
square. The most common sequence of
moves is 6 0-0 0-0 7 Nc3 Ne4 8 Qc2
Nxc3 9 Qxc3, which will be covered in
LESSON TWENTY-TWO.

207

e4. Black must now find an aggressive


way to offset Whites increased pressure
on e4.

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{dwHwdN)w}
{P)QdP)B)}
{$wGwIwdR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 213. Position after 7 Qc2.

7 c5
Black finally uses a Pawn to attack
Whites Pawn center. Black is threatening
to win a Pawn with 8 cxd4.

6 0-0

8 d5

Black gets his King out of the center


and behind a protective wall of Pawns.
The recommended alternative here is 6
Ne4 7 Qc2 Nxc3 8 Qxc3 0-0 9 0-0
transposing into the game in LESSON
TWENTY-TWO.

White takes care of the threat on his d


Pawn by advancing it with the idea of
cramping Blacks game.

7 Qc2
White brings his Queen to a more active
post where she attacks the important
e4 square. This prevents Blacks
Knight from entering e4 and gives
support to the placement of a Pawn on

8 exd5
Black removes Whites aggressively
posted d Pawn and forces White to
play actively with threats in order to
recover it.
9 Ng5
White opens up the h1-a8 diagonal for
his Bishop; this pins and attacks Blacks

208

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Pawn on d5 Pawn a third time. The


move also sets up tactical possibilities
by attacking Blacks h Pawn with a
second piece (Blacks Knight on f6 is
tied down to the defense of the Pawn
on h7).
Also playable is 9 Nh4. White not only
pins and attacks Blacks Pawn on d5
a third time, but also gives his Knight
the possibility of going to f5. After
9 Nh4 the game might continue 9
b5 (if 9 Nc6, then 10 cxd5 Nd4 11
Qd3) 10 Nxd5 Nxd5 11 cxd5 Bxh4
12 gxh4 planning to meet either 12
Na6 or 12 d6 with 13 Bg5, and
White stands slightly better.
9 Nc6

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{0bdpgp0p}
{w0ndwhwd}
{dw0pdwHw}
{wdPdwdwd}
{dwHwdw)w}
{P)QdP)B)}
{$wGwIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 214. Position after 9 Nc6.

Black develops his Knight toward the


center and completes his minor piece
development. Another common move
here is to immediately attack Blacks
aggressively posted Knight with 9 h6,
which might continue 10 Nxd5 Bxd5
11 cxd5 (Black stands slightly better

after 11 Bxd5 Nc6 because now if 12


Nf3, then 12 Nb4 13 Qf5 Nbxd5
14 cxd5 Re8; or if 12 Bxc6, then 12
dxc6 13 Nf3 Qd7 14 0-0 Rfe8) hxg5
12 d6 Nc6 13 dxe7 Qxe7 14 Bxg5 Qe5
with approximate equality.
10 Nxd5
White recovers his Pawn and takes the
strong outpost for his Knight. White
is now threatening 11 Nxf6+ Bxf6 12
Qxh7++. Capturing with the Pawn
gives Black a superior endgame after
10 cxd5 Nb4 11 Qd2 Nfxd5 12 Nxd5
Bxg5 13 Qxg5 Qxg5 14 Bxg5 Bxd5 15
Bxd5 Nxd5.
10 g6
Black defends against Whites mate
threat by blocking Whites Queen on
the b1-h7 diagonal. See if you can
find Whites best move without looking
at the next move in the game.
11 Qd2
This move has good ideas behind it:
1. White places his Queen on the
c1-h6 diagonal where she may
possibly penetrate on the kingside.
2. From d2 the Queen applies
pressure on the d file, where
Black has a backward Pawn.
3. From d2 the Queen adds extra
protection to both Knights.

Robert M. Snyder

4. The Queen is no longer a potential


target if Blacks Knight goes to b4
or d4.
The one drawback for White is that
the Queen blocks his Bishop on the
c1-h6 diagonal, but White looks at
this as a temporary problem of minor
consequence compared to the benefits
of the move.
11 Nxd5?
At this point this exchange only
strengthens Whites position by allowing
Whites Bishop to take command of
the strong d5 post. The best move
for Black is to defend his Bishop with
11 Rb8. After 11 Rb8 the game
might continue 12 h4 (if 12 0-0, then
12 Nxd5 13 cxd5 Nd4, or if 12 Nf3,
then 12 Ba6 13 Qc2 Nb4 14 Nxb4
cxb4) Nxd5 (it would be a mistake to
play 12 Ne5? because of 13 Nxf6+
Bxf6 14 Bxb7 Rxb7 15 Qd5 Nc6 16
Ne4 and White stands considerably
better) 13 cxd5 Nd4 14 0-0 Bf6 with
approximate equality.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
12 Bxd5
White recovers his Knight and brings
his Bishop to a very strong post on d5
where it applies strong pressure along

209

the a2-g8 diagonal. White is now


threatening a winning sacrifice.
12 Rb8?

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{dwdwdw)w}
{P)w!P)w)}
{$wGwIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 215. Position after 12 Rb8.

Black takes time to defend his Bishop


on b7. However, this is too slow
and allows Black to follow through
with his sacrifice. Black should remove
Whites active Knight with 12 Bxg5
13 Qxg5. Though White would stand
clearly better after this exchange, Black
needed to prevent Whites next move.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
13 Nxh7!
White wins Blacks h Pawn, attacks
Blacks Rook on f8 and opens up
the c1-h6 diagonal for his Queen.
The Knight is immune from capture.
If Black now plays 13 Kxh7?, then
White forces mate with 14 Qh6+ Kg8
15 Qxg6+ Kh8 16 Qh5+ Kg8 (if 16

210

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Kg7, then 17 Bh6+ Kh7 18 Bxf8+ Kg8


19 Qxf7+ Kh8 20 Qg8++) 17 Be4! f5
18 Bd5+ Rf7 19 Qxf7+ Kh8 20 Qh5+
Kg7 21 Qh6++.
13 Re8
Black gets his Rook out of attack. Giving
up the exchange with 13 Nd4 13
Nxf8 Bxd5 14 cxd5 Bxf8 would have
stopped Whites attack, but would have
lost the game.
14 Qh6

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{w0ndwdp!}
{dw0Bdwdw}
{wdPdwdwd}
{dwdwdw)w}
{P)wdP)w)}
{$wGwIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 216. Position after 14 Qh6.

Whites Queen penetrates Blacks


kingside. White is now threatening 15
Qxg6+. Another winning move is
14 Qf4 (threatening 15 Qxf7+), which
might continue 14 Ne5 15 Qxe5
Kxh7 16 Bxb7 Rxb7 17 Qd5 Rc7 18
Qxf7+ Kh8 19 Qxg6.

14 Ne5
Black defends his g Pawn and opens
up the a8-h1 diagonal for his Bishop.
If given the opportunity, Black would
like to trade off the white squared
Bishops to slow down Whites attack.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
15 Ng5
White gives Black no time to breathe.
This move opens up the h7 square
for Whites Queen with the threat of 16
Qh7+ Kf8 17 Qh8++.
15 Bxg5
Black had no choice but to remove
Whites Knight. Otherwise Whites
Queen would penetrate to h7.
16 Bxg5

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{0bdpdpdw}
{w0wdwdp!}
{dw0BhwGw}
{wdPdwdwd}
{dwdwdw)w}
{P)wdP)w)}
{$wdwIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 217. Position after 16 Bxg5.

Robert M. Snyder

White recovers his Knight and attacks


Blacks Queen. Whites dark squared
Bishop joins the attack on the kingside
and takes advantage of Blacks dark
squared weaknesses.
16 Qxg5
Black had nothing better than to give
up his Queen. If 16 Qc7 (or 16
Qc8), then 17 Bf6 forces mate.
17 Qxg5
White wins Blacks Queen,
17 Bxd5
This wins Whites Bishop because of the
threat of 18 Nf3+ (forking Whites
King and Queen). See if you can find
Whites best move here without looking
at the next move in the game.
18 0-0
White eliminates the threat of 18
Nf3+, gets his Rook out of attack by
Blacks Bishop, and places his Rook
effectively on the f file. White now
threatens 19 cxd5.
18 Bxc4
Black gets his Bishop out of attack and
wins Whites c Pawn. See of you can
find Whites best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.

211

19 f4

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{P)wdPdw)}
{$wdwdRIw}
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Diagram 218. Position after 19 f4.

White uses his f Pawn to drive Blacks


Knight out of the center and spearhead
a winning attack.
Black resigned here. Blacks two minor
pieces are no match for Whites Queen.
If 19 Nc6, then 20 f5 is strong.

LESSON 22

This is the most common move played


here. White removes his King from the
center.

The Desperado

6 0-0

James Tarjan versus Robert Snyder


Palo Alto, 1981
Opening: Queens Indian Defense

Black also removes his King from the


center.

In this game we will expand on our


study of the most common line of the
Queens Indian Defense. James Tarjan,
who is a Grandmaster of chess, gets an
edge out of the opening. Both sides
end up getting a Rook on their seventh
ranks and reach an interesting position
with numerous pieces hanging. White
sacrifices a Pawn to go into an endgame
with more active pieces and the better
Pawn structure. However, the final
result is a drawn endgame.
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nf3 b6 4 g3 Bb7
5 Bg2 Be7 6 0-0

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{0b0pgp0p}
{w0wdphwd}
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{wdP)wdwd}
{dwdwdN)w}
{P)wdP)B)}
{$NGQdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 219. Position after 6 0-0.

7 Nc3
White develops his Knight toward the
center and attacks the important e4
square. If given the opportunity, White
would like to move his Queen to c2
and then his Pawn to e4 thereby
obtaining a powerful Pawn center.
An equal game is reached after 7 d5
exd5 8 Nh4 (if 8 Nd4, then 8 Bc6
planning to meet 9 Nxc6 with 9
dxc6 10 Nc3 dxc4 11 Qa4 b5, or 9
cxd5 with 9 Bxd5 10 Bxd5 Nxd5 11
e4 Nb4 12 Nc3 N8c6 13 Nf5 Bf6 14
a3 Na6 15 Nd5 Nc5 16 Re1 Re8) c6 9
cxd5 Nxd5 10 Nf5 Nc7 11 Nc3 d5 12
e4 Bf6 13 exd5 Nxd5 14 Nxd5 cxd5
15 Ne3 Nd7 16 Nxd5 Nc5 17 Re1 (if
17 Rb1, then 17 Re8 18 Be3 Ne4
19 Nxf6+ Qxf6) Rc8 18 Rb1 Bxd5 19
Bxd5 Qd7 20 Qf3 Rcd8.
7 Ne4
This move has an important idea
behind it. Black sets up a blockade on
the e4 square by occupying it with
his Knight. This disrupts Whites plan

-212-

Robert M. Snyder

to occupy e4 with a Pawn. Black is


now threatening to exchange Knights
on c3 and double Whites Pawns.
8 Qc2
White brings his Queen to a more
active post where she attacks Whites
Knight on e4 and avoids getting
doubled Pawns on c3 by defending
the Knight.
A less common and passive move for
White is to defend the Knight on c3
with 8 Bd2.

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{rhw1w4kd}
{0b0pgp0p}
{w0wdpdwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdP)ndwd}
{dwHwdN)w}
{P)QdP)B)}
{$wGwdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 220. Position after 8 Qc2.

After 8 Bd2 the game might continue 8


f5 and now:
1. if 9 Qc2, then 9 Bf6 10 Rad1
Nxc3 11 Bxc3 Be4 12 Qc1 d6 13
Ne1 Bxg2 14 Nxg2 Nd7.
2. if 9 d5, then 9 Bf6 10 Rc1 Na6
11 Ne1,
if 11 Be1, then 11 Nd6 12
b3 Nc5 13 Nd4 a5 gives Black
a nice game.

213

if 11 a3, then 11 c6 12 dxe6


dxe6 13 Qc2 Nxd2 14 Nxd2
Qc7 with a comfortable game
for Black.
11 Nac5 12 Nd3 (after 12 b4
Nxc3 13 Bxc3 Ne4 14 Bxf6 Qxf6
15 Nd3 a5 16 b5 exd5 17 cxd5
Bxd5, Black stands clearly better)
Nxd3 13 exd3 Nxd2 14 Qxd2 c6
15 d4 Qc7 with a slight edge for
Black.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
8 Nxc3
White takes care of the threat on his
Knight by exchanging it for Whites
Knight.
Two other possibilities are less effective:
1. Defending the Knight with 8
d5 is inferior because of 9 cxd5
Nxc3 (if 9 exd5, then 10 Bf4
is strong) 10 bxc3 exd5 11 Bf4
planning to meet 11 Nd7 with
12 Rad1 c5 13 a4, and 11 Re8
with 12 Ne5 Bf6 13 Rad1. White
stands better in these variations.
2. If 8 f5, then White can pin
Blacks Knight on e4 with 9 Ne1
(slightly better than 9 Ne5 Nd6!
when Black is close to equal),
planning to meet 9 Nd6 with
10 c5!, and 9 d5 with 10 Bf4
Bd6 11 Bxd6 Qxd6 12 Rc1 Nc6

214

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

13 cxd5 exd5 14 Nf3 Rac8 15 Rfd1


and White stands slightly better.
9 Qxc3
White recovers his Knight.
9 c5
Black strikes at the center and attacks
Whites d Pawn. Blacks plan is to
increase the pressure on Whites d
Pawn by placing his Bishop on f6 and
possibly his Knight on c6.
A good alternative and the move I
usually recommend to my students here
is 9 f5 (gaining a further foothold
on e4). After 9 f5 the game might
continue 10 b3,
if 10 d5, then 10 exd5 11 Ne1
d4 12 Qxd4 Bxg2 13 Nxg2 Nc6 is
equal.
if 10 Rd1, then 10 Bf6 11 Bf4
d6 12 Qe3 Qe7 13 Bg5 Nd7 with
approximate equality.
10 Bf6 11 Bb2 (if 11 Ba3, then 11
d6 12 Rad1 and the game is even
after 12 Qe7, or 12 Qe8 13 Qe3
Be4) d6 12 Rad1 (if 12 Qd2, then 12
Qe7 13 Ne1 Bxg2 14 Nxg2 Nd7
with a comfortable game for Black) Qe7
(also good is 12 Qe8 13 Ne1 Bxg2
14 Nxg2 Nd7 with an equal game) 13
Ne1 Bxg2 14 Nxg2 Nd7 with an equal
game.

10 Rd1

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{dw!wdN)w}
{P)wdP)B)}
{$wGRdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 221. Position after 10 Rd1.

White places his Rook on the potentially


open d file and reinforces his d
Pawn.
10 d6
Black reinforces his c Pawn, covers his
e5 square, and opens d7 for possible
use by his Knight.
11 b3
White prepares to fianchetto his Bishop
to b2; this will counter Blacks Bishop
when it moves to f6 and attacks along
the a1-h8 diagonal. Furthermore,
White reinforces his c Pawn, which
down the line could come under attack
on the potentially open c file.
11 Bf6
Black repositions his Bishop on the long
h8-a1 diagonal and puts pressure on
Whites d Pawn.

Robert M. Snyder

12 Bb2
White continues with his plan to
fianchetto his Bishop.
12 Nc6?
Black develops his Knight toward the
center and increases pressure on Whites
d Pawn. At a glance this appears to be a
natural move. However, the immediate
placement of the Knight on c6 makes
it a target for Whites d Pawn.
It is more accurate to remove Blacks
Queen from the d file with 12
Qe7. After 12 Qe7 the game might
continue 13 Qc2 (if 13 Qd2, then
Black has the choice of equalizing with
13 Rd8 14 dxc5 bxc5 15 Bxf6 Qxf6,
or 13 Nd7 14 dxc5 Bxb2 15 Qxb2
dxc5) Nc6 14 e4 e5 15 d5 Nd4 limiting
Whites advantage to a slight edge.
13 Qd2

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{0bdwdp0p}
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{wdP)wdwd}
{dPdwdN)w}
{PGw!P)B)}
{$wdRdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 222. Position after 13 Qd2.

215

White removes the pin on his d Pawn


and increases pressure on the d file.
13 Qe7
Black connects his Rooks, gets his
Queen off of the potentially open d
file, and places his Queen on a more
active post covering Blacks 2nd rank
and defending the Bishop on b7.
See if you can find Whites best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
14 d5
White aggressively advances his d
Pawn and threatens Blacks Knight on
c6. This is Whites only attempt to
obtain an advantage.
14 exd5
Black seeks counter-play against Whites
e Pawn by opening the e file. White
obtains a dangerous passed Pawn and
stands clearly better after 14 Ne5 15
Nxe5 Bxe5 16 Bxe5 dxe5 17 d6 Qd7
18 Bxb7 Qxb7 19 d7.
15 Bxf6
This exchange frees Whites Queen
from the defense of his Bishop and will
allow him to recapture the Pawn on
d5 with his Queen (keeping the d
file open). The game would be even if

216

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

White closed the d file with 15 cxd5


Ne5.
15 Qxf6
Black recovers his Bishop.
16 Qxd5
White recovers his Pawn, keeps the d
file open, and threatens Blacks weak
d Pawn.

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{0bdwdp0p}
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{dw0Qdwdw}
{wdPdwdwd}
{dPdwdN)w}
{PdwdP)B)}
{$wdRdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 223. Position after 16 Qxd5.

16 Rfe8
Black takes the most aggressive course by
placing a Rook on the open e file and
threatening Whites e Pawn. Accepting
a more passive role and defending the
d Pawn with 16 Rad8 is reasonable.
But, White would stand better after
either 17 Qg5 or 17 e3.

Pawn in order to obtain superior piece


play. White now threatens to exchange
Queens and give Black doubled, isolated
Pawns on the f file. White could
have also maintained an advantage by
avoiding exchanges with 17 e3 Rad8 18
Qg5 Qe6 19 Nh4.
17 Qxd6
Before recovering his Pawn, Black removes
Whites threat to exchange Queens and
ruin Blacks kingside Pawns.
18 Rxd6
White recovers his Queen.
18 Rxe2
Black recovers his Pawn and posts his
Rook actively on the second rank.

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{0bdwdp0p}
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{dw0wdwdw}
{wdPdwdwd}
{dPdwdN)w}
{Pdwdr)B)}
{$wdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 224. Position after 18 Rxe2.

17 Qxd6

19 Rd7

White decides to allow the exchange


of his e Pawn for Blacks weak d

White posts his Rook on the seventh


rank, threatens Blacks Bishop on b7

Robert M. Snyder

and puts pressure on Blacks Pawn on


f7.
However, it would be stronger to
immediately open the a8-h1 diagonal
for Whites Bishop, threaten Blacks
Knight on c6, and put pressure on
Blacks f Pawn with 19 Ng5. After
19 Ng5 the game might continue 19
Na5 (if 19 h6, then 20 Nxf7
Kxf7 21 Rd7+ Kg6 22 Rxb7) 20 Bxb7
Nxb7 21 Rd7 and White stands clearly
better.
19 Na5
Black defends his Bishop on b7
and opens the a8-h1 diagonal for it.
Slightly more accurate for Black is to
neutralize Whites active Rook on d7
by challenging it with 19 Re7, which
might continue 20 Rxe7 Nxe7 21 Rd1
Bc6 22 Ng5 Re8 with approximate
equality.
20 Nh4
White challenges and threatens Blacks
active Bishop by opening the h1a8 diagonal for his Bishop and gives
his Knight the possibility of heading
toward an aggressive post on f5. A
reasonable alternative for White is
20 Re1 Rxa2 21 Rxb7 Nxb7 22 Nh4
Rd8 23 Bxb7 Kf8 24 Bd5 and Whites
active minor pieces give him a slight
advantage.

217

I remember this position well. The


game was being played at board two
on a stage during the US Open, and it
was being shown on a demonstration
board. I got up to get a glass of water
when a rather obnoxious Master
approached me and said, this is just
the type of position that Tarjan does
so well in. Of course, I just ignored
this person!
20 Bxg2
Black takes care of the threat on his
Bishop by exchanging it for Whites
Bishop.
21 Kxg2
White recovers his Bishop and brings
his King to a potentially more active
post for the endgame. See if you can
find Blacks best move here without
looking at the next move in the
game.

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{0wdRdp0p}
{w0wdwdwd}
{hw0wdwdw}
{wdPdwdwH}
{dPdwdw)w}
{Pdwdr)K)}
{$wdwdwdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 225. Position after 21 Kxg2.

218

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

21 Nc6
Blacks Knight is out of play on a5.
Therefore, it is brought back into play.
22 Nf5
White also removes his Knight from
the edge of the board and brings it to a
more active post.
22 Kf8
Since the endgame is approaching
Black begins to activate his King and
reduces the possibility of a back-rank
mate. This move also allows Blacks
Pawn to move to g6 without allowing
Whites Knight to fork his King and
f Pawn with Nh6+. However, a good
alternative for Black is to create luft for
his King with 22 h5 23 Kf1 Rae8
with approximate equality.
23 Rad1
White brings a second Rook into
play while doubling on the open d
file. If 23 Kf1 then 23 Re5 with
approximate equality.
23 g6
Black plans to dislodge Whites aggres
sively posted Knight by threatening it
with his g Pawn.

24 Rc7

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{rdwdwiwd}
{0w$wdpdp}
{w0ndwdpd}
{dw0wdNdw}
{wdPdwdwd}
{dPdwdw)w}
{Pdwdr)K)}
{dwdRdwdw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 226. Position after 24 Rc7.

White attacks Blacks Knight and opens


up the d7 square for the possibility
of doubling Rooks on the seventh rank
(with Rdd7). Though White is more
aggressively situated, Black has enough
resources to maintain the balance. White
must deal with his unprotected a Pawn
being under attack, the possibility of
Blacks Knight becoming more active,
and Blacks Rook hiding on a8 coming
into play. On the other hand Black needs
to deal with Whites possible back-rankmate threats, Whites doubled Rooks on
the d file, and the possibility of White
doubling his Rooks on the seventh
rank.
If White moved his Knight with either
24 Nd6 or 24 Nh6, then Black gets a
good game after 24 Ne5. Worthy
of examination is 24 R1d6 attacking
Blacks Knight on c6. After 24 R1d6
Black holds the fort nicely with 24
Nb4 25 Ne3 Re8 26 Ng4 R8e7 (if 26
Rxa2?, then 27 Rc7 is strong) 27 a3

Robert M. Snyder

Rxd7 28 Rxd7 Nc6 29 Rc7 h5 30 Ne3


(or if 30 Nf6, then 31 Ne5 32 Rxa7
Rb2) Ne5 planning to meet 31 Rxa7
with 31 Rb2.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
24 Rd8!
Black challenges and threatens Whites
Rook on the d file. Black didnt have
time to go Pawn grabbing with 24
Rxa2?. This would allow White to
double his Rooks on the 7th rank after
25 Rxc6 gxf5 26 Rd7 with the idea of
27 Rcc7 leaving White with a superior
endgame.
25 Kf3
An interesting position with numerous
pieces hanging!
White uses his King as an active fighting
piece to attack Whites unprotected
Rook on e2. At a glance this move
may appear to be a blunder that loses
a Pawn. However, it quickly becomes
clear that White intended to sacrifice
a Pawn to go into an endgame with
more active pieces and the better Pawn
structure.
White gets nowhere fast after 25 Rxd8+
Nxd8 26 Nd6 Rxa2 27 Rd7 Nc6 28
Rxf7+ Kg8 29 Rc7 Nd4. See if you can
find Blacks best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.

219

25 Rxf2+
Black uses a desperado to win a Pawn.
This is a term applied when a situation
exists where two or more pieces of equal
value are threatened on both sides, and
one of the pieces can make a forced
sacrifice that ends up winning material.
Therefore, Blacks Rook on f2 is
considered the desperado piece.
If Black doesnt accept Whites Pawn
offer and retreats with 25 Ree8, then
White gets a good game after 26 Rxd8
Nxd8 27 Ne3 (or 27 Nd6 Re6 28 Ne4
gives White a nice advantage) Re7 28
Rc8 Rd7 29 Nd5.
26 Kxf2
White gets his King out of check by
capturing Whites Rook.
26 Rxd1
Black recovers his Rook. See if you can
find Whites best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.

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{wdwdwiwd}
{0w$wdpdp}
{w0ndwdpd}
{dw0wdNdw}
{wdPdwdwd}
{dPdwdw)w}
{PdwdwIw)}
{dwdrdwdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 227. Position after 26 Rxd1.

220

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

27 Ke2!
This is an important zwischenzug (inbetween move). White first drives Blacks
Rook back to a less active position on
its first rank before capturing Blacks
Knight. White would not have enough
compensation for his sacrificed Pawn if
he immediately captures Whites Knight
with 27 Rxc6. After 27 Rxc6 the game
might continue 27 gxf5 28 Ke3 Ra1
29 a4 Ra3 30 Kf4 Rxb3 31 a5 Rb4 32
Kxf5 Kg7.
27 Rd8
Black must move his Rook and cover
his first rank to avoid a back-rank
mate.
28 Rxc6
This is a necessary part of Whites plan
to get compensation for his sacrificed
Pawn. The exchange of Knights results
in Black getting doubled, isolated f
Pawns.
28 gxf5
Black recovers his Knight.

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{wdw4wiwd}
{0wdwdpdp}
{w0Rdwdwd}
{dw0wdpdw}
{wdPdwdwd}
{dPdwdw)w}
{PdwdKdw)}
{dwdwdwdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 228. Position after 28 gxf5.

29 a4
Whites a Pawn is advanced for
possible use to attack and break-up
Blacks queenside Pawns by going to
a5.
Alternatives that also eventually lead to
a draw are:
1. Posting the Rook actively on the
seventh rank with 29 Rc7.
2. Attacking Blacks weak Pawn on
f5 with 29 Rf6. Now 29 Re8+
30 Kf2 leads to a draw after 30
Rd8 31 Ke2 Re8+, or 30 Re5 31
Rd6.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
29 Re8+
Black shifts his Rook to the e file
where it can be used to challenge
Whites Rook from either e7 or e6.
See if you can find Whites best move

Robert M. Snyder

here without looking at the next move


in the game.
30 Kf2
White gets his King out of check and
prevents Blacks Rook from penetrating
to e1, e2 and e3. Furthermore,
White keeps his King stationed on the
kingside where Black has his weak extra
Pawn. Whites King would be cut off
from the kingside after 30 Kd2?. This
would be met by 30 Re6.
30 Re6
Black challenges Whites actively posted
Rook.

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{wdwdwiwd}
{0wdwdpdp}
{w0Rdrdwd}
{dw0wdpdw}
{PdPdwdwd}
{dPdwdw)w}
{wdwdwIw)}
{dwdwdwdw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 229. Position after 30 Re6.

31 Rc8+
White avoids exchanging Rooks, which
would lead to a lost endgame after 31
Rxe6?? fxe6.

221

31 Re8
Black challenges Whites Rook again
and offers to trade Rooks. The game
would also be a draw after 31 Kg7
32 a5.
32 Rc6
White again avoids exchanging Rooks.
The exchange would lose after 32
Rxe8+ Kxe8 33 Ke3 Ke7 34 Kf4 Kf6
35 h3 h6 36 h4 h5 37 Kf3 Ke5 38 Ke3
f4+ 39 gxf4 Kf5 40 Kf3 f6 (White is in
zugzwang), and now if 41 Kg3, then 41
Ke4, or if 41 Ke3, then 41 Kg4.
32 Re6
Both sides recognized after the second
repetition of position that there were
no winning prospects. Therefore, both
players agreed to a draw.

LESSON 23

3 Bb4

Breaking a Pin

Black initiates the Nimzo-Indian


Defense. This develops his Bishop
aggressively and pins Whites Knight
on c3 while preventing White from
occupying e4 with a Pawn.

Laurence Newton vs Robert Snyder


Los Angeles, 1973
Opening: Nimzo-Indian Defense

4 Bg5
White immediately pins Blacks Knight
on f6 with his Bishop and then
declines Blacks flank gambit.
Black uses a unique way of removing a
troublesome pin, which allows him to
spring into action in the center.
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3

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{rhb1kgw4}
{0p0pdp0p}
{wdwdphwd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wdP)wdwd}
{dwHwdwdw}
{P)wdP)P)}
{$wGQIBHR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 230. Position after 3 Nc3.

White develops his Knight toward the


center and prepares support for the
placement of a Pawn on e4, which
would give him dominating control of
the center.

This is known as the Leningrad (or


Spassky) variation. White counters
Blacks pin with a pin of his own on the
opposite side of the board. Typically, in
most of the variations of the NimzoIndian, Whites dark square Bishop
plays a passive role early in the opening.
However, here White immediately
brings this Bishop into play. Whites
aggressive use of this Bishop does have
a drawback; Blacks opportunities on
the queenside are increased because of
the absence of the Bishop on that side
of the board.
Other variations of the Nimzo-Indian
with 4 a3, 4 Qc2 and 4 e3 are covered
in LESSONS TWENTY, TWENTYONE, andTWENTY-TWO respectively
in Unbeatable Chess Lessons.
4 h6
Black attacks Whites aggressively
posted Bishop forcing the Bishop to
either retreat or make an unfavorable
exchange on f6. After White retreats
his Bishop to h4, Black then has the

-222-

Robert M. Snyder

223

option, at the time of his choosing


and at the expense of weakening his
kingside, to remove the pin with g5.

a5 diagonal for his Queen. Blacks


immediate threat is to get a great
position with 6 Qa5.

5 Bh4

6 d5

Logically, White gets his Bishop


out of attack and maintains the
pin on Blacks Knight. This further
removes the Bishops influence on the
queenside. However, a retreat with 5
Bd2 is inconsistent and Black gets a
comfortable game after 5 0-0. If
he gives up the Bishop pair by 5 Bxf6,
Black gets a comfortable game after 5
Qxf6 6 Rc1 (if 6 e4, then 6 e5 7
Nf3 Nc6; or if 6 e3, then 6 Bxc3+ 7
bxc3 b6 8 Ne2 Bb7 9 Nf4 d6 10 Bd3
0-0) c5 7 dxc5 Na6 8 g3 Nxc5 9 Bg2 a5
10 Nh3 a4 11 a3 Bxc3+ 12 Rxc3 Ra6
13 0-0 Rb6.

This is Whites best way to release the


pressure on his d Pawn. White intends
to use his Pawn on d5 to cramp
Blacks game and to restrict Black from
using c6 and e6 as possible posts for
his pieces.
Whites other, less desirable, possibilities
are:
1. If White adds protection to his
Pawn on d4 with 6 e3, then Black
would play 6 cxd4 7 exd4 Qa5
with a nice game.
2. If 6 dxc5, then 6 Bxc3+ 7 bxc3
Qa5 8 Bxf6 gxf6 9 Qd4 e5 10 Qe3
Na6 11 Nf3 Qxc5 and Black stands
better.
3. If 6 Rc1, then 6 g5 7 Bg3 Ne4
is equal.

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{rhb1kdw4}
{0p0pdp0w}
{wdwdphw0}
{dwdwdwdw}
{wgP)wdwG}
{dwHwdwdw}
{P)wdP)P)}
{$wdQIBHR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 231. Position after 5 Bh4.

5 c5
Black uses his c Pawn to attack
Whites d Pawn and open the d8-

6 b5
Black offers his b Pawn as a Gambit
to gain more control of the center.
Blacks idea is to undermine the most
important defender of Whites Pawn
on d5by attacking the c Pawn.
Gambits are not on the high end of
my list of recommendations to my
students. However, when I consider
such a sacrifice as the best move, then
I dont hesitate in recommending it. I

224

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

look at its soundness for undermining


the enemy position as a key factor in
determining its value.
A reasonable alternative for Black is 6
d6, which might continue 7 e3 00 8 Bd3 Bxc3+ 9 bxc3 Nbd7 10 Ne2
Ne5 11 0-0 Re8 12 Re1 Qe7 with an
equal game.
7 e4

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{wgPdPdwG}
{dwHwdwdw}
{P)wdw)P)}
{$wdQIBHR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 232. Position after 7 e4.

White reinforces his e Pawn while


releasing his Bishop on f1, which
defends his c Pawn. We will now
examine some other possible lines for
White:
1. 7 cxb5. Immediately grabbing
Blacks b Pawn leads to
approximate equality after 7 g5
8 Bg3 Nxd5 9 Rc1 Bb7 10 Nf3 (if
10 h4, then 10 Qf6 11 Qd2
Nxc3 12 bxc3 Ba3 13 Rd1 d5 14
e4 Nd7 15 Be2 0-0-0 16 Nf3 c4)
Nf6 11 a3 Bxc3+ 12 bxc3 d5 13 e3

Ne4 14 Be5 Rg8 15 Bxb5 Qxb8 16


Bd3 Nf6.
2. 7 dxe6. This is the most common
way for White to accept the
Gambit. White first exchanges his
Pawn on d5, which is weakened
when he captures on b5 first. 7
fxe6 8 cxb5. Now Black gets
enough compensation for his Pawn
with his superior control of the
center after 8 d5 (or 8 0-0
9 e3 d5 transposes) 9 e3 (if 9 a3,
then 9 Bxc3+ 10 bxc3 0-0) 0-0
10 Bd3 (if 10 Nf3, then 10 Qa5
11 Bxf6 Rxf6 12 Qd2 a6 13 bxa6
Nc6 and Blacks position is worth
more than his sacrificed Pawn) a6
11 Nge2 c4 12 Bc2 axb5 13 0-0
Ra5 14 e4 (if 14 Nd4, then 14
Bxc3 15 bxc3 e5 16 Ne2 Nc6 and
Black stands better) Be7 15 exd5
(if 15 a3, then 15 b4 16 axb4
Rxa1 17 Qxa1 d4) b4 16 d6 Qxd6
17 Ne4 Qxd1 18 Rfxd1 Nc6 19 f3
and Black is clearly better.
3. 7 e3. With this conservative move,
White avoids placing his e Pawn
under attack on e4 and frees his
Bishop on the f1-a6 diagonal.
Black obtains good play for his
Pawn with 7 Bb7 8 dxe6 fxe6 9
cxb5 0-0 10 a3 (if 10 Nf3, then 10
Qa5 is strong) Ba5 11 Nf3 a6
12 bxa6 (or 12 Rb1 Bxc3+ 13 bxc3
axb5) Bxf3 14 gxf3 d5.

Robert M. Snyder

4. 7 Rc1. Black obtains a good game


with 7 bxc4 8 e4 exd5 9 Bxf6
Qxf6 10 Qxd5 (if 10 exd5, then
10 Qe7+ 11 Qe2 d6 12 Qxe7+
Kxe7 13 Bxc4 Ba6) Nc6 11 Bxc4
0-0 12 Nf3 Bb7 13 Qxd7 Na5
14 Be2 Bxe4 15 0-0 Bc6 16 Qh3
Rad8.
7 exd5
Black liquidates part of Whites Pawn
center and opens the e file. Also
playable is 7 g5 8 Bg3 Nxe4. This
gives White two ways to play:
1. 9 Qf3 exd5 10 0-0-0 Bxc3 11 Rxd5
Bf6 12 Qxe4+ Qe7 13 Qxe7+ (if 13
Qc2, then 13 Bb7 14 Rd1 Nc6;
or if 13 Qe3, then 13 Qxe3+ 14
fxe3 Be7) Bxe7 14 cxb5 a6 with an
equal game.
2. White can go for a draw with 9 Be5
0-0 10 Qh5 d6 11 Bd3 Nxc3 12
Qxh6 Ne4+ 13 Kf1 dxe5 14 Bxe4
f5 15 Qg6+ Kh8 16 Qh6+.
8 exd5
White recovers his Pawn and removes
his e Pawn from being a target to
Blacks Knight. If 8 cxd5, then g5 9 e5
(9 Bg3 Nxe4 10 Qf3 0-0 favors Black)
gxh4 10 exf6 Qxf6 11 Bxb5 a6 12 Ba4
(12 Bd3 Bxc3+ 13 bxc3 Qxc3+ 14 Kf1
d6 and Black stands better) Bxc3+ 13
bxc3 Qxc3+ 14 Kf1 a5 15 Bb5 Ba6 and
Black stands better.

225

8 0-0
Black removes his King from the center
and opens the e8 square for possible
use by his Rook or Queen.
9 Bd3
White develops his Bishop to the b1h7 diagonal. However, the drawback
behind this move is that Black will
force the Bishop to move a second time.
White can come close to achieving
equality by accepting the gambit Pawn
with 9 cxb5 Bb7 (also playable is 9
Re8+ 10 Be2 Bb7 11 Rc1 Bxc3+ 12
Rxc3 a6) 10 Bd3 (if 10 Be2, then 10
g5 11 Bg3 Nxd5 and Black stands
better, or if 10 Bc4, then 10 Qe8+
planning to meet 11 Nge2 with 11
Qe4, or 11 Qe2 with 11 Nxd5 and
Black stands better) Bxd5 11 Kf1 Bxc3
12 bxc3 Re8.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

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{rhb1w4kd}
{0wdpdp0w}
{wdwdwhw0}
{dp0Pdwdw}
{wgPdwdwG}
{dwHBdwdw}
{P)wdw)P)}
{$wdQIwHR}
vllllllllV
Diagram 233. Position after 9 Bd3.

226

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

9 bxc4

11 Kf1??

Black forces Whites Bishop to move


a second time. In order to recover his
Pawn, the Bishop will also need to leave
the b1-h7 diagonal.

This is a fatal mistake; it loses a piece.


The move recommended by theory is to
challenge Blacks Queen with 11 Qe2,
which ends up with Black standing
considerably better after 11 Ne4 12
Rc1 Ba6 13 Bxa6 Nxa6 14 f3 Nxc3 15
bxc3 Ba3 16 Rd1 c4.
The more passive approach with 11 Be2,
which is ignored by theory, is actually
the best move here. After 11 Be2 the
game might continue 11 Qe5 12
Bxf6 Qxf6 13 Rc1 d6 14 Nf3 Nd7 15
0-0 Nb6 16 a3 Bxc3 17 bxc3 Bg4 18
h3 Bh5 and Black stands better.
The natural looking 11 Nge2 is weak.
White is crushed after 11 Bxc3+ 12
bxc3 Qe4 13 Bxf6 Qxc4 14 Be7 Re8 15
d6 Ba6 16 f3 Nc6.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.

10 Bxc4
White gets his Bishop out of attack and
recovers his Pawn. Inferior is 10 Bc2
Bxc3+ 11 bxc3 d6 12 Ne2 Nbd7 13
0-0 Re8 14 Ba4 Rb8 and Black stands
clearly better. See if you can find Blacks
best move here without looking at the
next move in the game.
10 Qe8+!

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{rhbdq4kd}
{0wdpdp0w}
{wdwdwhw0}
{dw0Pdwdw}
{wgBdwdwG}
{dwHwdwdw}
{P)wdw)P)}
{$wdQIwHR}
vllllllllV

11 Bxc3
Black removes the Knight that covers
the critical e4 square.

Diagram 234. Position after 10 Qe8+.

Black removes the pin from his Knight


on f6 and attacks Whites King on
the open e file. This is much stronger
than 10 Re8+ 11 Nge2 Bxc3+ 12
bxc3 Re4 13 Bxf6 Qxf6 14 Bd3 Re7
15 0-0 d6 16 Re1 with approximate
equality.

12 bxc3
White recovers his piece. See if you can
find Blacks best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.

Robert M. Snyder

12 Qe4
Black forks Whites two Bishops. The
flaw in Whites analysis is back on
move 11. He didnt realize that after 13
Bxf6 the move 13 Qxc4+ places his
King in check and gives Black time to
recapture on f6.
Even a 2100 rated player (as in this case)
can make such an oversight in serious
tournament play. Some of the worlds
top players have made terrible blunders
that would be an eye opener to the
average scholastic player. Therefore, it
is possible on any given day for you to
win a game against a player rated many
hundreds of points above you! Never go
into a game feeling that you dont stand
a chance. Keep in mind that no one is
perfect and even the best players make
mistakes. Be confident and prepared
to punish your opponent for their
imperfections.
13 Qd3
White had to choose which Bishop to
part with. Therefore, he defends his
Bishop on c4 and brings his Queen
to a more active location.

227

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{rhbdw4kd}
{0wdpdp0w}
{wdwdwhw0}
{dw0Pdwdw}
{wdBdqdwG}
{dw)Qdwdw}
{Pdwdw)P)}
{$wdwdKHR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 235. Position after 13 Qd3.

13 Qxh4
Black wins Whites Bishop. The next few
moves are instructive in demonstrating
how to play efficiently when you have a
winning material advantage.
14 Re1
White brings his Rook to the open
e file and prevents Blacks Queen
from going to e4 to force a favorable
exchange. However, this doesnt prevent
Blacks next move!
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
14 Qxc4!
This is Blacks easiest winning method.
Black forces the exchange of the Queens
and Bishops resulting in a simplified
endgame. A professional player will

228

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

usually choose the no-brainer (no


thought required) method to win.
15 Qxc4

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{rhbdw4kd}
{0wdpdp0w}
{wdwdwhw0}
{dw0Pdwdw}
{wdQdwdwd}
{dw)wdwdw}
{Pdwdw)P)}
{dwdw$KHR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 236. Position after 15 Qxc4.

White recovers his Bishop. See if you


can find Blacks best move here without
looking at the next move in the game.
15 Ba6
This is the point behind Blacks 14th
move. Black pins Whites Queen to his
King.
16 Qe2
Since White must lose his Queen
anyway he retreats his Queen so that he
can capture Blacks Bishop and develop
his Knight.
16 Bxe2+
Black recovers his Queen.

17 Nxe2
White captures Blacks Bishop (actually,
White is forced to capture the Bishop
one way or another) and develops his
Knight.
17 Nxd5

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{rhwdw4kd}
{0wdpdp0w}
{wdwdwdw0}
{dw0ndwdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dw)wdwdw}
{PdwdN)P)}
{dwdw$KdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 237. Position after 17 Nxd5.

Being a piece and Pawn down, White


resigned here.

LESSON 24
A Knight on the Rim is Dim
Richard Mann vs. Robert Snyder
Los Angeles, 1972
Opening: Birds Opening
Black counters Whites thematic
opening idea, of an attempted buildup on the kingside, through active
development and queenside expansion.
White makes positional mistakes by
developing his Knight to the edge of the
board and later allowing his Queen to
become a target. After taking advantage
of these inaccuracies and forcing the
win of material, Black increases his
advantage by using threats to make even
exchanges. Putting the opponent away
quickly and efficiently, after obtaining
a winning material advantage, is part of
being a good player.
1 f4
This Opening is named after the famous
British player Henry Bird. Though I
have sometimes heard the joke, It is
for the birds, it isnt a flighty opening.
With 1 f4 White immediately attacks
the important e5 square with the
possibility of creating an outpost for
his Knight on e5 after it is developed
to f3. Another advantage of having
the Pawn on f4 is that Whites Rook

will be more actively posted on the f


file after castling kingside. Black must
be careful not to allow White to buildup a kingside attack. Some drawbacks
of 1 f4 are that it creates a potential
weakness on the e1-h4 diagonal and
it doesnt free a Bishop in the same way
as moving a center Pawn (1 e4 or 1
d4).
1 d5

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{rhb1kgn4}
{0p0w0p0p}
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwdpdwdw}
{wdwdw)wd}
{dwdwdwdw}
{P)P)PdP)}
{$NGQIBHR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 238. Position after 1 d5.

Black immediately stakes his claim in


the center by occupying it with a Pawn.
This move frees Blacks Bishop along
the c8-h3 diagonal, increases the
scope of the Queen on the d file and
gives Black the possibility of developing
a Knight to d7.
An interesting alternative for Black is
1 e5, known as Froms Gambit.
Black offers a Pawn sacrifice in return
for rapid development and to try to
take advantage of the weakened h4e1 diagonal. As a general rule, the best
way to refute a gambit is to accept it.

-229-

230

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

After 1 e5 the game might continue,


2 fxe5 (if White plays 2 e4 the game
transposes into the Kings Gambit) d6
3 exd6 Bxd6 (threatening 4 Qh4+ 5
g3 Bxg3+ 6 hxg3 Qxg3++) 4 Nf3 g5 (a
reasonable alternative is to develop with
4 Nf6) 5 d4 g4 6 Ne5 Bxe5 7 dxe5
Qxd1+ 8 Kxd1 Nc6 9 Bf4 Be6 10 e3
0-0-0+ 11 Nd2 Nge7 with a superior
position and Pawn structure in return
for the sacrificed Pawn.

3 g6

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{rhb1kgw4}
{0p0w0pdp}
{wdwdwhpd}
{dwdpdwdw}
{wdwdw)wd}
{dPdwdNdw}
{PdP)PdP)}
{$NGQIBdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 239. Position after 3 g6.

2 Nf3
White develops his Knight to its most
natural square and increases the attack
on e5 in keeping with the theme of
Birds Opening.
2 Nf6
Black develops his Knight toward the
center and makes the least committing
moves first.
3 b3
Whites use of the c1-h6 diagonal is
restricted because of the Pawn on f4.
Therefore, White decides to fianchetto
his problem child Bishop on c1.
The most common move for White
is 3 e3 freeing the Bishop on f1 and
reinforcing the f Pawn.

Black prepares to fianchetto his Bishop to


g7. The h8-a1 diagonal will be a very
effective placement for Blacks Bishop in
this Opening. Blacks Pawn on g6 also
increases Blacks foothold on f5 directly
in front of Whites f Pawn. Securing the
f5 square will reduce Whites attacking
chances on the kingside.
4 Bb2
White completes his fianchetto by
developing his Bishop to the long a1h8 diagonal.
4 Bg7
Black also completes his fianchetto and
counters Whites Bishop on the h8-a1
diagonal. This may allow for interesting
tactical opportunities later in the game
due to a potential discovered attack by
Blacks Knight on f6. White needs to
keep this in mind.

Robert M. Snyder

5 e3
This move frees Whites Bishop along
the f1-a6 diagonal, defends his Pawn
on f4 and covers the d4 square.
5 c5
Since this game has the same
characteristics as a d Pawn opening
for Black, he doesnt want to develop his
Knight to c6 and block the c Pawn.
This would be very cramping. With 5
c5 Black gains a greater foothold in
both the center and queenside while
freeing the Queen on the d8-a5
diagonal. Black also has the option of
developing his Knight to c6 without
blocking his c Pawn.
A good and flexible alternative is 5
0-0, this would prevent White from
playing the move he plays next. After
removing his King from the center with
5 0-0 the game might continue, 6
Be2 c5 7 0-0 Nc6 8 Ne5 Qc7 and Black
has comfortable development.
6 Bb5+
White aggressively develops his Bishop
and clears the way for castling. However,
there is nothing wrong with developing
the Bishop less actively with 6 Be2,
transposing into the analysis given for
Blacks 5th move.

231

6 Bd7

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{rhw1kdw4}
{0pdb0pgp}
{wdwdwhpd}
{dB0pdwdw}
{wdwdw)wd}
{dPdw)Ndw}
{PGP)wdP)}
{$NdQIwdR}
vllllllllV

Diagram 240. Position after 6 Bd7.

Black develops his Bishop and challenges


Whites aggressively posted Bishop on
b5. Black avoids playing 6 Nc6
because this gives White the option of
doubling Blacks Pawns with 7 Bxc6+
bxc6. The game would be about even,
but Black wants to obtain an advantage.
7 Qe2
White brings his Queen to a more
active post while defending his Bishop
on b5. However, it would be more
direct to play 7 Bxd7+ immediately and
not commit his Queen to e2. After
7 Bxd7+ the game might continue
7 Qxd7 8 Ne5 Qc7 9 0-0 0-0 10
Qf3 Nc6, though once again Black is
comfortably developed.
7 0-0
Black gets his King to a safer location
by removing his King from the center.

232

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

8 Bxd7
White relieves his Queen from being
tied down to the protection of his
Bishop on b5. Black must now make
a decision on how to recapture.
8 Nbxd7
Black chooses a developing move to
recover the piece. However, a good
alternative for Black is to activate his
Queen with 8 Qxd7. Blacks idea
is to reserve the option of developing
his Knight to the more active c6 post.
After 8 Qxd7 Black doesnt mind his
Queen being attacked with 9 Ne5. The
Queen would simply be driven to a nice
post after 9 Qc7 and Black ends up
with a good game after 10 0-0 Nc6.
9 0-0

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{rdw1w4kd}
{0pdn0pgp}
{wdwdwhpd}
{dw0pdwdw}
{wdwdw)wd}
{dPdw)Ndw}
{PGP)QdP)}
{$NdwdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 241. Position after 9 0-0.

White removes his King from the


center and brings his Rook to the f

file, thematic with the opening idea of


the game.
9 Qc7
Besides connecting his Rooks, this
move allows Black to bring his Queen
to a flexible and active post. From c7
the Queen exerts pressure on the critical
e5 square and ties Whites e Pawn
to the defense of his f Pawn. The
Queens potential use along the c file,
seventh rank, and d8-a5 diagonals
may come in handy.
10 Na3?
This is a positional inaccuracy. The
general rule, Dont develop Knights to
the edge of the board definitely applies
here. It is understandable that White
didnt want to block his c Pawn or
Bishop on b2 with 10 Nc3. However,
not only is the Knight less actively
posted on a3, it becomes a target
there later in the game.
White has a couple of better plans here.
He could immediately strike at the
center with 10 c4 and make the c3
square attractive for his Knight. Another
idea is 10 d3, this would increase
Whites control of the center and open
up d2 for use by his Knight.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move.

Robert M. Snyder

10 a6!
This quiet looking positional move
covers the important b5 square. It
further restricts the movement of Whites
Knight on a3. More important, it
gives support for the placement of a
Pawn on b5 in keeping with the
theme of queenside expansion.
11 c4
White counters by attacking Blacks
Pawn center and restraining Blacks
Pawn from going to b5. This also
opens up possible avenues for Whites
Knight on a3 to come into play. The
square c2 is opened and there is also
the possibility of eliminating Blacks d
Pawn allowing Whites Knight to go to
c4 (attacking the e5 square).
11 e6

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{rdwdw4kd}
{dp1ndpgp}
{pdwdphpd}
{dw0pdwdw}
{wdPdw)wd}
{HPdw)Ndw}
{PGw)QdP)}
{$wdwdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 242. Position after 11 e6.

233

Black reinforces his d Pawn to prevent


Whites Knight from being able to go
to c4.
12 cxd5?
This results in White giving up his c
Pawn for Blacks less active e Pawn.
It is important for the Pawn to stay
on c4 because it applies pressure on
Blacks center and helps restrain the
advance of Blacks b Pawn.
The idea of Whites move is to open up
the c file for his Rook and attempt to
take advantage of Blacks Queen being
on the same file. But, White should
have played 12 d3 to reinforce his c
Pawn and increase his foothold on the
center by attacking the square e4.
After 12 d3 the game might continue
12 Rad8 13 Rac1 b6.
12 exd5
The point of Blacks 11th move becomes
clearer now. Black recovers his Pawn
while maintaining his strong Pawn
center and keeping Whites Knight out
of c4.
13 Rac1
White places his Rook on the half-open
c file. See if you can find Blacks best
move here without looking at the next
move in the game.

234

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

13 b5

14 Qa5!

Black begins his queenside expansion.

This move must have come as a


devastating blow to White. Black
removes his Queen from the same
file as Whites Rook and threatens to
win Whites a Pawn by driving away
Whites Knight with 15 b4.

14 f5?
Another inaccuracy! It will soon be
demonstrated how a series of what may
appear to be small inaccuracies lead to a
lost game. White is trying to attack on
the kingside when he doesnt have an
attack. White doesnt realize how serious
things are becoming on the queenside.
He gives up what foothold he had on
the critical e5 square. As mentioned
earlier, one of the major thematic ideas
behind Birds Opening is to secure e5.
White should have either taken the
outpost for his Knight with 14 Ne5 or
played 14 d3 opening up his Queen along
the 2nd rank and attacking the c4 and
e4 squares. Against either move Black
would have the edge after playing the
same move he did in the actual game.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move.

cuuuuuuuuC
{rdwdw4kd}
{dw1ndpgp}
{pdwdwhpd}
{dp0pdPdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{HPdw)Ndw}
{PGw)QdP)}
{dw$wdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 243. Position after 14 f5.

15 fxg6
White continues to be inconsistent.
This helps Black by giving his Rook on
f8 an open file. White should leave his
Pawn on f5 as Black had no interest
in capturing it because it would have
given Black weak, isolated, doubled
Pawns and opened up his kingside. It is
better for White to defend his a Pawn
with 15 Ra1. After 15 Ra1 the game
might continue 15 c4 16 Nc2 Nc5
with Black standing slightly better.
15 fxg6
Black recovers his Pawn and opens up
the f file for his Rook.
16 Ra1
White defends his a Pawn to avoid
losing it.

Robert M. Snyder

16 Rae8

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdr4kd}
{dwdndwgp}
{pdwdwhpd}
{1p0pdwdw}
{wdwdwdwd}
{HPdw)Ndw}
{PGw)QdP)}
{$wdwdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 244. Position after 16 Rae8.

Black brings his Rook into play on the


half-open center file and pins Whites
e Pawn. Black now has a dream
position. Blacks advantages consist of
having a substantial spatial advantage
in the center and on the queenside, and
his pieces are more active and better
coordinated.
A good alternative for Black is to
immediately expand on the queenside
with 16 c4.
17 Qd3
White removes his Queen from the
same file as Blacks Rook. This solves
one problem, but creates another.
Whites Queen will now be a greater
target on d3. White should improve
the position of his Knight with 17
Nc2.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move.

235

17 c4
Black continues to gain even more
space while gaining time by attacking
Whites Queen.
18 bxc4
It is better for White to play 18 Qe2
Nc5 19 Nc2 maintaining his Pawn
on b3 to combat Blacks queenside
expansion.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move.
18 Nc5
Black brings his Knight to an awesome
post and gains time by attacking Whites
Queen.
19 Qd4

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{wdwdr4kd}
{dwdwdwgp}
{pdwdwhpd}
{1phpdwdw}
{wdP!wdwd}
{Hwdw)Ndw}
{PGw)wdP)}
{$wdwdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 245. Position after 19 Qd4.

On d4 the Queen will continue to


be a major target for Black. It is better

236

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

to retreat the Queen to a less exposed


location with 19 Qc2.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
19 b4!
This forces the win of material. Black
threatens Whites Knight on a3
while defending his attacked Knight
on c5. However, the key point to
this move is that it attacks c3 and
takes away a critical retreat square
for Whites Queen. As a result Black
is now threatening to trap Whites
Queen in the middle of the board with
20 Re4.
20 Nb5
White cuts off the Black Queens defense
of the Knight on c5 and threatens 21
Qxc5.
20 Ne6
Black gets his Knight out of attack
while gaining time by attacking Whites
Queen.

21 Qh4

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{wdwdr4kd}
{dwdwdwgp}
{pdwdnhpd}
{1Ndpdwdw}
{w0Pdwdw!}
{dwdw)Ndw}
{PGw)wdP)}
{$wdwdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 246. Position after 21 Qh4.

White gets his Queen out of attack


with the idea of keeping her as active
as possible without making her a target
again. White may have learned his
lesson, however it is too late to save the
game.
21 axb5
Black wins Whites Knight.
22 cxd5
White exchanges Pawns by taking the
center Pawn and leaving doubled Pawns
on the b file.
22 Nxd5
Black recovers his Pawn with a discovered
attack on Blacks unprotected Bishop on
b2. Now that Black is ahead (Black
has a Knight for a Pawn) it is to Blacks
advantage to exchange pieces with the

Robert M. Snyder

idea of simplifying into an easily won


endgame.
23 Bxg7
White had nothing better to do than to
trade off his threatened Bishop.
23 Kxg7
Black recovers his Bishop. The
alternative, 23 Nxg7 would remove
the Knight from a more centralized
location.
24 Ne5

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{wdwdr4wd}
{dwdwdwip}
{wdwdndpd}
{1pdnHwdw}
{w0wdwdw!}
{dwdw)wdw}
{Pdw)wdP)}
{$wdwdRIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 247. Position after 24 Ne5.

White aggressively posts his Knight on


e5 trying to complicate matters as
much as possible. This is a good idea
when you are materially lost.
24 Qd8
Since Blacks Queen is somewhat out
of play on a5 he retreats her and

237

challenges Whites Queen on h4.


There are two ideas in play here:
1. If White exchanges Queens, then
Black simplifies down to an easily
won endgame.
2. If Whites Queen moves to
avoid exchanging, then Black
has succeeded in gaining time
to reposition his Queen more
actively.
25 Qg4
White knows that his best chance is
to avoid trading Queens. He keeps
his Queen actively posted while tying
Blacks pieces to the defense of the
Knight on e6 and the Pawn on b4.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
25 Qd6
Black continues with his plan of
repositioning his Queen. From d6
Blacks Queen threatens Whites Knight
on e5 while adding protection to
Blacks Knight on e6 and Pawn on
b5.
26 Qg3
White does his best to maintain his
Knights active outpost on e5 by
defending it. This move also defends

238

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

Whites e Pawn a second time so that


Whites d Pawn is free to go to d4.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
26 Nc5
Black opens up his Rook on the e
file with a discovered attack on Whites
Knight. Additionally, from c5 Blacks
Knight has some good potential squares
to which it can go.
27 d4

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{wdwdr4wd}
{dwdwdwip}
{wdw1wdpd}
{dphnHwdw}
{w0w)wdwd}
{dwdw)w!w}
{PdwdwdP)}
{$wdwdRIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 248. Position after 27 d4.

White defends his threatened Knight


on e5 and attacks Blacks Knight on
c5.

28 Rxf8
Since White doesnt have a good way
of avoiding an exchange of Rooks
along the f file he decides to initiate
the exchange. By exchanging, White
removes Blacks Rook from the e file
where it applies pressure to Whites
backward e Pawn.
The idea behind Whites move becomes
apparent when we look at Whites
alternative after 28 Nxd7 Rxf1+ 29
Rxf1 Qxd7. Whites e Pawn is in
serious trouble. If White tries defending
his e Pawn with either 30 Rf3 or 30
Re1, then Black would play 30
Nxe3! with the plan to meet 31 Rxe3
with 31 Qxd4 32 Kf2 Qd2+. Now
White loses his Rook.
28 Rxf8
Black recovers his Rook while placing
his Rook on the open f file and
keeping up the pressure on Whites
Knight. Black now threatens to trade
Knights on e5 and give White
doubled isolated Pawns.
29 Nxd7

27 Nd7

White avoids getting doubled, isolated


Pawns by exchanging first.

This is in line with the idea of forcing


simplifying exchanges when ahead in
material, Black attacks and challenges
Whites actively posted Knight.

29 Qxd7
Black recovers his Knight.

Robert M. Snyder

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdw4wd}
{dwdqdwip}
{wdwdwdpd}
{dpdndwdw}
{w0w)wdwd}
{dwdw)w!w}
{PdwdwdP)}
{$wdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 249. Position after 29 Qxd7.

239

32 a3

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{wdwdw4wd}
{dwdwdwip}
{wdwdqdpd}
{dpdwdwdw}
{w0w)wdwd}
{)whw)w!P}
{wdwdwdPd}
{dwdw$wIw}
vllllllllV
Diagram 250. Position after 32 a3.

30 h3
White creates a breathing square (luft)
for his King by opening up h2.
30 Qe6
Black attacks and threatens Whites e
Pawn while he also prepares to attack
Whites Pawn on a2.
31 Re1
White defends his threatened e Pawn.
See if you can find Blacks best move
here without looking at the next move
in the game.
31 Nc3
Black attacks Whites a Pawn twice
and allows for the possibility of placing
his Knight on the strong outpost at
e4.

White attempts to save his Pawn and


sets up a nifty trap. See if you can find
Blacks best move here without looking
at the next move in the game.
32 Ne4
Black occupies the strong outpost
on e4 with his Knight and attacks
Whites Queen as well as the important
f2 square. Black does not want to play
32 bxa3? because 33 Qc7+ forks
King and Knight, thereby winning the
Knight.
33 Qc7+
White removes his Queen from attack
and plans to maneuver the Queen to
the queenside to defend his a Pawn.
However, White will soon discover that
even larger problems for him exist on
the kingside.

240

More Unbeatable Chess Lessons

33 Rf7

35 Rf2

Black gets his King out of check and at


the same time gains time by threatening
Whites Queen.

Black penetrates with a devastating


attack along Whites 2nd rank. The
immediate threat is 36 Rxg2+
leading to a quick mate. Also winning
quickly is 35 Qf2+ followed by 36
Qg3.

34 Qc1
White gets his Queen out of attack and
defends his threatened a Pawn. See
if you can find Blacks best move here
without looking at the next move in the
game.

36 Qc7+
White uses the check to gain time to
maneuver his Queen over to the defense
of the kingside.

34 Qa2
Black attacks Whites a Pawn again
and prepares to attack along Whites 2nd
rank. The f2 square is vulnerable and a
Rook and Queen on the 2nd rank would
be a serious threat to the White King.
35 axb4
White saves his a Pawn and wins
Blacks b Pawn, but he allows Black
to gain the f2 square.

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwdwdrip}
{wdwdwdpd}
{dpdwdwdw}
{w)w)ndwd}
{dwdw)wdP}
{qdwdwdPd}
{dw!w$wIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 251. Position after 35 axb4.

36 Kh6
Black finds the safest square to hide
his King from any further attack since
he controls the f file and prevents
Whites Queen from checking at f4.
37 Qh2
White defends his attacked g Pawn.
37 Qd2
Black attacks Whites Rook and e
Pawn which forces the issue. White
cannot save both.

Robert M. Snyder

38 Ra1

cuuuuuuuuC
{wdwdwdwd}
{dwdwdwdp}
{wdwdwdpi}
{dpdwdwdw}
{w)w)ndwd}
{dwdw)wdP}
{wdw1w4P!}
{$wdwdwIw}
vllllllllV

Diagram 252. Position after 38 Ra1.

White saves his Rook.


38 Qxe3
Black wins Whites e Pawn and
threatens 39 Rf1+ 40 Kxf1 (forced
because he is in double check) Qf2++.
39 Kh1
White tries to hide his King.
39 Ng3+
White resigned.
White has the choice of losing his
Queen with 40 Qxg3 Qxg3 or allowing
mate after 40 Kg1 Rf1++.
Also, moving the Rook anywhere along
the f file or 2nd rank except to g2
is mate!

241

About the Author

Robert M. Snyder is a National Master and chess educator. He has introduced


chess to over 170,000 Elementary and Junior High School students through his
presentations. His students have won thirty-six individual first place titles (a national
record) in championship sections at the National Scholastic Championships. His
teams have won first place in championship sections at the National Scholastic
Championships ten times.
At the age of twelve, Mr. Snyder learned how to play chess. By the time he was
18 he earned the title of National Chess Master. In 1973 he became champion of
the Western United States. Mr. Snyder had the highest score when he represented
the United States on the Correspondence Olympic Chess Team. He qualified
for the semi-finals of the World Correspondence Championships and earned an
International rating of 2405.
In 1983 Mr. Snyder founded the Chess for Juniors club, which grew to become
one of the largest and most active clubs in the nation. He currently gives instruction
to individual students by providing lessons and analysis of games through the
Internet (www.chessforeveryone.com). Mr. Snyder has arranged matches and
exchange programs for students; they have traveled to Australia, Canada, England
and Germany.
He has written articles for Chess Life, School Mates, Fernschach (Germany) and
Schach-Echo (Germany) magazines and is author of Chess for Everyone, Unbeatable
Chess Lessons, Winning Chess Tournaments, Winning Chess Traps, Basic Chess Tactics
and The Snyder Sicilian.

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