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CULTIVATING CREATIVITY:

Student
Growth in
the Arts
Susan M. Riley

www.educationcloset.com

Copyright

Susan M. Riley
The purchase of this resource entitles the buyer to reproduce tables,
templates and informational pages for classroom and reference use only, not
for commercial resale. Reproduction of these materials for an entire school,
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reproduced (except as noted above) without the prior written permission of
the author.
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Student Learning Objectives in the Arts

Measuring
Growth
An inherent goal of learning is to grow: in our
knowledge, skills, and deep understandings. The
arts are a natural conduit to growth. In this section,
well focus on the definitions of Student Growth
Measures and Student Learning Objectives and
where we fit as arts educators in this process.

Defining the Process

Growth by any other name


KEY TERMS
1. Growth: a measurable change in a
students or group of students knowledge
or skills between two or more points in
time.
2. SLO (Student Learning Objective): An
academic target based on student
performance over a specific period of time.
3. Target: Specific, measureable goal for
students that is grounded in an analysis of
relevant data.
4. Assessments: Rigorous, comparable
sources of evidence that authentically
measure student capacity in an identified
area.

What are SLOs?


Formalized process to document student
growth.
An opportunity for teachers to select the
students and the content of focus.
Encourages intentional conversation and
collaboration to move students forward.
Refines the instructional practice to ensure

alignment to standards and assessment.


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The SLO Timeline


Data Collection
(preassessment)
and Review (25%

Implement
the SLO
over a
significant
instructional
period.

of your instructional
period).

Collaboratively
develop the
SLO with a
team and
discuss with
an
administrator.

Administer
assessment,
collect evidence
and submit the
final SLO with data
charts.

Collect
evidence and
mid-point
check with
administrator.
Possible
adjustments
to target may
occur.

End of year
review with
your team
and
administrator
on progress
or attainment
of target.

Student Learning Objectives

Understanding SLOs

Essential Components of an SLO


Data Review,
Baseline
Evidence and
Rationale

Student
Population

Learning
Content

Instructional
Interval

Essential
Question: why
are you
choosing this
learning content,
evidence and
target?

Essential
Question: which
students are
being addressed
in this SLO?

Essential
Question: What
is the focus of
the learning
during this SLO
and what
standards are
being taught and
assessed?

Essential
Question: what
is the
instructional
period being
covered?

Specifics
required:
Analysis of preassessment and
other data to
determine where
students are
starting from.

Specifics
required:
Specific student
populations
targeted for this
SLO. May
include all
students taking
the same final
assessment.

Specifics
required:
Inclusion of
CCSS, national,
state and/or
industry
standards that
are applicable to
this SLO.

Specifics
required:
Clearly identify if
this SLO is for
the year,
semester,
quarter, or other
length of time
and the rationale
behind this
choice.

Analysis and Identification

Teacher
Professional
Development

Evidence of
Growth

Strategies

Essential
Question: What
is the goal for
success outlined
by this SLO?

Essential
Question: what
measures will
you use to
determine
student progress
or growth?

Essential
Question: which
key instructional
strategies will
you use to
achieve your
target?

Essential
Question: what
specific
professional
development
opportunities will
you need to
accomplish your
target?

Specifics
required:
Description of
the specific,
measurable goal
that students will
meet by the end
of the
instructional
interval. May be
whole group or
tiered.

Specifics
required:
Identify which
pre- or postassessments,
rubrics,
performance or
student work
products will be
used to measure
the target.

Specifics
required:
Include targeted
strategies or
best practices
that will be used
to ensure
maximum
student growth
to the target.

Specifics
required:
Identify what
you will need
(books,
conferences,
PLCs, etc) to
build your own
capacity in
moving students
toward the
target.

Target

Setting and Measuring the Target

Resources and Supports


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Quality Blueprint
Data Review,
Baseline
Evidence and
Rationale

Student
Population

Describes
student
performance on
pre-assessment.

Identifies course
sections
included in the
SLO.

Provides a
baseline score
for the student
population in this
SLO.

Identifies
students
selected for this
SLO in those
course sections.

Provides
reasoning for the
selection of the
learning content,
evidence and
target.

The
performance
level of the
students in the
SLO is specified.

Includes
complexity
factors, if
necessary.

Includes no less
than 35% of the
overall student
population of the
course.

Learning
Content
Identifies
essential
knowledge and
skills students
must master for
success in the
course.
Selected content
is taught during
the instructional
interval.
Content is
aligned to
CCSS, state,
national or
industry
standards.

Aligns with
district/school
priorities.

Analysis and Identification

Instructional
Interval

Target

Evidence of
Growth

Identifies a clear
start and end
date for the
SLO.

Based on a
comprehensive
data review and
trend lines.

The length of the


interval
represents a
significant
portion of
instruction.

Promotes
growth or
mastery.

Identifies
measures of
assessment (pre
and post,
formative,
summative or
performance
based).

Target is a
SMART goal.

Aligned to the
standards.

Interval takes
into account
students who
may not have
attended class
for the entire
instructional
interval.

Target includes
stretch (is
rigorous, yet
attainable) for all
students.

Provides an
explanation for
how the
assessments
were chosen.

Target is set for


either the entire
identified
student
population, or is
tiered for groups
within that
population.

Describes how
evidence will be
provided to
show if the
target has been
met.

Interval includes
an assessment
which clearly
measures
growth.

Setting and Measuring the Target

Strategies

Address content
and students
included in this
specific SLO.
Include specific
approaches
used to help
students attain
the target.
Follow researchbased best
practices.

Teacher
Professional
Development
Identify and
describes
professional
development
that will assist in
supporting
instruction for
this SLO.
Describes any
additional
materials or
resources
needed to
support this
SLO.

Resources and Supports

Process within Product

The Process of Developing an SLO

Analyzing
Data

Guiding Question
What is this previous assessment
measuring? What do I want to know about
my students learning?

You need to know what youre looking for to


be able to analyze data appropriately. Your
focus should be evident in your assessment
selection.

What does this data tell me?

Look at the raw data without any bias and


document what it states before you begin
making conclusions about the students.

What does this data NOT tell me?

Data can only share information taken at a


set point in time. Be sure to recognize what
the data cannot reflect so you know its
limitations.

What complexity factors (attendance,


student groups, prior knowledge, etc) may
have affected this data?

You must account for variances like these


so that the data conversations can be
authentic in their representation of student
achievement.

What trends do I see across this data set?

Noticing trends across data sets provides


you with an opportunity to select a target
that is representative of a true challenge for
your students.

THE DATA CONVERSATION


1. Work through your SLO collaboratively as a
team.
2. Look at the data questions presented here
as a framework for your conversation.
3. From this data conversation, decide what
your focus will be for a substantial
instructional period.

Why its Important

What professional development do I need to Professional development is a key


more effectively teach this content?
component in continuing the teaching and
learning cycle to provide the best strategies
and ideas for our students.

Data Template
Guiding Question

Group Responses

What is this previous assessment measuring? What do I want to know


about my students learning?

What does this data tell me?

What does this data NOT tell me?

What complexity factors (attendance, student groups, prior knowledge, etc)


may have affected this data?

What trends do I see across this data set?

What professional development do I need to more effectively teach this


content?

What Data Can I Use?


National/State
Assessments

1
New National
Coalition for Core
Arts Standards
Cornerstone
Assessments

Commercially
Available

District or Team
Created

Assessments via
textbook
publication

Pre- and PostAssessments


OR
Rubrics

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SAMPLE
RUBRICS

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12

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ARTISTIC LITERACY
Philosophical Foundations

Evidence
Selection:
Portfolios
Artistic
Processes

arts
One(by
of these:
disciplines)

Grades
Pre-K, K, 1, 2

Process
Components

Anchor
Standards

Enduring
Understandings

One of these:

Essential
Questions

Performance
Standards
Selected
Evidence
(by grade
level)

Grades
3, 4, 5
Performance
Standards
(by grade
level)

Creating

(Dance, Music, Theatre)

(Visual Arts)

Producing

Anchor
Standards

(Media Arts)

Responding
Connecting
(Stand-alone for Dance,
Media Arts & Theatre and
embedded for Music &
Visual Arts)

Standards

Advanced

(All)

Performance

Accomplished

Presenting

Grade 2 Model Cornerstone Assessment


(with benchmarked student work)

Performing

BEFORE
Include Tiering if Necessary

Proficient

(All)

DURING

AFTER

A Conceptual Framework for Arts

Many thanks to Tennessee fine arts educators for the vision in creating a portfolio model of growth for arts educators.

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http://nccas.wikispaces.com/Conceptual+Fram
Copyright 2013 State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education (SEADAE) on behalf of N

Bullseye

Setting Your Target


THE IMPORTANCE OF TARGETS
1. This is what you will be held accountable
for - be as clear as possible.
2. Always provide a RANGE!
3. Set your students up for success, while
also providing them with an opportunity to
S-T-R-E-T-C-H.
4. Be careful with your wording and try to use
templates whenever possible.

4 Components of an
SLO Target

Specific Student
Population

Percentage of
students to achieve
target

Of the 10 Hispanic students in the music class, 70-80% of these students will
achieve a score of 75% or greater on the Unit 2 sight-reading performance
Specified growth or
mastery target

Identified aligned
assessment

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Target Templates for Fine Arts Educators

#1: Student Mastery


Of the (number of students in the targeted group) students in the targeted
population with an attendance rate of (insert percentage), (insert a range) %
of these students will achieve the (proficient or advanced) standard as
measured by the (insert assessment).
EXAMPLE:
Of the 19 students in the targeted population with an attendance rate of 85% or better, 72-85% of these
students will achieve the advanced standard as measured by the assessment rubric for Elements of
Design.
Many thanks to Anne Arundel County Public Schools in MD for the vision in creating templates to assist in writing targets.

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Target Templates for Fine Arts Educators

#2: Pre-Post Growth


Of the (number of students in the targeted group) students in the targeted
population with an attendance rate of (insert percentage), (insert a
percentage range) % of these students will improve their percentage score
from the (insert pre-assessment) by a minimum of the (insert percentage)%
as measured by the (insert post-assessment).
EXAMPLE:
Of the 15 students in the targeted population with an attendance rate of 85% or better, 71-81% of these
students will improve their percentage score from the Unit 3 pre-test by a minimum of 25 percentage
points as measured by the Unit 3 post-assessment.

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Target Templates for Fine Arts Educators

#3: Student Mastery:


Multiple Measures
Of the (number of students in the targeted group) students in the targeted
population with an attendance rate of (insert percentage), (insert a
percentage range) % of these students will achieve (insert goal) and (insert
goal).
EXAMPLE:
Of the 42 students in the targeted population with an attendance rate of 85% or better, 70-89% of these
students will perform a 4-measure rhythmic reading with 90% accuracy and write an accompanying
rhythmic response using at least one syncopated rhythm.
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Putting it all together

A Sample Fine Arts SLO: 4th Grade Music


SLO Component

Data Review, Baseline


Evidence and Rationale

Student Population

Learning Content

Instructional Interval
Target

DESCRIPTION
A diagnostic assessment of 4th grade students ability to read the notes on the treble staff was administered in November. Data
analysis indicated that 22% of combined students in all 4th grade general music classes scored a 2 or below on a 4 point rubric.
Students must be able to read notes on a treble staff in order to sing and play simple melodies on a variety of instruments. This is a
critical skill that lays the foundation for future musical study. Understanding that musical literacy can translate as literacy at all levels,
CCSS literacy standards, skills and strategies may be used in music note reading. Complexity factors may include the capacity for
parental support, missed instruction due to additional testing in other areas, and transient populations.
12 fourth grade students who scored a zero or one on the pre-assessment.

National Standards for Music: 5. Reading and notating music.


CC Reading Standards for Literacy and Technical Subjects: RF 4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support
comprehension. RF 4.A. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.
General Music Unit 3: Reading Musical Notation (3rd marking period)
As 4th grade music classes meet once per week for 45 minutes, the instructional period will be 9 classes within a 9 week period.
Of the 12 students in the population who scored a 1 or below on the pre-assessment and attended music class 85% or more of the
instructional period, 70-85% of these students will increase their a score by 2 or more on the four point rubric post-assessment.

Evidence

Mastery level will be a score of 4. The pre-assessment and post-assessment will contain eighteen items that assess the nine notes of
the treble clef staff in a district-designed template. Student data chart will be attached.

Strategies

* Use of essential question techniques


* Technology applications such as websites, iPad/iTouch, self-recordings and reflections
* Use of multiple representations, including visual, aural and kinesthetic, to support music comprehension.

Teacher Professional
Development

* Music teacher collaboration across the district/Fine Arts Team PLC


* Professional organizations
* Online arts classes in Common Core Literacy

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Sample
Data
Template

Student Name

Student
Score: PreTest

Student
Score: PostTest

Is the post-test score 2 or


more than the pre-test?

Karen

Yes

Byron

No

Jalin

Yes

Kelsey

Yes

Miley

Yes

Peter

Yes

Drew

No

Reggie

Yes

Peyton

Yes

Sheryl

No

Maria

Yes

Jasmine

Yes

Total students scoring 2 or more than the pre-test: 9/12.


Percentage: 75% Met Target? YES
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Final Thoughts

Key Reminders
1.Dont Panic.

You are already doing this process. This just

formalizes good teaching practice.

2.SLOs can be empowering.

This is your chance to

select the students who are struggling with your content. You know your
kids, you know how best to help them. This lets you have a say in how you
will be measured as a professional.

3.Work in a team.

Whether it is as a fine arts team or with other

arts content teachers in your district, SLOs are more authentic when you
are working on a collaborative goal.

4.Try starting with a Common Core practice.


If you are working in a fine arts team with multiple arts teachers, try
selecting either a Common Core practice (such as the standards for
mathematical practices or a literacy anchor standard) that could apply to all
of your classes. Better yet, try to select a common area across the arts,
such as creating or responding, which you can all approach within your
own artforms.

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Graduate
Classes are
Available!
SLOs for the Arts are included as part of the Common Core through the Arts Class

http://classes.educationcloset.com
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References and
Additional
Resources

The following list of resources and references were used to inform the work
of this guide. My sincere thanks and appreciation to all who are working
toward helping our teachers through this process.
Anne Arundel County Public Schools: www.aacps.org
Engage NY: www.engageny.org
Ohio State Department of Education: http://education.ohio.gov
Tennessee Arts Growth Measures System: http://team-tn.org
Austin Independent School District: http://austinisd.org
RISE Indiana: www.riseindiana.org
Kids at the Core: http://kidsatthecore.com
Amy Cohn, Coordinator of Music, Anne Arundel County Public Schools
Eleni Dykstra, Acting Coordinator of Visual Art, Anne Arundel County Public
Schools

For more information about SLOs in the Arts, Common Core and the Arts, and
Arts Integration, visit us at http://educationcloset.com

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