DATA

MAPPING GIS DATA SURVEY Applied Spatial GIS DATA GIS MAPPING
DATA GIS
essex Archaeology has been developing an integrated GIS and database framework for use on projects utilising spatial information. At the core of this approach is a reusable database that can be easily and rapidly adapted for use in a range of projects and tasks. The Stonehenge Landtrain Transit Route Impact Assessment was an early example of the combination of GIS and database functionality where the GIS was used to map the project gazetteer and geoprocess landscape data. During the Stansted EIA a more sophisticated approach was applied with increased GIS and database integration. Spatial queries of data, based upon different development option boundaries, were carried out to identify direct and indirect impacts. Details of these selections were fed back into the project database. The Historic Environment Strategy for the Thames Gateway region again applied an integrated GIS and database approach. This process involved the generation of spatial entities that were assigned a Monument Importance Value based upon documentary evidence. Along with historic mapping and other digital data sources, these were used to aid definition of zones of heritage character and potential. The Salisbury Plain Training Area monument condition survey has utilised Pocket GIS to facilitate data collection in the field. In this case each table of information held within the database had a corresponding GIS layer accessible during data collection.

SURVEY

W

Introduction

1

1

2

1

3

2

4
Reproduced from Ordnance Survey mapping with permission of the controller of Her Majesty's Stationery Office © Crown copyright, Wessex Archaeology. Licence Number: AL 100006861.

Design by K.Nichols Wessex Archaeology

Wessex Archaeology

Framework project joint venture between Wessex Archaeology and Oxford Archaeology

4

DATA

MAPPING GIS DATA in SURVEY techniques GIS DATA GIS MAPPING
DATA GIS

SURVEY

Thames Gateway
2

Monument locations are displayed within the GIS directly from the database. The extents of monuments are derived from historic and modern mapping sources and aerial photography guided by HER descriptions and grey literature. This has allowed erroneous points to be identified, addressed and corrected.

1

Monuments are scored within the project database using the Monument Importance Value system. This consists of the aggregated scores of eight separate categories; Group Value (association), Survival, Potential, Documentation (archaeological), Documentation (historical), Group Value (clustering) Diversity (features), and Amenity Value.

Workflow Model

Design by K.Nichols Wessex Archaeology

Historic Environment Character Zones are created by merging adjacent polygons generated by the union process. This process operates by identifying the level of commonality within the inherited attributes of the polygons and merging these based upon a hierarchy of value, or significance, established for the different data sources. For example, HER information has greater significance than environmental character.

4

The digitised monument extents are mapped thematically by their MIV scores along with an environmental character layer generated using a deductive modelling approach, using historic mapping and a layer mapping broad potential for Palaeolithic archaeological resources. The extent of each of these layers is mapped individually and then combined using a union function.

3

DATA

MAPPING GIS DATA SURVEY CulturalGIS MAPPING Heritage GIS DATA
DATA GIS

SURVEY

A Flexible Database
T
1

he system is applied to a diverse range of projects and therefore needs to be flexible and robust. Projects often have a very short lead in time but may continue for several years. Concept and Framework - Base data is sourced from SMR, NMR and proprietary HER, so the MIDAS data structure (mon-event) is used as a unifying standard. Inscription or other thesauri are used for controlled terms. Extra data objects have been developed to meet the needs of individual projects - often these come to be reused e.g. Impacts, Condition assessments, MIV. Stansted presented many challenges - the management of assessment information for hundreds of monuments across multiple and frequently changing scheme options in a very short turnaround time. The solution was to use a database to collate data from various sources. Conflicting monument records were compared, a master record updated and marked as "prime". The definitive Gazetteer has then been mapped in a GIS. GIS spatial queries are used to generate a "first pass" selection of impacted monuments. Direct and indirect impacts are distinguished through buffering. Database queries are used to extract definitive impact lists by scheme option and severity. For field data capture, a relational database structure has been mapped to flat file shape files, these represent the real world objects. Relational links are maintained by dropdown lists of "related features". This means field workers have access to all the previous assessment information so they can make informed decisions and recommendations in the field. The setup ensures a uniqueness of new records across field teams. Field data can easily be reintegrated into the project database.

2

3

4

Design by K.Nichols Wessex Archaeology

Wessex Archaeology

Design by K.Nichols Wessex Archaeology

DATA

GIS DATA MAPPING GIS DATA w. SURVEY ww GIS DATA GIS MAPPING

SURVEY

Design by K.Nichols Wessex Archaeology

DATA

GIS DATA MAPPING GIS DATA SURVEY s e x a r c h w e s GIS MAPPING GIS DATA

SURVEY

Design by K.Nichols Wessex Archaeology

DATA

GIS DATA MAPPING GIS DATA SURVEY . u k . c o GIS MAPPING GIS DATA

SURVEY

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful