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A Students Solutions Manual to Accompany

THERMODYNAMICS for ENGINEERS


KENNETH A. KROOS
MERLE C. POTTER

STUDENT'S SOLUTIONS MANUAL


TO ACCOMPANY

THERMODYNAMICS
for ENGINEERS
FIRST EDITION

KENNETH A. KROOS
MERLE C. POTTER

CONTENTS
Chapter

Page

PREFACE .................................................................................... IV
1. BASIC CONCEPTS AND SYSTEMS OF UNITS ..................................................1
2. PROPERTIES OF PURE SUBSTANCES.........................................................5
3. THE FIRST LAW FOR SYSTEMS............................................................ 20
4. THE FIRST LAW APPLIED TO CONTROL VOLUMES.........................................33
5. THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS.................................................48
6. ENTROPY................................................................................ 54
7. THERMODYNAMIC RELATIONS ............................................................ 69
8. THE RANKINE POWER CYCLE ............................................................ 79
9. GAS POWER CYCLES .................................................................... 100
10. REFRIGERATION CYCLES ............................................................... 120
11. MIXTURES AND PSYCHROMETRICS ...................................................... 127
12. COMBUSTION ......................................................................... 143

Preface
This manual provides the solutions to those problems in THERMODYNAMICS for
Engineers that have answers included in the back of the textbook. In many cases, the
solutions are not as detailed as the examples in the book; they are intended to provide the
primary steps in each solution so a student is able to quickly review how a problem is
solved, although it is very important that the student first attempt a solution before
viewing the solution in this manual. The discussion of a subtle point, should one exist in a
particular problem, is left as a task for the instructor. In general, some knowledge of a
problem may be needed to fully understand all of the steps presented. This manual is not
intended to be a self-paced workbook; the instructor is critically needed to provide
explanations, discussions, and illustrations of the myriad of phenomena encountered in
the study of thermodynamics.
The degree of difficulty and length of solution for each problem varies considerably.
Some are relatively easy and others quite difficult. This allows for flexibility in
assignments or in practice sessions. Typically, the easier problems are the first problems
for a particular section. A number of the problems have a design aspect.
We continue to include a number of multiple-choice problems, similar to those
encountered on the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam and the GRE/Engineering Exam.
These problems will provide students with a review for the Thermodynamics part of
those exams. They are all four-part, multiple-choice problems and are located at the
beginning of the appropriate chapters. Not all discipline exams (e.g., E.E. and C.E.) that
make up the FE Exam include problems on Thermodynamics.
The examples and problems have been carefully solved with the hope that errors have not
been introduced. Even though extreme care is taken and problems are reworked, errors
creep in. We would appreciate knowing about any errors that you may find in this manual
or the textbook. They can be eliminated in the future. We have class tested most of the
chapters with good response from our students, but we are sure that there are
improvements to be made. Suggestions for changes and improvements are welcomed;
send any corrections or comments to MerleCP@att.net or kenneth.kroos@villanova.edu.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Kenneth A. Kroos

East Lansing, Michigan

Merle C. Potter

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