HIGH ALERT

LAND PURCHASE
RATTLES FARMERS

TERROR THREAT GRIPS
BRUSSELS
WORLD PAGE 8

STATE PAGE 3

CRUZ AIMING TO BE
‘THE’ CONSERVATIVE
NATION PAGE 6

www.smdailyjournal.com

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015 • XVI, Edition 84

Worker center to stay, for now
San Mateo City Council approves contract for day laborer site
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

San Mateo’s Worker Resource
Center will remain near the heart
of downtown for at least another
year and a half after the City
Council approved a contract to
support the nonprofit-run service
for day laborers.
Prompted in part by concerns
from a group of residents in the

Central neighborhood, city officials took a closer look at its
agreement with the Samaritan
House to run the center built on a
city-owned lot that is slated for
eventual redevelopment.
The
council
unanimously
approved at a meeting last week
continuing its contract to spend
nearly $262,500 over the next
year and a half to support the facility that connects day laborers with

employers.
“I think the extension is a good
thing, I think the Worker
Resource Center is still needed,”
Councilman David Lim said after
the meeting. “I think people who
talk about it not being needed
don’t remember how bad it was
before we had it there. And just as
a point of compassion, we as a
city are compassionate and we
want to do things to help our

neighbors. It’s
good to offer
these services
and resources
to members of
our community.”
Forming the
center was initially sparked
David Lim
by complaints
in the late 1990s and early 2000s

over the hundreds of workers who
would congregate on the streets
between downtown and Highway
101. Common reports included
public urination, litter, trespassing and traffic safety issues. With
minimal oversight, day laborers
were frequently taken advantage of
with little recourse when some
employers would refuse to pay

See CENTER, Page 20

“One of the things that we certainly heard
from the climate experts is that we should
expect warmer weather and, even if we get
wet weather, it’s more likely to fall as rain
and less as snow.”

BACK-TO-BACK CROWNS IN STYLE

— Assemblyman Rich Gordon

Assembly studies
drought, looks to
expand sources
Gordon chairs select committee
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

as corporate housing. There was even a
corporate housing listing at one of the
addresses investigated on Expedia.
Corporate housing providers typically rent out a “block” of rooms in an
apartment building, furnish the units
and then sublet them to employees of
their corporate clients.
The problem, however, was not as
extreme as initially thought, Aknin

Although many are hopeful a wet El Niño winter will help
alleviate the state’s oppressive drought; a group of legislators, scientists and experts are collaborating to envision
how Californians might adjust to a future
where climate change and water conservation are the new norm.
The Assembly Select Committee on
Water Consumption and Alternative
Sources kicked off its first meeting this
week with Assemblyman Rich Gordon,
D-Menlo Park, leading the effort.
Gordon is the chair of the eight-member committee that seeks to study climate change predictions and options for Rich Gordon
how the state can best adapt. Eventually,
the committee will make recommendations to the
Legislature suggesting new laws or potential budgetary
allocations.
The committee met for the first time Tuesday and drew a
variety of state and international experts to Sacramento for
an overview of state consumption as well as alternative
sources.
Gordon, who also chaired the Assembly’s Select
Committee on Sea Level Rise, said it’s critical to gather
experts and consider how the state can diversify its water
portfolio. Whether it’s promoting water recycling, considering the pros and cons of desalination or investing in

See ENDS, Page 19

See WATER, Page 20

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Menlo-Atherton and Notre Dame-Belmont each captured their second straight Central
Coast Section volleyball titles Saturday. Above: Menlo-Atherton senior Courtney Foliaki,
left, and junior Kiana Sales, right, celebrate after the Bears forced match point during
Saturday’s win over Carlmont in the CCS Division 1 title game. Right: Notre DameBelmont junior Kristine Gese shouts in celebration after Saturday’s victory over Menlo
School in the CCS Division 4 championship match at San Jose’s Independence High
School. SEE PAGE 11.

Corporate housing practice ends
Several Redwood City apartment buildings ordered to stop short-term rentals
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

About 80 units at three new apartment complexes in Redwood City were
being rented as hotel rooms in violation of city code, officials learned after
a lengthy investigation.
“Redwood City appears to be the
first (Bay Area) city to flag the issue
and issue cease and desist orders,”
Assistant City Manager Aaron Aknin
reported on the city’s website.

The units were approved as housing
but were being rented out for periods of
less than 30 days at 201 Marshall St.,
640 Veterans Blvd. and 333 Main St.
After the cease and desist orders were
issued, each of the corporate housing
providers investigated agreed to rent
the rooms out for a minimum of 30
days, according to Aknin’s report.
The investigation started after complaints came in that the units were
taken off the rental market to be used

2

FOR THE RECORD

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“It is better to debate an important matter
without settling it than to settle it without
debating it.”
— Author unknown.

This Day in History
The first jukebox made its debut in
San Francisco, at the Palais Royale
Saloon. (The coin-operated device
consisted of four listening tubes
attached to an Edison phonograph.)

1889

On thi s date:
In 1 8 0 4 , the 14th president of the United States, Franklin
Pierce (puhrs), was born in Hillsboro, New Hampshire.
In 1 8 9 0 , William III, King of the Netherlands and Grand
Duke of Luxembourg, died, ending 75 years of Dutch rule
over Luxembourg.
In 1 9 0 3 , Enrico Caruso made his American debut at the
Metropolitan Opera House in New York, appearing in
“Rigoletto.”
In 1 9 1 4 , the seven-month U.S. military occupation of
Veracruz, Mexico, ended.
In 1 9 3 6 , Life, the photojournalism magazine created by
Henry R. Luce (loos), was first published.
In 1 9 4 5 , most U.S. wartime rationing of foods, including
meat and butter, was set to expire by day’s end.
In 1 9 5 9 , the musical “Fiorello!,” starring Tom Bosley as
legendary New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, opened on
Broadway.
In 1 9 6 3 , President Lyndon B. Johnson proclaimed Nov.
25 a day of national mourning following the assassination
of President John F. Kennedy.
In 1 9 7 1 , the People’s Republic of China was seated in the
U.N. Security Council.
In 1 9 8 0 , some 2,600 people were killed by a series of
earthquakes that devastated southern Italy.
In 1 9 9 5 , movie director Louis Malle (”Pretty Baby”;
“Atlantic City”; “My Dinner with Andre”) died in Beverly
Hills, California, at age 63.
Ten y ears ag o : In Iraq, gunmen broke into the home of a
senior Sunni Arab leader and killed him, three of his sons
and a son-in-law.

Birthdays

Singer Bruce
Hornsby is 61.

Actor Page
Kennedy is 39.

Actress-singer
Miley Cyrus is 23.

Former Labor Secretary William E. Brock is 85. Actress
Elmarie Wendel is 87. Actor Franco Nero is 74. Actress Susan
Anspach is 73. Screenwriter Joe Eszterhas is 71. Actor-comedy writer Bruce Vilanch is 68. Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., is
65. Former Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., is 60. Actor Maxwell
Caulfield is 56. Actor John Henton is 55. TV personality
Robin Roberts (”Good Morning America”) is 55. Rock musician Charlie Grover is 49. Actress Salli Richardson-Whitfield
is 48. Actor Oded Fehr (OH’-dehd fayr) is 45. Rapper-actor
Kurupt (Tha Dogg Pound) is 43. Actress Kelly Brook is 36.
Actor Lucas Grabeel (GRAY’-beel) is 31.

REUTERS

NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver Jeff Gordon walks on stage as he is introduced with daughter Ella prior to the Ford EcoBoost
400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway. It was Gordon’s last race as a professional.

In other news ...
Missing red panda found safe
after escaping California zoo
EUREKA — A red panda that went
missing three days ago from a zoo on
California’s far north coast has been
safely located and returned to her home
in Eureka.
The Eureka Times Standard reports
Sunday the tiny creature named Masala
was found safe and sound Saturday
night and is back at the Sequoia Park
Zoo.
Zoo manager Gretchen Ziegler says a
citizen saw the 1-year-old red panda
walking around a half-mile from the
zoo’s entrance.
Ziegler says that the unidentified citizen herded Masala up a small fruit tree
and kept an eye on the furry creature
until zoo staff arrived.
The panda was lured down the 10
foot tall tree with food and caught.
Ziegler says the furry creature is eating and drinking normally in a quarantine area. Veterinarians will check up
on her Monday.

Endangered white
rhino dies at San Diego Zoo
SAN DIEGO — A popular white rhinoceros has been euthanized at San

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Nov. 21 Powerball

©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

NKULF

DIDUGE

37

47

50

57

52

21

Nov. 20 Mega Millions
9

12

29

37

67

15
Mega number

Nov. 21 Super Lotto Plus
7

15

19

38

47

3

20

23

30

34

3

6

2

Daily Four
5

Daily three midday
1

0

Daily three evening
7

9

6

The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Star, No.
2, in first place; Money Bags, No. 1s, in second
place; and Gold Rush No. 1, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:49.84.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: HYENA
TRACT
BLURRY
DUGOUT
Answer: To learn his rope tricks, the magician had —
TO BE “TAUT”

The San Mateo Daily Journal
1900 Alameda de las Pulgas, Suite 112, San Mateo, CA 94403
Publisher: Jerry Lee
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com
jon@smdailyjournal.com
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twitter.com/smdailyjournal

of genetic algorithms and state
machines in data compression. She
plans to study medical anthropology
at Oxford.
Cameron Platt of Santa Barbara is a
senior at Princeton She won the Class
of 1870 Old English Prize awarded to
the university’s top scholar in the
fields of Old English, Medieval, and
Early Modern Studies.
Platt serves as the president of
Princeton University Players and has
participated in both production and
acting roles in multiple performances
and theaters. She will pursue master
degrees in English and American studies and in medieval studies at Oxford.
Hassaan Shahawy of Pasadena is a
senior at Harvard, where he is pursuing
a double major in history and near
eastern languages. He is the vice president of the Harvard Islamic Society
and co-founder of the Ivy League
Muslim Council.
Shahawy has volunteered at the
Children’s Cancer Hospital in Cairo,
Egypt and mentors prison inmates in
Norfolk, Massachusetts. He plans to
pursue a master’s degree in Islamic
studies and history.
The Rhodes scholarships cover all
expenses for multiple years of study at
Oxford starting next October.

Local Weather Forecast

8
25
Mega number

RIJYUN

Saturday’s

LOS ANGELES — Three college students from California are among the
32 new Rhodes scholars who have
been chosen to pursue post-graduate
studies at Oxford University in
England.
Megan G. Musilli, a senior math
major at the U.S. Naval Academy and a
native of El Dorado Hills, plans to
become a physician in the Navy.
Musilli’s research includes the study
of traumatic brain injury and MRI
scanning techniques and the concept

Fantasy Five
Powerball

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

UNANL

3 Californians win prestigious
Rhodes scholarships

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

Diego Zoo Safari Park after a series of
illnesses.
The Los Angeles Times reports that,
at 41, Nola was considered geriatric
and had a series of old-age ailments,
including arthritis.
The rhino had also been treated for a
recurring abscess on her hip.
Zoo officials say Nola was euthanized early Sunday after her condition
deteriorated. The rhino had been a draw
at the Safari Park since 1986.
The newspaper says Nola’s death
leaves only three northern white rhinos in the world — all at a sanctuary in
Kenya, protected from poachers by
around-the-clock armed guards.

scribd.com/smdailyjournal
facebook.com/smdailyjournal

Mo nday : Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs around 60. Northwest
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Mo nday ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy. A
chance of rain after midnight. Lows in the
mid 40s. West winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance
of rain 30 percent.
Tues day : Mostly cloudy. Breezy. A chance of showers.
Highs in the mid 50s. Northwest winds 20 to 30 mph.
Chance of showers 40 percent.
Tues day ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. Breezy. A chance of showers. Lows in the mid 40s.
Wednes day : Partly cloudy. A slight chance of showers.
Highs in the mid 50s.
Wednes day thro ug h Thurs day ni g ht: Mostly clear.
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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STATE/LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

3

Water agency’s land purchase rattles farmers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BLYTHE, Calif. — The nation’s largest
distributor of treated drinking water became
the largest landowner in a remote California
farming region for good reason: The alfalfagrowing area is first in line to get Colorado
River water.
Metropolitan Water District of Southern
California’s play in Palo Verde Valley,
along the Arizona line, tapped a deep distrust between farm and city that pervades the
West over a river that’s a lifeline for seven
states and northern Mexico.
Farmers recall how Los Angeles’ modern
founders built an aqueduct a century ago to
bring water hundreds of miles from rural
Owens Valley, a story that was fictionally
portrayed in Roman Polanski’s 1974 film,
“Chinatown.”
“Are we going to dry up our rural, agricultural communities just to keep Los Angeles,
San Francisco and San Diego growing? I
think it would be a sad state of affairs,” said
Bart Fisher, a melon and broccoli farmer
who is board president of the Palo Verde
Irrigation District.
Metropolitan tried to calm nerves by
sending its chairman in September to a public forum in Blythe, 225 miles east of its
Los Angeles headquarters. It pledged to
honor a 2004 agreement that caps the
amount of land it pays farmers to idle at 28
percent of the valley.
That agreement, which expires in 2040,
is hailed as a model for farms and cities to
cooperate. Metropolitan pays farmers about
as much as they would profit to harvest —
$771 an acre this year — to bring foregone

Colorado River water on its 242-mile aqueduct to 19 million people in the coastal
megalopolis it serves.
Palo Verde enjoys California’s highest
rights to the river, making their immune to
drought.
The dynamic changed when Metropolitan
paid $256 million in July to nearly double
its Palo Verde holdings to 29,000 acres, or
about 30 percent of the valley. The agency
denied its purchase from Verbena LLC, a
company that bought the land several years
earlier from the Mormon church, was part of
an orchestrated plan.

Police reports

the 400 block of Millbrae Avenue before 6
a.m. Thursday, Nov. 12.

Los Angeles and its suburbs founded Metropolitan in 1928 to build the remarkably
durable Colorado River Aqueduct.

BURLINGAME

Tweeker talk
A San Francisco man was arrested when
he was found to be in possession of
methamphetamine and a glass pipe after
yelling at employees on the 1100 block
of El Camino Real in Millbrae before
6:15 p.m. Friday, Nov. 13.

MILLBRAE
Warran t . Two people were arrested on
active warrants when methamphetamine and
a syringe were found in their vehicle on the
100 block of California Drive before 12:37
a.m. Friday, Nov. 13.
Burg l ary. A hole was cut in a fence and a
radio and tools were taken from a vehicle on

Sus pi ci o us ci rcums tances . Somebody
attempted to break into a car on Palm Drive
before 8:21 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 17.
Theft. Tires were stolen from a vehicle on
Rollins Road before 6:57 a.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 17.
Theft. A bicycle was stolen on Howard
Avenue before 7:16 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 14.
Identi ty theft. A driver was found to be in
possession of social security numbers and
other identity theft materials on Old
Bayshore Boulevard before 11:17 a. m.
Wednesday, Nov. 4.
Mal i c i o us mi s c h i e f . A window was
scratched on Broadway before 9:28 a.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 4.

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“It’s made the farmers out there nervous
that we are the largest owner but there was a
strategic opportunity that came up, ”
Metropolitan’s general manager Jeffrey
Kightlinger said.
Metropolitan stirred similar angst this
month in Northern California when its
board expressed interest in buying farms on
several islands in the Sacramento-San
Joaquin River Delta. Its staff said the land
could provide water storage and wildlife
habitat.
Blythe, a riverside town of about 13,000
people in the Mojave Desert with two state
prisons, is an oasis of gas stations, motels
and fast-food restaurants on Interstate 10
between Los Angeles and Phoenix. Thomas
Blythe staked claim to the river in 1877,
beating Southern California cities under a
Gold Rush-era doctrine called ‘first in time,
first in right.’
Los Angeles and its suburbs founded
Metropolitan in 1928 to build the remarkably durable Colorado River Aqueduct.
Parker Dam and the reservoir it created in
Lake Havasu empties into a gray Art Decostyle building with nine pumps that quietly
pipe water 300 feet up a steep slope. Teal
metal cases that cover the pumps vibrate so
little that a nickel placed on top stands on
its side.
The water goes uphill through four more
pump stations and through tunnels, canals
and pipelines before reaching Southern
California’s coastal plain two days later.
The Colorado’s huge man-made reservoirs
have made the river an unheralded savior in
California’s four-year drought. Last year,
the river supplied two-thirds of the 1.7 bil-

lion gallons of drinking water that
Metropolitan delivers daily, up from a third
three years earlier.
The river sustains 40 million people and
farms 5 1/2 million acres, but white “bathtub rings” lining walls of the nation’s
largest reservoir in Lake Mead, near Las
Vegas, are evidence of shrinking supplies.
California took more than it was entitled to
until Sunbelt cities like Phoenix and Las
Vegas clamored for their share and forced the
nation’s most populous state to go on a diet
in 2003.
“It’s really the only supply of water to
this otherwise bone-dry region,” said Bill
Hasencamp, Metropolitan’s manager of
Colorado River resources.
Metropolitan has diverted up to 118,000
acre feet of water a year from Palo Verde
since 2005, enough for about 250,000
households. It paid $3,170 an acre to farmers who committed for 35 years, plus an
annual fee for fallowed land. It idles 7 percent to 28 percent of the valley each year,
depending on its needs.
Jack Seiler, a grower who volunteered 900
acres, calls the agreement a “poster child”
for farms and cities to cooperate but
Metropolitan’s July purchase of nearly
13, 000 acres unsettled him. It gave
Metropolitan the largest voting bloc on
Palo Verde’s water board.
Metropolitan says it won’t have to pay
someone else to idle the land it now owns
and will lease it to farmers, cutting its net
cost to about $50 million. It voted for
incumbents in a September election to Palo
Verde’s seven-member board, which
includes Seiler.

4

MATURE RESOURCES

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

5

As crime rises in LA, community takes action
By Amanda Lee Myers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Eduardo Rebolledo had
just gotten into his pickup truck after work,
eager to head home to his two children when
a gang dispute erupted 30 yards behind him
on a Los Angeles street. The 38-year-old
ducked right into the path of a bullet that hit
him in the head, killing him instantly.
“He was completely innocent. The guy’s
never even had a parking ticket, ” said
Detective Dave Peteque with the Los
Angeles Police Department. “He’s just a
working Joe, a family man trying to support his kids.”
In a split second, Rebolledo joined the
growing list of victims in the nation’s second-largest city, where murders are up 12
percent this year and shooting victims have
increased 20 percent. The city is also on the
cusp of recording its 1,000th shooting victim of the year.
After an especially violent weekend in
late September, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck
expressed his frustration about the bloodshed, particularly among gangs. “This is
not Dodge City,” Beck said, referring to 19
shootings in one weekend, 13 of which
were gang-related.
The increases come as redevelopment of
the city’s downtown and nearby neighborhoods has attracted trendy new bars and
restaurants, thousands of new residents and
megaprojects that include a $1 billion
mixed-use hotel tower that will be the
tallest in the West.
In response to the rising numbers, the
LAPD has deployed hundreds of elite officers to crime hot spots, increased the num-

ber of officers walking the streets versus
patrolling in cars, and created a community
relationship division dedicated to building
the public’s trust in police officers.
But Beck said his department can’t solve
the problem alone.
“A lot of it is public will,” he said. “A will
of everyone in the city of Los Angeles to
say, ‘Enough is enough.”’
Members of the community say they
stepped up their own efforts when the crime
numbers started going up.
Rebolledo’s death, for instance, inspired
a “peace movement” in the neighborhood
where he was killed, said Michelle Miranda,
founder of Alliance for Community
Empowerment, a nonprofit that provides
services to disadvantaged young people,

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including gang intervention.
Young people involved with Miranda’s
organization decided to hold a peace march
on a recent Saturday in response to
Rebolledo’s death. More than 250 people
took to the streets wearing white shirts, carrying signs that included: “We protest our
right to live in peace.”
“These are young people that know drugs
in the community and gang activity, and
they’re tired of it,” Miranda said.
Miranda said the same youths who organized the march are working on more plans to
continue the peace movement.
At Good News Baptist Church in South
Los Angeles, the Rev. Winford Bell began a
program through his nonprofit group to
train members of the community how to
counsel family and friends of people
who’ve been murdered.
The idea for the so-called “life comforters” is to provide a safe outlet to vent
anger and sorrow, and wherever possible,
attempt to prevent retaliatory violence
common among gangs.
“Don’t get me wrong, hardcore gang
members are not going to hear me. Them we
can’t do nothing with,” Bell said. “The
other ones who aren’t so hard, who aren’t
dedicated to being gang members ... If they
come, we can do a lot of work.”
Los Angeles is among a number of major
cities across the U.S. seeing rises in violent
crime this year, including Baltimore,
Washington, D.C., Chicago, Cleveland and
Houston. Other California cities also have
seen increases, including Sacramento,
Oakland and Long Beach.
Though the numbers are up, those cities
are far safer than they were in the early

1990s during the crack cocaine epidemic. In
Los Angeles, for example, murders peaked
in 1992 at 1,092 people killed.
So far this year, there have been 251
homicides, compared to 225 during the
same time period last year.
Still, the LAPD is taking this year’s
uptick seriously.
“We’re not panicking,” said Capt. Jeff
Bert, commanding officer of the department’s strategic planning group. “But we
are in the business of driving down crime so
when a crime spike goes up, we’re all over
it. It is a concern.”
It’s still too early to pinpoint what’s driving the increased violence across the country and in Los Angeles, said Charis Kubrin,
a criminologist at the University of
California at Irvine who analyzes crime in
Southern California.
She said there could be a number of contributing factors, including easier access to
guns, the poverty rate, a new state law that
reduced penalties for certain crimes, and a
growing distrust of police, which can contribute to retaliatory violence.
“If you don’t see the police as a viable
option when you have a problem, then you
handle things on your own,” Kubrin said.
The LAPD, all the way to the chief,
acknowledges that community trust in
police is wavering.
Restoring it will be the No. 1 way to turn
the crime numbers around, Bert said.
“We make or break our success based on
our relationships, based on people’s willingness to talk about to police and based on
police’s ability to get out of their car and
talk to people,” Bert said. “We can’t arrest
our way out of this.”

6

NATION

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Cruz seeks to cast himself as the electable conservative
By Steve Peoples
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SIOUX CITY, Iowa — Ted Cruz
is among the most hated men in
Washington, reviled by leaders of
both parties as an ideological hardliner loyal only to the far-right of
the conservative movement.
But racing down an Iowa highway on a snowy weekend morning,
a solemn Cruz suggested some of
his Republican rivals for president
have amped up their rhetoric too
much — especially on policy
toward people who are in the U.S.
illegally.
“Tone matters,” Cruz, the son of a
Cuban immigrant, told the

Ted Cruz

Associated
Press in an interview between
campaign stops.
“Are there some
in
the
Republican
Party
whose
rhetoric
is
unhelpful with
regard to immi-

gration? Yes.”
Donald Trump’s call for a database to track Muslims in the U.S. is
one example, Cruz says. But he
refused to condemn the rhetoric of
another Republican who could help
him win Iowa’s leadoff caucuses,
Rep. Steve King, the influential

conservative who has described
immigrants living in the country
illegally as disease-ridden — and
spent the weekend campaigning at
Cruz’s side.
“I cannot help the language that
others use,” Cruz said in the interview. “I can only help the words
that come out of my own mouth.”
Taken together, they are remarkable statements for a conservative
firebrand who rarely, if ever, shows
signs of moderation. Yet in the
crowded
and
unruly
2016
Republican primary, Cruz is trying
to position himself as the grown-up
alternative to Trump and Ben
Carson, two inexperienced and
undisciplined front-runners who

have so far captivated their party’s
most passionate voters by riding a
wave of anti-immigrant rhetoric.
Carson’s support appears to be
softening, and Trump is struggling
to explain with precision his exact
plans for increasing surveillance of
potential threats in the wake of the
Paris attacks. At the same time,
Cruz is ramping up his pitch and
trying to cast himself not just as an
outsider — but an electable outsider
at a time of widespread mistrust of
Washington.
“I do not believe either one of
them is going to be the nominee,”
Cruz told the AP about Carson and
Trump. “I am working very hard to
win every one of their supporters.”

Cruz spoke to AP at the end of a
week in which Carson, who previously said he wouldn’t support a
Muslim president, likened dealing
with some Syrian refugees to the
handling of “rabid dogs” and said
he would support government monitoring of any group deemed radical
and “anti-American.”
Having described Mexican immigrants as rapists and criminals in his
announcement speech, Trump this
week said he would “absolutely”
support a mandatory database to
track Muslims in the U.S.
He later said he wanted a “watch
list” for Syrian refugees and “surveillance of certain mosques.”
To be sure, Cruz has reacted

After the snow, Midwest gets deep freeze
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A deep freeze set in across the
Midwest on Sunday with low temperatures forecast in the single digits and a
few below zero, turning the season’s
first major snow into ice that made some
roads treacherous to travel.
Temperatures plunged behind a cold
front that brought snow across much of
the region Friday and Saturday. The
National Weather Service forecast 20
degrees or lower across six states from
North Dakota to Illinois.
The weather service reported temperatures in the single- and low double-digits Sunday in northern Illinois, including

Chicago, where residents were digging
out of more than 11 inches of snow —
the highest November total in 120 years
in the city.
More than 130 flights were cancelled
Sunday into and out of the O’Hare
International Airport in Chicago,
according to flight-tracking website
FlightAware.com.
In Minneapolis, dozens of people huddled around fires to stay warm at an
encampment outside a police station to
protest the fatal shooting of a black man
by
officers
there
last
week.
Temperatures hit a low of 17 degrees
overnight, and light snow was expected
to move in by Sunday evening.

The first snowfall of the season also
brought amounts ranging from a few
inches to 20 inches of snow from South
Dakota through Michigan earlier in the
weekend.
In the southern Wisconsin town of
Janesville, between 10 and 20 inches of
snow had fallen by late Saturday afternoon, according to the National Weather
Service.
Southside True Value Hardware manager Matt Krienke said business had
been good in the days leading up to the
storm in the Janesville, but that it had
become “very, very, very, very slick.”
“People who don’t need to drive don’t
need to be out,” he said.

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

7

Syria’s Assad may outlast Obama in office
By Bradley Klapper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON

Bashar
Assad’s presidency looks likely to
outlast Barack Obama’s.
As the United States has turned
its attention to defeating the
Islamic State group, it has softened its stance on the Syrian
leader. More than four years ago,
Obama demanded that Assad leave
power. Administration officials
later said Assad did not have to
step down on “Day One” of a
political transition. Now, they are
going further.
A peace plan agreed to last weekend by 17 nations meeting in
Vienna says nothing about
Assad’s future, but states that “free
and fair elections would be held
pursuant to the new constitution
within 18 months.” To clarify the
timeline, the State Department
said this past week that the clock

starts
once
Assad’s representatives and
opposition figures begin talks
on a constitution. The vote
would determine
a new parliaBarack Obama ment, though
not necessarily
a new president.
Getting to constitutional talks
will be difficult. It implies that
Syria’s warring parties first reach
a cease-fire and establish a transition government — something
unattainable so far. Neither
Syria’s government nor its fractured opposition has endorsed the
strategy yet or done much to
advance it.
“Nothing can start before defeating the terrorists who occupy
parts of Syria,” Assad recently
told Italian state television. Assad

considers anyone fighting him,
including moderate rebels, to be
terrorists.
Obama countered: “I do not foresee a situation in which we can end
the civil war in Syria while Assad
remains in power. ... Even if I said
that was OK, I still don’t think it
would actually work. You could not
get the Syrian people, the majority of them, to agree to that kind of
outcome. And you couldn’t get a
number of their neighbors to agree
to that outcome, as well.”
Syria was the focus for Secretary
of State John Kerry as he headed to
the United Arab Emirates on
Sunday for talks with government
leaders. Many more discussions
with Arab officials are planned
over the next months.
The uncertainty of the new peace
process, particularly as it pertains
to Assad, points to Washington’s
evolution from early in the civil
war, when Obama and other offi-

Federal lawyers to investigate
shooting death of black man
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MINNEAPOLIS
— U. S. Justice
Department attorneys are expected to fly to
Minnesota on Sunday to investigate the
killing of a black man that has prompted
protests and calls for the two Minneapolis
police officers involved in the shooting to
be prosecuted.
A key issue during their visit will be
whether authorities should release to the
public videos of the fatal shooting of 24year-old Jamar Clark a week ago.

Federal and state authorities have resisted
releasing the footage — from an ambulance,
mobile police camera, public housing cameras and people’s cellphones — because
they said it doesn’t show the full incident
and making the recordings public would
compromise their investigations.
Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton said on
Saturday that he had asked Clark’s family
and representatives of the Black Lives
Matter group protesting his death to meet
with the federal government lawyers and
that the footage be released.

cials boldly stated the Syrian president’s days were “numbered” and
sought his immediate departure.
The focus of Washington — and
much of the world — has shifted
now to IS, whose most recent
attack killed at least 130 people in
Paris on Nov. 13. As a result, the
U.S. is cooperating with Russia
and Iran, countries it once tried to
ostracize because of their support
for Syria.
The hope is peace between
Assad’s forces and moderate rebels
will allow everyone to work
together to defeat IS.
The U.S. and its allies say Assad
remains responsible for far more
Syrian deaths than IS. His military
has used chemical weapons and
continues to drop barrel bombs
that indiscriminately hit foes and
civilians alike.
But for all their brutality,
Assad’s forces are not directing
attacks in European capitals,

beheading American journalists or
downing Russian passenger jets.
Unlike IS, Assad has powerful
patrons in Moscow and Tehran.
Russian
airstrikes
since
September have helped stiffen the
Syrian government’s defenses,
while Iranian forces and proxy
Hezbollah militants have added
muscle to its ground operations.
The U.S. is trying to take all
these considerations into account
as it refines a common strategy
with partners in Europe and the
Arab world that see Syria’s conflict differently.
The Europeans are mostly concerned about the refugee crisis
across their continent, and they
fear more deadly attacks. Saudi
Arabia and others backing the
rebels want foremost to defeat
Iran, which they would see in
Assad’s downfall.
The U.S. says both sets of goals
are connected.

8

WORLD

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Brussels stays on high alert
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BRUSSELS — With hundreds of
troops patrolling Brussels for a
second day and authorities hunting one or more suspected militants, the Belgian government
chose Sunday to keep the capital
on the highest state of alert into
the start of the workweek to prevent a Paris-style attack.
Citing a “serious and imminent”
threat, Prime Minister Charles
Michel announced that schools
and universities in Brussels will
be closed Monday, with the subway remaining shut down, preventing a return to normal in the
city that is also home to the
European Union’s main institutions.
“We fear an attack like in Paris,
with several individuals, perhaps
in several places,” Michel said
after chairing a meeting of
Belgium’s National Security
Council.
While Brussels was kept on the

REUTERS

A Belgian soldier stands guard outside a cafe near Brussels’ Grand Place
Sunday, after security was tightened in Belgium following the fatal attacks
in Paris.

Mali hotel attack aimed at peace talks
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BAMAKO, Mali — The assault
on a luxury hotel in Mali’s capital
that killed 19 people was a clear
attempt to derail a fragile peace
process meant to stabilize the
country’s volatile north, a representative of northern separatist
groups said Sunday.
Halting peace negotiations
have been dragging on between
the central government and northern separatist groups for more
than two years in an effort to end
the disputes that turned large sections of the country into a haven
for radical Islamic militants.
The talks have shown some
promise in recent months. The
Radisson Blu hotel attacked by

two gunmen on Friday was preparing to host a meeting on implementing the latest accords.
“The attack was targeting the
peace agreement, ” said Sidi
Brahim Ould Sidati, a representative of the Coordination of
Azawad Movements, known by its
French acronym CMA. The CMA
is a coalition of groups seeking
autonomy in northern Mali and
includes ethnic Arabs and Tuaregs.
“The jihadis are in different
groups but their goal is the same,
and that’s to hinder implementation of the peace accord,” Sidati
said.
It was the secular separatist
groups that first wrested northern
Mali from the government in
2012, using weapons looted from

t1SFTDSJQUJPOT)PNF 
.FEJDBM4VQQMJFT%FMJWFSFE
t1IBSNBDJTUTPO%VUZ 

 

arsenals in neighboring Libya,
but they were soon overtaken by
al-Qaida-allied radicals.
In 2013, the French pushed the
Islamic extremists out of cities
and towns though they continue to
carry out attacks on U.N. peacekeepers.
The peace talks between the
government and the separatists
excluded the radicals, who have
spoken out against the negotiations, accusing participants of
betraying the population’s desire
for independence.
The hotel attack was claimed by
the
Al-Mourabitoun
(The
Sentinels) radical group which has
links to al-Qaida. The group’s
statement said attacks would continue.

highest of four alert levels, the
rest of the country remains on a
Level 3 alert, meaning an attack is
“possible and likely.”
“Nobody is pleased with such a
situation. Neither are we. But we
have to take our responsibility,”
Michel said.
A series of police raids in central
Brussels ended late Sunday, a government official said, speaking on
condition of anonymity because
the overall investigation was still
ongoing.
The situation was tense Sunday
night in the wider area around the
Grand Place, with police out in
force as several raids looking for
suspects were carried out. At one
point, security forces closed off
streets and yelled at people to stay
away.
It was still unclear what results
the raids had yielded. Prosecutors
scheduled a news conference for
just after midnight.
Western leaders stepped up the
rhetoric against the Islamic State

group, which has claimed responsibility for the attacks in Paris
that killed 130 people and wounded hundreds more; the suicide
bombings in Beirut that killed 43
people and injured more than 200;
and the downing of the Russian
jetliner carrying 224 people in
Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula. All happened within the past month.
“We will not accept the idea that
terrorist assaults on restaurants
and theaters and hotels are the new
normal, or that we are powerless
to stop them,” President Barack
Obama said in Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia.
French Defense Minister JeanYves Le Drian said IS must be
destroyed at all costs. “We must
annihilate Islamic State worldwide
... and we must destroy Islamic
State on its own territory,” Le
Drian said. “That’s the only possible direction.”
The decision to put Brussels on
the highest alert came early
Saturday.

World brief

But nowadays the Taliban say
they have mostly ceased the practice, while those selling forged
threat letters are doing a brisk
business as tens of thousands of
Afghans flee to Europe, hoping to
claim asylum.
“Of the threat letters now being
presented to European authorities
by Afghans, I’d say only one percent are real and 99 percent are
phony,” said Mukhamil, 35, who
has forged and sold 20 such letters.
Like many Afghans, he has only
one name.
He sticks to a simple formula —
accusing the buyer of working for
Afghan or U.S. forces — and adds a
Taliban logo copied from their
website.
“To this day I have only ever
known one guy who genuinely got
a threat letter from the Taliban. All
the rest are fake,” he said.

Afghans seeking asylum buy
fake Taliban threat letters
KABUL,
Afghanistan

Threatening letters from the
Taliban, once tantamount to a
death sentence, are now being
forged and sold to Afghans who
want to start a new life in Europe.
The handwritten notes on the
stationery of the so-called Islamic
Emirate of Afghanistan were traditionally sent to those alleged to
have worked with Afghan security
forces or U.S.-led troops, listing
their “crimes” and warning that a
“military commission” would
decide on their punishment. They
would close with the mafia-style
caveat that insurgents “will take
no further responsibility for what
happens in the future.” 

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OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Nov. 6, 2015

Guest perspective

Protecting the soul of downtown San Carlos
By Cameron Johnson

M

y in-laws were in town last
weekend, and as we strolled
down Laurel Street I took
special pride when they told me how
much they liked our downtown.
Our day included taking the kids to
storytime at The Reading Bug, eating
sandwiches at Gherkin’s and celebrating my wife’s birthday at Gusto. You
can easily spend an entire day in downtown San Carlos enjoying time with
family and friends.
The character of our downtown is
defined by an eclectic assortment of
locally-owned businesses. Handmade
signs announce sales and daily specials, and owners greet you with a
smile. Some businesses are eccentric
and some are a little funky around the
edges, but they all contribute to a
downtown that feels comfortable, welcoming and uniquely San Carlos.
These businesses have a real stake in

our community.
They host charity
events, sponsor
local youth sports
teams and participate in our civic
life.
Our booming
local economy is
spurring new development and raising rents all over the
Bay Area. And when these conditions
conspire to displace small businesses,
the character of downtown changes.
More often than not, the businesses
standing in line to take their place are
national chains that are less invested
in our community and contribute little
to the local character. Imagine what
downtown would be like if San Remo’s
became a Spaghetti Factory,
Bianchini’s became a Whole Foods,
The Reading Bug became a Borders and
Prairie become a Gap. Strolling down
Laurel Street would be an entirely different experience.

To help protect our downtown, I’ve
proposed requiring a conditional use
permit and a public hearing for any
chain store that wants to lease a storefront. This does not ban chain stores
outright, but it provides the public an
opportunity to weigh in before any
new chain store can set up shop.
To give the city time to study and
implement such a change, I’ve further
proposed a short-term moratorium on
new chain stores locating in the core
downtown. This moratorium will come
before the City Council for a vote
Monday, Nov. 23.
Making it harder for chain stores to
move in may depress rents a little or
make it take a little longer to fill an
empty storefront. But in the long term,
we’ll hold on to something that is
becoming increasingly rare these days.
We’ll make sure our downtown stays a
unique place with character and soul.
Cameron Johnson is the vice mayor
of San Carlos.

Letters to the editor
We need a COLA
Editor,
I am writing to express my deep
disappointment in the recent
announcement that there will not be a
cost of living increase for Social
Security beneficiaries next year. As
health care costs continue to rise, the
strain on seniors, like me, is becoming unmanageable, especially as previous cost of living adjustments
(COLAs) have failed to keep pace.
Though there is a growing movement in America to expand Social
Security, next year’s lack of COLAs
demands immediate action. Seventynine percent of likely voters —
Democrats, Republicans and independents — support expanding Social
Security benefits and paying for it by
asking the wealthy to pay their fair
share. It is critical that Congress acts
now to maintain dignity for seniors
and people with disabilities by
addressing the lack of a cost of living
adjustment next year.
People like me are counting on it.

Willis Korhonen
Pescadero

Refugees and gun control
Editor ,
In reading all of last week’s letters
regarding Syrian refugees, I am
deeply upset at the hypocrisy of some
of the writers.
How can people scream for the
closing of our borders to refugees,
citing concerns about the possibility
of them carrying out mass shootings
in malls and other public places, but

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Bill Silverfarb, Austin Walsh, Samantha
Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

also write letters rallying against gun
control? Americans are the ones carrying out shootings in malls,
schools, etc. If you really care about
mass shootings, then do something
about gun control, not refugees.
The same holds true for the
Republican proposal of a Christianity
litmus test for refugees. How Christian
is it of you to deny help to the needy,
shelter to the homeless and food to the
hungry? How many American Muslims
have committed the gun atrocities of
recent years here as compared to “good
American Christians”? If you really
care about Christianity, act like you
actually believe in the bible. Hatred
and fear are not how a compassionate
society should act. Open your hearts,
open your doors, and open your minds
people. Refugees are our calling; guns
are our downfall.

Norm Federname
San Mateo

No respect for working class
Editor,  
I have worked as a physical therapist for San Mateo County for four
years and am a proud member of
AFSCME Local 829, comprised of
people who serve our residents and
keep our county in good working
order. I am writing because I am concerned about a matter before the U.S.
Supreme Court that threatens labor
unions and working families.  
Everyday, Americans are working
harder than ever before. Our work has
created record wealth for an economic
recovery that has been everywhere but
ordinary peoples’ wallets. Everyone

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INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
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Cindy Zhang

Emily van de Water
Menlo Park

Thanksgiving: A prayer
and a promise
Editor,
As we count our Thanksgiving blessings, may we take a moment to consider those who are less fortunate. Do we
dare look at the world today through
the eyes of the world’s children?
Imagine being a 6-year-old today in
Paris, Brussels, Beirut, Baghdad, Syria,
Israel, Palestine, Nigeria, Mexico,
Guatemala, El Salvador, or some of the
more troubled cities here in our own
country? Perhaps we can now pause and
consider and pray — each in our own
way — that the hope and innocence of
hundreds of thousands of loving children stirs our conscience and encourages us to do our best to make a difference and try to work for a better
world.

Michael Traynor
Burlingame
OUR MISSION:
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Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

who works should be able to make ends
meet, have a say in their futures and
have the right to negotiate together for
better wages and benefits that can sustain their family. Almost no one stands
up for average Americans these
days, and now this Supreme Court case
threatens to make it even worse. 
The Supreme Court should reject
this attempt by the wealthy to make
it even harder for working people to
come together, speak up for one
another and get ahead.  

Online edition at scribd.com/smdailyjournal
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9

The challenges
of youth today

K

evin Skelly, the new superintendent of the San
Mateo Union High School district, was formerly
the superintendent at Palo Alto Unified. One of his
daughters is a senior at Stanford but he doesn’t regularly
attend Stanford football games. And he won’t be rooting for
Stanford when they play Notre Dame the end of November
— the one Stanford game he plans to attend. He’s a Notre
Dame fan (one of his sons is an alum) and he’s Irish. In fact,
his parents were born and raised in Ireland. The family
moved to England where Skelly was born and then to
Roanoke, Virginia when he was 2 years old.
His dad was an electrical engineer, his mother a physical
therapist. Skelly admitted to
being an OK student but said
he was a very good athlete.
At one time, he was the
number one tennis player in
Virginia and an all-state basketball player. He’s thinking of opening up a gym for
local players in San Mateo,
where he and his family now
live. They have four grown
children.
Skelly began his career
working for a program serving talented students from
disadvantaged backgrounds
in Washington, D.C. He was
also a high school math and
Spanish teacher. He served
as principal at Saratoga High School in Santa Clara County
for 11 years. From 2004-2007, he was associate superintendent of the Poway Unified School District followed by
seven years as the superintendent of the Palo Alto Unified
School District.
As for his being just an OK student. Dr. Skelly graduated
from Harvard University with honors and a degree in economics and completed his Ph.D. in education policy and
administration at the University of California at Berkeley.
***
He seems the perfect match for the challenges and diversity of the high school district. He’s well aware of what youth
face today as a parent and as an administrator. High school
years seem so much more difficult today than faced by previous generations. Young people are smarter but there are so
many with so many talents, it’s hard to stand out. The competition is intense to get good grades and get into the
“right” school. For many, college has become unaffordable
unless they can obtain an athletic or some other scholarship. There are fears of going into debt and asking the family to sacrifice too much. Students are expected to get top
grades, excel in sports and do community service with a passion. What they give up is peace of mind and sleep. Some
students get as little as three hours a night.
***
Nowhere has the pressure been so intense as in Palo Alto
where Skelly previously served. In the past 10 years, the
suicide rate for the city’s two high schools is between four
to five times the national average. Palo Alto, next to
Silicon Valley and Stanford, is “a distillation of what elite
parents expect from a school.” All the emphasis on excellence puts a tremendous cost on vulnerable students. Some
cannot deal with pressure from parents. This is not a subject
the superintendent wished to discuss. It has been well aired
in a recent Atlantic Monthly article: theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/12/the-silicon-valley-suicides/413140/.
***
The district has two promising new initiatives Skelly is
pushing. And one has to do with starting school later at
8:30 a.m. instead of 8 a.m. That’s the starting time recommended by The American Academy of Pediatrics and the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Now the 8 a.m.
start is to accommodate football practice after school before
it gets dark. Lighting stadiums would solve the problem.
Most of the competing districts have lighted fields. But
neighbors object to the lights and noise. Hopefully, Aragon
and Hillsdale residents will be more flexible if the district
lowers the noise and sound systems.
Perhaps an easier sell is relocating Peninsula Alternative
High School from the former Crestmoor High School site in
the San Bruno hills to Rollins Road. This space is currently
being used by Design Tech charter high school which will
likely be moving to Oracle next year. The site, owned by
the county Office of Education, is close to transportation
and Skelly is even thinking of adjusting the hours to better
fit the needs of these students. Crestmoor could then be used
for much-needed teacher and staff housing while leaving the
fields available for San Bruno residents. That would remove
the sticking point which has stymied district attempts during the past 20 years to develop the site. The neighbors
keep their fields and Peninsula students get the location they
deserve and need.
Maybe with the luck of the Irish, Skelly and the school
board can succeed in one if not both of these initiatives.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjournal.com.

10

BUSINESS

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

High-speed rail project gets boost
By Michelle Rindels

said Steve Hill, director of the
Governor’s Office of Economic
Development.
Las Vegas-based XpressWest has
been working since at least 2005
to secure the complicated government clearances it needs to build a
185-mile rail line between Sin
City and Victorville, a city east of
Los Angeles in California’s high
desert. The planned, zero-emissions train would at least halve the
travel time between the two cities,
down to 80 minutes, and would
cost less than $100 round-trip.
Eventually, the line would
extend 50 miles west to Palmdale,
where it would connect with metro
lines and the future California
High-Speed Rail line stretching
north to the Central Valley.
Proponents say it could divert 25
percent of car traffic off Interstate
15 and onto the rails, potentially
saving 8.5 million gallons of gas
each year.
Efforts to finance the $8 billion

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CARSON CITY, Nev. — A project to link Las Vegas and Southern
California with a high-speed train
got a boost this week when the
newly formed Nevada High-Speed
Rail Authority approved an exclusive relationship with long-suffering XpressWest.
The panel’s move Wednesday to
select the company as a franchisee
— and sideline other futuristic yet
far-fetched transportation concepts floated to the group — adds a
layer of government legitimacy to
the endeavor that could help it
attract investors and get closer to
breaking ground. But with no state
dollars attached, the decision
doesn’t directly address the project’s most glaring missing link
— billions of dollars.
“Obviously the biggest obstacle is still funding and this decision doesn’t affect the funding,”

endeavor suffered a major setback
in 2013, when the government
stopped considering a $5.5 billion loan to XpressWest. Part of
the holdup was that the planned
railroad didn’t use enough
American-made products — a difficult task because, generally, all
bullet trains are made overseas.
Republicans in Congress also
raised concerns that the train
wouldn’t make enough money to
repay the loan.
Now, the stalled project could
get new life through a partnership
with a Chinese firm that was
announced in September. While
the company has said it has $100
million in initial capital, it’s not
clear how much money in total the
partnership would bring, and officials at the railroad declined an
interview request.
Getting the rail authority’s
blessing Wednesday can’t hurt,
especially among investors in
China, where governmental

approval carries even more
weight.
“It sends a strong message to
them that it’s a serious project,”
said transportation strategy
expert Tom Skancke.
Critics have been skeptical that
Southern Californians would drive
their cars to a station well outside
Los Angeles, then take a train that
leaves them car-less and cabdependent in Las Vegas. But proponents believe it will open up a
flow of tourism that’s currently
limited by bottlenecks on
Interstate 15. They say people
should take a long view on the
project.
“It took 50 years to build the
interstate highway system. It was
built in segments and phases and
miles,” Skancke said. “It will go
to L.A., but It won’t go to L.A. in
phase one.”
XpressWest’s project comes
against the backdrop of a pricey
and increasingly unpopular high-

speed rail project in California,
which is partly funded by $10 billion in bonds taxpayers approved
in 2008. The project is facing lawsuits and is behind schedule, and
the price tag has ballooned to $68
billion, driven by the complex
task of boring tunnels through
earthquake fault-laden mountains
in Southern California.
But in Nevada, taxpayers will
have no financial skin in the game
if XpressWest’s plan flops. The
state’s rail authority has no
money to give, although it could
help facilitate bonds if another
government entity spearheads an
effort.
XpressWest told lawmakers this
spring that it wants to be a privately funded venture, meaning it
won’t have to convince the legislature or Congress. However, it
will need to sell the dream of zipping through the desert at 150
mph to a wide-enough base of
investors.

Utilities see potential in drones to inspect lines, towers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

shop to help nearly a dozen utilities choose the best machines for
the job. Miniature helicopter-like
drones, some equipped with cameras and other sensors, conducted
demonstration inspections of
transmission lines at a hydroelectric plant in the Catskill
Mountains.
“We want to start using drones
next spring when the inspection
season begins,” said Alan Ettlinger,
research and technology director for
the New York Power Authority, who
attended the workshop.
Utilities spend millions of dol-

BLENHEIM, N.Y. — U.S. utilities see great potential in the use
of remote-controlled drones to do
the often-dangerous work of
inspecting power lines and transmission towers but strict regulations have so far slowed adoption
of the technology.
The remote-controlled devices
make the work of linemen safer,
more efficient and less expensive,
according to the Electric Power
Research Institute, which last
month put on a three-day work-

lars inspecting power lines,
which are often in hard-to-reach
places. The industry has been
interested in the potential use of
drones for years, but has been
slower than European companies
to adopt the technology because
of U.S. regulatory restrictions.
While hobbyists can fly drones
without certification, the Federal
Aviation Administration requires
special certification for commercial users. There are numerous conditions and limitations: The drone
operator needs a pilot’s license,
the aircraft must weigh less than

55 pounds, flights can go no more
than 200 feet above the ground,
and the drone must be operated in
the pilot’s line of sight.
The FAA treats the operation of
drones like any other aircraft for
safety reasons and commercial
operators face strict rules for getting permission to use them,
according to the agency.
Seven U.S. utilities have been
granted FAA approval for testing
drone technology in 2015.
Consumers Energy in Michigan
conducted a series of tests over the
summer using its own eight-rotor

drone and unmanned aerial vehicles
operated by outside vendors to
inspect wind turbines, utility poles
and transformers. The utility is part
of a UAV task force under the Edison
Electric Institute, the association
representing U.S. investor-owned
electric companies.
“When you look at the amount
of information we can gain to
make accurate decisions about our
systems, and look at the cost and
time savings, this is a huge
opportunity for us,” said Andrew
Bordine, a Consumers Energy
executive.

Seasonal workers flock to process marijuana
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WILLITS, Calif. — The annual
march of migrant marijuana workers
throughout California’s pot-rich
North Coast is in full swing but, like
the pot industry itself, reaction to the
workers’ presence is mixed.
Some residents say the migrant
workers contribute to the economy,

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but critics point out that during the
marijuana trimming season there are
often upticks in complaints about
transients, illegal camping and illegal
dumping in their towns, the Santa
Rosa Press Democrat reported Sunday.
There are no official statistics available on the number of seasonal laborers in the underground industry but
local experts say between 7,000 and

12,000 workers show up during the
trimming season, which runs from
mid-September through November.
Tim
Blake,
who
heads
a
Laytonville-based marijuana cooperative, estimates about 150,000 workers labor in California’s pot crop
annually and he figures each worker
spends about $1,000 while they’re in
Northern California.

WIN STREAKS IN CHIC: SHARKS IMPROVE WINNING STREAK TO SIX GAMES WITH 5-3 VICTORY IN COLUMBUS >> PAGE 13

<<< Page 15, Kyle Busch ruins
Jeff Gordon’s retirement party
Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

Warriors win 15th straight
Golden State ties all-time mark for best start in NBA history
By Pat Graham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DENVER — Who’s counting? The Golden
State Warriors certainly are. The wins are piling up, and they’re moving closer to NBA
history.
But they’re focused not so much on a number as winning in general.
Klay Thompson scored 21 points and the
Warriors tied the best start in league history,
beating the Denver Nuggets 118-105 on

Sunday night to move to 15-0.
Golden State matches the start of the 194849 Washington Capitols and the ‘93-94
Houston Rockets. The Warriors can break the
record Tuesday night at home against the Los
Angeles Lakers.
“It’s kind of a quiet confidence that we
don’t feel like we’re going to lose anytime
soon,” Stephen Curry said. “The way we’re
playing ... we can get even better.”
That’s a scary thought for a Warriors team
that just surpassed the ‘57-58 Boston Celtics

for the best start by a defending champion.
“It’s a huge accomplishment,” Curry said
of their blistering start. “Obviously, coming
off a championship and taking care of business 15 straight times to start the season —
couldn’t ask for a better start.”
As good as it gets right there — until
Tuesday anyway.
“It would be a cool milestone,” Thompson
JAYNE KAMIN-ONCEA/USA TODAY SPORTS
said. “Shows how special this team can be.” Draymond Green — who had a team-high seven

rebounds — celebrates in the fourth quarter of the
See DUBS, Page 15 Warriors’ 118-105 win Sunday night in Denver.

M-A, NDB repeat as CCS champs
Bears batter Scots
to claim D-I crown

Tigers take down
Menlo for D-IV title

By Terry Bernal

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

What a fitting preface it was to MenloAtherton volleyball repeating as Central
Coast Section Division I champions.
With five championship matches being
held Saturday at San Jose’s Independence
High School, the match preceding M-A’s was
the CCS Division III title game, featuring a
Valley Christian takedown of Sacred Heart
Cathedral in four sets. Valley Christian just
happens to be helmed by former M-A head
coach Ron Whitmill, who led the Bears to
last year’s D-I crown.
So, after the postgame celebration of Valley
Christian gave way for M-A’s pregame warmups, Whitmill took a stroll by the Bears’ sideline to wish his former players well.
“It was so much fun to see him,” M-A junior Kirby Knapp said. “It was really motivational. It was cool his team won too.”
And — just as they did during Whitmill’s
three-year tenure as their coach — the Bears
responded. With first-year coach Fletcher
Anderson now running the show, No. 3-seeded
M-A (24-7) took down Peninsula Athletic
League Bay Division rival No. 5 Carlmont
(27-9) in straight sets 25-14, 27-25, 25-17 to
claim its second straight CCS Division I title.
The win was a reckoning of sorts for M-A,
after splitting the two-match season series
with Carlmont. In the final regular-season
matchup between the two, the Scots swept to
hand the Bears their only loss in PAL Bay
Division play over the past two seasons.
And, boy, was it a source of motivation heading into Saturday’s rubber match.
“This rubber match was huge for us,”
Anderson said. “These girls wanted to win.
They wanted to get them back. And I was
rooting for [Carlmont] to win their semifinal
so we could rematch.”
The Bears staked their claim to victory by
virtue of two key four-point runs. M-A

See M-A, Page 14

Notre Dame-Belmont has been here before
— just last year, in fact.
But when the top-seeded Tigers (28-10)
took No. 2 Menlo to four sets Saturday at
Independence High School for a 25-18, 1725, 25-19, 25-15 victory in the Central Coast
Section Division IV championship game,
Notre Dame junior setter Kristine Gese was
noticeably more aglow than her teammates.
While Gese was on the team for last year’s
D-IV title run, she served as the Tigers’ backup setter and didn’t see any playing time in the
2014 championship game. This year, Notre
Dame’s starting setter produced 26 assists to
fuel a relentless offensive attack.
“This is amazing,” Gese said. “For me, it’s
more emotional because I actually played in
the game.”
Gese’s most consistent outlet was outside
hitter Katie Smoot. The junior has been one of
the most fearsome terminators in San Mateo
County this season, and shouldered the Notre
Dame attack with a match-high 24 kills.
Smoot’s dominance was clear from the outset. In Game 1, as Gese opened with a threepoint service run including an ace right off the
bat, Smoot followed with the first two kills of
the match. The 6-1 Smoot went on to record
seven kills in the opening set, including a
crusher off the Menlo block to give the Tigers
the lead for good at 8-7.
It was Smoot’s early showing that led to
Notre Dame head coach Jen Agresti instructing Gese to continue feeding the hot hand.
“That was my talk with the setter, was get it
to her until they stop her,” Agresti said.
The Knights (22-7) never were able to stop
her. They contained her for a bit, which
allowed Menlo to swing the advantage for a
win in Game 2. With the set deadlocked at 1010, outside hitter Mia Vandermeer produced
TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL three straight blocks to give the Knights the

Menlo-Atherton senior middle Courtney Foliaki scores one of her five match kills to help the
Bears claim a 25-14, 27-25, 25-17 win Saturday in the CCS Division I championship match.

See NDB, Page 14

Bulldogs eliminated by Chabot in barnburner
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The highlight reel of Saturday’s Bulldog
Bowl looked like a season-long compilation. Unfortunately for College of San
Mateo, a majority of the scoring highlights
belonged to Chabot, as the Gladiators
totaled a bowl record 717 yards in marching
to a 76-55 win at College Heights Stadium.
Chabot running back Ondre Rudolph
rushed for 260 yards and four touchdowns,

including two in the
opening half to stake the
Gladiators to a 34-14
halftime lead. Nine seconds into the fourth quarter, they extended their
lead to 62-21 before CSM
scored 34 points in the
final quarter.
CSM quarterback Dru
Dru Brown
Brown threw for 425
yards and set a new program record with

seven touchdown strikes. The freshman was
21-of-37 passing, with receivers Devontae
Young (four catches for 106 yards) and
Chikwado Nzerem (six catches for 101
yards) each surpassing the 100-yard plateau
for the first time in their collegiate careers.
Amid the record-setting bonanza,
Brown’s 425 passing yards set a new
Bulldog Bowl record.
Association Northern California finals
this Saturday at City College of San
Francisco.

CCSF rolled to a 30-13 win over Butte
Saturday at Rams Stadium, paced by the aerial exploits of former Terra Nova great, quarterback Anthony Gordon.
Gordon surpassed the benchmark 3,000yards passing, throwing 25-of-35 for 375
yards and three touchdowns. He now ranks
second in the state with 3,312 passing
yards. He figures to pass Diablo Valley
College’s Drew Anderson (3, 459 yards)
this Saturday, as DVC was not a postseason qualifier.

12

SPORTS

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Punchless Raiders Gators rule CCS water polo
drop 3rd straight
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

By Noah Trister
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DETROIT — Derek Carr and the Oakland Raiders are falling
behind in a forgiving race for an AFC playoff spot.
Carr was held to 169 yards passing and Amari Cooper managed only one reception as the Raiders lost 18-13 to Detroit on
Sunday. Oakland remains within striking distance of a wild
card, but the Raiders have dropped three in a
row and looked inept offensively during a
scoreless first half against the Lions.
“That just can’t happen,” Carr said. “We
can’t do that to our defense.”
The Raiders (4-6) finished with 214
yards and 13 first downs, both season
lows. Their only touchdown came after an
interception by Carr was negated by a
defensive holding penalty. Oakland led
Derek Carr
13-9 before Detroit’s Matthew Stafford ran
for a 5-yard touchdown early in the fourth quarter.
The Raiders gave up a safety with 7:31 remaining when
Donald Penn was called for holding in the end zone. The Lions
took the ensuing free kick and ran out the remaining time.
Oakland hasn’t made the playoffs since the 2002 season,
when the Raiders went to the Super Bowl. They now trail
Buffalo (5-4) by 1 1/2 games for the last wild card in the AFC,
with the Bills playing Monday night. Oakland can certainly
remain in the mix for a postseason spot with a strong finish,
but the Raiders dropped a winnable road game Sunday.
“Just not in sync, not operating the way we expect to
operate. We had two delay of games, just not showing
awareness of the clock,” coach Jack Del Rio said. “Just a
little off in some of those situations.”
Oakland had only 91 yards of offense in the first half and
trailed 9-0 after two quarters. The Raiders scored early in
the third on a 1-yard run by Latavius Murray. That 80-yard
drive nearly ended when Carr was intercepted, but a holding call on defensive back Nevin Lawson allowed the
Raiders to keep possession.
Sebastian Janikowski made field goals of 48 and 56
yards in the third, but Stafford’s touchdown put the Lions
(3-7) back ahead.
After a penalty on a punt forced the Raiders to start at their,

See RAIDERS, Page 16

Flacco out for year
with a knee injury
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BALTIMORE — Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco
will miss the remainder of the season after tearing ligaments in his knee.
The injury occurred late in the fourth quarter of Sunday’s
16-13 win over the St. Louis Rams. Ravens coach John
Harbaugh said Flacco “tore at his ACL and I think, his MCL
as well, “ but did not disclose which knee.
Flacco has never missed a game since starting the season
opener in 2008. His run of 122 straight starts will end next
week.
He played the final series Sunday despite being injured
and moved the offense to set up the winning field goal by
Justin Tucker. Flacco went 27 for 44 for 299 yards.
The Ravens also lost running back Justin Forsett, who
broke his right arm.

The Big Game
McCaffrey helps No. 15 Stanford run past Cal
STANFORD — Christian McCaffrey ran around and
through the California defense on a 49-yard touchdown
catch and also scored on a 98-yard kickoff return to help No.
15 Stanford clinch a spot in the Pac-12
championship game by winning the Big
Game 35-22 on Saturday night.
McCaffrey ran for 192 yards and gained
a school-record 389 all-purpose yards in
another highlight-reel performance that
gave the Cardinal (9-2, 8-1, No. 11 CFP)
their sixth straight win over the Golden
Bears (6-5, 3-5).
Remound Wright ran for two short
Christian
touchdowns and Bryce Love added a 48McCaffrey
yard scoring run for Stanford, which
clinched the Pac-12 North with the win. The Cardinal will
play the winner of next week’s game between UCLA and
Southern California for the Pac-12 title on Dec. 5 in Santa
Clara.
But before that, the Cardinal host No. 5 Notre Dame next
week in a game that could boost their playoff chances that
looked dire after last week’s loss to Oregon.

Once again, Sacred Heart Prep is the
center of the Central Coast Section
water polo universe.
The SHP boys’ team beat rival
Menlo School in the championship
game for the third straight year, 11-8,
for its fifth straight CCS crown. The
SHP girls’ team won its unprecedented
ninth straight CCS Division 2 title
with an 11-5 win over St. Francis at
Independence High School Saturday.
The SHP and Menlo boys met in the
finals for the ninth time Saturday and
for the third time in a row, the Gators
proved to be the better team. After
falling behind 2-1 in the first period,
No. 1-seed SHP (22-7) scored four
answered goals to take a 5-2 lead after
the opening seven minutes. The
Gators maintained their three-goal
advantage for the rest of the game.
“Sacred Heart is an immensely wellcoached team,” said Menlo coach Jack
Bowen in a press release. “You just
can’t afford to spot them three goals
early. We played even with them for

three quarters but that lapse in the first
quarter hurt us.”
If Bowen was not, literally, a
philosophist, the constant losing to
his school’s main rival would drive
him crazy. But not surprisingly, he
was philosophical after the loss.
“The sting of losing a game like this
dwindles immensely when you recognize your team literally came out all
season and all game playing their
best,” Bowen said. “Menlo did this
[Saturday]. I couldn’t be more proud.”
SHP took a 1-0 lead on a Jackson
Enright strike, but second-seeded
Menlo (18-12) got goals from Miller
Gesecke and James Thygesen to take a
2-1 lead. SHP’s Alex Tsotadze tied the
match at 2 on a penalty shot and
Andrew Churukian gave the Gators the
lead for good with his goal at the 3:36
mark of the first. Finn Banks scored
the next two goals to give the Gators a
5-2 at the end of the first.
Tsotadze led the Gators with four
goals and an assist, while Banks
scored three times and dished out two
helpers of his own. Enright and Larsen

Weigle rounded out the scoring for the
Gators with a goal apiece.
Weigle was a defensive force, coming up with a game-high four steals.
SHP goaltender Alexander Nemeth also
had a hand in the victory, stopping 14
Menlo shots.
Menlo was led by Geschke, who
scored three times and assisted on two
others. Untrecht, only a freshman who
made huge contributions all season,
finished with two goals and an assist,
while Niko Bhatia, Chris Xi and
Thygesen each scored once. Menlo
goaltender Tiago Bonchristiano finished with seven saves.
In the girls’ championship match,
the top-seeded Lady Gators got a balanced attack and a stifling defense to
beat the second-seeded Lancers. St.
Francis, which has been in the
Division 1 bracket the previous seven
seasons, was the team the Gators beat
in 2007 to begin their current run of
dominance.
It is SHP’s fourth win over the

See SHP, Page 16

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

49ers still can’t solve Seattle
By Tim Booth

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

Seahawks 29, 49ers 13
San Francisco 0
Seattle
13

7
7

6
3

0
6

— 13
— 29

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Against one of the top
defenses in the league, Blaine Gabbert
showed flashes of why San Francisco went
ahead with benching Colin Kaepernick.
But those positive moments lacked the
consistency for San Francisco to take down
the Seahawks on a day Seattle started to
look more like the team that has won two
straight NFC titles.
Gabbert threw for 264 yards and a touchdown, but San Francisco couldn’t overcome
an early 20-0 deficit or slow down Seattle
rookie running back Thomas Rawls in a 2913 loss to the Seahawks on Sunday.
Rawls rushed for 209 yards, the most
yards rushing ever allowed by the 49ers. San
Francisco was ready for a Seattle run game
led by Marshawn Lynch, not an undrafted
rookie from Central Michigan.
Gabbert will be the 49ers starter going forward after the decision to place Kaepernick
on injured reserve on Saturday. After winning
in his first start, Gabbert had his moments
against Seattle, especially at the end of the
first half when he led the 49ers on a 92-yard
touchdown drive just before halftime.
But up until the point Gabbert hit Vance
McDonald on a 19-yard touchdown, the 49ers
had done nothing offensively and created far
too big a hole to overcome on the road.

TROY WAYRYNEN/USA TODAY SPORTS

Seahawks receiver Tyler Lockett catches a
touchdown pass during the second quarter as
he is defended by 49ers safety Jaquiski Tartt.
Along with the slow start, San
Francisco’s defense had no answer for
Rawls, who had the second-best rushing day
in Seahawks history. Rawls averaged 7
yards per carry and was a surprise replacement after Lynch was unable to go in
pregame due to an abdominal injury.

First Quarter
Sea—Lockett 24 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick),9:55.
Sea—Rawls 2 run (kick failed), 3:04.
Second Quarter
Sea—Lockett 11 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick),7:15.
SF—McDonald 19 pass from Gabbert (Dawson kick),:09.
Third Quarter
SF—FG Dawson 27, 9:44.
Sea—FG Hauschka 33, 5:01.
SF—FG Dawson 25, :07.
Fourth Quarter
Sea—Rawls 31 pass from Wilson (kick blocked), 12:32.
A—68,993.
Min
SF
First downs
14
28
Total Net Yards
306
508
Rushes-yards
16-59
44-255
Passing
247
253
Punt Returns
1-6
4-1
Kickoff Returns
4-96
0-0
Interceptions Ret.
0-0
0-0
Comp-Att-Int
22-34-0 24-29-0
Sacked-Yards Lost
2-17
2-7
Punts
7-43.7
4-38.5
Fumbles-Lost
2-0
0-0
Penalties-Yards
5-42
8-51
Time of Possession
22:21
37:39
Individual statistics
RUSHING—San Francisco, Draughn 12-37, Gabbert 422. Seattle, Rawls 30-209, Wilson 9-30, F.Jackson 4-11,
Lockett 1-5.
PASSING—San Francisco, Gabbert 22-34-0-264.
Seattle, Wilson 24-29-0-260.
RECEIVING—San Francisco,Draughn 8-40,Boldin 5-93,
McDonald 4-65,Celek 2-35,Patton 2-15,Smith 1-16.Seattle,
Baldwin 6-60, Lockett 4-48, Rawls 3-46, Graham 3-39,
Kearse 3-34,Willson 2-15, F.Jackson 2-11, Helfet 1-7.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Kaepernick surgery was mutual decision says Baalke
By Tim Booth
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — The decision for 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick to have season-ending
surgery on his left, non-throwing shoulder was
a mutual decision between the QB and the team,
general manager Trent Baalke said Sunday.
Speaking before the 49ers game in
Seattle, Baalke said Kaepernick consulted
team doctors and received a second opinion

before the decision for surgery was made.
“This was something they felt from a
medical standpoint it needed to be taken
care of and addressed through surgery, ”
Baalke said. “Which, obviously, if he has
surgery, he’s not going to be able to play.
So moving him to IR is the natural move.”
Baalke said he expects Kaepernick to go
through offseason recovery with the team
and said any belief the former starter’s stint
with the 49ers was over was unfounded.

“I wouldn’t say that at all. I think people
are reading into that. For me, where we
stand right now, I wouldn’t read too much
into that right now,” Baalke said.
The 28-year-old Kaepernick’s $11.9 million 2016 contract would become fully
guaranteed for injury if he’s still on the roster on April 1. Because of that, many
already figured Kaepernick’s time with the
Niners (3-6) might be done after what so far
has been a forgettable season.

13

Sharks win
6th straight
By Robert Denhard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Joe Pavelski scored
twice and the Sharks rallied late for a 5-3
win over the Columbus Blue Jackets for
their sixth straight victory Sunday night.
San Jose won its seventh straight road game
by completing a perfect
six-game trip. Patrick
Marleau had a goal and an
assist, and Brent Burns
and Brenden Dillon also
scored. Joel Ward added
two assists and Alex
Joe Pavelski Stalock made 28 saves.
Ryan Johansen, Boone
Jenner and Cam Atkinson scored for Columbus.
Sergei Bobrovsky finished with 24 saves.
Columbus led 3-1 after Atkinson’s goal
1:23 into the third, but the Sharks stormed
back with help from several key offensive
zone faceoff wins. They took the lead by
scoring three times in a 7:02 span, including Dillon’s go-ahead score with 6:45 left.
Pavelski started the rally at 6:13, with a
long redirection between Bobrovksy’s legs.
Burns pulled San Jose even, one-timing a
cross-ice feed from Ward at the left circle for
his eighth and third in two games. Dillon’s
seeing-eye shot from the blue line made it
past a screened Bobrovksy.
Pavelski scored his 12th into an empty
net with 1:16 remaining.
Despite being road weary and having
played on Saturday night in Pittsburgh, the
Sharks had more than enough energy in the
first period. They seemed to catch Columbus
off guard with their speed, and they didn’t
shy away from the rough stuff, participating
in two fights 4 seconds apart.

14

SPORTS

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

Playoff FB scores
Open Division I
San Benito 21, M-A 19
Open Division III
SHP 42, Live Oak 21
Palma 45, Aragon 24
Monte Vista 34, Terra Nova 27
Riordan 30, Burlingame 28
Division IV
Hillsdale 35, Westmont 20
Division V
HMB 47, San Lorenzo 34
Carmel 50, King’s Academy 47
Scotts Valley 28, Menlo 14
Pacific Grove 17, Capuchino 13

Hillsdale, HMB,
SHP advance
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

Top-seed Hillsdale (10-1) opened
Central Coast Section Division IV
football play with a 35-20 win
Friday at home over No. 8
Westmont (6-5). The Fighting
Knights took a 21-0 lead into the
fourth quarter, then got a pair of long
touchdown runs by senior Cameron
Taylor to put it away. Hillsdale
advances to Friday’s D-4 semifinals
to host No. 4 Silver Creek at 7 p.m.
No. 2 Half Moon Bay (9-2) triumphed 47-34 over No. 7 San
Lorenzo Valley (6-5) at home Friday
in the CCS Division V opener. The
Cougars’ three-headed monster of
Matt
Spigelman,
Anthony
Demartini and Chase Hofmann combined for 406 rushing yards, paced
by Spigelman’s 181 yards and two
touchdowns. HMB advacnes to host
No. 3 Carmel Friday at 7 p.m.
No. 6 Sacred Heart Prep (8-3)
upset No. 3 Live Oak (9-2) in the
Open Division III bracket Friday.
The Gators will travel to No. 2
Monte Vista Friday at 7 p.m.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NDB
Continued from page 11
lead. Notre Dame rallied back to tie
it 14-14, but a kill by sophomore
opposite Ashley Dreyer gave Menlo
the lead for good at 16-15.
“Their blocks were doing great,”
Notre Dame outside hitter Tammy
Byrne said. “We played them earlier
in the season and they did not look
like did today.”
So in Game 3, Notre Dame made a
slight adjustment, with Gese setting
Smoot towards the inside. She
responded with six kills in the set,
and showed her adept hitting aptitude after Menlo libero Jessica
Houghton executed a dig on
Smoot’s best bolt to the back row;
but when Smoot got a second
chance on the ensuing volley, she
hit a picturesque fade over the Menlo

M-A
Continued from page 11
opened the match by winning the
first four points to jump out to a
commanding lead en route to a
healthy 25-14 win in Game 1. Then
in Game 2, with Carlmont taking it
to set point while leading 24-20, MA again rallied for four consecutive
points to tie it, forcing extra
points. The Bears then overcame
Carlmont for a dramatic 27-25 win
from which the Scots never recovered.
“It’s tough,” Carlmont head coach
Chris Crader said of dropping Game
2. “It’s tough to go from that to
even footing and playing with a
chance to raise your level.”

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Katie Smoot goes cross court for one of her 24 kills as Notre Dame-Belmont
downed Menlo for its second straight CCS Division IV title.
block to score the kill.
In Game 4, Byrne — who totaled
just six match kills — found another
way to produce as, after a side-out
gave Notre Dame an 8-7 lead, the junior went on a seven-point service run.
“I don’t have the toughest serve,

but I feel like I go on runs when it’s
needed,” Byrne said.
Notre Dame libero Katarina
Warburton does have the Tigers’
toughest serve, and proved it with
seven match aces. She set the tone
early with three in the first set,

Outside hitter Leanna Collins led
M-A back from the abyss in the pivotal Game 2 comeback. The senior
— who scored a match-high 12 kills
— enjoyed a strong opening set
with five kills. But she was having
trouble getting going in the second
set, until she produced a clutch
block to close Carlmont’s lead to
24-21. The senior followed that
with two consecutive kills off the
right side as M-A closed it to 24-23.
“She’s was on fire,” Knapp said.
M-A sophomore Lauren Heller
tied it at 24-24 with one of her four
match kills. Then after Carlmont
forced its fifth set point on a kill by
senior middle Alexis Morrow, the
Bears rallied for three straight
points with a kill from Heller, an ace
from
junior
libero
Alexa
Roumeliotis and a Carlmont misfire
into the net to end it.
“It was just a question of how bad

we wanted that set,” Collins said. “I
think the momentum carried over
into the third set.”
Game 3 was dominated by M-A
middle blocker Courtney Foliaki at
the net. The senior produced three
blocks to keep the Scots attack at
middle net in check. Scots outside
hitter Maya McClellan kept it
close; the sophomore matched
Collins with a match-high 12 kills,
five of which McClellan scored in
the third set.
“I just told her I’m proud of how
much she’s grown over the course of
the year,” Crader said. “She’s a
leader on the team and she’s one of
our go-to players. And that’s pretty
cool being a go-to player on a CCS
championship [finalist] as a sophomore.”
After a McClellan kill closed MA’s lead to 16-13, however, the
Bears went on a 9-4 run to end it.

including back-to-back aces to give
Notre Dame a 22-14 lead. It was a
defining element of the match,
according to Smoot.
“That helps us a lot because
missed serves are the biggest
momentum killer,” Smoot said. “So
when she started putting the ball in
that game, it gave us a lot of energy
and just got in their heads.”
Tigers senior middle Jess Beering
added 10 kills and three blocks,
while junior opposite Mavis Lui
added eight kills. Menlo senior
Maddie Stewart produced a teamhigh 12 kills.
The two teams are projected to
meet again in the second round of
the California Interscholastic
Federation
playoffs
starting
Tuesday. No. 1 seed Notre Dame
hosts No. 8 St. Patrick-St. Vincent
Tuesday at 7 p.m. No. 4 Menlo
hosts No. 5 Hilmar Tuesday at 7
p.m. The winners of the two matches will meet this Saturday.
M-A’s back row gave a fine performance. Roumeliotis had a matchhigh 23 digs while PAL Bay
Division MVP Jacqueline DiSanto
added 17 digs. Carlmont senior
libero Erin Alonso put on a show as
well, totaling a team-high 12 digs.
“Our game plan was to win the
serve, pass game,” Anderson said.
“We served well, we passed well.
That’s all I could really ask for.”
The two teams could very well
meet again in the California
Interscholastic Federation State
Volleyball Championships. The
Division I bracket opens Tuesday,
with No. 3 M-A hosting No. 6
Lowell-SF at 7 p.m. No. 7 Carlmont
travels to No. 2 Pitman-Turlock at 7
p.m. The winners of those two
matches with meet in Saturday’s
Northern California semifinals.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday • Nov. 23,

15

Kyle Busch completes comeback to win 1st Cup title
By Jenna Fryer

team radio.
He won the season finale Sunday
night
at
Homestead-Miami
Speedway to claim the title, and
knocked Kevin Harvick from his
perch as reigning champion.
Busch also denied Jeff Gordon a
fifth crown in his final race.
Gordon said before the season

started he’d retire after this race.
Harvick finished a distant second, Gordon was a mediocre sixth
and Martin Truex Jr., the fourth
driver in the championship field,
finished 12th.
“You always want to win, but
I’ve learned not to be greedy,”
Harvick said after his 12th second-

place finish of the year cost him
the championship.
There was a strong sentimental
push for Gordon to go out on top
in his final race. But he was only
average all season, and that didn’t
change Sunday night in front of a
huge contingent of friends and
family that included Formula One
champion Lewis Hamilton and
Mario Andretti, who both sat atop
his pit box at the start of the race.
Gordon led nine laps early in the
race and was third for an early
restart but he bobbled it and plummeted to eighth. That was about as
good as he’d be the rest of the race
as he struggled mightily with the
handling
of his
Hendrick
Motorsports Chevrolet.
Gordon eventually made his way
to victory lane to congratulate
Busch, who began his career as
Gordon’s teammate at Hendrick
Motorsports. Temper tantrums and
wrecked race cars led to his release
before the 2008 season, and Busch
has been chasing a Cup championship ever since.
“All he’s been through this year,

world. It’s a difficult task,” said
Nikola Jokic, who had 11 points
and 11 rebounds. “In some parts of
the game we could defend them and
in other parts no. I mean they just
need 3, 4 minutes and they’re up by
15 so we need to play defense all
the time.”
Thompson hit a 3-pointer with
2:08 remaining in the second
quarter and Golden State never
trailed again. The reserves built
up a sizeable lead and allowed
Curry to rest the entire fourth
quarter. He had 19 points, the first
time this season he didn’t reach
20.

Darrell Arthur had 21 points for
the Nuggets, who’ve lost three
straight. Kenneth Faried was sidelined by a sprained left ankle.
Harrison Barnes scored seven of
his 17 points in the third quarter
to allow the Warriors to gain some
separation. This was the way
things went for the Warriors in the
third: Festus Ezeli missed a wideopen dunk and it wound up in the
hands of Curry, who drained a 3pointer.
When the Warriors played in
Denver last March, they rested
Curry & Co. That didn’t sit well
with fans who were expecting to see

the sharp-shooting guard.
Resting wasn’t an option this
time. Not so close to an NBA
record.
“Whether or not we get it, it really doesn’t affect our ultimate goal
of trying to win a championship,”
said Walton, who picked up a technical in the third quarter. “It would
be something nice to get along the
way.”
Walton said head coach Steve
Kerr (back surgery) is “doing better.” Said Walton: “He gets really
sick of being asked that question.
So I’ve stopped asking it.”

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOMESTEAD, Fla. — Kyle
Busch opened the season in a hospital bed and ended it in victory
lane with the championship trophy.
Busch completed the ultimate
comeback Sunday night by winning his first career Sprint Cup
title just nine months after a serious crash at Daytona nearly ended
his season. He crashed into a concrete wall the day before the
Daytona 500 and broke his right
leg and left foot.
Despite multiple surgeries and
grueling rehabilitation, Busch
missed only 11 races and was back
in his Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota in
late May. NASCAR granted him a
waiver to race for the championship if he earned a berth in the
playoffs, and Busch was off and
running.
“I don’t know if I quite understand life yet, but there’s something to be said about this year,”
an emotional Busch said on his

DUBS
Continued from page 11
The Nuggets saw just how special
the Warriors can be first hand. They
hit 15 of 29 3-pointers. They
dished out 35 assists. They played
suffocating defense. They even
turned the ball over — 21 times, to
interim coach Luke Walton’s chagrin — but it didn’t seem to hurt
them.
“They’re the best team in the

MARK J. REBILAS/USA TODAY SPORTS

NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver Kyle Busch races to victory at the Ford EcoBoost 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway.

nobody’s more deserving than
him, ” Gordon said of the new
champion.
Truex, the underdog driving for
single-car team Furniture Row
Racing, also didn’t have enough
in his Chevrolet to contend
despite a handful of gutsy pit calls
the team used out of desperation.
That made the championship
race a two-car battle between
Busch and Harvick, and the outgoing champion simply didn’t have
enough for Busch.
Busch was headed toward the
title via a second or third-place
finish in the race when NASCAR
called a caution for debris with 11
laps remaining. Team owner Joe
Gibbs pumped his fists in frustration, but Busch remained calm in
the car. The field headed to pit
road, Busch asked for an adjustment, and was second on the
restart with seven laps remaining.
He worked his way past leader
Brad Keselowski to claim the lead,
then Busch pulled away and handily beat Harvick to the finish line
by 1.553 seconds.

Oct. 27 — New Orleans, 111-95
Oct. 30 — at Houston, 112-92
Oct. 31 — at New Orleans, 134-120
Nov. 2 — Memphis, 119-69
Nov. 4 — L.A. Clippers, 112-108
Nov. 6 — Denver, 119-104
Nov. 7 — at Sacramento, 103-94
Nov. 9 — Detroit, 109-95
Nov. 11 — at Memphis, 100-84
Nov. 12 — at Minnesota, 129-116
Nov. 14 — Brooklyn, 107-99, OT
Nov. 17 — Toronto, 115-110
Nov. 19 — at L.A. Clippers, 124-117
Nov. 20 — Chicago, 106-94
Nov. 22 — at Denver, 118-105

THE STREAK

16

SPORTS

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

Lions 18, Raiders 13
Oakand
Detroit

0
6

0
3

13
0

0
9

— 13
— 18

First Quarter
Det—FG Prater 29, 7:54.
Det—FG Prater 41, :31.
Second Quarter
Det—FG Prater 51, :02.
Third Quarter
Oak—Murray 1 run (Janikowski kick), 10:24.
Oak—FG Janikowski 48, 3:55.
Oak—FG Janikowski 56, :15.
Fourth Quarter
Det—Stafford 5 run (Prater kick), 11:04.
Det—Team safety, 7:31.
A—60,202.
Oak
Det
First downs
13
22
Total Net Yards
214
375
Rushes-yards
21-50
31-109
Passing
164
266
Punt Returns
4-16
3-22
Kickoff Returns
3-61
3-80
Interceptions Ret.
0-0
0-0
Comp-Att-Int
13-25-0 22-35-0
Sacked-Yards Lost
1-5
4-16
Punts
5-43.4
5-47.6
Fumbles-Lost
3-0
0-0
Penalties-Yards
6-31
7-55
Time of Possession
23:58
36:02
Individual statistics
RUSHING—Oakland, Murray 13-28, Olawale 4-12,
Carr 2-8, Reece 2-2. Detroit, Abdullah 12-44, Stafford 631, Bell 6-22, Riddick 6-14, Tate 1-(minus 2).
PASSING—Oakland, Carr 13-25-0-169. Detroit,
Stafford 22-35-0-282.
RECEIVING—Oakland, Crabtree 6-50, Roberts 2-54,
Walford 2-25, Rivera 1-21, Olawale 1-15, Cooper 1-4.
Detroit,Tate 8-73, C.Johnson 5-88, Riddick 5-72, Moore
1-21, Bell 1-18, Pettigrew 1-8, Abdullah 1-2.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

RAIDERS
Continued from page 12
Penn was flagged for holding Ziggy Ansah in the end zone, and
the safety made the score 18-13.
“We did a lot of soul searching, because we were one of the best
defenses in the NFL last year and we weren’t close to that this
season,” Detroit defensive lineman Jason Jones said. “We knew
we needed to get ourselves back to that level, and I think we’ve
done that in the last couple weeks.”
After a free kick, the Lions drive into Oakland territory, and
Joique Bell ran for a key conversion on third-and-3 from the 19.
After the 2-minute warning, Bell broke free for an 11-yard run
that allowed Detroit to kneel out the rest of the clock.
Cooper was targeted four times and caught only one pass.
“I think they tried to roll up on him a little bit. He ended up
having just one ball. He dropped a couple,” Del Rio said.
“Obviously, he’s a good player for us. We need to find ways to
get him more involved. For him to come out of a game with one
catch, we’ve got to do a better job there.”
Matt Prater made field goals of 29, 41 and 51 yards for the
Lions. The last kick came in the final seconds of the second quarter. Stafford completed a 36-yard pass to Calvin Johnson on
third-and-15 to put the Lions in range.
Detroit made it to the Oakland 1 on its first possession of the
game before being pushed back by a holding penalty and settling for a field goal.
NOTES: Detroit’s Golden Tate had eight receptions for 73
yards and Johnson made five catches for 88 yards. ... Raiders C
Rodney Hudson (ankle), RB Taiwan Jones (knee) and CB Keith
McGill (ankle) were injured during the game.

SHP
Continued from page 12
Lancers this season. The Gators beat
the Lancers in a non-league tournament, once during the West Catholic
Athletic League regular season and

NBA GLANCE

NFL GLANCE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T
New England 9 0 0
Buffalo
5 4 0
N.Y. Jets
5 5 0
Miami
4 6 0
South
Indianapolis 5 5 0
Houston
5 5 0
Jacksonville 4 6 0
Tennessee
2 8 0
North
Cincinnati
8 2 0
Pittsburgh
6 4 0
Baltimore
3 7 0
Cleveland
2 8 0
West
Denver
8 2 0
Kansas City 5 5 0
Raiders
4 6 0
San Diego
2 8 0
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T
N.Y. Giants
5 5 0
Washington 4 6 0
Philadelphia 4 6 0
Dallas
3 7 0
South
Carolina
10 0 0
Atlanta
6 4 0
Tampa Bay
5 5 0
New Orleans 4 6 0
North
Green Bay
7 3 0
Minnesota
7 3 0
Chicago
4 6 0
Detroit
3 7 0
West
Arizona
8 2 0
Seattle
5 5 0
St. Louis
4 6 0
49ers
3 7 0

Pct PF
1.000 303
.556 231
.500 234
.400 205

PA
169
207
208
249

.500
.500
.400
.200

224
208
211
182

248
228
268
233

.800
.600
.300
.200

266
236
226
186

186
191
249
277

.800
.500
.400
.200

222
257
240
213

183
198
259
282

Pct
.500
.400
.400
.300

PF
273
221
229
190

PA
253
253
229
228

1.000 299
.600 250
.500 236
.400 255

191
214
254
315

.700
.700
.400
.300

249
211
214
185

198
184
251
274

.800
.500
.400
.300

336
228
179
139

216
192
199
252

Sunday’s Games
Houston 24, N.Y. Jets 17
Denver 17, Chicago 15
Detroit 18, Oakland 13
Indianapolis 24, Atlanta 21
Tampa Bay 45, Philadelphia 17
Baltimore 16, St. Louis 13
Dallas 24, Miami 14
Carolina 44, Washington 16
Kansas City 33, San Diego 3
Seattle 29, San Francisco 13
Green Bay 30, Minnesota 13
Arizona 34, Cincinnati 31
Monday’s Game
Buffalo at New England, 5:30 p.m.

again in the championship game of
the WCAL tournament before prevailing in Saturday’s CCS title game.
SHP (24-5) set the tone by jumping
out to an early lead in the first period
and maintaining it throughout. The
Gators scored four time in the first
seven minutes to take a 4-1 lead. they
would go on to outscore St. Francis
(21-8) in every quarter, holding a dangerous Lancers’ squad to just five

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
Toronto
9
New York
8
Boston
7
Brooklyn
3
Philadelphia
0
Southeast Division
Miami
8
Atlanta
9
Washington
6
Charlotte
7
Orlando
6
Central Division
Cleveland
10
Chicago
8
Indiana
8
Detroit
7
Milwaukee
5
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
San Antonio
10
Dallas
9
Memphis
7
Houston
5
New Orleans
3
Northwest Division
Oklahoma City
8
Utah
6
Denver
6
Portland
6
Minnesota
5
Pacific Division
Warriors
15
Phoenix
7
L.A. Clippers
6
Sacramento
5
L.A. Lakers
2

L
6
6
6
11
14

Pct
.600
.571
.538
.214
.000

GB

1/2
1
5 1/2
8 1/2

4
6
4
6
7

.667
.600
.600
.538
.462


1/2
1
1 1/2
2 1/2

3
4
5
6
8

.769
.667
.615
.538
.385


1 1/2
2
3
5

3
5
7
9
11

.769
.643
.500
.357
.214


1 1/2
3 1/2
5 1/2
7 1/2

6
6
8
9
8

.571
.500
.429
.400
.385


1
2
2 1/2
2 1/2

0
6
7
9
11

1.000
.538
.462
.357
.154


7
8
9 1/2
12

Sunday’s Games
Toronto 91, L.A. Clippers 80
New Orleans 122, Phoenix 116
Brooklyn 111, Boston 101
Oklahoma City 117, Dallas 114
Golden State 118, Denver 105
Portland 107, L.A. Lakers 93
Monday’s Games
Orlando at Cleveland, 4 p.m.
Sacramento at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
New York at Miami, 4:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Milwaukee, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Utah, 6 p.m.

goals. St. Francis averaged 10 goals in
its previous two CCS matches.
SHP got goals from seven different
players, with Claire Kerrigan, Nadia
Paquin, Maddie Pendolino and Layla
Waters all scored twice. Addi Duvall,
Maddy Johnson and Malaika Koshy
had a goal each to round out the scoring. Jane Rakow had strong game in
the cage, finishing with nine saves.

DATEBOOK

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

17

Last ‘Hunger Games’ opens to $101 million, a franchise low
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — “Mockingjay
— Part 2, ” the final “Hunger
Games” film, soared to a $101
million opening in its first weekend in theaters, according to
Rentrak estimates Sunday. For
most films this would be a coup,
but “The Hunger Games” had its

T

own records to beat, and this sets a
new low for the four-film franchise.
The series starring Jennifer
Lawrence kicked off with a bang in
March 2012 with a massive
$152.5 million weekend — one of
the highest openings of all time.
“Catching Fire,” the second film
in the franchise, one-upped that

oday’s question comes from a loyal
reader. “Should I give my dog real
bones, and what are your thoughts
on cooked versus raw bones?” When I was

with a $158.1 million debut in
November 2013.
Lionsgate split the final book
in Suzanne Collins’ trilogy into
two films, following the precedent of “Twilight” and “Harry
Potter.”
“Mockingjay — Part 1” opened
on this weekend last year to
$121.9 million, considered at the

a kid, we gave our dog bones from the
butcher, Mancini’s Meats in San Bruno.
And, Ginger loved them. The bones were
such a high-value treat, we couldn’t get
near her those first few days with the new
bone. Our shelter’s veterinarians do not
recommend giving real bones.
Complications aren’t common, but can be
deadly. Worst-case scenario is that the
bone splinters and causes a perforation
within the intestinal tract, anywhere from
the throat to the rectum. When the intestinal tract ruptures, it’s incredibly painful,
will spread intestinal bacteria throughout
the animal’s system and could be fatal
before an owner realizes what’s happen-

time to be a necessary and expected dip, while fans awaited the final
installment, which, if it mimicked
“Twilight” or “Harry Potter, ”
would have snared the second
highest (if not highest) opening
in the series.
With that perspective, a franchise low for the final “Hunger
Games” film, which cost a report-

ing. Surgical repair may be close to
impossible. A less serious but more likely
scenario is that the dog breaks a tooth.
This is as painful for them as it would be
for us. And, getting the tooth extracted
could cost several hundred dollars. If the
owner doesn’t notice (or can’t afford
extraction) and the tooth remains, it could
abscess and the infection could spread into
the surrounding jawbone. Several bad
things can happen from one ignored broken tooth. Some people will suggest giving raw bones instead of cooked bones.
The idea is that cooking a bone dries it
out, which makes the bone harder and easier to break teeth or splinter. However, raw

ed $160 million to make, was a bit
of a surprise. Lionsgate, however,
is not disappointed.
“It’s a great accomplishment.
The overall franchise has grossed
over $2 billion worldwide and
counting,” said David Spitz, copresident of theatrical distribution
for Lionsgate. “It’s a pretty phenomenal result.”

bones can still splinter and are a huge risk
for spreading bacteria, especially salmonella. I’ve also heard the idea that dogs
need to eat bones because “that’s what
they do in the wild.” But, dog food is formulated to provide the nutrients that chewing a bone would provide; from a nutritional standpoint, bones aren’t necessary.
There are many healthy options for dogs
who want to chew; different toys and treats
and methods of doing things, like putting
treats in the freezer.
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Customer
Service, Behavior and Training,
Education, Outreach and Field Services.

Entertainment brief
People hid in dressing room during Paris attack
Two members of the Eagles of Death Metal band said several people hid in their dressing room during the deadly terrorist attack in Paris last week. The U.S. band was performing at the Bataclan theater on the night of Nov. 13 when
jihadi militants killed 130 people and wounded more than
350 others at several locations in Paris. Hughes says that
the killers were able to get into the dressing room and killed
almost everyone — with the exception of one person who
hid under Hughes’ leather jacket.

&EVDBUJPO5IBU8PSLTt8JOUFS

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Clinical Medical Assistant Program

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For more information call 650.574.6149

18

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

Birth announcements:
Val dei r and Chel s ea Fari a,
of Half Moon Bay, gave birth to a
baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Oct. 31, 2015.
Bri an Wenzel and Sarah
Jo nes Wenzel , of Redwood
City, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
Nov. 4, 2015.
Kev i n and Ro s anna Cas per,
of Menlo Park, gave birth to a
baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Nov. 4, 2015.
Bri an and Raquel Beck, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Nov. 4, 2015.
Berndt and Kari Jung , of
Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Nov. 6, 2015.
Mi chael and Cy nthi a
Zhang , of Belmont, gave birth to
a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Nov. 7, 2015.
Charl es and Andrea
Shanno n, of Sunnyvale, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 8,
2015.

Peter Do ukaki s and Eri ca
Rus s el l , of San Mateo, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 8,
2015.
Jo s e and El i zabeth
Rami rez, of East Palo Alto, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 8,
2015.
Andrew and Natas ha Jo nes ,
of Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Nov. 10, 2015.
Brent Kaway e and Jai me
Del l a Santi na, of Redwood
City, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
Nov. 10, 2015.

GLOBAL GRANDMOTHERS WALK
Twenty local citizens joined Global
Grandmothers Walk the Walk on
Saturday, Nov. 14, to raise more than
$2,500 for Save the Children’s Child
Refugee Crisis Appeal. The walk was
along the San Mateo shoreline, beginning at Ryder Park, and
proceeding down to Coyote Point
and back to Seal Point Park. Global
Grandmothers is the brainchild of
San Mateo resident and grandmother Diana McDonough. Its
mission is to “build a movement of
caring adults committed to acting
as Global Grandmothers by supporting children in need
worldwide.”

Bl as Di az and Adri ana
Juarez, of Moss Beach, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Nov.
12, 2015.
Dani el Swartz and Ol ena
Lev i na, of Redwood City, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Nov.
13, 2015.
Bri an Bro wn and Ana
DeOcampo Bro wn, of Menlo
Park, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
Nov. 15, 2015.

FILOLI’S HOLIDAY
TRADITIONS
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL

Oct. 29 was Garland Day at Filoli in Woodside, when
over 100 volunteers gathered to decorate the Visitor Center in preparation for Holiday Traditions,
when guests can enjoy seasonal shopping, dining,
holiday music, and the beautifully decorated rooms
of the historic country estate. Here, volunteers Katy
McCormick (on scaffold) and Ruth Ann Groves
(lower left) add festive touches to the Center’s foyer.
Holiday Traditions runs from Fri. Nov. 27 through
Sat. Dec. 5. For information go to
http://www.filoli.org/holiday-traditions.

Dani el and Meredi th
Lars en, of San Carlos, gave birth
to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital
in Redwood City Nov. 16, 2015.

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NATION/LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

Clinton proposes tax break for caregivers
By Catherine Lucey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLINTON, Iowa — Pledging to
invest in the “caring economy,”
Hillary Rodham Clinton proposed
a new tax break Sunday for people
caring for aging parents and
grandparents.
The Democratic presidential
candidate touted her latest proposal at a town hall-style meeting in
Iowa Sunday.

Tax credit
She is seeking a tax credit to
help offset up to $6,000 in caregiving costs for elderly family
members. The credit would apply
to 20 percent of those expenses
for a maximum tax bill savings of
$1,200.
“We need to recognize the value
of the work that caregivers give to
all of us, both those who are paid

and the great
number who are
un p a i d, ”
Clinton said to
the crowd of
more than 400
people gathered
at a middle
school.
The caregiver
Hillary Clinton
proposal
is
part of a series of tax proposals
geared at the middle class that
Clinton is rolling out. In her plan,
Clinton states that the number of
Americans needing long-term care
is expected to grow from about 12
million today to 27 million by
2050. She says that family members often have to take time away
from work, using vacation time or
personal time to provide care.
“The lost wages and the work
that is sometimes given up are
costing families— especially
women— who make up the major-

ENDS
Continued from page 1
reported.
“In addition to operating this building in
violation of the city’s zoning, please be
aware that this wrongful conversion from
residential to a hotel or lodging use for
transient purposes undermines important
City Council initiatives. A variety of policy documents articulate the City Council’s
vision and direction to bring housing to
downtown and to the community which is
affordable to a variety of income groups,”
according to the cease-and-desist letter
sent to the corporate housing providers.

ity of both paid and unpaid caregivers,” said Clinton.

Social Security
The former secretary of state is
also seeking to provide additional
Social Security benefits to those
who spend time out of the workforce to care for immediate family.
She wants to enhance support for
care workers and increase funding
for a program that offers statelevel grants to programs for caregivers. Clinton’s campaign says
the plan would cost $10 billion
over 10 years and would be paid
for through other revenue increases.
In Memphis on Friday, Clinton
touted a tax credit of up to $5,000
for families and $2,500 for individuals she proposed earlier this
year. Americans with out-of-pocket health care expenses exceeding
5 percent of their income would be

Short-term rental providers such as
Airbnb are considered separate from corporate housing and city policy, Aknin reported.
“You can still find units listed on Airbnb
and other short-term vacation rental platforms throughout Redwood City. Although
the impacts can be overlapping, the city
sees this as a separate and distinct policy
issue from corporate housing. Airbnb units
are typically listed by the primary longterm resident, which is different from a corporate housing company renting units
directly to a corporation (a business to
business transaction). The city is currently
developing regulations for Airbnb units,
and expects the City Council to review
these regulations in early 2016,” Aknin
wrote in the report.

eligible for the credit. Her campaign says the tax cut will be funded through tax increases on
wealthy families and by “demanding” rebates from drug manufactures.
Clinton says that she is the
only primary candidate committed
to holding current tax rates on
average workers. She has accused
primary rival Sen. Bernie Sanders
of promoting programs that she
says would raise taxes on middleclass families, including his plan
for a single-payer health system
based on Medicare.
Sanders’ campaign says that his
single-payer health system would
save taxpayers money in the long
run because it would eliminate
wasteful health spending. Sanders
spokesman Michael Briggs criticized Clinton’s tax proposals
Sunday in a statement, calling
them “tentative half-steps that
sound Republican-lite.”

19

Nation brief
Despite oil bust, Texas preps
more students for oil jobs
HOUSTON — The oil industry is
mired in its latest bust, with thousands of jobs evaporating like
flares flaming out over natural gas
wells. But in Texas, education officials are preparing more young
people for the oil patch, showing
the state’s unshakeable commitment to the energy sector despite
the employment uncertainties.
The Houston school district is
planning to expand its Energy
Institute High School to around
1,000 students by 2017 and inaugurate a new 110,000 square-foot,
$37 million facility. The threeyear-old institute is the nation’s
only high school fully specializing in oil and energy careers.
In the oil-rich Permian Basin,
two Midland high schools have
begun “petroleum academies.”
And state officials have
approved vocational classes in oil
production.

20

LOCAL

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

CENTER
Continued from page 1
after work was completed. So after citizens and the city studied options, the
Worker Resource Center was opened in
2003 at the corner of Fifth and
Railroad avenues.
Dozens of workers, often San Mateo
residents with experience in construction or landscaping, gather at the center in search of employment. Yet some
opt to remain on the streets and have
elicited complaints from neighbors as
well as inquires as to whether it was
worth city funds to keep the center
afloat.
Todd Murtha, a more than 12-year
Central neighborhood resident, said
the center was created to help alleviate
the problems and questioned why the
city would continue to pay as fewer and
fewer workers now use the facility.
“The neighborhood was viewed as a
primary beneficiary of the Worker
Resource Center, we were one of the
reasons it was created,” Murtha said
during the meeting. “While we feel it’s
appropriate to help these individuals,
… it’s unfair the impacts of providing

WATER
Continued from page 1
means to capture storm water, more
must be done to ensure a sustainable
future, Gordon said.
“One of the things that we certainly
heard from the climate experts is that
we should expect warmer weather and,
even if we get wet weather, it’s more
likely to fall as rain and less as snow,”
Gordon said, noting the average temperature in the Sierra Nevada last winter was just 32 degrees. “We’ve had
these cycles of climate change over a
millennium and we are now certainly,
it would appear, in a period where as
you look at the graphs, our temperatures are rising. They predict that will
be our future for the next several
decades.”
Longer periods of drought have
occurred throughout the centuries, scientists say, and they anticipate more
extreme climate changes over the next
100 years. A new period can have
tremendous effects on a variety of
species and industries. As the large
state is highly dependent on snowpack
and importing drinking water, Gordon
said it’s time to consider cutbacks as
well as new technologies.
The largest desalinization plant in
the Western Hemisphere is slated to
come online in Carlsbad in the near
future and is expected to sell at least

that help is falling on just one neighborhood.”
Samaritan House representatives
noted some of the complaints stem
from the homeless population downtown. The Community Relations
Commission discussed the contract in
August and also recommended San
Mateo continues to provide its land as
well as financial support to keep the
center open.
Reyna Sandoval, who recently came
on board to manage the center, said
they’re striving to improve the facility, reinstate English classes and connect with workers on the street in an
attempt to relocate them indoors.
“These workers really need this center. For most of them, this is pretty
much all they have; this is their livelihood, their sense of community and we
do protect them, we make sure their
best interest is taken into account,”
Sandoval said.
Several residents spoke at the meeting with varying viewpoints. Josh
Hugg, a member of the Sustainability
Commission and 16-year resident of
the neighborhood, said there’s been a
vast improvement since the center
opened as fewer workers line the
streets and many are receiving care.
James Wayne, another longtime

Central neighborhood resident, said
he’s sympathetic but feels it’s a waste
of money as attendance has declined.
Regardless of the arguments, the
city will have to consider whether to
shift the center elsewhere in the near
future.
As part of the council’s action, it
directed the Community Relations
Commission to work on considering
future options for relocating the center
as the current site was purchased with
former redevelopment agency funds
and could be turned into housing.
Lim said he would support any
efforts to find a new location and, during the meeting, said he tended to side
with Carlos Chavez’s sentiment.
Chavez, a retired San Francisco
County employee who now volunteers
at the center, said he and other members of his congregation bring food
and moral support. The center is more
than a worthwhile expense, Chavez
said.
“This is a human issue. It’s not a statistic, it’s not economics. These are
humans, they have families, they have
children,” Chavez said to the council.
“I appeal to your human kindness,
leave aside the economics and the politics, just look at another human
being.”

48,000 acre-feet of water annually,
according to a committee report.
Ocean desalinization is considered a
more secure option as it doesn’t rely
on rainfall, however, Gordon noted
several hurdles to expanding operations.
Constructing facilities is extremely
costly as is the immense amount of
energy required to force the water
through a membrane filtration system.
There’s also the question of what to do
with the leftover brine — a highly
concentrated salty material that must
be disposed, Gordon said.
Environmental impacts must also be
managed to reduce the amount of aquatic life and organisms that are captured
when pulling in large amounts of
ocean water, Gordon said.
“Desalinization uses an awful lot of
energy so it’s very expensive, ”
Gordon said. “Managing the environmental issues is a cost factor and energy is a cost factor.”
Considering recycled water on a
grander and yet smaller scale is another option to diversifying sources. One
idea could relate to new building codes
or ways to promote reusing water on
site. For example, instead of having
storm water filtered at a large plant,
homes can be constructed with more
permeable surfaces or a system that
reuses water from a dishwasher or
washing machine to water landscape,
Gordon said.
“These are some of the things technology is helping us understand, ”

Gordon said.
Another consideration is how to
maximize wet weather and capture rainfall. While many are hopeful El Niño
will provide some relief, the state isn’t
fully equipped to capture much of the
rainfall, Gordon said.
Often, options to promote a more
sustainable and diverse water portfolio
are costly. Gordon noted that although
the committee’s recommendations
won’t directly affect the recently
passed $7.5 billion water bond, for
which funding has already been outlined, it does have similar provisions.
“Interestingly, the current water
bond does envision a portfolio
approach, because there’s money in
the water bond for storage, for conservation, for recycling activities, ”
Gordon said.
The committee will meet in
December for a focused discussion on
desalinization and again in January to
consider recycled water, Gordon said.
Unable to predict what exact recommendations come out of the special
Assembly group, Gordon said one
thing is for sure — conservation is
key.
Many have adhered to Gov. Jerry
Brown’s landmark mandates for residents to cut back a cumulative 25 percent, but consistent efforts must coincide with adapting to climate change,
Gordon said.
“If drought is potentially our new
normal, then conservation is also our
new normal,” Gordon said.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
MONDAY, NOV. 23
San Mateo on Ice. Fitzgerald Ball
Field in Central Park, Fifth Avenue
and El Camino Real, San Mateo. 2
p.m. to 10 p.m. Located in San
Mateo’s Central Park, the outdoor
ice rink features 9,000 square feet of
real ice and is the largest outdoor
skating rink in the Bay Area. $15 per
person for all day skating with free
skate rental. For more information
visit sanmateoonice.com.
Tween Thanksgiving. 3 p.m. to 5
p.m. 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Join
the San Mateo Public Library to
make fun seasonal crafts, turkey
sandwiches and a special dessert.
For more information call 522-7838.
Make-Up and Skin Care Class for
Adults. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. 2645
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo.
Could your cosmetics be harming
you? Do anti-aging products work?
Tickets start at $42. For more information email abrown@cityofsanmateo.org.
TUESDAY, NOV. 24
San Mateo on Ice. Fitzgerald Ball
Field in Central Park, Fifth Avenue
and El Camino Real, San Mateo. 2
p.m. to 10 p.m. Located in San
Mateo’s Central Park, the outdoor
ice rink features 9,000 square feet of
real ice and is the largest outdoor
skating rink in the Bay Area. $15 per
person for all day skating with free
skate rental. For more information
visit sanmateoonice.com.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 25
Annual Christmas Tour. 2 p.m. to 4
p.m. 519 Grand Ave., South San
Francisco. Tour of museum featuring
Christmas decorations.
San Mateo on Ice. Fitzgerald Ball
Field in Central Park, Fifth Avenue
and El Camino Real, San Mateo. 2
p.m. to 10 p.m. Located in San
Mateo’s Central Park, the outdoor
ice rink features 9,000 square feet of
real ice and is the largest outdoor
skating rink in the Bay Area. $15 per
person for all day skating with free
skate rental. For more information
visit sanmateoonice.com.
Computer Coach. 10:30 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
Las Pulgas, Belmont. Drop in to this
relaxed setting to receive one-onone help with computer related
needs. For more information email
belmont@smcl.org.
THURSDAY, NOV. 26
San Mateo on Ice. Fitzgerald Ball
Field in Central Park, Fifth Avenue
and El Camino Real, San Mateo.
Open Thanksgiving Day! Noon to 9
p.m. Located in San Mateo’s Central
Park, the outdoor ice rink features
9,000 square feet of real ice and is
the largest outdoor skating rink in
the Bay Area. $15 per person for all
day skating with free skate rental.
For more information visit sanmateoonice.com.
Thanksgiving dinner for seniors.
Noon. Veterans Memorial Building,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City.
Sponsored by the Peninsula Hills
Women’s Club. For more information and to RSVP call 780-7259.
FRIDAY, NOV. 27
San Mateo on Ice. Fitzgerald Ball
Field in Central Park, Fifth Avenue
and El Camino Real, San Mateo.
Noon to 10 p.m. Located in San
Mateo’s Central Park, the outdoor
ice rink features 9,000 square feet of
real ice and is the largest outdoor
skating rink in the Bay Area. $15 per
person for all day skating with free
skate rental. For more information
visit sanmateoonice.com.
Sharr White’s Sunlight. 8 p.m. 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. Sunlight
tackles the polarity of the post-9/11
world. Tickets start at $35. For more
information and to buy tickets go to
dragonproductions.net.
SATURDAY, NOV. 28
International Game Day. 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. 610 Elm St., San Carlos. Join
the San Carlos Library for a day of
board games for adults and children. For more information call
650.591.0341 ext.237
San Mateo on Ice. Fitzgerald Ball
Field in Central Park, Fifth Avenue
and El Camino Real, San Mateo.
Noon to 10 p.m. Located in San
Mateo’s Central Park, the outdoor
ice rink features 9,000 square feet of
real ice and is the largest outdoor
skating rink in the Bay Area. $15 per
person for all day skating with free
skate rental. For more information
visit sanmateoonice.com.
Sharr White’s Sunlight. 8 p.m. 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. Sunlight
tackles the polarity of the post-9/11
world. Tickets start at $35. For more
information and to buy tickets go to
dragonproductions.net.
SUNDAY, NOV. 29
San Mateo on Ice. Fitzgerald Ball
Field in Central Park, Fifth Avenue
and El Camino Real, San Mateo.
Noon to 9 p.m. Located in San
Mateo’s Central Park, the outdoor

ice rink features 9,000 square feet of
real ice and is the largest outdoor
skating rink in the Bay Area. $15 per
person for all day skating with free
skate rental. For more information
visit sanmateoonice.com.
Last Sunday Ballroom Tea Dance.
1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Join the
Bob Guiterrez Band for a ballroom
dance in the Senior Center. Tickets
will be $5. For more information call
616-7150.
Sharr White’s Sunlight. 2 p.m. 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. Sunlight
tackles the polarity of the post-9/11
world. Tickets start at $35. For more
information and to buy tickets go to
dragonproductions.net.
MONDAY, NOV. 30
San Mateo on Ice. Fitzgerald Ball
Field in Central Park, Fifth Avenue
and El Camino Real, San Mateo. 2
p.m. to 9 p.m. Located in San Mateo’s
Central Park, the outdoor ice rink
features 9,000 square feet of real ice
and is the largest outdoor skating
rink in the Bay Area. $15 per person
for all day skating with free skate
rental. For more information visit
sanmateoonice.com.
TUESDAY, DEC. 1
Alice Weil’s “ Chasing Light and
Reflection” Exhibit Opening Day.
10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Portola Art
Gallery at Allied Arts Guild, 75 Arbor
Road, Menlo Park. “Chasing Light
and Reflection” is a collection of oil
and acrylic paintings inspired by
rolling hills and majestic oaks.
Proceeds benefit the Ronald
McDonald House in Menlo Park.
Exhibit runs from Dec. 1 to Dec. 22,
Monday through Saturday, 10:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information contact 321-0220.
Rotary Park Peace Project. 11:30
a.m. 89 South Ashton Ave., Millbrae.
Join the Rotary club for the unveiling of our new Peace Pole and
bench. For more information call
259-2333.
San Mateo on Ice. Fitzgerald Ball
Field in Central Park, Fifth Avenue
and El Camino Real, San Mateo. 2
p.m. to 9 p.m. Located in San Mateo’s
Central Park, the outdoor ice rink
features 9,000 square feet of real ice
and is the largest outdoor skating
rink in the Bay Area. $15 per person
for all day skating with free skate
rental. For more information visit
sanmateoonice.com.
Ladies’ Night Annual Holiday
Boutique. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Domenico Winery, 1697 Industrial
Road, San Carlos. Enjoy award-winning wines from a no-host bar, complementary light hors d'oeruvres,
and a unique experience as you
shop for the people on your holiday
list. For more information email
karen@domenicowinery.com.
Kindergarten Open House. 7 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m. Ronald C. Wornick
Jewish Day School, 800 Foster City
Blvd., Foster City. For more information call 378-2611.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 2
Computer Class: Digital Device
Petting Zoo. 10:30 a.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Come and experience a
variety of digital devices and learn
about their library applications. For
more
information
email
belmont@smcl.org.
Annual Christmas Tour. 2 p.m. to 4
p.m. 519 Grand Ave., South San
Francisco. Tour of museum featuring
Christmas decorations.
San Mateo on Ice. Fitzgerald Ball
Field in Central Park, Fifth Avenue
and El Camino Real, San Mateo. 2
p.m. to 9 p.m. Located in San Mateo’s
Central Park, the outdoor ice rink
features 9,000 square feet of real ice
and is the largest outdoor skating
rink in the Bay Area. $15 per person
for all day skating with free skate
rental. For more information visit
sanmateoonice.com.
Lifetree
Cafe:
Could
a
Conversation with God Change
Your Life? 6:30 p.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. For more information
call 854-5897.
THURSDAY, DEC. 3
Lifetree
Cafe:
Could
a
Conversation with God Change
Your Life? 9:15 a.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. For more information
call 854-5897.
ESL Conversation Club. 10 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. ESL conversation club is a relaxed and welcoming weekly meeting where participants with beginning English skills
can practice their English conversation abilities. For more information
email belmont@smcl.org.

For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT®

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

21

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Falafel bean
5 Double or twin
8 Groovy
11 Blissful spot
12 Europe-Asia range
14 Fix a squeak
15 Unexpected winner
(2 wds.)
17 Ames inst.
18 — Peninsula
19 Give a hard time
21 “Frozen” sister
23 Jot down
24 Pop
27 Deposits
29 Sporty truck
30 Yanked, as weeds
34 Pitchers?
37 Lobster eggs
38 Astronaut — Shepard
39 Licorice herb
41 Visage
43 Prima donna
45 Quits talking

GET FUZZY®

47
50
51
54
55
56
57
58
59

Light fogs
USN officer
Mineral in bananas
Ripen
Thick carpet
Measure of land
Quarry
Keats opus
Preowned

DOWN
1 Govt. agent
2 “Bonanza” brother
3 Designer Wang
4 Calf neighbors
5 Warning floats
6 Miscalculate
7 100-meter event
8 Palm off
9 Theater part
10 Sad
13 Shack (hyph.)
16 Come to a standstill
20 Just average (hyph.)
22 Tack on

24
25
26
28
30
31
32
33
35
36
39
40
41
42
44
45
46
48
49
52
53

Urban transport
Actress Hagen
Shinto or Zen (abbr.)
Tall vase
“Pulp Fiction” name
Numerical prefix
Goddess of dawn
Billy — Williams
Per person
Slumbers
Car rental name
Capital of the Bahamas
Mushrooms
Valuable thing
Film projection
Jalopy
London district
Twitches
Certain
Minuscule amount
Glove sz.

11-23-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2015
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Keep your plans
to yourself if you don’t want someone else to end
up taking credit for your hard work. Someone you
trust will let you down.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Stay in the
background where you can get a better view of what’s
going on around you. Careful timing will ensure that
your work will reach a wide and receptive audience.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Love is in the stars.
You may feel like splurging, but resist the urge to
overspend or you will fall short when your monthly bills
arrive. Think ahead and set new trends.

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

WEEKEND’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Showcase your
ideas to anyone who can help you move forward
professionally. Trying to do everything on your own will
be disheartening. Don’t be shy; ask for assistance.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Financial gain is
apparent. Assert your needs and wants without being
overbearing. Tact and diplomacy will enable you to
charm people and groups into granting you favors.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Money matters will be
unsettling. Avoid lending and borrowing. Call in loans
and pay off as many debts as you can to avoid being
left in a compromising position.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Your innovative concepts
will provide you with a new direction. Focus your
efforts on what you enjoy doing most in order to end

11-23-15
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

up with a lucrative sideline or full-time career.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Don’t be content
with just getting by. Educate yourself about topics
that are relevant to your profession. Your chance
for advancement will increase as you become
more proficient.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — In order to stay ahead of the
game, you must be aware of what your competition
is doing. Be observant. It’s apparent that someone is
trying to undermine your credibility.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Unanticipated changes
within the family will cause emotional distress. Do your
best to avoid finding fault or placing blame on others.
Outside help may be required to reach a compromise.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Don’t make promises

you can’t keep. Be honest about your feelings and
intentions. The time and effort you put into your
personal relationships will be proof of your devotion.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Put your plans in
motion. This is an opportune time to show others what
you have to offer. Make the best of any opportunity you
get to enhance your self-esteem.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

22

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

104Training
TERMS& CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

110Employment
ACCOuNTING-

CREDIT& COLLECTIONS/
AR:
Small HDPE Pipe Company. F/T,
Career Oriented person, MAS 90 helpful,
Great benefits. Experience preferred
but will train. Contact Sandra or Arlene
(415)467-4630
FINANCE
Help build the next generation of systems behind Facebook's products. Facebook, Inc. currently has the following
openings in Menlo Park, CA (various levels/types):
Principal, Auction and Delivery Science (6017N) Perform custom financial
and economic performance analysis and
share resulting insights with Product
teams and select advertisers. Mail resume to: Facebook, Inc. Attn: SB-GIM,
1 Hacker Way, Menlo Park, CA 94025.
Must reference job title & job# shown
above, when applying.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

110Employment

110Employment

110Employment

110Employment

110Employment

CAREGIvERS

CrystalCleaning
Center

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

BuSINESS

NEWSPAPERINTERNS
JOuRNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

HOMECARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

Help build the next generation of systems behind Facebook's products. Facebook, Inc. currently has the following
openings in Menlo Park, CA (various levels/types):
Technical Recruiter (3101N) Responsible for full-cycle recruiting process from
end-to-end ensuring a smooth & positive
candidate experience. Associate Manager(FP&A),Infrastructure&Network
(5901N) Responsible for Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) for Facebook’s
Infrastructure & Network department. Develop metric financial scorecards for capital expenditures & perform budget versus actual variance analysis. SalesOperations Associate (6497N) Develop
business strategies & focus on identifying trends in revenue performance (including drivers like product adoption &
organizational design), improve efficiency in recurring processes through automation, & undertake analyses to proactively identify short & long term growth
opportunities. AssetStrategy&Optimization (2935N) Apply advanced analytical techniques to help make better decisions & to solve problems. Provide independent analysis to achieve the optimal
value for Infrastructure costs. Strategic
Partner Development, Strategic Partnerships (4704N) Develop & manage
the communications & public relations
strategy, implementation & optimization
of Instagram’s strategic partnerships.
Mail resume to: Facebook, Inc. Attn:
SB-GIM, 1 Hacker Way, Menlo Park, CA
94025. Must reference job title & job#
shown above, when applying.

2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000

Wewillhelpyourecruitqualified,talented
individualstojoinyourcompanyororganization.
TheDailyJournal’sreadershipcoversawide
rangeofqualificationsforalltypesofpositions.
Forthebestvalueandthebestresults,
recruitfromtheDailyJournal...
Contactusforafreeconsultation

Call(650)344-5200or
Email:ads@smdailyjournal.com

Presser
Are you dependable and
looking for full-time employment
with benefits?

Callforanappointment:
650-342-6978

HOuSECLEANERS NEEDED
$12.25 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.
NEEDED- Cook/Caregiver; Bayview Assisted Living; San Carlos.
(650) 596-3489

NENABEAuTY
SALON
GRAND OPENING
523 LINDEN AVE
SO. SAN FRANCISCO
94080

NOWHIRING!

GOTJOBS?
Thebestcareerseekers
readtheDailyJournal.

SanMateo,CA

Licensed Stylists
and Barbers
4 seats available
Manicure and Pedicure
One Table Available

NOW HIRING:
t Room Attendants t Laundry Attendants
t Line/Banquet Cook t Banquet Set-Up
t Dishwasher t PBX Hotel Operator
t Bussers & Servers

***

(650)219-5163
(650)270-3151
(650)703-2626

TECHNOLOGY
Help build the next generation of systems behind Facebook's products. Facebook, Inc. currently has the following
openings in Menlo Park, CA (various levels/types):
Software Engineer (SWEB715N) Create web and/or mobile applications that
reach over one billion people & build high
volume servers to support our content.
Bachelor’s degree required. Exp. may be
required depending on level/type.
Software Engineer (SWEM715N) Create web and/or mobile applications that
reach over one billion people & build
high-volume servers to support our content, utilizing graduate level knowledge.
Master’s degree required. Exp. may be
required depending on level/type.
ProductDesigner(5902N)Design, prototype, & build new features for Facebook’s website or mobile applications.
Infrastructure
Strategy
Analyst
(4487N) Perform industry, market, & financial analysis related to the growth &

AM & PM Shifts Available
Employee Benefits Package

Call Michelle D. (650) 295-6141
1221 Chess Drive Foster City 94010

Home Care Attendants wanted in San Mateo County
Transportation preferred
Work one-on-one in the client's home
Competitive rates of pay

Call (650) 347-6903
or visit our employment page on our website

www.irishhelpathome.com
Director of Maintenance / Environmental Services needed for
busy, upscale Assisted Living Memory Care community. This position
ensures residents and families have a clean, comfortable, positive
overall experience from first visit to move-in to lifelong care.
Candidate TIPVMEIBWFt$BSFGVMBUUFOUJPOUPEFUBJMJOVQTDBMFFOWJSPONFOUTt"CJMJUZUPMFBEBOECVJMETUSPOH XFMMUSBJOFEBOEDPNQFOTBUFE
UFBNTt)JHIGVODUJPOJOH TFMGTUBSUFSNFOUBMJUZt*OOPWBUJWFBUUJUVEF
*EFBM DBOEJEBUF XJMM IBWF TVQFSWJTPSZ FYQFSJFODF BOE CF WFSTFE JO
building operations including commercial kitchen, laundry, resident
space, offices, and common areas.
The QPTJUJPO XJMM JODMVEF NBJOUBJOJOH BNFOJUJFT TVDI BT TDIFEVMFE
TZTUFN DIFDLT BOE VQLFFQ PG -JGF 4BGFUZ TZTUFNT  )7"$  FMFDUSPOJD
monitoring, electrical, plumbing, and mechanical systems.
Candidate must be able to respond to and resolve emergencies such
BTnPPEJOH QPXFSPVUBHFT FUD BOEDPPSEJOBUFBOE
other services as needed.
Must be a friendly, flexible team player, able to learn and teach, and love
XPSLJOHXJUITFOJPSTBOEFYUFOEFEGBNJMJFT#BDLHSPVOEJOIPTQJUBMJUZPS
IFBMUIDBSFJTQSFGFSSFECVUBTUBCMFXPSLIJTUPSZ HPPEDPNNVOJDBUJPO
TLJMMTXJUI&OHMJTInVFODZBSFFTTFOUJBM
&YDFMMFOUsalary depending on experience plus an exceptional training
QSPHSBNGPSOFXUFBNNFNCFSTBTXFMMBTBGVMMSBOHFPGCFOFmUTTVDI
as meals, generous paid time off, medical, dental, vision, disability,
life insurance, and more.
Kensington 1MBDFJTUIFOFXFTU NPTUJOOPWBUJWF"TTJTUFE-JWJOHDPNNVOJUZ
JO UIF #BZ"SFB  TQFDJmDBMMZ TFSWJOH UIPTF XJUI"M[IFJNFST BOE PUIFS
UZQFT PG EFNFOUJB &NBJM JobRC@KensingtonSL.com, fax 650-6491726, or visit 2800 El Camino Real, Redwood City for an application.

DRIvERS
WANTED
San Mateo Daily Journal
Newspaper Routes
Early mornings, six days per week,
Monday through Saturday
Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m.
and 4:30 a.m. 2 to 4 hour routes
available from South SF to Palo Alto and the Coast.
Pay dependent on route size.
Call 650-344-5200.

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL
110Employment

LEGALNOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

improvement of Facebook’s Infrastructure systems & computer applications.
Developer Support Engineer (2969N)
Interface with operations & engineering
teams to drive development & improvement of application tools & processes.
ProgramManager,Education (2285N)
Play a key role in recruiting & building
strategic relationships with relevant educators & education communities both internally at Facebook & externally at
school campuses & within education
groups. Data Engineer, Analytics
(4219N)Responsible for data warehouse
plans for a product or a group of products. Design, build, & launch new data
models in production & new data extraction, transformation & loading processes
in production. Research Scientist
(3117N) Research, design, & develop
new optimization algorithms & techniques to improve the efficiency & performance of Facebook’s platforms. DataEngineer (4566N) Design, develop, test &
launch new reports & dashboards into
production, & provide support to reports
& dashboards running in production. DataScientist(830N)Apply your expertise
in quantitative analysis, data mining, &
the presentation of data to see beyond
the numbers & understand how our
users interact with our core products.
Production Engineer (3425N) Participate in the design, implementation & ongoing management of major site applications & subsystems. Operations Analyst, Small & Medium Business
(5703N) Define, measure, and report
strategic goals and top operational KPIs.
Mail resume to: Facebook, Inc. Attn:
SB-GIM, 1 Hacker Way, Menlo Park, CA
94025. Must reference job title & job#
shown above, when applying.

210Lost&Found
FOuND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOuND:RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
FOuND: WEDDING BAND Tuesday
September 8th Near Whole Foods, Hillsdale. Pls call to identify. 415.860.1940
LOST - Apple Ipad, Sunday 5.3 on Caltrain #426, between Burlingame and
Redwood City, south bound. REWARD.
(415)830-0012
LOST-MYCOLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

OvertheHedge

OvertheHedge

OvertheHedge

23

210Lost&Found

Books

296Appliances

LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.

MAGAzINES. SIx “Arizona Highways”
magazines from 1974 and 1975. Very
good condition. $15. 650-794-0839.

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763

NICHOLASSPARKS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

ICE MAKER brand new $90. (415)2653395

STEPHENKING Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

JACK LALANE juicer $25 or best offer.
650-593-0893.

LOST DOG, 14 year old Bichon, white
and Fluffy. Reward $500 cash. Her name
is Pumpkin. Lost in Redwood City.
(650) 281-4331.
LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061
LOST SMALL gray and green Parrot.
Redwood Shores. (650)207-2303.

Books
11/22/63. 4-BOOK collection on the assassination of JFK. 650-794-0839. San
Bruno. $30.
16BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
FREE30 volume 1999 Americana Encyclopedia. Excellent condition Call 650349-2945 to pick up.

294BabyStuff
GRACO 3 way pack n play for kid in
good condition $20. Daly City (650) 7569516.
GRACO DOuBLE Stroll $90 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.
SIT AND Stand Stroll $95 My Cell 650537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.

295Art
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

296Appliances
AIR CONDITIONER 10000 BTU w/remote. Slider model fits all windows. LG
brand $199 runs like new. (650)2350898

KIRBY MODEL G7D vacuum with accessories and a supply of HEPA bags.
$150 obo. 650-465-2344
PORTABLE AIR conditioner by windchaser 9000 btu s cools 5,600 ft easily
$90 obo (650)591-6842
RIvAL 11/2 quart ice cream maker
(New) $20.(650)756-9516.
SHARK FLOOR steamer,exc condition
$45 (650) 756-9516.
uPRIGHT vACuuM Cleane, $10. Call
Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco

297Bicycles
2 BIKES for kids $60.My Cell 650-5371095. Will email pictures upon request.
MAGNA-GLACIERPOINT26" 15 speed.
Hardly used . Bluish purple color .$ 59.00
San Mateo 650-255-3514.

298Collectibles
1920'S AquA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

Exciting Opportunities at

1940 vINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
BASEBALLCARDS #1-535 1999 Upper
Deck, mint complete set. $40 OBO.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-518-6614.

Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply.

BELT BuCKLE-MICKEY Mouse 1937
Marked Sterling. Sun Rubber company.
$300 (650) 355-2167.

CANDY MAKER TRAINING PROGRAM – Starting Rate: $15.00/hr

CHERISHED TEDDIES Figurines. Over
90 figurines, 1992-1999 (mostly '93-'95).
Mint in Boxes. $99. (408) 506-7691

t 2VJDLSBUFQSPHSFTTJPOCBTFEPOBUUFOEBODFBOEQFSGPSNBODF
t 2VBMJmDBUJPOTJODMVEF CVUOPUMJNJUFEUP'PMMPXJOHGPSNVMBT TUBOEJOH  
XBMLJOH CFOEJOH UXJTUJOHBOEMJGUJOHMCTGSFRVFOUMZ

SEASONAL OPPORTUNITIES
UTILITY – Starting Rate: $12.50/hr
t "TTJTUJOUIFNBOVGBDUVSJOHQBDLJOHPGDBOEZJO1SPEVDUJPOBOE1BDLJOH

26"-*5:"4463"/$&*/41&$503o4UBSUJOH3BUFIS
t $IFDLUIFXFJHIU BQQFBSBODFBOEPWFSBMMRVBMJUZPGUIFQSPEVDUBUWBSJPVTTUPQTPG 
UIFNBOVGBDUVSJOHQSPDFTT.VTUQBTTXSJUUFOUFTU

PRODUCTION SPECIALIST – Starting Rate: $13.50/hr
t "TTJTUXJUIDBOEZQSPEVDUJPO

SANITATION – Starting Rate: $13.50/hr
t (FOFSBMDMFBOJOHPGQMBOU PGmDFT XBSFIPVTFCVJMEJOHTBOEHSPVOETUPNBJOUBJO 
TBOJUBSZDPOEJUJPOTJOBDDPSEBODFXJUI(PPE'PPE.BOVGBDUVSJOH1SBDUJDFT

MACHINE OPERATOR – Starting Rate: $13.50/hr
t 0QFSBUFBOENBJOUBJOBMMLJUDIFONBDIJOFSZPSXSBQQJOHFRVJQNFOU

SHIPPING – Starting Rate: $14.00/hr
t 'JMMPSEFSTGPSQSPEVDUBOEPSNBUFSJBMTTVQQMJFEUPUIFNBOVGBDUVSJOHEFQUTBOESFUBJM 
TIPQT FOTVSJOHPSEFSTBSFQSPQFSMZmMMFE XFJHIFEBOEJEFOUJmFEXJUITIJQQJOH 
JOGPSNBUJPO.VTUQBTTBXSJUUFOUFTU

Requirements for all positions include:
t
t
t
t
t 

"QQMJDBOUTNVTUCFBWBJMBCMFUPXPSLEBZBOEPSOJHIUTIJGUBOEPWFSUJNF
.VTUCFBCMFUPSFBE TQFBLBOEXSJUF&OHMJTI
1PTJUJPOTBWBJMBCMFJO4PVUI4BO'SBODJTDPPS%BMZ$JUZ
1SFWJPVTFYQFSJFODFJONBOVGBDUVSJOHQSFGFSSFE
"CMFUPQFSGPSNUIFFTTFOUJBMGVODUJPOTPGUIFKPC JODMVEJOHMJGUJOHMCT
GSFRVFOUMZ EFQFOEJOHPOQPTJUJPO

Apply at 210 El Camino Real, So. San Francisco, Monday-Friday, 8:30 am – 3:30 pm,
at the Guard Station on Spruce Street, Rear Parking Lot. EOE

ELvISSPEAKS To You, 78 RPM, Rainbow Records(1956), good condition,$20
,650-591-9769 San Carlos
MONOPOLY GAME, 1930's, $20, 650591-9769 San Carlos

24

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

298Collectibles

302Antiques

303Electronics

304Furniture

310Misc.ForSale

316Clothes

GEOFFREYBEENE Jacket, unused, unworn, tags , pink, small, sleeveless, zippers, paid $88, $15, (650) 578-9208

BEAuTIFuL AND uNIquE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. ExCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

OPTIMuS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

8 TRACKS, billy Joel, Zeppelin, Eagles
,Commodores, more.40 @ $4 each , call
650-393-9908

LENNOx RED Rose, Unused, hand
painted, porcelain, authenticity papers,
$12.00. (650) 578 9208.

HAND DRILLS and several bits & old
hand plane. $40. (650)596-0513

PIONEER HOuSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198

TEAK-vENEER COMPuTER desk with
single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344

SuNGLASSSES uNISEx TOMS Lobamba S007 w/ Tortoise Frames. Polarized lenses 100% UVA/UVB NEW
$65.(650)591-6596

GAME "BEAT THE ExPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858

NuTCRACKERS1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260

MAHOGANY ANTIquE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

PORTABLE AC/DC Altec Lansing
speaker system for IPods/audio sources.
Great for travel. $15. 650-654-9252

Tv STAND in great condition. 3'x 20"x
18", light grey. $20. (650)366-8168

HARLEY DAvIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720

uPHOLSTERED BROWN recliner , excellent condition. $99. (650)347-6875

INCuBATOR,$99, (650)678-5133

vEST,BROWN Leather , Size 42 Regular, Like New, $25 (650) 875-1708

LIONELENGINE #221 ‘Rio Grande diesel, runs good ex-condition
$90.
(650)867-7433

vINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260
RENO SILvER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

OLD COFFEE grinder with glass jar.
$40. (650)596-0513
OLD vINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

SONYDHG-HDD250 DVR and programable remote.
Record OTA. Clock set issues $99 650595-8855
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

304Furniture

299Computers

303Electronics

ANTIquE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324

DELL LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

46” MITSuBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

RECORDABLECD-R 74, Sealed, Unopened, original packaging, Samsung, 12X,
(650) 578 9208

300Toys
$16 OBO. Star Wars action figures, all
four Battle Droids mint unopened. Steve,
650-518-6614.
3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142
AMERICAN GIRL 18” doll, “Jessica”,
blond/blue. new in box, $65 (505)-2281480 local.
STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg
THOMASTRAINS, over 20 trains, lots of
track, water tower, bridge, tunnel.
$80/OBO. (650)345-1347
THOMAS/BRIO TRAIN table, $30/OBO.
Phone (650)345-1347

302Antiques
ANTIquE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

ANTIquEMAHOGONY double bed with
adjustable steelframe $225.00. OBO.
(650)592-4529
ANTIquE MOHAGANY Bookcase. Four
feet tall. $75. (415) 282-0966.
BEIGE SOFA $99. Excellent Condition
(650) 315-2319

DvD/CD Player remote never used in
box $45. (650)992-4544

BRASS / METAL ETAGERE 6.5 ft tall.
Rugs, Pictures, Mirrors. Four shelf. $200.
(650) 343-0631

ELECTRONICTYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542

BROWNRECLINER,$75 Excellent Condition. (650) 315-2319

HOME THEATER system receiver KLH"
DVD/CD Player remote 6 spks. ex/con
$70. (650)992-4544

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

JvCEvERIO Camcorder, new in box
user guide accessories. $95/best offer.
(650)520-7045
KENWOOD STEREO receiver deck,with
CD Player rermote 4 spks. exc/con. $55.
(650)992-4544
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA BRAvO MB 520 (android
4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855
ONKYO Av Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393

NOTICEOF INTENTTOADOPT
ANINITIALSTuDY/MITIGATEDNEGATIvEDECLARATION
Notice is hereby given that the City of San Bruno has prepared
an Initial Study and intends to adopt a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) for the San Francisco Police Credit Union New
Administration Building Project.
ProjectDescription: The San Francisco Police Credit Union
New Administrating Building Project includes the construction
of a three-story, 67,586-square-foot (sf) office building, with a
two-level subsurface parking on a 1.7-acre site located at 1250
Grundy Lane, San Bruno, California. The office building would
serve as the San Francisco Police Credit Union new administration building and would include a large reception area, work
stations, meeting rooms, a small retail credit union branch, a
staff lounge, a training room, a break room, and 16,560 sf of
future office expansion or lease space.
A total of 168 parking spaces would be included in the two-level subsurface parking garage – 82 on the upper level and 86
on the lower level. In addition, the proposed project includes 47
spaces of surface level parking. The project is anticipated to
accommodate the current staff of the existing SFPCU, as well
as future employees in relation to future growth in the next ten
years. The total number of employees expected at full capacity
would be approximately 210. The environmental analysis contained in this IS/MND is based on the maximum employment
projection of 210 employees. The necessary entitlements being considered by the City of San Bruno include a Planned Development (P-D) Amendment, Planned Development Permit,
and an Architectural Review Permit.
Public Review Period:  Notice is hereby given that a Draft
MND has been prepared in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The City, as lead agency, has
elected to provide a 30-day public review period for the MND
beginning on Tuesday, November 24, 2015 and ending on
Wednesday, December 23, 2015 pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15105. The Draft MND and supporting documents are available for public review at the City Clerk’s Office,
as well as the Community Development Department, located at
567 El Camino Real, San Bruno, CA 94066. An electronic copy
of the MND is available for viewing at the following website address:
https://sanbruno.ca.gov/gov/city_departments/commdev/planning_division/current_planning/development_activity/1250_gru
ndy_lane.htm
It should be noted that the project site is not listed on any of
the lists of sites enumerated under Section 65962.5 of the
Government Code including, but not limited to lists of hazardous waste facilities, land designated as hazardous waste property, and hazardous waste disposal sites.
Written comments on the Draft MND will be accepted during
the 30-day public review period commencing November 24,
2015 and ending December 23, 2015 at 5:00 PM. Written comments on the Draft MND should be directed to:
Matt Neuebaumer, Associate Planner
City of San Bruno
Community Development Department
567 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA 94066-4247
Comments may also be sent by email to
mneuebaumer@sanbruno.ca.gov.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, November 23, 2015.

WALNuT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITEBOOKCASE :H 72" x W 30" x D
12" exc condition $30. (650)756-9516.

PAIR OF beautiful candalabras . Marble
and brass. $90. (650)697-7862

BAzOOKA SPEAKER Bass tube 20
longx10 wide round never used in box
$75.0 (650)992-4544

vINTAGE LARGE Marble Coffee Table,
round. $75.(650)458-8280

CHILD’STABLE (Fisher Price) and Two
Chairs. Like New. $35. (650) 574-7743.
COFFEETABLE @ end table Very nice
condition $80. 650 697 7862
COMPuTERDESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
COMPuTER SWIvEL CHAIR. Padded
Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409
CuSTOM MADE wood sewing storage
cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)4831222
DINETTETABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DININGROOM table – Good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193
DINING/CONF.TABLE top. Clear glass
apprx. 54”x36”x3/8”. Beveled edges &
corners. $50. 650-348-5718”
DRuM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

WHITE WICKER Shelf unit, adjustable.
Excellent condition. 5 ft by 2 ft. $50.
(650)315-6184
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65. (650)504-6058
WOODFuRNITuRE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
WOOD WALL unit, 7 upper and lower
cabinets, 90" wide x 72" high. $99.
(650)347-6875
WOODEN MINI bar with 2 bar stools
$75. (415)265-3395

306Housewares
PRE-LIT7 ft Christmas tree. Three sections, easy to assemble. $50. 650 349
2963.

TABLECLOTH,uNuSED in original box,
Royal Blue and white 47x47, great gift,
$10.00, (650) 578-9208.

307Jewelry&Clothing
DANISHWATCH, ultra thin elegant, lifetime warranty, $59, 650-595-3933

308Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CHIPPER/SHREDDER 4.5 horsepower,
Craftsman $150 OBO. (650) 349-2963

FuLL SIzED mattress with metal type
frame $35. (650)580-6324

COMMERCIAL PADDLE CONCRETE
MIXER, Electric Driven. $875. (650) 3336275.

LOvE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MAPLECOFFEE table. Excellent Condition $75.00 (650)593-1780
MAPLE LAMP table with tiffany shade
$95.00 (650)593-1780

CRAFTMANRADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
DEWALT DRILL/FLASHLIGHT Set $99
My Cell 650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.

MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.

HEAvYDuTY Mattock/Pick, Less Handle $5. (650)368-0748

OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429

SHOPSMITHMARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585

OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OAK WINE CABINET, beautiful, glass
front, 18” x 25” x 48” 5 shelves, grooved
for bottles. 25-bottle capacity. $299.
(360)624-1898
OuTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061

vASEWITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
vINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167

311MusicalInstruments
ALvAREz ACOuSTICAL guitar with
tuning device - excellent to learn on, like
new $95. 925-784-1447
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598

HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

COMMERCIAL PADDLE CONCRETE
MIXER, Motor Driven. $1,350. (650) 3336275.

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038

uLTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

FREE 2 piece china cabinet. Pecan finish. Located in SSF. I'll email picture.
650-243-1461

INFINITY FLOOR speakers H 38" x W
11 1/2" x D 10" good $50. (650)756-9516

TASCO LuMINOvA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. Good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393

HAILuNPIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296

CLICKERTORquE Wrench, 20-150 lbs,
1/2", new, $25, 650-595-3933

GLASS TOP dining table w/ 6 chairs
$75. (415)265-3395

STARTREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167

SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260

ESPRESSOTABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021

FuTONCOuCH into double bed, linens
D41"xW60"xH34" 415-509-8000 $99

SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709

PuLLEYS-FOuR 2-1/8 to 7 1/4" --all for
$16. 650 341-8342

vINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517
WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.
WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

RECLINING SWIvEL chair almost new
$99 650-766-4858

WIzARD STAINED Glass Grinder, extra
bit, good condition, shield included,
$50. Jack @348-6310

ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762

310Misc.ForSale

TABLE,HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141

"MOTHER-IN-LAW TONGuES" plants,
3 in 5-gal cans. $10.00 each. 650/5937408.

LOSTCOCKATIEL

“JERRY”
Grey and white; very tame and friendly.
Lost in Millbrae Highlands Area.

REWARD
if found

(650)302-4102

vELvET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622

317BuildingMaterials
32PAvING/EDGING bricks, 12” x 5”x1”
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno
CuLTuRED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041
ExTERIORBRASS lanterns 20" 2 NEW,
both $30. (650)574-4439
INTERIORDOORS, 8, free.
call 573-7381.
SHuTTERS 2 wooden shutters 32x72
like new $50.00 ea.call 650 368-7891
WHITE DOuBLE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.
WOODENSHuTTERS 12x36" Six available. $20. (650)574-4439

318SportsEquipment
ATOMIC SKI bag -- 215 cm. Lightly
used, great condition. $15. (650) 5730556.
BuCKTACTICAL folding knife, Masonic
logo, NEW $19, 650-595-3933
DELuxEOvER the door chin up bar; excellent shape; $10; 650-591-9769 San
Carlos
G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$10. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.

KIMBALL MAHOGANY Baby Grand
Piano, Bench and Sheet Music. $1,100.
(650)341-2271

GOLF BALLS-15 dozen. All Brands: Titeslist, Taylor Made, Callaway. $5 per
dozen. (650)345-3840.

MONARCHuPRIGHT player piano $99
(650) 583-4549

GOLF CLuBS, 2 sets of $30 & $60.
(415)265-3395

uPRIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.
WuRLITzER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAHAPIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

312Pets&Animals
AIRLINE CARRIER for cats, pur. from
Southwest Airlines, $25, 2 available. Call
(505-228-1480) local.
BAMBOOBIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
FRENCH BuLLDOG puppies. Many
colors.
AKC Registration. Call
(415)596-0538.
ONE KENNEL Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084

GOLFCLuBS, 4-9 irons, oversize driver,
metal 3, putter, bag; nice; $20; San Carlos (650)591-9769
IN-GROuNDBASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
LADIESMCGREGOR Golf Clubs
Right handed with covers and pull cart
$150 o.b.o. (650)344-3104
LEAD FOR fishing sinkers: cleaned,
cast in small ingots, 20# for $12.00
(650)591-4553, days only.
NEWAB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260
POWER PLuS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

SOCCERBALLS - $8.00 each (like new)
4 available. (650)341-5347
TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804
TWO SETS of 10lb barbell weights @
$10 each set. (650)593-0893
vINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

PETCARRIER, brown ,Very good condition, $15.00 medium zize leave txt or call
650 773-7201

vINTAGE GOLF Set for $75 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.

315WantedtoBuy

WETSuIT-medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878

WEBuY

WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

335Rugs

MillbraeJewelers
Est.1957

CARPET RUNNER, new, 30 inches,
bound on both sides, burgundy color, 30
lineal feet, $290. Call (650)579-0933.

400Broadway-Millbrae

650-697-2685

345MedicalEquipment

316Clothes

ADuLT DIAPERS, disposable, 10 bags,
20 diapers per bag, $10 each. (650)3420935

BLACK LEATHER belt, wide, non-slip,
43" middle hole, $2, 650-595-3933
LEATHER JACKET, New Black Italian
style, size M Ladies $45 (650) 875-1708
LEATHER JACKET, New Dark Brown ,
Italian style, Size L $49 (650) 875-1708
PARIS HILTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648

BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.
BATHTRANSFER bench, back rest and
side arm, suction cups for the floor.
$75/obo. (650)757-0149
quICKIE WHEELCHAIR - Removable
arms for transferring standard size.
$350.00. (650) 345-3017

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL
345MedicalEquipment
TRAvELWHEEL chair Light weight travel w/carrying case. $300. (650)596-0513

380RealEstateServices

620Automobiles

HOMES&PROPERTIES

Don’tlosemoney
onatrade-inor
consignment!

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.

GarageSales

GARAGESALES
ESTATESALES

Look for it
everyFridayandWeekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.

Sellyourvehicleinthe
DailyJournal’s
AutoClassifieds.

Makemoney,makeroom!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

620Automobiles

OPENHOuSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

Reach76,500drivers
fromSouthSFto
PaloAlto
Call(650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

‘08SAAB 250 HP, 4 Cylinder, 95-AERO
80,040 miles, Arctic Blue, 4 Door, $5,500
(415) 528-9402

Complete Repair& Service
$29.75 plus certificate & fee
869 California Drive .
Burlingame

379OpenHouses

Call(650)344-5200

HIPHOuSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

AASMOG

Call(650)344-5200

Just$42!
We’llrunit
‘tilyousellit!

470Rooms

(650)340-0492
FORD ‘98 Mustang. GT Convertible.
Summer fun car. Green, Tan, Leather interior, Excellent Condition. 128,000
Miles. $3700. (650) 440-4697.
CHEvY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.

DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$4,200 OBO (650)481-5296

625ClassicCars

640Motorcycles/Scooters
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

670AutoService
MENLOATHERTON
AuTOREPAIR
WE SMOG ALL CARS
1279 El Camino Real

Menlo Park

650-273-5120
www.MenloAthertonAutoRepair

670AutoParts
BRIDGESTONE TuRANzA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL42 used 70% left $80.
(650)483-1222
BRIDGESTONE TuRANzA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL 42 All Season Like
New $100. (650)483-1222
NEvER
MOuNTED
new Metzeler
120/70ZR-18 tire $50, 650-595-3933

FORD ‘63 thunderbird Hardtop, 390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,400. /OBO (650)364-1374

NEW CONTINENTAL Temporary tire
mounted on 5 lug rim Size T125/70/R1798M $100. (650)483-1222

630Trucks&Suv’s

SET OF cable chains for 14-17in tires
$20 650-766-4858

DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298
TOYOTA97FOuRRuNNER white clean
$4700 obo. (650)342-6342

640Motorcycles/Scooters

NISSAN ‘02 Altima, 3.5 litre V.6, one
owner. Passed smog, Fully loaded,
$3,800 (650) 573-1050

BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003

CADILLAC ‘01 Deville, like new, 148K
miles, 1 owner, $4,290. (650)342-6342

DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $55 (650)357-7484

SHOPMANuALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680AutosWanted
Wanted62-75Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

CHEvY ‘10 HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

ACROSS
1 Popeye’s
nemesis
6 Electrolux, briefly
9 Nos. on beach
lotion labels
13 Pachelbel
composition
14 Tel Aviv’s
country: Abbr.
15 Opera highlight
16 Small thicket
17 Online
matchmaker
19 “Look before
you __”
21 School course
with slides
22 =
25 Lawyer’s charge
26 Carry with effort
27 Partner of hither
28 For the lady
29 Inlaid designs
32 Apple music
players
34 “U Can’t Touch
This” rapper
36 Web destinations
38 Worded
42 They’re usually
divided into
scenes
43 Wisecracking
West
44 MLB’s Indians,
on scoreboards
45 __ Vegas
46 Looked ready to
fight
50 Obscure from
view, as in an
eclipse
52 Continually
53 See 42-Down
55 Vacant
58 San __: Riviera
resort
59 Ambient music
pioneer Brian
60 Bete __
61 Tijuana three
62 Athletic center
63 Pig’s sniffer
DOWN
1 Secretly keep in
the email loop,
for short
2 Philosopher __tzu

3 Disconnects from
the outlet
4 Where sailors go
5 Ryan or Tatum
6 Compete
7 Hearth
receptacle
8 Online guy with a
list
9 O.T. prophet
10 Reviewed for
errors
11 Piano players?
12 Make a proposer
smile
18 Director Howard
20 Gives a pep talk,
with “up”
22 Stately tree
23 Status __
24 Slugger Sammy
28 Bar mitzvah
dance
30 Bill totals: Abbr.
31 Cocktail rocks
32 Announcement
upon arrival
33 For each
35 Movie-rating org.
36 Like large
reptiles,
compared to
smaller ones

37 “My treat”
39 Many a
November birth,
to astrologers
40 Helper for Santa
41 Dict. entry
42 With 53-Across,
physics Nobelist
who devised the
formula that
begins 17-, 22-,
34- and 46Across

43 Problem on the
Caine
46 Drunkard
47 Captain of the
Caine
48 Coin toss call
49 Exorcism target
51 General __
chicken
54 __ de plume
56 Capote
nickname
57 To this point

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

Cleaning

ANGIE’SCLEANING&
POWERWASHING
Move in/out; Post Construction;
Commercial & Residential;
Carpet Cleaning; Powerwashing

650.918.0354
www.MyErrandServicesCA.com

xwordeditor@aol.com

11/23/15

Concrete
Construction

AAACONCRETE DESIGN
Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates
By Clement McKay
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

11/23/15

(650)533-0187
Lic# 947476

O’SuLLIvAN
CONSTRuCTION
• New Construction
• Remodeling
• Kitchen/Bathrooms
• Decks/Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596

25

26

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Decks&Fences

Housecleaning

Hauling

MARSHFENCE
&DECKCO.

TIDYCLEANERS

CHEAP
HAuLING!

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Callforfreeestimate
(650)571-1500

Services Included:
General House Cleaning,
Move In/Out, Window Washing.
20 + Experinece/Free Estimates
Please Call:
Donna (650)839-3768,
Maria (650)361-1135;
Cell (650)815-1635

Hauling

Plumbing
MEYERPLuMBING SuPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030SDelawareSt
SanMateo
650-350-1960

Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

Patchwork, Texture, Matching,
Water Damage, Wall Paper Removal, Small Jobs.

(650)248-4205

• Fences • Tree Trimming
• Decks • Concrete Work
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling

ALLELECTRICAL
SERvICE

Removal
Grinding

Free
Estimates

FreeEstimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Free Estimates

Pruning

• Stump

Mention

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers

DISCOuNTHANDYMAN
&PLuMBING

Electricians

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000

• Large

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

Free Est. Lic/Bd/Ins.

Service

• Shaping

CONTRERASHANDYMAN
SERvICES

Drywall/Plaster

Hillside Tree

• Trimming

HandyHelp
Drywall

TreeService

Call Luis (650) 704-9635
WindowWashing

HvAC

(650)296-0568

650-322-9288

Free Estimates

Lic.#834170

for all your electrical needs

SENIORHANDYMAN

ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

“Specializing in any size project”

• Painting • Electrical
• Carpentry • Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience

Gardening

650-201-6854

CALLNOWFOR
FALLLAWN
PREPARATION
Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

THEvILLAGE
CONTRACTOR

CallRobert
STERLINGGARDENS
650-703-3831Lic#751832

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting

REED
ROOFERS
Serving the entire Bay Area
Residential & Commercial

Licensed General and
Painting Contractor

Landscaping

Lic#979435

(650)701-6072
Flooring
Hauling

SPECIALS
AS LOWAS$2.50/sf.

AAARATED!

Mention this ad for
FreeDelivery

INDEPENDENT
HAuLERS

See website for more info.

kaprizhardwoodfloors.com

650-560-8119

$40&uP
HAuL

Housecleaning

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

CONSuELOSHOuSE
CLEANING

FreeEstimates

Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

(650)219-4066

AUTUMN LAWN

PREPARATION!
Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

Painting

(650)341-7482

CRAIG’SPAINTING
Residential & Commercial
Interior & Exterior

CHAINEYHAuLING

(650)553-9653

A+BBBRating

FreeEstimates,15%offFirstvisit
Lic#1211534

10-year guarantee
craigspainting.com

FreeEstimates

PENINSuLA
CLEANING

Junk&DebrisCleanup

Lic#857741

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

bondEd
FREEESTIMATES

Roofing

Retired Licensed Contractor

1-800-344-7771

Startingat$40 &up
www.chaineyhauling.com
FreeEstimates
(650)207-6592

ADvERTISE
YOuR SERvICE
inthe
HOME&GARDENSECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!

Call(650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

JONLA MOTTE

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

NICKMEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564

SuNNYBAY PAINTINGCO.

Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior
Water Damage, Fences,
Decks, Stain Work
FreeEstimates
CALic982576
(415)828-9484

License #931457

Notices

(650)591-8291

NOTICETO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

CallforFreeEstimate

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

27

Attorneys

DentalServices

Food

Health&Medical

Insurance

MassageTherapy

LawOfficeofJasonHonaker

Do you want a White,brighter
Smile?

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13

Safe, Painless, Long Lasting

NOTHINGBuNDTCAKES
MakeLifeSweeter

BACK,LEG PAIN OR
NuMBNESS?

LIFEINSuRANCE
America's Lowest Cost!

L & R WELLNESS
CENTER

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

(510)282.2466

Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
LawOfficeofJasonHonaker

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com

MauiWhitening
650.508.8669
1217 Laurel St., San Carlos
(Between Greenwood & Howard)
www.mauiwhitening.com

I- SMILE
Implant & Orthodontict Center
1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain View

Exceptional.
Reliable.Inovative
650-282-5555

MILLBRAESMILE CENTER

valeriedeLeon,DDS
Cemetery

Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY

(650)697-9000

Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing

$5CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

*864 Laurel Street, San Carlos

650.592.1600

*140 So. El Camino Real, Millbrae

650.552.9625

PANCHOvILLA
TAquERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com

THECAKERY
AtouchofEurope
1308 Burlingame Ave
Burlingame
650 344-1006
www.burlingamecakery.com
Find us on Facebook

Financial
RuSSODENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

uNITEDAMERICANBANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

www.russodentalcare.com

Call(650)579-1500
for simply better banking

Food

unitedamericanbank.com

BRuNCHEvERY
SuNDAY

Houlihans

CROWNEPLAzA
FosterCity-SanMateo

(650)771-6564

TheClubhouseBistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

DentalServices

1221 Chess Drive Foster City

(650)295-6123

Save$500on
ImplantAbutment&
CrownPackage.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

EYEExAMINATIONS

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

KAY'SHEALTH
&BEAuTY
Facials • Waxing • Fitness
Body Fat Reduction

381ElCaminoReal
Millbrae

LOSEWEIGHT

(650)697-6868

InJust10Weeks!
with the ultimate body shaping course
contact us today.

(650)490-4414
www.SanBrunoMartialArts.com

Furniture

Cosmetic Spa Cool Sculpting
Laser&Cosmetic Dermatology
1838 El Camino Rl#130
Burlingame. 650 542-7055
www.skintasticmedicalspa.com

Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

COMPLETEIMPLANT
DentistryunderOneRoof
Same day treatment
Evening & Saturday appts available
Peninsula Dental Implant Center
1201 St Francisco Way, San Carlos
650.232.7650

GETHAPPY!
HappyHour4-6•M-F
SteelheadBrewingCo.
333CaliforniaDr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com

Open 7 days 10am - 9pm
Free parking behind bldg

LegalServices

Music

LEGAL

Music Lessons
Sales • Repairs • Rentals

DOCuMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
JeriBlatt,LDA#11
Registered & Bonded

(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

GROW
YOuR SMALLBuSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com

MassageTherapy

BESTASIANBODY
MASSAGE

$35/hrFirsttimevisitors
$39.99/hrCurrentClients

BedroomExpress
WhereDreamsBegin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

SLEEPAPNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
MillbraeDental
Insurance

AFFORDABLE
HEALTHINSuRANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net

Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Bronstein Music
363 Grand Ave, So. San Francisco

(650)588-2502
bronsteinmusic.com
RealEstateLoans
REAL ESTATELOANS
WeFundBankTurndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
AllCreditAccepted
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

650-348-7191

Sign up for the free newsletter

SKINTASTIC
MEDICAL LASER

(650)557-2286

Lic #OJ11250

Marketing

Fitness

Omelette Station, Carving Station
$24.95 / adult $9.95 /Child
&HolidayInnSFOAirport
275 So Airport blvd.
South San Francisco

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

Larry Hutcherson
Belmont, CA

Relaxing & healing massage
$50 per hour
39 N. San Mateo Dr. #1, San Mateo

HomeCareAssistance
HealthCareConsultant

(650)692-1989
1838ElCamino#103,Burlingame

WachterInvestments,Inc.
Real Estate Broker
CA Bureau of Real Estate#746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268

Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hourAssistedLivingCare
locatedinBurlingame
MillsEstatevilla
Burlingamevilla
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

TaxPreparation

IRSTAx
PROBLEM?
Call:
TrustTheTaxPros

(650)349-4492
FuLLBODY MASSAGE

$48

Travel

BelbienDaySpa

FIGONETRAvEL
GROuP

1204 West Hillsdale Blvd.
SAN MATEO
(650)403-1400

GRAND
OPENING
Asian Massage
$5 OFF W/THIS AD
(650)556-9888
633 Veterans Blvd #C
Redwood City

(650)595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

HOLIDAYRATES
NOWAvAILABLE
Luxury SUV / Town Car
Napa Sonoma Wine Tours
Door to Door pick up
Bay Area
650-834-2011Nick

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday • Nov. 23, 2015

Chronic Neck or Back Pain?
Disc Restoration Therapy May Be Your Answer
Bay Area Disc Centers has helped thousand of patients
suffering from chronic neck and lower back pain due to
Bulging/Herniated Discs
Degenerative Disc Disease
Sciatica
Spinal Stenosis
Facet Arthrosis

The Solution
The DRT Method
(Disc Restoration Therapy)
The DRT Method is a non-invasive 5 Step “S.P.I.N.E”
approach to healing & restoring function to bulging
and degenerative discs.

Spinal Decompression
Physiotherapy
Inter-Segmental Mobilization
Nutritional Support
Exercise Rehabilitation
The DRT Method allows for a much higher success rate by
increasing hydration and restoring health to your discs.
This results in a more effective and lasting solution to your
pain. There are no side effects and no recovery time is
required. This gentle and relaxing treatment has proven to
be effective…even when drugs, epidurals, traditional chiropractic,
physical therapy and surgery have failed…Disc Restoration Therapy
has shown dramatic results.

Why Bay Area Disc
Centers?
Dr. Thomas Ferringo DC and his team have vast
experience in treating patients suffering from
moderate to severe disc disease.
Dr. Thomas Ferringo DC and all the doctors at Bay Area Disc
Centers are Nationally Certified in spinal decompression
and have gone through extensive training that follow the
protocols set up by The International Medical Advisory Board on
Spinal Decompression.

Stop Waiting
Get Relief Today!
“If you suffer from sciatica, severe back or neck pain, you can find
relief! If you are serious about getting your life back and eliminating
your back and neck pain, my staff and I are serious about helping you
and providing how our technology and experience can help.

CALL NOW
and receive FREE
1. Consultation with Dr. Thomas Ferrigno
2. Complete Spinal Evaluation
3. MRI/X-Ray Review
4. Report of Findings

Dr.Thomas Ferrigno, D.C.
Member, DCOA Disc Centers of America
t:FBST&YQFSJFODF
t/BUJPOBMMZ$FSUJmFEJO4QJOBM%FDPNQSFTTJPO
t0WFS %FDPNQSFTTJPO5SFBUNFOUT1FSGPSNFE
%JTDMBJNFST%VFUP'FEFSBM-BX TPNFFYDMVTJPOTNBZBQQMZ

Campbell:
855-240-3472

Palo Alto:
855-322-3472

San Mateo:
650-231-4754

www.BayAreaBackPain.com
Space Is Limited To The First 30 Callers! Call Today To ScheduleYour Consultation

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