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2012

UKRAINIAN

NATIONAL STUDENTS OLYMPIAD


IN THE ENGLISH

LANGUAGE
STAGE IV

FORM 9
LISTENING COMPREHENSION TEST ..........................................................2
READING COMPREHENSION TEST ..............................................................4
SPEAKING COMPREHENSION TEST ...........................................................9
WRITING COMPREHENSION TEST .............................................................11

FORM 10
LISTENING COMPREHENSION TEST ........................................................12
READING COMPREHENSION TEST ............................................................14
SPEAKING COMPREHENSION TEST .........................................................22
WRITING COMPREHENSION TEST .............................................................24

FORM 11
LISTENING COMPREHENSION TEST ........................................................25
READING COMPREHENSION TEST ............................................................27
SPEAKING COMPREHENSION TEST .........................................................35
WRITING COMPREHENSION TEST .............................................................37
TEACHER'S BOOKLET ......................................................................................................38
ANSWER SHEET ....................................................................................................................41
ANSWER KEYS ........................................................................................................................43

ENGLISH - N 18 (594) - SEPTEMBER 2012

FORM 9
ROUND I
LISTENING COMPREHENSION TEST
FOR 9th FORM STUDENTS
STUDENT'S BOOKLET
DO NOT OPEN THIS BOOKLET UNTIL ADVISED BY THE TEACHER.
DICTIONARIES ARE NOT ALLOWED.
STUDENT NUMBER: ...............
DIRECTIONS
In this test you will carefully listen to a text read aloud twice.
The text is followed by 10 true/false statements and 10 multiple-choice questions.
You should do the first 10 tasks following the first reading of the text on the basis of what is stated
or implied in the text.
The text will be read a second time and you should do tasks 11 through 20 following the second
reading of the text on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.
For each task you will choose from two symbols (+ or -) or four possible answers (, , C or D),
as specified prior to each task.
Choose the best answer and circle the symbol or letter of your choice on the answer sheet.

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.


From "The Hazards of the Couch" by Ronnie Caryn Rabin, The New York Times, 2011

Statements 1 through 10
(on your answer sheet circle + if the statement is true, - if it is false).
1.

People who spend most of their free time watching TV have a low risk for
developing health problems.
2.
According to the author, the results of the study were unique and previously
unknown.
3.
Squeezing in an hour at the gym can counteract the effect of motionless sitting.
4.
Children who watch a lot of television may have high blood pressure, even if
they are thin and active.
5.
If you cut your TV watching time in half, you burn more calories than someone
who does not.
6.
Other casual activities, like reading books, are just as damaging as watching TV.
7.
In the US and Britain, people spent 30 minutes on average watching TV.
8.
Adults who watch less TV eat less.
9.
Eating a healthy diet can counteract the effects of a sedentary life.
10. Spending two or more leisure hours in front of a screen doubles one's risk of a
heart attack.
STOP. WAIT FOR THE SECOND READING OF THE TEXT.

Questions 11 through 20 (on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).
11. This text describes an article recently written in which publication?
A. The Journal of the American Medical Association.
B. The British Journal of Health Sciences.
C. The National Cardiology and Pulmonology Newspaper.
D. The Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
12. Which nationality is not mentioned in the text?
A. Irish.
C. American.
B. Scottish.
D. British.
13. The study followed how many men?
A. 2,215.
C. 400.
B. 4,512.
D. 4,000.
14. The author of the study works in which department?
A. Cardiology and Pulmonology.
B. Epidemiology and Public Health.
C. Education and Psychology.
D. Landscape and Architecture.
15. Which activity bums the most calories?
A. Playing aboard game. C. Watching a computer.
B. Watching TV.
D. Sitting in the car.
16. Participants in the study who watched TV four or more hours a day...
A. received a reward of SO dollars.
B. had a high blood pressure reading.
C. were more likely to develop heart problems.
D. were more likely to die of any cause.
17. An exercise regimen had which effect on the blood pressure sedentary people?
A. None.
B. It reversed heart disease.
C. It made their conditions worse.
D. It made them more likely to eat.
18. According to the article, time spent in front of the television is ...
A. mandatory for all Americans and British.
B. discretionary for everyone.
C. well-spent
D. a healthy alternative to board games.
19. The article associates all of the following with watching too much television,
EXCEPT ...
A. heart disease.
C. over-eating.
B. burning fewer calories.
D. high blood pressure.
20. Children who watch more TV ...
A. have more free time.
C. have high blood pressure.
B. eat less.
D. exercise more.

ROUND II

READING COMPREHENSION TEST


for 9th FORM STUDENTS
DICTIONARIES ARE NOT ALLOWED.
DIRECTIONS
In this test you will read five texts. Each text is followed by either 10 true/false statements or 5
multiple-choice questions. You should do the tasks that follow a text on the basis of what is stated
or implied in that text. For each task you will choose the best possible answer from two symbols
(+ or -) or four possible answers (A, B, C or D), as specified prior to each task.
Choose the best answer and circle the symbol or letter of your choice on the answer sheet.

TEXT 1
From "Living with Lions'" by Joe Levit National Geographic, 2012
Darkness falls over a small village in Kenya. Kenya is a country in Africa. The
people who live here are getting ready to go to sleep. They're herders, and their cows
are resting in a nearby wooden pen called a "boma". All is quiet.
The sound of a snapping twig changes everything. The cows raise their heads.
They perk their ears. They know something is outside their pen. It's a female lion.
The lioness pounces. Her sharp claws rip at the walls of the pen. The frightened
cows ran in different directions.
The lioness tears through the fence and races toward the nearest cow. All the
noise wakens the sleeping herders. They run to the pen, but they're too late.
One cow is dead, and the lioness is gone. Scared off by the herders, she left her
kill behind. The lioness returns to her pride without a fresh kill. Her two hungry cubs
greet her as she comes closer. They rub their faces against hers. She answers them
with a low, rumbling noise. She cannot stay long, though. She has to hunt again so her
cubs won't go hungry.
This time, she will hunt prey elsewhere. The herders wait for the lioness to return.
Losing livestock to lions is a big deal for these herders. They are the Maasai.
They need livestock to survive. Cows, sheep, and goats are like money to the
Maasai. They use the animals to pay for what they need. If one is killed, life becomes
harder for the herders.
perk ; herder .
DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.

Statements 1 through 10 (on your answer sheet circle + if the statement is true, - if it is false).
1.
Lions hunt only in the daytime.
2.
The herders and savannah predators have an antagonistic relationship.
3.
The cubs depend solely on the male lion.
4.
Herders kill lions for sport and as a supplementary source of income.
5.
Livestock is used as currency among the Maasai people.
6.
The lioness successfully captured her prey.
7.
The lioness will not immediately return to the village to hunt.
8.
The lioness feeds the cow to her hungry cubs.
9.
The author sets his piece in the country of Africa.
10. In this context the word "pride" means "arrogance".

TEXT 2
From "Rowling Hints at Possible New HP Book" by Joyce Grant Teaching Kids News, 2011

Another Harry Potter adventure? Might Harry Potter be called into service again, to
keep the wizarding (and Muggle) world safe from the likes of Voldemort and his
accomplices?
The answer is: "maybe". It's not much, but as anyone who's ever asked his parents
for a new video game knows, it's better than "no".
Author J. K. Rowling is open to the possibility that she may write another Harry
Potter book. Or maybe even a few more.
That's what she told talk show host Oprah Winfrey in an interview recently. The
characters are still in her head, Rowling said, and she "could definitely" write more
books in the series.
The Harry Ratter series, beginning with Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
and ending with the seventh novel, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallow, brought
Rowling international fame.
More than 400 million books have been sold worldwide. The series also made her
one of the richest women in Britain, according to Forbes magazine.
With wealth have also come pressures, such as reporters searching through her
trash and constant pestering from the paparazzi.
So will we see another Harry Potter novel in the very near future?
Probably not very soon. Rowling says she's moved on to a new phase in her writing.
In the meantime, kids can always close their eyes, wave a wand ... and make a wish.
pester , .
DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.
Questions 11 through 15 (on our answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).
11. The author believes the likelihood that Rowling will write another Harry Potter
novel soon is ...
A. low.
C. high.
B. strong.
D. unclear.
12. The author has a(n) ..... attitude about Rowling writing more books.
A. pessimistic
C. hopeful
B. unrealistic
D. indecisive
13. The author encourages children to ...
A. ask their parents for video games. C. practice Harry Potter spells.
B. tell Rowling to write more books. D. be patient and wait.
14. Rowling told a ..... that she is open to the possibility of writing more Harry Potter
novels.
A. famous actress
C. book editor
B. Forbes Magazine correspondent
D. popular TV personality
15. The Harry Potter series has given Rowling all of the following EXCEPT...
A. international fame.
C. a full private life.
B. a lot of money.
D. worldwide recognition.

TEXT 3
From "A New Aquarium for Toronto?" by Julia Mohamed / Teaching Kids News, February 2011

Toronto has a huge sports stadium, a science centre and great museums. But there's
one attraction it doesn't have, that some big cities have - a large aquarium.
Now, an aquarium may be built in Toronto. If it is approved by the City Council, it
could be ready by July 2015. The aquarium would be in a large building.
It could include many thousands of fish and marine animals including sharks. One
idea is to have a jellyfish room with special lighting and mirrors to make it look very
exciting.
Another idea is for a tunnel that people could walk through to see the fish swimming around and above them. An aquarium would make a lot of money for Toronto.
Visitors to the city would come to the aquarium to see the fish. It would also attract
school groups for field trips to see the life that exists underwater.
The makers of the book and TV show Ripley's Believe it or Not are supporting the
project and will be helping to pay for it.
The Canadian government will also put some money toward the project.
People living in Toronto will also be contributing to the payments since some of
their tax money will help to pay for the building.
The aquarium may be placed near the CN Tower downtown. There are many
things that could stop the aquarium from being built such as lack of money or City
Council (Toronto's government) saying no to the project.
But if it goes through, it will be a wonderful tourist attraction for the city.
DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.
Questions 16 through 20 (on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).
16. The new aquarium in Toronto could include everything EXCEPT...
A. a tunnel where people can see fish under their feet.
B. a room with special lights and mirrors.
C. sharks, fish, and other marine animals.
D. a special display for jellyfish.
17. The aquarium must be approved by...
A. taxpayers of Toronto.
C. Ripley's Believe it or Not.
B. the Canadian government.
D. the City Council.
18. How many years will it take to finish the aquarium?
A. Two.
C. Four.
B. Three.
D. None of the above.
19. The aquarium will be paid for by the following groups, with the exception of...
A. residents of Toronto.
C. the Canadian government.
B. school groups.
D. Ripley's Believe it or Not.
20. It can be inferred from the article that the author probably...
A. works for the City Council.
B. believes the aquarium will bring in money.
C. is employed by Ripley's Believe it or Not.
D. has never been to Toronto.

TEXT 4
From "Rats to the Rescue in Experiment" by Sindya Bhanoo / The New York Times, 2011

In the Chinese zodiac, rats are considered witty, imaginative and curious. Now
scientists have discovered another attribute.
A new study in the journal Science has found that rats can be helpful - the first
instance that such behavior has been documented in rodents.
The researchers placed a free-roaming rat in an arena with a caged rat. Over the
course of several days, the free rats realized they could nudge open a door and release
the caged rat.
After figuring this out, they did so repeatedly, day after day.
"They then did what we refer to as a celebration," said an author of the study,
Peggy Mason, a neuroscientist at the University of Chicago.
"The trapped rat runs around the arena, and the free rat appears excited and runs
after the trapped rat."
That behavior alone is not enough to show that rats are empathetic, she said. The
rats could be releasing their caged cohorts simply for companionship.
So the researchers changed the setup: when the free rat released the caged rat, the
caged rat went into a second arena, and the two were unable to interact.
Still, the free rats released the caged rats, day after day.
Then the researchers placed a free rat in an arena with a caged rat and locked-away
chocolate. The free rats were just as likely to free the caged rat as they were to liberate
the chocolate and eat it.
Moreover, when they got the chocolate they almost always shared it; on average,
they would leave about one and a half out of five pieces for the caged rats, Dr. Mason
said. There was also a difference in the behavior of male rats and female rats.
"The females, once they open the door, they open the door every day, and within a
few minutes," Dr. Mason said. "But the male rats would occasionally take off a day."
Questions 21 through 25 (on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).
21. Peggy Mason's study of rodents includes all of the following EXCEPT...
A. the brain and emotions.
C. relationships among rodents.
B. emotional reactions.
D. digestive systems of rats.
22. The rats most likely celebrated in order to...
A. get to know each other.
C. get exercise.
B. express their happiness.
D. the researchers don't know why.
23. The scientists adjusted the experiment because...
A. someone made a mistake.
C. further proof was necessary.
B. they were forced to start again.
D. they didn't believe the results.
24. Expressing empathy means...
A. being compassionate.
C. being considerate.
B. being understanding.
D. all of the above.
25. The study also showed that female rats are..
A. less empathetic than males. C. as empathetic as males.
B. equally empathetic as males. D. more empathetic than males

TEXT 5
From "Ancient Capital Wilted When Water Ran Low" by S. Bhanoo / New York Times, 2012

Angkor, the ancient city in Cambodia that was the seat of the Khmer empire,
flourished from the 9th to the 15th century.
Today, tourists still appreciate the remnants of its architecture and sophisticated
hydro-engineering systems, composed of canals, moats and large reservoirs known as
barays.
Researchers now studying sediments from one of the reservoirs report that
prolonged droughts and overuse of the soil may have interfered with Angkor's water
management system and led to the empire's decline.
"When Angkor collapsed, there was a drop in water levels," said Mary Beth Day,
an earth scientist at the University of Cambridge in England.
"And much less sediment was delivered to the baray at the time." Angkor's
population may have been growing, and the soil may have been stressed from
aggressive use, she said.
"The sediment being delivered to the reservoir during Angkor times was more
weathered than the sediment being delivered post-collapse," she said. "The land was
used fairly aggressively for agriculture, as opposed to when people left."
Ms. Day sampled six and a half feet of sediment core from Angkor that allowed
her to study its physical properties, like the abundance of various elements and the
ratio of sand to finer-grained materials.
She and her colleagues published their research in the current issue of
The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
sediments , .
DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.

Questions 26 through 30 (on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).
26. Angkor was ...
A. the capital of Cambodia.
B. an important city in the Khmer empire.
C. a modern city with simple hydro-engineering systems.
D. a very rainy, ancient city in Cambodia.
27. The hydro-engineering systems were composed of all of the following EXCEPT ...
A. aqueducts.
C. moats.
B. reservoirs.
D. canals.
28. When Angkor collapsed, there was a ..... in water levels.
A. surge
C. jump
B. growth
D. reduction
29. Angkor prospered between about ..... years ago.
A. 600-1200
C. 1000-1600
B. 800-1400
D. 1500-2100
30. The word "weathered" in the third paragraph means ...
A. fresh.
C. depleted.
B. synthetic.
D. abundant.

ROUND III

SPEAKING COMPREHENSION TEST FOR 9th FORM STUDENTS


DIRECTIONS
In this test you will select three task slips from those before you.
After selecting three, choose the one you feel you are most capable to speak about and return the
other two to the table face down.
Then take about a minute to collect your thoughts before you begin to speak on the topic.
You may refer to the topic as needed. Take a deep breath and begin.
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

Fast food is generally considered unhealthy, but many people still eat it.
Why do you think restaurants like McDonald's are so popular?
How would you make McDonald's better?
If you could add one thing to the menu, what would you add?
Think of a powerful childhood memory. How did you feel at that time?
How does the memory affect you when you think about it today?
What sensory experiences trigger that memory for you (smells, tastes, etc.)?
Many children grow up listening to or watching fairytales that contain moral lessons. What
was your favorite childhood book or story?
What was the moral of the story, and is it still relevant today?
Why do you think stories are a good way to teach morals?
If you could write a new fairytale, what moral or value would you want your readers to take
away from it?
Some people believe that living a healthy lifestyle is the key to one's happiness.
What is your idea of a healthy lifestyle? How has the definition of health changed over time,
and from culture to culture?
Can a person who is hot healthy still be happy?
Imagine you are in charge of giving five billion dollars to any country in the world. What
country would you give aid to, and why does this country deserve it?
How has this country demonstrated a need for the money?
What criteria did you use to make your decision?
How could you ensure that the money would not be wasted?
In the age of computers and instant information, we are constantly exposed to the latest
news and information. What influences your choices when selecting what content to view?
How should people sort and filter the information they take in?
What are the positives and negatives of such constant exposure?
The proverb, "The more languages you speak, the more of a person you are", is often heard
in our language classrooms. What does this saying mean to you?
Do you agree with this proverb?
Do you know any examples of people who embody this statement?
How does knowing more than one language enrich your life?
In your opinion, what are the three most important qualities a great teacher should have?
Tell about a time when you were in a challenging class and you witnessed a teacher
demonstrate these qualities. How do these qualities help students learn?
Would you rather have a teacher with high expectations who teaches interesting, difficult
classes, or a teacher whose classes are easy and boring?
Imagine that you are a newspaper reporter. You have the opportunity to interview any living
person in the world. Who would you choose to interview, and why? How has this person
influenced the lives of others? How has this person influenced your life?

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

Some people live for music and some people do not seem to care.
What is your attitude towards music? What role does music play in your life and in your
culture? Why are some people moved by music and others not?
If you could be a character in any book you have read, who would you choose? Why?
Describe the character you have chosen, including both their physical appearance and their
personality traits. Does this character have any weaknesses?
What traits does this character have that you do not? Similarly, is there anything you like
about yourself that this character does not possess?
Social networking sites like Vkontakte and Face-book are becoming more and more
popular. Do you see social networking as a positive or negative thing? Why?
If Vkontakte and all other social networking sites were shut down forever, how would your
life be affected?
In what way do social networks affect communication between people?
Language barriers often make it difficult to communicate with people from other countries.
Would you prefer to live in a world where everyone spoke only one universal language?
Why? What would be the advantages and disadvantages of having only one universal
language?
What do you think would change if everyone spoke the same language?
C. S. Lewis once wrote, "Friendship is unnecessary, like philosophy, like art... It has no
survival value; rather, it is one of those things that gives value to survival."
How do you interpret this quote?
What is more valuable in your life, your friends or your family? Why?
What does friendship mean to you?
Mahatma Gandhi said, "The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the
strong." What is your opinion of this statement?
Is there a time when you have forgiven someone even though it was difficult?
Do you regret your decision? Why or why not?
Ever since humans landed on the moon, people have been obsessed with the idea of
extraterrestrial life. Do you believe in this possibility?
What would you do if you met an alien?
How do you think humanity would react to the discovery of alien life?
Assume you are a descendent of Albert Einstein. You have found his journal and it has
information that would affect his reputation.
Would you publish it, or would you keep it hidden? What would be the consequences?
Does the public interest in the information outweigh your personal right to protect your
family's name? What would you consider when making this decision?
If you made a terrible life-changing mistake and you had the option to forget it, would you
take this opportunity?
What are the positive and negative consequences of your answer?
What role do painful experiences play in shaping our character?
Is it necessary to experience difficult situations to appreciate the good?
You are working as a volunteer for Euro Cup 2012, translating for foreign English speaking
tourists. Describe a problem you think you might have to deal with.
How will foreigners perceive Ukrainian culture?
Do you think the presence of so many foreigners will affect the Ukrainian mentality?
Do you think these changes will be permanent or short term? Why?
Imagine that you are the owner of a new museum. From which time period would you
gather most of your materials?
Who would be the most interested in visiting your museum?
What, type of museum would you like to own?

ROUND IV
WRITING COMPREHENSION TEST
FOR 9th FORM STUDENTS

DIRECTIONS
In this test you will select from three writing tasks.
Choose the one that you feel you are most capable to write about.
You will then begin writing your essay on the pages provided.
When you are finished close your papers, lay down your pen and wait for us to collect
your test materials.
STUDENT NUMBER: ...

1.

"True friends are hard to find" is a popular American saying.


Do you agree with this saying? Why or why not?
What qualities do you think a person must have to be a true friend?
Do you have a true friend? What is he/she like?

2.

Even the Ancient Romans knew that a sound mind could be found in a sound
body.
What do you do to take care of yourself both physically and mentally?
Think about your eating and exercise habits.
What could you do to lead a healthier lifestyle?

3.

Imagine you are given the chance to be a character from your favourite book.
Which character would you choose and why?
How does this character advance the plot of the story?
How would you change the plot of the story if you were this character?

FORM 10
LISTENING COMPREHENSION TEST
FOR 10th FORM STUDENTS
STUDENT'S BOOKLET
DO NOT OPEN THIS BOOKLET UNTIL ADVISED BY THE TEACHER.
DICTIONARIES ARE NOT ALLOWED.
DIRECTIONS
In this test you will carefully listen to a text read aloud twice. The text is followed by 10 true/false
statements and 10 multiple-choice questions. You should do the first 10 tasks following the first
reading of the text on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.
The text will be read a second time and you should do tasks 11 through 20 following the second
reading of the text on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.
For each task you will choose from two symbols (+ or ) or four possible answers (, , C or D),
as specified prior to each task. Choose the best answer and circle the symbol or letter of your
choice on the answer sheet.

STUDENT NUMBER: .....


DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.

From "Humans lake on Computer in Jeopardy" by Joyce Grant


Teaching Kids News, 2011
Statements 1 through 10
(on your answer sheet circle + if the statement is true, - if it is false).
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Jeopardy is a game show created by Brad Rutter and Ken Jennings.


Watson helped show how complex the human brain is.
Watson's "brain power" is equal to a hundred home computers.
Deep Blue is a chess program designed by IBM.
Computers can easily understand idioms in the English language.
The computer incorrectly answered a question about a famous city in Canada.
The Jeopardy competition was two days long.
Watson was programmed to think very carefully about the question's category.
The humans answered many questions faster than the computer.
Watson won the first question.

STOP. WAIT FOR THE SECOND READING OF THE TEXT

Questions 11 through 20 (on your answer sheet circk the correct letter , , C or D).
11. According to the article, questions in Jeopardy may include all of the following
EXCEPT...
A. cultural references.
C. metaphors.
B. riddles.
D. puns.
12. It took ..... years to prepare Watson for the game show.
A. four
C. fourteen
B. around four
D. around fourteen
13. Watson's "brain" will be used by...
A. emergency dispatchers.
B. health care professionals.
C. computer programmers.
D. doctoral candidates.
14. About which category did Watson answer a question incorrectly?
A. US cities.
C. World War II.
B. Canadian capitals.
D. Famous airports.
15. Watson won the contest by about ..... dollars.
A. $21,000
C. $67,000
B. $24,000
D. $77,000
16. Choose the correct ranking of players, from last place to first place.
A. Jennings, Rutter, Watson.
B. Watson, Rutter, Jennings.
C. Rutter, Jennings, Watson.
D. Watson, Jennings, Rutter.
17. The phrase "to get a lot of points on someone" most closely means...
A. to earn more points than someone.
B. to receive points from an opponent.
C. to steal points from another player.
D. to transfer points to a different player.
18. The author would mostly likely agree that in the future, computers will...
A. take jobs away from humans.
B. replace the need for human doctors.
C. help professionals in certain fields.
D. make game shows out of date.
19. Which US city's largest airport was named after a World War II hero?
A. Ontario.
C. Boston.
B. Chicago.
D. Toronto.
20. If you had a "runaway victory," you could also say that you...
A. crushed your opponent.
B. barely defeated your opponent.
C. celebrated your victory by running.
D. unfairly won the competition.

ROUND II

READING COMPREHENSION TEST


FOR 10th FORM STUDENTS

DICTIONARIES ARE NOT ALLOWED

DIRECTIONS
In this test you will read five texts. Each text is followed by either 10 true/false statements or 5 multiple-choice
questions. You should do the tasks that follow a text on the basis of what is stated or implied in that text. For each
task you will choose the best possible answer from two symbols (+ or ) or four possible answers (A, B, C or D),
as specified prior to each task. Choose the best answer and circle the symbol or letter on the answer sheet.

TEXT 1
From "Arctic Ice Hits Record Lows" by Gregory Mone / Discover Magazine, 2011
Satellites first began measuring the extent of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean during
the 1970s. One summer reading revealed nearly 3 million square miles of it.
Last summer that coverage shrank to 1.67 million square miles, the second-lowest
number on record, according to climatologist Mark Serreze of the National Snow and
Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado. "The year 2011 is another exclamation point on
the overall downward trend that we see in sea-ice extent," he says.
Georg Heygster, a physicist at the University of Bremen in Germany, goes
further. His 2011 data shows the lowest coverage of sea ice since records began.
The researchers may have slightly different numbers regarding the exact amount
of ice remaining, but both agree that nature is outpacing projections from computer
models and that summer sea ice in the Arctic could vanish by 2030.
The effects would be far reaching: Polar bears and walruses would lose the ice
they depend on for hunting and resting. Ice-free lanes during summer months could
open the area to shipping and onshore drilling but could also trigger new geopolitical
conflicts. These changes come atop the strong seasonal variation in Arctic ice, which
melts through the summer and freezes up in the winter months.
The last decade has been one of the warmest on record for the polar region, with
2007 summer temperatures having risen 9 degrees Fahrenheit above average in some
areas. The warming trend accelerates the summer melt even during years of ordinary
temperatures. This year the average temperature hovered near the freezing point
typical for the area yet ice still disappeared at an accelerated pace.
Serreze explains that the ice refreezes in winter, but by the time spring arrives, the
remaining layer is thinner, so it melts faster. "We've got to the point now where the ice
is so thin that we don't need a boost from the weather," he says.
Statements 1 through 10 (on your answer sheet circle + if the statement is true, - if it is false)
1.
All data show that 2011 had the lowest sea ice coverage ever reported.
2.
Mark Serreze is a professional climate researcher.
3.
Satellites began measuring sea ice in the Arctic Ocean more than forty years ago.
4.
Both scientists agree that by 2030, sea ice in the Arctic could disappear.
5.
The researchers found very different measurements of sea ice.
6.
Arctic ice stays frozen all year.
7.
Weather in the polar region has changed in the last ten years.
8.
Melting ice will cause problems for native animals of the polar region.
9.
Ice refreezes in the spring and melts in the summer.
10. The author of this article probably does not believe in global warming.

TEXT 2
From Weather Beaten by Jim Cantore
Time Magazine, 2012
To look ahead, we must look back. This is especially true when it comes to
weather - which might not be the kind of thing you expect to hear from a guy whose
job it is to forecast storms and droughts, not to reflect on past ones.
All forecasts are initially based on good data, and the margin of error increases
the further out we project.
Our ability to create even five-day forecasts is a relatively recent development
about as good as our ability to create three-day forecasts 20 years ago.
This, of course, means that predicting all four seasons in 2012 is impossible, but
2011 does provide a good starting point.
The earth's complex atmosphere includes large-scale global patterns and
phenomena such as La Nia and El Nio, and last year saw many of these coming
together at the right time (which, of course, means the wrong time) to create a historic
season of heartache and havoc.
The numbers, as compiled by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA), were jaw dropping.
In one three-day stretch in April, 343 tornadoes struck in a swath from Alabama
to Virginia.
Precipitation in the Ohio Valley exceeded normal levels by 300%, leading to
flooding along the Mississippi River.
Drought-fueled wildfires burned more than a million acres in Texas alone. State
and federal budgets, already stretched tight, took a big hit.
The U.S. saw a dozen or more weather events that did at least $1 billion each in
damage - and $54 billion collectively - according to the NOAA.
DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET
Questions 11 through 15 (on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).
11. The author says what is a relatively recent development?
A. Five-day forecasts.
C. Four-day forecasts.
B. Three-day forecasts.
D. Five-week forecasts.
12. Jaw dropping means ...
A. exciting.
C. turbulent.
B. shocking.
D. gregarious.
13. Where did 343 tornadoes hit the U.S. in April 2011?
A. Alabama and Virginia.
C. Ohio Valley.
B. Alabama and Virginia, among others.
D. Mississippi.
14. What does the word "precipitation" imply?
A. Winds.
C. Rainfall.
B. Droughts.
D. Dangerous weather.
15. What does the phrase "already stretched tight" mean?
A. There is a lot of money.
C. The budget in endless.
B. There is extra money.
D. There are limited funds as it is.

TEXT 3
From "American Art in Delaware"
http://www.americaslibrary.gov, 2012

Henry Francis du Pont (1880-1969) was an heir to Delaware's DuPont


Company fortune. He was one of the first serious collectors of American decorative
art objects - furniture, textiles, paintings, and other objects made in the United
States between 1640 and 1840.
American furniture and household objects had been considered inferior to those
from Europe. But du Pont helped develop a new appreciation for American decorative arts. He created a legendary showplace for these objects on his family's estate
just outside of Wilmington, Delaware.
In 1951 it was opened to the public as the Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur
(pronounced winter-tour) Museum.
Du Pont assembled objects from his collection into 175 "period rooms", each
with examples of American antiques and decorative arts that followed a certain
theme or period in early American history. For example, the du Pont Dining Room
has furniture dating from the late 18th and early 19th centuries. And, because this
was the time when the United States became a new nation, there is a patriotic theme
in the room.
Another example is the Chinese Parlor, which has furnishings that reflect
Americans' fascination with Asian culture during the 18th century.
In these period rooms du Pont believed he could tell the story of the early
United States through furniture and other decorative arts.

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.


TEXT 3
Questions 16 through 20
(on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).
16. Henry Francis du Pont was one of the first serious collectors of what?
A. Paintings.
B. American dcor.
C. American cars.
D. Postage stamps.
17. What is the best description of a "period room"?
A. A room designed by a historical figure.
B. A room in which the contents reflect a certain period of time.
C. A room where you sit for a period of time and think.
D. A room that follows a certain theme, for example, a patriotic theme.
18. From what time period did du Pont collect objects?
A. The 16th to 17th century.
B. The 19th to 20th century.
C. The 17th to 19th century.
D. The 20th to 21st century.
19. What BEST describes why du Pont collected, and later displayed, American
decorative art objects?
A. He believed that he could convey early United States' culture through them.
B. He wanted to sell them for more money later in his life.
C. He wanted them so that no one else could have them.
D. He thought they were beautiful.
20. What was the result of Henry F. du Pont collecting American decorative art objects?
A. There was no art left in museums.
B. American-made furniture and household objects gained popularity.
C. A period of art that was considered lost was found again.
D. Du Pont sold everything for a lot of money.

TEXT 4
From "Chapter 1: The One to Get Away," by Barbara Kingsolver
The Bean Trees, 1988

I have been afraid of putting air in a tire ever since I saw a tractor tire blow up
and throw Newt Hardbine's father over the top of the Standard Oil sign. I'm not
lying.
He got stuck up there. About nineteen people congregated during the time it
took for Norman Strick to walk up to the Courthouse and blow the whistle for the
volunteer fire department.
They eventually did come with the ladder and haul him down, and he wasn't
dead but lost his hearing and in many other ways was never the same afterward.
They said he overfilled the tire.
Newt Hardbine was not my friend, he was just one of the big boys who had
failed every grade at least once and so was practically going on twenty in the sixth
grade, sitting in the back and flicking little wads of chewed paper into my hair.
But the day I saw his daddy up there like some old overalls slung over a
fence, I had this feeling about what Newt's whole life was going to amount to, and I
felt sorry for him.
Before that exact moment I don't believe I had given much thought to the
future.
My mama said the Hardbines had kids just about as fast as they could fall down
the well and drown.
This must not have been entirely true, since they were abundant in Pittman
County and many survived to adulthood. But that was the general idea.
Which is not to say that we, me and Mama, were any better than Hardbines or
had a dime to our name.
If you were to look at the two of us, myself and Newt side by side in the sixth
grade, you could have pegged us for brother and sister.
And for all I ever knew of my own daddy I can't say we weren't, except for
Mama swearing up and down that he was nobody I knew and was long gone
besides.
But we were cut out of basically the same mud, I suppose, just two more dirtykneed kids scrapping to beat hell and trying to land on our feet.
You couldn't have said, anyway, which one would stay right where he was, and
which would be the one to get away.

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.

Questions 21 through 25
(on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).
21. Why is the narrator afraid of tires?
A. She almost got hit by a tractor as a child.
B. She saw someone get hit by a tractor and die.
C. She watched a tire burst and hurt someone.
D. She was in a tire accident.
22. What best describes Newt Hardbine?
A. Poor, dim-witted, unlucky.
B. Lazy, educated, sad.
C. Sweet, disadvantaged, uneducated.
D. Hardworking, poor, energetic.
23. Why does the narrator feel sorry for Newt Hardbine?
A. She sees that his life is hard and has little chance of improvement.
B. She saw his father get blown over a large fence and die.
C. Because he failed so many grades.
D. All his brothers and sisters fell down wells and drowned.
24. Why does the narrator say she and Newt Hardbine are basically the same?
A. They have the same father.
B. They are from the same town and go to the same school.
C. They look similar and have the same future prospects.
D. They are neighbors and have the same friends.
25. In this context "overalls slung over a fence" means...
A. the overalls were folded neatly on the fence.
B. the overalls were placed on top of the fence.
C. the overalls were tossed over the fence.
D. the overalls were forgotten on a fence.

TEXT 5
From "Conversation Starters: 2011's Top 5 Book Club Picks" by Lynn Neary
NPR, 2011

In Caleb's Crossing, Geraldine Brooks has created a lovely heroine in Bethia


Mayfield, a young girl living on Martha's Vineyard in colonial times.
Bethia longs to break free of the restrictions of her strict Puritan community.
Smarter than her older brother, who is destined to get the education she wants
and deserves, Bethia finds comfort in exploring the wilds of the island with a young
Native American named Caleb.
It is a secret friendship and remains so, even as the two end up in Cambridge:
Caleb to study at Harvard, Bethia as an indentured servant who takes care of the
students.
When I first heard about this book, I wasn't sure I wanted to read it. I knew it
was about the first Native American to graduate from Harvard.
That sounded pretty academic to me, not to mention elitist and politically
correct.
But it is by Geraldine Brooks, a writer I admire. So I plunged ahead and was
quite delighted to get swept up in the kind of story I loved as a kid: a headstrong,
rebellious young girl in a wild, untamed place defies all the rules and finds love.
Actually, scratch that last part.
This is a book for grown-ups written by Geraldine Brooks, who not only
respects history, she loves it.
So while she sets up a story that's easy to fall into, she doesn't shy away from
the realities of those times.
And Bethia and Caleb's lives take some unexpected turns. The result is a
satisfying but sobering look at the early days of this country.
This is a great pick for lovers of historical fiction.
untamed .

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.


Questions 26 through 30
(on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).
26. The reviewer's first impression of Caleb's Crossing was that...
A. it would be boring and snobby.
B. it would be slow and difficult.
C. it would be difficult but interesting.
D. it would be discriminatory and offensive.
27. The novel takes place...
A. in a conservative Protestant community.
B. in the untamed wilderness of the New World.
C. in a college town.
D. all of the above.
28. The reviewer chose to read Caleb's Craswjg because...
A. she loves historical fiction.
B. she is Native American.
C. she identifies with the main character.
D. she is a fan of the author.
29. The reviewer's overall opinion of the book is...
A. negative.
B. neutral.
C. indifferent.
D. positive.
30. The plot of Caleb's Crossing focuses on...
A. How a young Puritan girl helped a Native American go to Harvard while
working as a servant.
B. How a young girl made it possible for a poor Indian boy to get an
education.
C. How the first Indian Harvard graduate and a young indentured servant help
each other.
D. The struggle for Bethia to succeed in a sexist society.

ROUND III

SPEAKING COMPREHENSION TEST


FOR 10th FORM STUDENTS
DIRECTIONS

In this test you will select three task slips from those before you. After selecting three, choose the one you feel you
are most capable to speak about and return the other two to the table face down.
Then take about a minute to collect your thoughts before you begin to speak on the topic.
You may refer to the topic as needed. Take a deep breath and begin.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

Athletics are very popular among the nation's youth. They are a good way to maintain a
healthy lifestyle, and they help kids to develop skills as team players and athletes.
Do you think kids should be forced to participate in athletics while growing up?
Is competition among peers a good or a bad thing?
Should athletics focus more on winning or just having fun?
Imagine that you are a villain from your favorite book or movie.
Give an apology to the hero of the book or movie. What have you done wrong?
What do you regret? How will you make amends?
Some people believe it is important to share wisdom with future generations so that they
avoid making the same mistakes. Imagine that you are speaking to your future
granddaughter or grandson about the lessons you have learned so far in your life.
What life lessons would you like to share? What traditions do you hope he or she will carry
on in the future? What wisdom would you pass to him or her from your grandparents?
Some people believe that living a healthy lifestyle is the key to one's happiness.
What is your idea of a healthy lifestyle? How has the definition of health changed over time,
and from culture to culture? Can a person who is not healthy still be happy?
C. S. Lewis once wrote, "Friendship is unnecessary, like philosophy, like art... It has no
survival value; rather, it is one of those things that gives value to survival."
Do you agree with this statement? Why or why not?
If you didn't have friends, how would your life be easier? How would it be more difficult?
Throughout history, how has friendship helped people survive?
The Internet and television have made the world a much smaller place, as virtually everyone
is aware of pop culture icons like David Beckham and Lady Gaga.
Is it important to keep up with pop culture? Why or why not?
If you stopped paying attention to pop culture, would you be able to participate in the same
kinds of conversations with your friends? Does pop culture create similar interests in people
throughout the world, regardless of culture?
There is a commonly known phrase, "Jack of all trades, and master of none."
How do you interpret this phrase?
Would you rather be really good at one thing or average at many things?
What is the difference between being good at something and being great at something?
Imagine you had the power to change one historical event. However, this action would
create a chain reaction which would result in you never being born.
What event would you change? Why? What would be the consequences of you never being
born? Is it better to sacrifice one person for the benefit of all or not?
The way that people behave and what they desire are constantly changing. What differences
can you predict about food, culture, clothing, etc. in the future?
Do you think it will be easier to live one hundred years from now?
In what ways would it be more difficult?
What new challenges do you imagine your generation will face in the future?
Are you prepared to face these challenges?

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

Many people are distrustful of modern medicine. They believe that natural medicines from
herbs and plants work much better.
If you were sick, would you go to a regular doctor or a doctor who uses herbs and plants as
medicine?
Some argue that laughter makes a person feel better than any medicine can. Do you agree?
Why or why not?
Have your parents ever treated you with medicinal remedies? Were they effective?
Both men and women spend a lot of time and money on fashion in an attempt to keep up
with the latest trends. Does beauty affect one's success in life?
Do you think the standard of beauty is the same in Ukraine as in America?
Is there more pressure on women than on men to be beautiful?
Each country has different rules of etiquette and behavior.
What are some common rules of etiquette in Ukraine?
Why is it important to respect the rules of etiquette in a foreign country? Which practices
have you heard about or experienced that are different from what you are used to?
Leo Tolstoy wrote, "Art is a human activity which has as its purpose the transmission to
others the highest and best feelings to which men have risen."
How can art reflect our personal ideals? Tell about a painting, play, book, or song that
reflects your beliefs. Do you think we can learn from different forms of art?
Imagine that you are a newspaper reporter. You have the opportunity to interview any living
person in the world. Who would you choose to interview, and why? How has this person
influenced your life and the lives of others?
What is the goal of your article, and how will you make it newsworthy?
If you could be the pet of a character in any book you have read, who would you choose?
Why did you choose this person? Describe your new owner's caretaking habits. Why did
you choose them to be your caregiver? What kind of food do you think you would eat?
Social networking sites like Vkontakte and Face-book are seemingly all over the place. Do
you see this as a good thing or bad thing? Why?
If Vkontakte and all other social networking sites were shut down forever, how would your
life be affected?
Aside from socializing with friends, what other uses do social networking sites have?
How can social networking sites be used as an agent of social change in Ukraine?
Imagine that you are in a place that does not speak your native language. Instead, the world
will now be required to speak English.
What would be the advantages and disadvantages of having only one universal language?
How important is your native language to your own cultural identity?
What do you think would change if everyone spoke the same language?
Mahatma Ghandi said, "The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is an attribute of the strong."
Do you agree with this statement? What would be the hardest thing to forgive? Are there
any situations where doing something unforgivable can be justified?
In Ukraine, children grow up believing in Father Frost. In America, children believe in
Santa Claus. Why do you think societies create fictitious parental figures?
What role did these figures play in your upbringing?
How do you think being told an untruth as a child manifests itself later in life?
If you could create a new fictional holiday character, what would he or she be like?
As one grows older, schedules become more important.
What do you think your schedule will be like five years from now?
Do you prefer following a strict schedule, or do you prefer to be spontaneous?
How can you maintain independence while following a routine someone else made for you?

ROUND IV

WRITING COMPREHENSION TEST


FOR 10th FORM STUDENTS

DIRECTIONS
In this test you will select from three writing tasks.
Choose the one that you feel you are most capable to write about.
You will then begin writing your essay on the pages provided.
When you are finished close your papers, lay down your pen and wait for us to collect
your test materials.
STUDENT NUMBER: .....

1.

As technology grows and the world becomes smaller, "globalization" has


become a buzz word.
What does this buzz word mean to you?
What do different countries and cultures stand to lose or gain?
How is globalization affecting smaller and/or poorer countries as opposed to
larger and/or richer countries?
How is globalization affecting Ukraine right now?

2.

Some people argue that learning from a book is not useful and that your
experiences in life will teach you everything that you need to know. Others
believe that learning from books is more significant.
What do you think is more significant in a person's life: book learning or
experience?
Can you have one without the other? Why or why not?
What are the advantages and disadvantages?

3.

There is a proverb which states that a student can follow only so far as a teacher
can lead.
What teacher has been most influential in the development of your education?
How has their teaching style helped you learn?
What methods does your favorite teacher use that other teachers do not?
If you became a teacher, which methods would you use?

FORM 11
LISTENING COMPREHENSION TEST
FOR 11th FORM STUDENTS

STUDENT'S BOOKLET

DO NOT OPEN THIS BOOKLET UNTIL ADVISED BY THE TEACHER.


DICTIONARIES ARE NOT ALLOWED.
DIRECTIONS
In this test you will carefully listen to a text read aloud twice. The text is followed by 10 true/false
statements and 10 multiple-choice questions. You should do the first 10 tasks following the first
reading of the text on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.
The text will be read a second time and you should do tasks 11 through 20 following the second
reading of the text on the basis of what is stated or implied in the text.
For each task you will choose from two symbols (+ or ) or four possible answers (, , C or D),
as specified prior to each task. Choose the best answer and circle the symbol or letter of your
choice on the answer sheet.

STUDENT NUMBER: .....


DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET
Excerpt from "How Many Notes Would a Virtuoso Violinist Pay for a Stradivarius?"
by Ian Sample
The Guardian, 2012
Statements 1 through 10
(on your answer sheet circle + if the statement is true, - if it is false).
1.

Stradivarius violins are considered the best in the world and are worth hundreds
of dollars.
2.
The violinists involved in the study could not tell the difference between the
sound of a Stradivarius violin and a modern violin.
3.
Claudia Fritz believes that the beauty of a Stradivarius justifies its price.
4.
Guarneri del Gesu and Antonio Stradivari were Spanish violin makers.
5.
The study was conducted by Kai-Thomas Roth.
6.
Overall, the violinists preferred newer models over the classic ones.
7.
Of the six violins used in the study, three were modern and three were made in
the 1700s.
8.
Claudia Fritz thinks the quality of an instrument is more important than its age
or reputation.
9.
Fritz's study was the first to compare the sound of modern and antique violins.
10. Roth concluded that the difference between playing a Stradivarius and a modern
violin is the musician's mindset toward the instrument.
STOP. WAIT FOR THE SECOND READING OF THE TEXT.

Questions 11 through 20
(on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).
11. The purpose of the experiment was to discover ...
A. if playing a Stradivarius affects the quality of a performance.
B. if playing a Stradivarius affects the audience differently.
C. if Stradivarius violins actually sound better than modern instruments.
D. if Stradivarius violins actually sound better than Guarnari violins.
12. Of the six violins tested how many were made by Antonio Stradivari?
A. One.
B. Two.
C. Three.
D. Four.
13. The results of the study were surprising because ...
A. Stradivarius violins are thought to be vastly superior to modern instruments.
B. string instruments sound better with age.
C. Stradivarius violins are worth millions of dollars.
D. modern violins are usually considered to be better crafted.
14. The musicians were prevented from knowing which violin they were playing by..
A. wearing goggles and standing behind a curtain.
B. wearing a blindfold and standing in a separate room.
C. wearing goggles and standing in a separate room.
D. wearing a blindfold and standing behind a curtain.
15. The best synonym for "commandeer" as it is used in the article is ...
A. to command.
C. to appropriate.
B. to control.
D. to take over.
16. Which of the following was noted as a shortcoming of the study?
A. Only a few violins were tested.
B. Not all the violinists were qualified.
C. Only half of the violins were made by Stradivari.
D. One of the violins was made by Guarneri del Gesu.
17. This study used the "double blind" testing method because ...
A. neither the researcher nor the violinist knew what instrument was being played.
B. both the researcher and the violinist were blindfolded.
C. the test was done twice, once with blindfolds and once without.
D. none of the above.
18. Kai-Thomas Roth thinks that ...
A. the myth of Antonio Stradivari is the main factor.
B. people aren't educated enough to tell the difference.
C. Stradivarius violins aren't worth their price.
D. Guarneri instruments actually sound better.
19. The musicians participating in the study did NOT rate the violins for ...
A. resonance.
C. craftsmanship.
B. playability.
D. overall quality.
20. Antonio Stradivari and Guarneri del Gesu lived and worked in the ...
A. 15th century.
C. 17th century.
B. 16th century.
D. 18th century.

ROUND II

READING COMPREHENSION TEST


FOR 11th FORM STUDENTS
DICTIONARIES ARE NOT ALLOWED.
DIRECTIONS

In this test you will read five texts. Each text is followed by either 10 true/false statements or 5 multiple-choice
questions. You should do the tasks that follow a text on the basis of what is stated or implied in that text.
For each task you will choose the best possible answer from two symbols (+ or ) or four possible answers (A, B,
C, or D), as specified prior to each task. Choose the best answer and circle the symbol or letter on the answer sheet.

TEXT 1
"Why Multitasking May Be Bad for Your Brain" by Karen Pallarito Health.com, 2011
Are you reading this while thumbing through text messages, streaming a TV
show online, or scribbling a note to your child's teacher? (Or maybe doing all three?)
Don't congratulate yourself.
Even though most people think an amped-up, gadget-dependent lifestyle makes
them more nimble, focused, and efficient, that may not be the case. In fact, many
researchers believe the human brain can't really perform two or more tasks
simultaneously, as the word multitask implies.
Rather, they say, the mind toggles between tasks. And while mindless activities
like walking and chewing gum aren't a problem, the brain doesn't fare well when
people double up on complex tasks, such as driving and talking on a cell phone.
"Something's got to give," says David E. Meyer, PhD, director of the Brain,
Cognition, and Action Laboratory at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.
"Either your cell phone conversation will suffer or your driving will suffer."
And it's not just behind the wheel. There's mounting evidence that multitasking
can slow you down no matter what you're doing. In a study published a decade ago,
Meyer and his colleagues found that, contrary to popular belief, people are less
efficient not more when they multitask.
That's because it takes more time to complete one of the tasks, especially as they
become more complex, versus focusing on a single task.
to scribble ; nimble - ; toggles .
Statements 1 through 10 (on your answer sheet circle + if the statement is true, - if it is false).
1.
Multitasking means doing several things at different times.
2.
Researchers believe multitasking is focusing on several things at the same time.
3.
Most people believe that multitasking makes them more efficient.
4.
Many researchers believe it is good for the brain to perform different tasks at the
same time.
5.
In this article, "toggling" most likely means staying on one task until it's finished.
6.
David Meyer thinks you should talk on the phone and drive at the same time.
7.
The author of this text would most likely agree that you should not do your
homework while watching TV.
8.
Twenty years ago, Dr. Meyer found that people were less efficient when they
multitasked.
9.
Growing evidence shows that multitasking will always slow you down.
10. Chewing gum and driving have the same level of complexity.

TEXT 2

From "Climate Change Warning" by Pete Spotts / www.csmonitor.org, 2010


Already, global warming's fingerprints are evident in broad temperature and pre-cipitation
trends over the past 60 years, say scientists from the two working groups one that focuses
on climate science and one that focuses on assessing the effects and vulnerability. Globally, the
number of warm days and nights has grown, while the number of cold days and nights has decreased. In the United States, researchers have documented an increase in the number of hightemperature records set per decade and a decrease in the number of record lows set. Also
globally, the number of storms delivering a deluge rather than gentle showers has increased in
more regions than those regions recording decreases in intense rain or snowfall a sign that
the warming atmosphere is holding more moisture.
Moreover, a warming climate has contributed to sea-level rise, the report says. This has
led to an increase in incidents of extreme coastal flooding during storms.
Among the changes researchers have tracked, they're most confident in the conclusions
drawn about the changes described above. The picture is more mixed for trends in tropical
cyclone activity, droughts, and river floods globally.
Looking ahead, the report acknowledges that projecting further changes to extremeweather patterns as the climate warms carries significant uncertainties particularly over the
next 20 to 30 years, "because climate-change signals are expected to be relatively small
compared to natural climate variability" over that period.
Still, the report projects with virtual certainty that if greenhouse-gas emissions continue
unabated, temperature extremes will grow warmer and occur more frequently.
By the end of the century, expect heat waves that occur on average every 20 years now to
take place every two years, Field says. Likewise, the number of storms delivering heavy
precipitation by century's end is expected to grow. The storms include tropical cyclones as well
as winter storms in the northern mid-latitudes.

Questions 11 through 15 (on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).
11. How do scientists measure the effects of global warming, according to this article?
A. By looking at temperature, rain, and snow.
B. By measuring how fast ice melts.
C. By counting how many storms there are in a week.
D. By making predictions.
12. What effect is global warming having worldwide?
A. The number of cool days and nights is growing.
B. The salinity of the oceans is rising.
C. The severity of storms is increasing.
D. All of the above answers are correct.
13. What is the antonym of the word "unabated"?
A. Restricted.
B. Freely.
C. Nonstop.
D. Unrelenting.
14. What has been happening in the United States in relation to global warming?
A. There is an increase in the number of record highs.
B. The rainforests are dying.
C. There is an increase in the number of severe storms.
D. The ocean levels are rising.
15. What do scientists believe will happen to the planet in the future?
A. Temperatures extremes will increase and be more frequent.
B. The number of tropical cyclones will decrease.
C. The sea will rise too high.
D. Global weather patterns will remain relatively unchanged.

TEXT 3
From "The Naturalist" by Barry Lopez
Orion Magazine, 2011
My home stands on a wooded bench, set back about two hundred feet from the
north bank of the McKenzie River in western Oregon.
Almost every day I go down to the river with no intention but to sit and watch. I
have been watching the river for thirty years, just the three or four hundred yards of it
I can see from the forested bank, a run of clear, quick water about 350 feet wide.
If I have learned anything here, it's that each time I come down, something I don't
know yet will reveal itself.
If it's a man's intent to spend thirty years staring at a river's environs in order to
arrive at an explanation of the river, he should find some other way to spend his time.
To assert this, that a river can't be known, does not to my way of thinking
denigrate science, any more than saying a brown bear can't be completely known. The
reason this is true is because the river is not a thing, in the way a Saturn V rocket
engine is a thing.
It is an expression of biological life, in dynamic relation to everything around it
the salmon within, the violet-green swallow swooping its surface, alder twigs
floating its current, a mountain lion sipping its bank water, the configurations of basalt
that break its flow and give it timbre and tone.
In my experience with field biologists, those fresh to a task say, caracara
research are the ones most likely to give themselves a deadline ten years, say
against which they will challenge themselves to know all there is to know about that
falcon. It never works.
More seasoned field biologists, not as driven by a need to prove themselves, are
content to concentrate on smaller arenas of knowledge. Instead of speaking
definitively of coyote, armadillo, or widgeon, they tend to say, "This one animal, that
one time, did this in that place."
It's the approach to nature many hunting and gathering peoples take, to this day.
The view suggests a horizon rather than a boundary for knowing, toward which we are
always walking.

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET


Questions 16 through 20
(on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).

TEXT 3

16. Why does the author visit the river every day?
A. To measure its distance.
B. To clear his mind.
C. To look at it.
D. To develop a scientific explanation of the river.
17. Why are a river and a rocket engine different?
A. The river is an expression of nature.
B. A rocket engine can't be completely understood.
C. The author doesn't want to denigrate science.
D. A rocket engine is an expression of nature.
18. Experienced field biologists ...
A. learn everything about a subject.
B. give themselves a deadline.
C. speak with authority on their subjects.
D. limit them to a specific area of study.
19. When the author says that knowledge should be viewed as-a horizon without
boundaries, he means that ...
A. it is impossible to learn everything about a subject.
B. people should become field biologists before studying nature.
C. knowledge is limited those who hunt and gather.
D. it is possible to master a subject only by giving yourself a deadline.
20. By speaking about the river and field biologists, what is the author trying to say
about knowledge?
A. Ten years of study is necessary in order to speak definitively on a subject.
B. Knowledge is not a destination so much as a path or habit.
C. Knowledge about nature is more important than knowledge about science.
D. People should not try to develop their knowledge, because it's impossible to
learn all there is to know about a subject.

TEXT 4
From "The Shallows: How the Internet Is Changing the Way We Read,
Think, and Remember" by Nicholas Carr
2010

The Dutch humanist Desiderius Erasmus, in his 1512 textbook De Copia,


stressed the connection between memory and reading.
He urged students to annotate their books, using "an appropriate little sign" to
mark "occurrences of striking words, archaic or novel diction, brilliant flashes of
style, adages, examples, and pithy remarks worth memorizing."
He also suggested that every student and teacher keep a notebook, organized by
subject, "so that whenever he lights on anything worth noting down, he may write it
in the appropriate section." Transcribing the excerpts in longhand, and rehearsing
them regularly, would help ensure that they remained fixed in the mind.
The passages were to be viewed as "kinds of flowers," which, plucked from the
pages of books, could be preserved in the pages of memory.
Erasmus, who as a schoolboy had memorized great swathes of classical
literature, including the complete works of the poet Horace and the playwright
Terence, was not recommending memorization for memorization's sake or as a
rote exercise for retaining facts.
To him memorizing was far more than a means of storage. It was the first step
in a process of synthesis, a process that led to a deeper and more personal
understanding of one's reading.
He believed, as the classical historian Erika Rummel explains, that a person
should "digest or internalize what he learns and reflect rather than slavishly
reproduce the desirable qualities of the model author."
Far from being a mechanical mindless process, Erasmus's brand of
memorization engaged the mind fully. It required, Rummel writes, "creativeness
and judgment."

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.

Questions 21 through 25
TEXT 4
(on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).

21. Which of the following did Erasmus not offer people advice on?
A. How to remember more clearly.
B. How to memorize better.
C. How to annotate their books.
D. How to organize subjects.
22. Erasmus encouraged people to do the following to books they were reading.
A. Make notes at interesting parts.
B. Make connections between memory and reading.
C. Memorize them entirely.
D. Clean them often.
23. For Erasmus, memorizing texts was ...
A. a mechanical process.
B. a way to keep a notebook.
C. a deeper understanding and relationship to the text.
D. a means of storing vast amounts of information about a topic.
24. What is meant by "memorization for memorization's sake"?
A. For no other purpose but to recall material.
B. Contributing to a deeper understanding of the text.
C. The process of analysis.
D. To better retain his memorization notebooks.
25. Which best describes Erasmus' view of memory?
A. A way to remember important dates and quotes.
B. A part in the process of understanding something.
C. A way to read better.
D. A mechanical, mindless process.

TEXT 5
From "Game of Her Life" by Tim Crothers
ESPN Magazine, 2011
Agape Church could collapse at any moment. It is a ramshackle structure that lists
alarmingly to one side, held together by scrap wood, rope, a few nails and faith. It is
rickety, like everything else around it.
At the church on this Saturday morning in September are 37 children whose lives
are equally fragile. They wander in to play a game none had heard of before they met
Coach Robert, a game so foreign that there's no word for it in Luganda, their native
language. Chess.
When they walk through the door, grins crease their faces. This is home as much
as any place, a refuge, the only community they know. These are their friends, their
brothers and sisters of chess, and there is relative safety and comfort here.
Inside Agape Church it is almost possible to forget the chaos outside, in Katwe,
the largest of eight slums in Kampala, Uganda, and one of the worst places on earth.
There are only seven chessboards at the church, and chess pieces are so scarce
that sometimes an orphan pawn must stand in for a king. A child sits on each end of a
wobbly pew, both straddling the board between their knobby knees, with captured
pieces guarded in their laps.
A 5-year-old kid in a threadbare Denver Broncos No. 7 jersey competes against
an 11-year-old in a frayed T-shirt that reads "J'Adore Paris". Most of the kids are
barefoot. Some wear flip-flops. One has on black wing tips with no laces.
It is rapid-fire street chess. When more than a few seconds elapse without a move,
there is a palpable restlessness.
It is remarkably quiet except for the thud of one piece slaying another and the
occasional dispute over the location of a piece on a chessboard so faded that the dark
spaces are barely distinguishable from the light ones. Surrender is signaled by a
clattering of captured pieces on the board. A new match begins immediately without
the slightest celebration.
Coach Robert Katende is here. So are Benjamin and Ivan and Brian. And up near
the pulpit sits Phiona.
One of two girls in the room, Phiona is juggling three matches at once and
dominating them with her aggressive style, checkmating her young opponents while
drawing a flower in the dirt on the floor with her toe. Phiona is 14, and her stone face
gives no sign that the next day she will travel to Siberia to compete against the very
best chess players in the world.

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOOKLET.

Questions 26 through 30
(on your answer sheet circle the correct letter , , C or D).
26. "Luganda" is...
A. a country.
B. a language.
C. the name of the church.
D. a colloquial dialect.
27. "Palpable" means the same as....
A. unable to be detected.
B. able to be sensed.
C. unable to be heard.
D. able to be seen.
28. What is the author's tone toward chess games played in Agape Church?
A. Incredulous.
B. Interested.
C. Resentful.
D. Indifferent.
29. "Stone faced" can best be described as ...
A. emotionless.
B. hard.
C. elated.
D. somber.
30. Coach Robert introduced chess to the children because he wanted...
A. to give the children an after-school activity.
B. to teach them logical thought process.
C. them to be more involved with the church.
D. the text does not specify his reasons.

ROUND III

SPEAKING COMPREHENSION TEST


FOR 11th FORM STUDENTS
DIRECTIONS
In this test you will select three task slips from those before you. After selecting three, choose the
one you feel you are most capable to speak about and return the other two to the table face down. Then take about a minute to
collect your thoughts before you begin to speak on the topic. Take a deep breath and begin.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

Many people are distrustful of modern medicine. They believe that natural medicines from
herbs and plants work much better.
Do you think using natural medicine is a valid form of treatment? Why / why not?
Some argue that laughter is a better cure than any medicine. Do you agree?
Some say that curing illnesses is more mental than physical. Do you agree?
It is said that first impressions are the most important. Perhaps for this reason, both men and
women spend a lot of time and money on their appearance in an attempt to keep up with the
latest trends. How does beauty affect one's success in life? What are the different standards
of beauty in Ukraine for men and women?
Is there more pressure on women to modify their appearance than men?
Each country has different rules of etiquette and behavior.
Why is it important to respect the rules of etiquette in a foreign country?
What practices have you heard about or come into contact with that seemed strange to how
you were raised?
Are there any common rules of etiquette in Ukraine that you believe are outdated?
Leo Tolstoy wrote, "Art is a human activity which has as its purpose the transmission to
others of the highest and best feelings to which men have risen."
How can art reflect our personal ideals? Do you think we can learn from different forms of
art? How does art communicate the values of a culture? Give an example.
The Internet and television have made the world a much smaller place, as virtually everybody is
aware of pop culture icons like Paris Hilton and Lady Gaga. Is it important to keep up with pop
culture? Why or why not? If you stopped paying attention to pop culture, how would your life
be different? How does pop culture create similar interests in people throughout the world,
regardless of nationality?
Athletics are very popular among the nation's youth. They are a good way to maintain a
healthy lifestyle, and they help kids to develop skills as a team player as well as an athlete.
Do you think kids should be forced to participate in athletics while growing up? How does
competition among peers influence their development into adulthood? If a child is not
interested in athletics, what are viable alternatives and what skills can they develop?
How would you explain diversity to a person who has lived in a homogenous society where
everyone looks the same? What examples can you give to explain this? Is it important to
live in a place where there is diversity? How does living in a society influence a person's
worldview?
Imagine that you are a villain from your favorite book or movie. Give an apology to the hero
of the book or movie. Why would society look down on your past actions?
How would you make amends? Do you believe it is possible to find redemption or do we
always live with the consequences of our actions in the past?
Some people believe it is important to share wisdom with future generations so that they
avoid making the same mistakes. Imagine that you are speaking to your future
granddaughter or grandson about the lessons you have learned so far in your life.
What life lessons would you like to share and why are they important?
What traditions do you hope he or she will carry on in the future?
What constitutes wisdom and what makes you qualified to pass it on?

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

Multimedia has become extremely advanced within the last decade. What is your view on
media in the 21st century? Is it good that people can have access to almost anything
through the Internet? Why /why not? In your opinion, what are the benefits of the advances
in media? What do you imagine media will be like by the year 2025?
In many cultures age is regarded differently, either as a positive or a negative attribute.
How are cultural values reflected in the way elders are treated?
How are the elderly regarded in Ukrainian culture? What are the advantages and
disadvantages of a society that places more value on youth?
In today's world, taking care of your body has become very important as more and more
people choose not to smoke, exercise regularly, and are very careful about the types of food
they put in their body. Becoming a vegetarian is an increasingly popular lifestyle decision
all over the world. What is the effect of consuming meat on our bodies? What is the effect
of consuming meat on the environment? What are the challenges of being a vegetarian in
Ukraine? How do Ukrainians typically view vegetarians?
Extreme sports have become increasingly popular in today's society. The X Games
competitions demonstrate how popular these sports have become.
Would you ever participate in an extreme sport like sky diving or snowboarding? Why or
why not? Do you think these sports require more or less training than sports like football,
hockey, and basketball? Why or why not? Do you believe an athlete who wins a gold
medal in curling or snowboarding is as athletic as an athlete who wins a gold medal in
football or gymnastics? Why or why not?
Parents often have certain expectations for their children regarding education, career, and
life choices. Do you think it is more important to listen to your parents or follow your heart?
How do parental expectations affect the lives of their children?
What societal factors shape parental expectation?
Mark Twain wrote, "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness. Broad,
wholesome, charitable views cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth."
How do you interpret Twain's statement? Is it necessary to travel in order to develop an
understating of other peoples? Why or why not?
What are other ways of learning to be open-minded and tolerant?
Many people around the world volunteer on a regular basis. What kinds of services do
volunteers provide that government or private companies do not? Why would someone work
for free? In what ways could the Euro 2012 tournament affect volunteerism in Ukraine?
In life you are sometimes required to work with people whom you do not like or agree with.
Some people do not voice their opinions because they are afraid of conflict. What is the
correct balance between keeping the peace and voicing your opinion? How does success in
the workplace depend on teamwork? How would one's strategy for cooperation change
from dealing with a difficult boss to a difficult coworker?
Friendships are a very important part of life. What is the process of a person changing from
being an acquaintance to a friend? How do people balance their romantic relationships with
their friendships? Is it possible to be close friends with someone from the opposite sex in a
non-romantic way? Why or why not?
In recent years there have been many breakthroughs in genetic engineering. What factors
should be considered in genetically engineering food products? Do you think that eating
food that has been genetically modified is unhealthy? Are there benefits to producing genetically modified foods? Do you think that people should have this power? Why / why not?
Imagine you had the power to change one historical event. However, this action would
create a chain reaction which would result in you never being born.
What event would you change? Why? What would be the consequences of you never being
born? Is it better to sacrifice one person for the benefit of all or not?

ROUND IV
WRITING COMPREHENSION TEST
FOR 11th FORM STUDENTS
DIRECTIONS
In this test you will select from three writing tasks.
Choose the one that you feel you are most capable to write about.
You will then begin writing your essay on the pages provided.
When you are finished close your papers, lay down your pen and wait for us to collect
your test materials.
STUDENT NUMBER: .

1.

Every day of our lives we are bombarded with advertising images and messages
in the supermarket, on billboards, on television, etc.
Do you think advertising reflects the products that people want or do
people want these products because of advertising?
What influences does advertising have on our culture?
What would life be like without advertising?

2.

Imagine you are faced with a difficult decision; choosing a career that
guarantees financial security or a career that you are passionate about but is
financially unwise.
Which would you choose and what factors would affect your decision?
What outside influences may sway your decision?
Does money guarantee happiness or is passion enough to keep you content?

3.

Watching films and TV shows is a popular pastime among teenagers today.


As such, not many young people enjoy reading books anymore.
Do you think that this is a good change or a bad one?
What are the advantages and disadvantages of watching films as opposed
to reading a book?
How do you think this shift in teenagers' choice of entertainment will affect
them as they get older?

TEACHER'S BOOKLET
FORM 9
LISTENING COMPREHENSION TEST FOR 9th FORM STUDENTS
From "The Hazards of the Couch" by Ronnie Caryn Rabin The New York Times, 2011

Many of us sit in front of a computer for eight hours a day, and then go home and
head for the couch to surf the Web or watch television, exchanging one seat and
screen for another. Even if we try to squeeze in an hour at the gym, is it enough to
counteract all that motionless sitting? A mounting body of evidence suggests not.
Increasingly, research is focusing not on how much exercise people get, but how
much of their time is spent in sedentary activity, and the harm that does.
The latest findings, published this week in The Journal of the American College of
Cardiology, indicate the amount of leisure time spent sitting in front of a screen can
have such an overwhelming, seemingly irreparable impact on one's health that
physical activity doesn't produce much benefit.
The study followed 4,512 middle-aged Scottish men for a little more than four years
on average. It found that those who said they spent two or more leisure hours a day
sitting in front of a screen were at double the risk of a heart attack or other cardiac
event compared with those who watched less.
Those who spent four or more hours of recreational time in front of a screen were 50
percent more likely to die of any cause.
It didn't matter whether the men were physically active for several hours a week
exercise didn't mitigate the risk associated with the high amount of sedentary screen
time.
The study is not the first to suggest that sedentary activities like television viewing
may be harmful.
A study last year found that men who spent more than 23 hours a week watching TV
and sitting in their cars were more likely to die of heart disease than those who sat for
11 hours a week or less, even if they exercised.
And a 2009 study reported that young children who watch one and a half to five and a
half hours of TV a day have higher blood pressure readings than those who watch less
than half an hour, even if they are thin and physically active.
Another small study found that when overweight adults cut their TV time in half, they
burned more calories than those who watched five hours or more a day.
Children whose TV time is cut tended to eat less, but that wasn't true for adults. And
the light activities adults filled their time with, like reading and playing board games,
actually burned more calories than watching TV.
In both the United States and Britain, people are spending three to four hours a day on
average watching television, said the study's author, Dr. Emmanuel Stama-takis, of the
department of epidemiology and public health at University College London.
"This is excessive," he said. "It is more than 20 percent of total waking time for most
people." And, he added, "it's 100 percent discretionary."
Please write the following words and translations on the blackboard prior to reading the text.

Sedentary .

TEACHER'S BOOKLET

FORM 10
LISTENING COMPREHENSION TEST FOR 10th FORM STUDENTS
From "Humans Take on Computer in Jeopardy" by Joyce Grant Teaching Kids News, 2011
In 1997, there was a very famous chess match. The world champion chess player, Gary Kasparov,
went up against a special challenger: a computer.
The computer was called "Deep Blue" and it was built by IBM just to play chess. Deep Blue won
the six-game chess match.
This year, IBM came up with a new challenge. They decided to build a computer that could match
wits with two humans on a game show called Jeopardy. The computer is called "Watson", and its
"brain power" is equal to thousands of home computers.
Playing chess is something computers can do very well because it relies on quickly deciding
between different moves.
However, answering questions and understanding English is not something computers do well. In
Jeopardy, the questions may include riddles, puns and cultural references. These are things humans
are good at, but computers are not.
That's because human language often uses pictures -metaphors - that don't always make sense
when they're taken at face value.
For instance, if you said, "I ran like a deer!" your friend would know that you ran fast - not that
you had four legs or were running through a forest. Computers need to "learn" those kinds of word
pictures.
IBM wanted to prove they could make a computer that could understand many difficult things
about the English language. Watson took on Jeopardy's two biggest all-time winners: Brad Rutter
and Ken Jennings.
It took four years to get Watson ready to play humans on Jeopardy. Its memory banks are filled
with encyclopaedias, the Internet movie database, New York Times articles and the Bible. It also
knows thousands of correctly answered Jeopardy questions.
So, how did Watson do? Great! In fact, the computer won the two-day contest. But it wasn't a
runaway victory.
In fact, the very first question was won by human contestant Brad Rutter. And Watson got some
answers wrong. For instance, the computer incorrectly answered this question in the category "US
cities":
"Its largest airport is named for a WWII hero; its second-largest for a WWII battle."
Watson answered: "Toronto". Toronto? That's not even a US city, it's the capital of Ontario,
Canada! How could Watson have gotten that one so wrong?
It turns out that Watson was programmed to not think very much about the category, so it wasn't
really thinking of a US city - it was focused on the WWII part of the question. Both humans
answered correctly: Chicago. In any case, Watson went on to win that game.
In the second game, Watson knew most of the answers, but was just too slow buzzing in so the
humans got a lot of points on him.
The fact that humans could figure out answers and buzz in more quickly than Watson, an
extremely powerful computer, shows how complex the human brain really is.
By the end of game two, Watson had won the match with more than $77,000. Jennings came in
second with a two-game total of $24,000 and Brad Rutter came third with $21,600.
What's next for Watson? Watson's Jeopardy win is historical.
It means that computers can do much more than most people thought they could. Watson's "brain"
will now be used in hospitals to diagnose and treat patients. It will also be used to give doctors
information.

TEACHER'S BOOKLET

FORM 11
LISTENING COMPREHENSION TEST FOR 11th FORM STUDENTS
From "How Many Notes Would a Virtuoso Violinist Pay for a Stradivarius?"
by Ian Sample
The Guardian, 2012
They are deemed to be among the most exquisite musical instruments ever made, and collectors
have parted with millions just to have one to call their own.
But it appears that concert violinists cannot tell from the sound alone whether they are playing a
300-year-old Stradivarius or an instrument made last week. And, for playing quality alone, the
virtuoso will opt for the modern one when asked which fiddle they would like to take home.
These discordant findings emerge from experiments by Claudia Fritz, a researcher at the
University of Paris, at an international violin competition in Indianapolis in 2010.
She asked 21 musicians to play six different violins, three modern instruments and three by Italian
maestros one made by Guarneri del Gesu around 1740, and two made in Antonio Stradivari's
workshop around 1700.
Fritz commandeered a large room, dimmed the lights and passed the violins in random order to the
musicians, who had to wear welders' goggles and stand on the other side of a dividing curtain.
Each had time to play the six instruments and rank them according to their playability, projection,
response and "tone colours", a measure of the quality of the sound.
Writing in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Fritz and her co-authors
describe their findings as a "striking challenge to conventional wisdom".
The violinists mostly preferred new instruments, and overall they were least keen on one of the
two Stradivarius. And, when each had chosen their favourite violin out of the six, they could not
say whether it was old or new.
The researchers could find no link between the age and value of the violins and how they were
rated by the violinists.
The three old instruments had a combined value of $ 10m, a hundred times that of the modern
violins. "They are beautiful instruments, but the prices are insane," Fritz said. "The old versus new
issue doesn't make any sense." "It doesn't matter if the violin's old or new, all that matters is
whether it's a good violin or a bad violin. Many modern violin makers are doing a great job."
One shortcoming of the study was that the violinists were asked to rate a particular instrument's
projection, how well its sound travels, themselves. Another was that only a few violins were
tested.
Kai-Thomas Roth, secretary of the British Violin Making Association, said that double blind tests,
where neither experimenter nor musician knows which violin is played, had already shown people
cannot distinguish a modern violin from a priceless work of art.
"There's some myth-making that helps old instruments," Thomas said. "If you give someone a
Stradivari and it doesn't work for them, they'll blame themselves and work hard at it until it works.
Give them a modern violin, and they'll dismiss the instrument straight away if it doesn't work for
them. That's the psychology at work. Modern violins are easily as good, but even a good maker
can make an instrument that doesn't work out."

Please write the following words and translations on the blackboard prior to reading the text.
Fiddle - .

ANSWER SHEET
OFFICIAL RECORD KEEPER BOOKLET

READING AND LISTENING COMPREHENSION

FORM ..

LISTENING COMPREHENSION

1
2
3
4
5

+
+
+
+
+

SECTION 1
6 +
7 +
8 +
9 +
10 +
-

11
12
13
14
15

A
A
A
A
A

B
B
B
B
B

C
C
C
C
C

SECTION 2
D
16
D
17
D
18
D
19
D
20

A
A
A
A
A

B
B
B
B
B

C
C
C
C
C

D
D
D
D
D

READING COMPREHENSION

1
2
3
4
5

+
+
+
+
+

TEXT 1
6
7
8
9
10
-

+
+
+
+
+

11
12
13
14
15

TEXT 2
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

16
17
18
19
20

TEXT 3
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

21
22
23
24
25

TEXT 4
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

26
27
28
29
30

TEXT 5
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

WRITING COMPREHENSION

ANSWER KEYS
READING AND LISTENING COMPREHENSION

FORM 9

LISTENING COMPREHENSION

1
2
3
4
5

+
+
+
+
+

SECTION 1
6 +
7 +
8 +
9 +
10 +
-

11
12
13
14
15

A
A
A
A
A

B
B
B
B
B

C
C
C
C
C

SECTION 2
D
16
D
17
D
18
D
19
D
20

A
A
A
A
A

B
B
B
B
B

C
C
C
C
C

D
D
D
D
D

READING COMPREHENSION

1
2
3
4
5

+
+
+
+
+

TEXT 1
6
7
8
9
10
-

+
+
+
+
+

11
12
13
14
15

TEXT 2
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

16
17
18
19
20

TEXT 3
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

21
22
23
24
25

TEXT 4
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

26
27
28
29
30

TEXT 5
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

ANSWER KEYS
READING AND LISTENING COMPREHENSION

FORM 10

LISTENING COMPREHENSION

1
2
3
4
5

+
+
+
+
+

SECTION 1
6 +
7 +
8 +
9 +
10 +
-

11
12
13
14
15

A
A
A
A
A

B
B
B
B
B

C
C
C
C
C

SECTION 2
D
16
D
17
D
18
D
19
D
20

A
A
A
A
A

B
B
B
B
B

C
C
C
C
C

D
D
D
D
D

READING COMPREHENSION

1
2
3
4
5

+
+
+
+
+

TEXT 1
6
7
8
9
10
-

+
+
+
+
+

11
12
13
14
15

TEXT 2
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

16
17
18
19
20

TEXT 3
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

21
22
23
24
25

TEXT 4
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

26
27
28
29
30

TEXT 5
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

ANSWER KEYS
READING AND LISTENING COMPREHENSION

FORM 11

LISTENING COMPREHENSION

1
2
3
4
5

+
+
+
+
+

SECTION 1
6 +
7 +
8 +
9 +
10 +
-

11
12
13
14
15

A
A
A
A
A

B
B
B
B
B

C
C
C
C
C

SECTION 2
D
16
D
17
D
18
D
19
D
20

A
A
A
A
A

B
B
B
B
B

C
C
C
C
C

D
D
D
D
D

READING COMPREHENSION

1
2
3
4
5

+
+
+
+
+

TEXT 1
6
7
8
9
10
-

+
+
+
+
+

11
12
13
14
15

TEXT 2
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

16
17
18
19
20

TEXT 3
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

21
22
23
24
25

TEXT 4
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

26
27
28
29
30

TEXT 5
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

D
D
D
D
D

UKRAINIAN NATIONAL STUDENTS OLYMPIAD IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

STAGE IV

2012

STUDENT'S BOOKLET

DO NOT OPEN THIS BOOKLET UNTIL ADVISED BY THE TEACHER.

DICTIONARIES ARE NOT ALLOWED.

STUDENT NUMBER ...............

FORM ....

NAME ..