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English Language

Marshall

Cavendish

Teacher’s
Guide
6
Unit 6: Family

Scheme of Work
Lesson Plans
Resource Sheet

2
4
23

Dr Cheah Yin Mee • Tan See Keen
Project Advisor: Dr Beverly Derewianka

(E)MCEngELTG6_06.indd 1

30/12/14 10:12 AM

Scheme of Work
Unit 6: Family
Suggested No.
of Periods

Learning Objectives

References

Resource Sheets

1

Reading and Responding
to the Text (Visual Text
Comprehension)
• Read and understand a
visual text at the literal and
inferential levels.
• Use reading strategies to
make sense of a visual text.

• Practice Sheet 1
pages 48–51:
Visual Text
Comprehension

2

Reading and Responding to the
Text (Comprehension)
• Read and respond to a
narrative.
• Know the different parts of a
narrative.
• Read and understand a
narrative at the literal and
inferential levels.
• Use reading strategies to
make sense of a narrative.

• Practice Sheet 2
pages 52–55:
Comprehension

• TG Appendix 1A:
Writing Text Frames
– The Narrative
Text Frame

2

Grammar
• Show an understanding of
grammatical rules at the
word, phrase and sentence
levels.
• Extend sentences in a variety
of ways.
• Complete a grammar cloze
text.

• Practice Sheet 3
page 56:
Comprehension Cloze

• TG pages 23 and 24:
Resource 6.1
Sentence Extension

• Practice Sheet 4
page 57:
Sentence Extension
• Practice Sheet 4 (A)
page 58:
Sentence Extension
• Practice Sheet 4 (B)
pages 59 and 60:
Grammar Cloze

2

Unit 6

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© 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd

30/12/14 10:12 AM

• Practice Sheet 6 page 63: Continuous Writing Resource Sheets • TG Appendices 1A–1E: Writing Text Frames • TG Appendix 2: Writing Checklist • TG Appendix 3: Writing Rubrics Self-Monitoring • Use a writing checklist to monitor writing. • Practice Sheet 5 pages 61 and 62: Situational Writing Continuous Writing • Write a composition based on a given theme and set of pictures. of Periods 3 Learning Objectives References Situational Writing • Write a letter based on a given situation. 2 2 Listening • Listen and show an understanding of seven texts at the literal and inferential levels. • Practice Sheet 7 pages 64–68: Listening Comprehension Oral • Read aloud a given passage. • Have a conversation based on a given pictorial stimulus. © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd (E)MCEngELTG6_06. • Use rubrics to review and improve writing.Suggested No.indd 3 pages 77–79: Listening Script • Practice Sheet 9 page 70: Stimulus-based Conversation • TG Appendix 4: Reading Aloud Rubrics • TG Appendix 5: Rubrics for Stimulusbased Conversation Family 3 30/12/14 10:12 AM . • Practice Sheet 8 page 69: Reading Aloud Self-Monitoring • Use rubrics to review and improve oral performance.

READING AND RESPONDING TO THE TEXT (VISUAL TEXT COMPREHENSION) Visual Text Summary: The pamphlet invites primary school children to participate in a story-writing contest. Special Family My Examples: My Special Family Writing Contest. Prizes Writing Contest Do you have a special family story to tell? Does your family have a special talent? Do you have a heartwarming family story that celebrates love and courage? If you do. “This contest has produced so many amazing and inspiring stories over the years — stories that will move even the hardest of hearts. model the reading process. based on a real experience that your family members had • Add captivating photographs that make your story come alive Prizes • $100 cash • Free copies of the quarterly Family Story magazine 48 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. Practise one or two strategies listed below.indd 4 2/12/14 7:47 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd 30/12/14 10:12 AM (E)MCEPP . Criteria. join the My Special Family Writing Contest and share your story. unique family members) Reading Strategy: Predict Get pupils to predict what the text is about by looking at the title and subheadings. As you read the pamphlet with pupils. it 6 P Un Un it 6 Family c ra tice Shee 1 t (b) During Reading Good readers use reading strategies to make sense of a text. Family Date: Visual Text Comprehension Study this pamphlet carefully and then answer questions 1 to 8. Stories that move our judges will be published in the Family Story magazine.indd 48 4 Unit 6 (E)MCEngELTG6_06.” — Adrian Safian. Instructional Procedure: (a) Before Reading Explain to pupils what a visual text comprehension is and its requirements. judge and prize-winning author Criteria • Open to primary school children only • Write an original story. Ask pupils to scan the visual text itself and ask questions such as: • What type of visual text is this? (a pamphlet) • What is it about? (a writing contest) • Who is it targetting? (primary school children) • What is the purpose of the visual text? (to invite children to join a writing contest) • What do the pictures suggest at first glance? (family.

• Are the stories moving? • Do the stories contain interesting descriptions? • Are the stories concise yet meaningful? Narratives Past Winning Entries Brave Daisy My Famous Great Grandpa My sister. 12 Visit www. Ask pupils why these winning entries have been showcased in the pamphlet. she has never whined about the loss of the use of her legs nor her freedom. Daisy. to Singapore. Ask them why they think these entries have been selected by the judges.specialfamily. However. she puts on a smile and brings cheer to everyone in the family. She challenges herself to try everything from swimming to even riding on a roller coaster. He has inspired me to have the same passion for serving others. by Denise de Souza. is the bravest girl I have ever known. Instead. 49 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. Our Partners Organised by Family Services (c) After Reading Ask pupils to identify the type of texts featured in the pamphlet by studying the text and language features: • Exposition Introduction – Use of questions to attract readers to join the contest Example: Do you have a special family story to tell? Quotation – Use of convincing descriptions by a prize-winning author. judge and prize-winning author • Recount Past Winning Entries – Use of personal pronouns in recounting a series of events Examples: – My sister. 11 by Leo Tan. by boat in 1898. – I have a greatgrandfather who was an extraordinary philanthropist in Singapore. she was involved in a terrible car accident that left her wheelchairbound. Get pupils to refer to the criteria in the pamphlet.com for winning entries and more information about the contest. He left everything back in Fujian and brought my great-grandmother and grandfather.indd 5 Family 5 30/12/14 10:12 AM ./14 7:47 am Reading Strategy: Evaluate Evaluating is a skill that readers use when reading and critically thinking about a particular text. China. I have a great-grandfather who was an extraordinary philanthropist in Singapore. is the bravest girl I have ever known. who was only a baby then.indd 49 2/12/14 7:47 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd (E)MCEngELTG6_06. a credible source Example: This contest has produced so many amazing and inspiring stories over the years –– stories that will move even the hardest of hearts. Daisy. He came to Singapore from Fujian. — Adrian Safian. He contributed money to help start many schools and orphanages. A year ago.

China.READING AND RESPONDING TO THE TEXT (Continued) Narratives it Un 6 Family For each question from 1 to 8. • Who – Identify someone. 4. What did Leo Tan think was most “extraordinary” about his great-grandfather? (1) He came to Singapore from China by boat. (2) He was dedicated to helping others in need. • How – Describe the manner in which something happens. (4) He left everything he had behind in Fujian. ) ) ( ) ( ) Family Services The Wise Owl School Books Galore Company National Family Association 8. ( ) 50 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. 2. ( ) 5. (1) write stories like him (2) read his prize-winning stories (3) do something inspiring for others (4) read the stories featured in the writing contest 3. Who wrote the stories featured in this contest? (1) parents (2) children (3) teachers (4) professional writers 7. The quote by Adrian Safian is mainly used to get readers to .indd 51 2/12/14 7:47 am Reading Strategy: Annotate Get pupils to underline key words in each question to find out its exact requirements. ask them what the following key words mean: • What / Which – Look for something specific. For example. ( ) . 6 Unit 6 (E)MCEngELTG6_06. Why are questions used at the start of the pamphlet? (1) to interview the readers (2) to make a survey of readers’ opinions (3) to attract readers to share their family stories (4) to get readers to participate in a family talent contest 2. choose the most appropriate option (1.indd 50 51 2/12/14 7:47 am (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. The main purpose of the pamphlet is to invite readers to (1) win a free magazine (2) trace their family history (3) learn how to be a good writer (4) participate in a writing contest . A winning entry is a story that (1) has an interesting idea (2) is accompanied by photographs (3) touches the hearts of the judges (4) meets the requirements of the contest ( ( 6. • Why – Give a reason.indd 6 © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd 30/12/14 10:12 AM . (8 marks) 1. 3 or 4) and write your answer in the brackets provided. • Where – Locate a place. (3) He brought a wife and a baby son to Singapore. How many times a year is the Family Story magazine published? (1) one (2) two (3) three (4) four (1) (2) (3) (4) ( ) organises the writing contest.

I can’t feed myself or take myself to the bathroom. I usually ignore them and act like the disabled person they think I am. who has cerebral palsy (who). dark. Use the narrative text frame to help pupils understand and remember what they read. Ask them to review the language features of a narrative –– orientation. I knew this was bad.indd 7 Family 7 30/12/14 10:12 AM . a girl with cerebral palsy. (20 marks) I was born with cerebral palsy1. Ask pupils to predict the problem in the story. As a result. But didn’t he know I couldn’t grab the blocks? So I took my arm and swept them all to the floor. 5 I have seen dozens of doctors. Reading Strategy: Find the Organisational Pattern The way information is organised in a text can help pupils make meaningful connections. (b) During Reading Good readers use reading strategies to make sense of a text. takes her to a doctor’s clinic (where) for an assessment (why). He spoke to Mom as if I could not understand their conversation. What is touching about the story is how her mother sticks by her through her struggles and gives her strength and hope. I can’t talk. she faces many struggles to fit into mainstream society as people perceive and treat her differently. it is my opinion that Melody is severely brain-damaged and profoundly retarded. it was time to think about enrolling me in school. resolution and ending. Of course I knew which block was bigger than the other. As you read the story with pupils. it c ra tice Shee 2 t P Un 6 Family Date: Comprehension Read this passage and answer the questions that follow. brought out a stack of wooden blocks. but everything was stuck in my head. When I turned five. a trained nurse. Practise one or two strategies listed below. who was a large stocky man. When people look at me. Instructional Procedure: (a) Before Reading Text Type: Ask pupils if they know of any good family stories. then protested quietly.indd 52 2/12/14 7:47 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd (E)MCEngELTG6_06. 52 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. Dr Hugely. Reading Strategy: Predict This story centres on a girl. gasped. a condition of the brain that affects her muscle control. He asked if I could stack them in order according to size. Melody. As a result. Her mother wishes to enrol her in school and thus. I can’t walk. Mom. problem. I knew things children of my age were supposed to know.” Appendix 1A: Writing Text Frames – The Narrative Text Frame Get pupils to use the text frame to help them understand what they are reading. 10 15 20 Whoa! That was so unkind. Even though I was only five. “Mrs Brooks. Have pupils read the story quickly and see how close their prediction was. I guess they see a girl with short. The specialist. but none of them can help me. I can see it in her eyes. Dr Hugely would never be smart enough to see the inside of me.READING AND RESPONDING TO THE TEXT (COMPREHENSION) Text Summary: This is a story of Melody. curly hair strapped into a wheelchair. model the reading process. “But I know she’s bright. so Mom took me to a doctor to figure out how smart I was.” 1 Cerebral palsy: A condition of the brain that affects a person’s control over his or her muscles.

30 Finally. by distinguished author.” (line 35) • “I trembled as Mom took it. I trembled as Mom took it. That’s a perfect age for her to adjust to a new environment. She was losing control of herself. “Melody is. I suddenly felt a new hope welling up within me that day.” (line 37) • “I gulped nervously.indd 8 2/12/14 7:47 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd 31/12/14 12:04 PM . 35 Dr Hugely pulled out a colourful brochure with a smiling child using a wheelchair on the cover. Out Of My Mind.” (c) After Reading Reading Strategy: Synthesise Get pupils to draw conclusions: • How did the story end? • Do you think that this is a good resolution to the story? Give a reason. or put her in a nursing home where she can be cared for. 50 The story above is adapted from the book. her voice replaced by desperation. “right at the punch line. ah. to Dr Hugely’s bewilderment. then protested quietly …” (line 23) • “Mom mewed like a kitten. Sharon M. Get pupils to underline the sensory descriptions and infer how each character felt in this story.” Mom mewed like a kitten.Reading Strategy: Infer Writers describe the senses such as sight. a trained nurse. Dr Hugely had to give her a whole box of tissues. Doctor. “You can choose to keep Melody at home. Mom stared daggers at Dr Hugely. send her to an institution for the disabled.” Mom hardly ever cries but she cried and cried that day. he gave her options.” my mother insisted. 53 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06.” (lines 42 and 43) • “She angrily hurled the brochure into the trash bin …” (line 46) Narratives “You love her. sound and movement to tell us how the characters feel. Does the ending to this story have a more definite resolution? 45 Because Mom refused to let my condition define me. he did not do a good job. In time. Then she said. gasped. It’s normal to have wishful thinking. Was I a burden? Would it be easier for them if I were not around? I gulped nervously. I did not want to be sent away. Get pupils to compare the ending of this story with the endings of the narratives in the previous units. This book was chosen as the winner of the 2013 Sasquatch Reading Award. I am so blessed to have a mother who believes in me. “Let me tell you something. You and your husband can get on with your lives without her as a burden. her memories of you will fade. • “Mom.indd 53 8 Unit 6 (E)MCEngELTG6_06. 40 I stared at Mom desperately. and vowed she would send me to school with or without his help. 25 “She laughs at jokes. Although he tried to find nice words to say.” Dr Hugely said gently. five now. Draper. There is no way we will be sending Melody away to a nursing home!” She angrily hurled the brochure into the trash bin.

ask them what the following key words and phrases mean: • What / Which – Look for something specific.indd 55 2/12/14 7:47 am Reading Strategy: Respond to the Text Divide the class into two groups (proposition and opposition). (2m) 3. This strategy helps pupils to expand their understanding of the text by listening to the ideas and opinions of others. (1m) Angry at Dr Hugely’s suggestion to send Melody to a nursing home 4. Get pupils to discuss the two points of view based on this question: Do you think Melody should go to school or a nursing home? Both groups should substantiate their points of view with evidence from the passage. (2m) (i) 5. “Mrs Brooks. • Where – Locate a place. Choose words from lines 17–34 which have similar meanings to the words below. How do we know that Melody was as smart as her peers but struggled to express her intelligence? (2m) 9. (3m) seriously objected possibilities 54 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. What does “them” refer to and why does she ignore them? (2m) 7. Write 1.Narratives it Un 6 Family 1. Why did Mrs Brooks take Melody to see Dr Hugely? (2m) (ii) 8. Write both groups’ contributions on the board. Melody states “I usually ignore them …” (line 7). Explain fully why Mrs Brooks “stared daggers at Dr Hugely” (line 44). What could Melody do that made Mrs Brooks say she was smart? (2m) (ii) 6. it is my opinion that Melody is severely brain-damaged and profoundly retarded. • Who – Identify someone. • How – Describe the manner in which something happens. Mrs Brooks went through a series of emotions in the passage. • Why – Give a reason. • Explain fully … • Give two reasons … © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd (E)MCEngELTG6_06.indd 9 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06.” (lines 18–20) What does Dr Hugely’s use of these words tell you about his attitude towards Melody’s situation? (2m) Anxious to find out the doctor’s assessment of Melody Discouraged by Dr Hugely’s assessment of Melody’s condition 10. 2 and 3 in the blanks below to indicate the order of her feelings. For example. Give two reasons why Melody should go to school instead of a nursing home. What two reasons did Dr Hugely give to Mrs Brooks to convince her to send Melody away to a nursing home? (2m) (i) 2. Family 9 30/12/14 10:12 AM .indd 54 55 2/12/14 7:47 am Reading Strategy: Study the Question Get pupils to underline key words in each question stem to find out its exact requirements.

Miraculously. Now. • Then reread to fill in the missing words. which (3) swelled into a terrifying roar. The Alvarez family was swept apart Maria later. 2004.COMPREHENSION CLOZE Instructional Procedure: For comprehension cloze. resort in Thailand. tragedy struck. It took a year for the Alvarez family to 26 December to to the sea. it P Un 6 Family c ra Date: tice Shee 3 t Reading Strategy: Predict Get pupils to underline key words and phrases in the first few sentences to help them predict what the text is going to be about.indd 56 10 Unit 6 (E)MCEngELTG6_06. This is a good way to check that the words they have filled in make sense. we will not die!” Fortunately. Enrique. Examples: Alvarez family. Maria was her husband. (15 marks) 26 December. Maria thought. the currents threw Maria and Lucas out onto land and they were by Thai locals. They Reading Strategy: Identify Contextual Clues Get pupils to underline key words before and after the blanks to identify contextual clues that can help them establish the answer. the resort. A kind Thai villager took them to a (11) hospital to treat their (13) (12) . Lucas. The answer is likely to be “Suddenly”. she saw her eldest son. if possible. “We must be brave. • Discuss and justify their choices at the end. (8) on to a palm tree. who looked very frightened. Christmas. the Alvarez family was reunited. It was a torrential force Example: Suggest to pupils that blank (3) is likely to be a connector of time as it precedes a comma. followed by the phrase “tragedy struck”. here is what pupils can do: • Read the whole text first to get the overall meaning and to predict the gaps in the text. was a day the Alvarez family will never forget. floating nearby. after days of frantic . 56 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. As she (7) a deadly current. . they gather at a beach on every (14) (15) that day. • Suggest that pupils come up with more than one word for each blank. tragedy struck Comprehension Cloze Fill in each blank with a suitable word. and then choose the most suitable answer. We must take care (10) each other. (9) Maria reassured Lucas. • Reread the whole text after the task.indd 10 2/12/14 7:47 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd 30/12/14 10:12 AM (E)MCEPP . The tsunami claimed the lives of many people. There was a deep droning sound. The Impossible. were on a Christmas reading a book (1) (2) at a resort in Thailand. I have an important to be alive. the sea crashed into (4) (6) she was going to die. This family’s extraordinary survival was an inspiration for the movie. and her three sons were swimming in the pool. by a tsunami from the (5) Indian Ocean.

Sentence Extension A good text is made up of a variety of short and long sentences. was a large. Dr Hugely. I suddenly felt a adverbial clause new hope welling up within me that day.indd 11 Family 11 05/01/15 2:05 PM . places. adverb 57 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. things. events or happenings.Instructional Procedure: P Narratives c ra Date: tice Shee 4 t /14 7:47 am GRAMMAR Grammar Tell pupils that they can extend a sentence several ways. places. we can extend our sentences to provide our reader with more information. stocky man.indd 57 1/5/15 2:47 PM © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd (E)MCEngELTG6_06. There are many ways of extending a sentence. Sometimes a short. relative clause Events / Happenings (Where did this event / happening take place?) • She angrily hurled the brochure into the trash bin. Events / Happenings (How did this event / happening take place?) • I stared at Mom desperately. We can extend the sentence by providing more details about people. sharp sentence can be very effective — particularly for dramatic effect. Example: People (Who is this person? What does he / she do?) • The specialist. Often. events or happenings. prepositional phrase Events / Happenings (Why did this event / happening take place?) • Because Mom refused to let my condition define me. however. noun phrase Places / Things (What is special about this place / thing?) • You can choose to send Melody to a nursing home where she can be cared for. Short and long sentences serve different purposes. They can provide more details to a sentence by describing people.

burning with embarrassment the mischievous boy just in the nick of time in his favourite rattan chair 1. “Papa. (How did Dad stare?) Then he shouted.indd 12 2/12/14 7:47 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd 30/12/14 10:12 AM . Dad stared. 3. (How did Joe back off?) When pupils are writing their narratives or recounts. the canteen tables. Extension: Rubbing her eyes. . Your answer must be in one sentence. 2. Resource 6. Use the questions in brackets to help you. Grandfather snored (Where did this take place?) . get pupils to ask themselves questions about how they can extend the sentence.indd 58 12 Unit 6 (E)MCEngELTG6_06. my sister cried all the way home. events or happenings. dear. (Who was this person?) 4. Joe walked into the living room. Example: May yawned. Jimmy.” (How did Meng tell Papa?) Wracked with guilt. putting her knitting on the table. “It’s late. (How did the room look like?) Dad stared. Extend the following paragraph on your own. Joe backed off. Mama looked up. Joe (Who is Joe?) walked (How did he walk?) into the living room. Remind them to ask themselves questions (e. Sentence Extension Extend the following sentences by adding further details to describe the people.” she added. “Papa. (8 marks) Example: Meng said.” You may use the helping words in the box or words of your own. I have something to tell you. it 6 Family Un Give pupils more practice in sentence extension.g. May yawned. Does the additional information make a useful contribution to the overall meaning of the sentences?) as they extend the sentences. things.Instructional Procedure: In question (5). 5. She told May tenderly to go to bed. Then he shouted. places. tell them to include a variety of short and long sentences. Meng said. A. climbed up and down . I have something to tell you. (How did this happen?) . She told May to go to bed. Mama looked up. My brother and I arrived at school (When did this take place?) . (How did Dad shout?) Joe backed off. you have an early train to catch tomorrow.1 Sentence Extension (pages 23 and 24) Give pupils more practice in sentence extension. 58 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06.

(1) . The thief then walked menacingly (7) her. Jessie was thankful to have Jack with her. pronoun. Jessie looked eagerly around the park to thank her benefactor. Jessie felt as if her feet were rooted to the ground.indd 59 2/12/14 7:47 am 60 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. Examples: • Preposition following a noun. EACH WORD CAN BE USED ONLY ONCE. Relieved. will!” Jessie declared. it was Jack! He had trailed Jessie after she had stormed out of the house. • Then complete the gaps you are absolutely sure of. she was walking (4) a secluded path into a nearby park. “HELLO JESSIE!” Jack spoke into Jessie’s ear through their dad’s loudhailer. They (2) had always been at loggerheads with each other ever since they were little. took off There are 10 blanks numbered 1 to 10 in the passage below. • Next. Grammar Cloze Jessie scanned the place but could not see anyone around. The thief. that hurts! Get out of my room!” Jessie shouted Jessie and Jack were twins who were born a minute Jack. I will!” … /14 7:47 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd (E)MCEngELTG6_06.indd 60 2/12/14 7:47 am Suggest these strategies to pupils: • First. Read it twice or thrice until you have a clear understanding of what the text is about. (10 marks) (9) a flash. She could not find her voice. See which part of speech may fit in each gap (article. connector. looking confused and afraid. The (A) along (D) at (G) I (K) on (N) towards (B) and (E) by (H) in (L) over (P) when (C) apart (F) for (J) of (M) to (Q) you loudhailer. All of a sudden. “STOP where you are!” a deep voice boomed through the park. The letters (I) and (O) have been omitted to avoid confusion during marking. had come in handy! For the first time. slowly read the text without filling any of the gaps. From the list of words given. stomping out (3) of the house. choose the most suitable word for each blank. “Ouch. adjective or verb – … Jessie shouted at Jack. A familiar face stuck out from a bush. Before long. try and find out what the missing words in the remaining gaps are.it 6 Family Un Narratives B. she turned around see an (5) unshaven man in a hooded jacket wielding a knife. (10) he realised that the thug had been following Jessie.indd 13 Family 13 31/12/14 12:09 PM . he quickly sprang into action and pretended to be the police. “You are surrounded (8) the police!” 59 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. “Give me all the cash you have!” the man demanded (6) her. preposition. which was still slung over his shoulder. “If you won’t get out. • Pronoun preceding a verb – “If you won’t get out. etc) and pay special attention to the grammar around the words in each gap. Write the letter (A to Q) in the blank.

Ken Lim. The youngsters. sharing your experience in the competition. (d) Editing Get pupils to edit their work for organisation. include the following key information: • • • • • who organised and sponsored the competition what you and your sibling cooked for the competition what the prize money was reasons why you thought you would not win the competition how you felt about winning the competition You may reorder the points. The newspaper article below is about how a pair of siblings wins a cooking competition. Helping Mum in the kitchen really paid off. The Lim siblings won the Happy Family Cooking Competition on Saturday. © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd 30/12/14 10:12 AM . 11. “There were so many siblings who could cook well.indd 61 2/12/14 7:47 am Instructional Procedure: (a) Before Writing Get pupils to read the situational writing task and understand its requirements. “We never thought we would win. Remember to write in complete sentences. Audience. Remind pupils to use the correct tense and appropriate vocabulary. and Sandy Lim. Youngest Siblings Win Cooking Competition By Julie Tan You are to refer to the information in the article on the previous page for your letter.indd 14 62 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. In your letter. Write a letter to your aunt who is living overseas.SITUATIONAL WRITING c ra tice Shee 5 t P it 6 Family Un Narratives Date: Situational Writing Your Task Your sibling and you won a cooking competition that was reported in the newspaper article. a popular Japanese food company. from Tampines Central Primary School won $5 000 worth of prize money — all thanks to the winning dish they created together called ‘Happy Family Steamboat’.indd 62 2/12/14 7:47 am (c) Writing Ask pupils to extract relevant content from the given stimulus to answer the prompts given. Ask pupils to establish the following: • What is the purpose of the task? (to write a letter to an aunt) (b) During Writing Then get pupils to plan their writing using the acronym RAFT as a guide: Role.” 61 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. accuracy and fluency. 3 October. Read the article and complete a writing task. The contest was organised and sponsored by Happy Kazoku. Tone: • Role of the Writer: Who or what are you as the writer? (A boy or a girl? A student or a product advertiser?) • Audience: To whom are you writing? (A relative? A neighbour? A friend? Your teacher? Readers of a magazine?) • Format: In what format are you writing? (A blog entry? An email? A letter? A speech?) What are the main features of this text? • Tone: What tone will you use? (A formal tone? A casual and friendly tone?) 14 Unit 6 (E)MCEngELTG6_06. (15 marks) Imagine you are Ken or Sandy. 7. especially since we were the youngest in the competition!” said Ken. Format.

Modelling Get pupils to review the pictures. The first picture usually gives an important clue to how pupils can develop their ideas. • An explanation can provide more information on the significance of family events. • An information report can begin with the definition of a family event. Get pupils to identify the problem. The text can be a personal recount or a factual recount like a newspaper article. c ra Date: tice Shee 6 t P Narratives Continuous Writing Write a composition of at least 150 words about a family event. pupils may choose to write one of the following text types based on their interest and language ability: • A narrative is interesting because of the characters involved. They can then use the narrative text frame to make a plan for their story. The report can give more information on the different types of family events. Consider the following points when you plan your composition: • What was the family event? • What experiences made it eventful? • An exposition can argue for a position or stance on the topic related to the theme.CONTINUOUS WRITING Instructional Procedure: Here are some writing strategies pupils can use in continuous writing. (40 marks) • A recount is simple and easy to write where pupils can recount a series of events that happened leading up to the family event. the problem presented and the dramatic nature of the topic. You may use the points in any order and include other relevant points as well. Direct pupils to each picture and discuss what could be the family event. for example: • A Wonderful Family Event (narrative) • An Extraordinary Family Event (recount) • Family Events (information report) • Why are Family Events Important? (explanation) • “We should always make time for our family.indd 63 2/12/14 7:47 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd (E)MCEngELTG6_06. Then get pupils to decide what kind of texts they wish to write based on the topic.” Do you agree with this statement? (exposition) 63 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. Your composition should be based on one or more of these pictures. Make a list of responses to the prompts before they begin writing. Getting pupils to come up with a working title first helps with the thinking.indd 15 Family 15 30/12/14 10:12 AM . The pictures are provided to help you think about this topic. (a) Before Writing Begin by getting pupils to understand the theme of the question: What is a family event? Lead pupils to study the pictures and read the prompts. For example.

write the text features in the left margin: • Narrative: Orientation. P Narratives c ra Date: tice Shee 6 t Remind pupils to write a variety of short and long sentences to create interest in their writing.indd 63 16 Unit 6 (E)MCEngELTG6_06.CONTINUOUS WRITING (Continued) (b) Writing Joint Construction Jointly write out the text with low progress pupils. Independent Writing High progress pupils may write the text on their own. Pupils may also write a text using mixed text types. • Complex sentence – Based on the above research. For low progress writers. incorporating elements of the procedural text type into an explanation text.indd 16 2/12/14 7:47 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd 30/12/14 10:12 AM (E)MCEPP . (c) After Writing Editing After the class has done their writing draft. Events and Conclusion • Explanation: Introduction. get them to work in pairs and check for the following. (40 marks) The pictures are provided to help you think about this topic. Write the sentences. Resolution and Ending • Recount: Orientation. Continuous Writing Write a composition of at least 150 words about a family event. Sub-topics and Conclusion • Exposition: Author’s position. Explanation and Conclusion • Information report: Introduction. for example. • Compound sentence – My family went to East Coast Park and we cycled all day. Have they: • linked the theme with the pictures? • used a variety of sentences? • used suitable tenses? • used appropriate vocabulary? • used suitable paragraphing? 63 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. you may wish to focus on writing narratives or recounts. On the board or a large sheet of butcher paper. Examples: • Simple sentence – My grandfather was a remarkable man. using the correct tense and adding appropriate vocabulary. I believe what makes a family special is that a family that plays together stays together. Some writers can be challenged to write an information report or exposition. Consider the following points when you plan your composition: • What was the family event? • What experiences made it eventful? You may use the points in any order and include other relevant points as well. Arguments to support that position and Conclusion Elicit ideas from pupils for each part of the text type. Problem. Your composition should be based on one or more of these pictures.

Appendix 3: Writing Rubrics Use the writing rubrics to help assess pupils’ writing together with them. (40 marks) The pictures are provided to help you think about this topic. conventions and voice.indd 17 Family 17 30/12/14 10:12 AM . Your composition should be based on one or more of these pictures. organisation. You can use the rubrics as a: 1.Appendices 1A–1E: Writing Text Frames Get pupils to write a plan using one of the following writing frames: • Narrative • Recount • Explanation • Information Report • Exposition Appendix 2: Writing Checklist Pupils can monitor their writing using a checklist to review their ideas. post-writing tool after marking the compositions to help pupils review their own writing. pre-writing tool to help pupils be familiar with the qualities of good writing. 3. word choice. during-writing tool and have pupils monitor their writing and make the necessary revisions. 63 63 /14 7:47 am (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. Consider the following points when you plan your composition: • What was the family event? • What experiences made it eventful? You may use the points in any order and include other relevant points as well.indd 63 2/12/14 7:47 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd (E)MCEngELTG6_06. 2. sentence fluency. Narratives c ra Date: tice Shee 6 t P ves Continuous Writing Write a composition of at least 150 words about a family event.

Example: Questions (19) and (20) • What kind of text is this? (a poem) • Who is speaking in the poem? (Either a child. Ask pupils what text type it is. (a) Before Listening Listening Strategy: Predict Get pupils to read the instructions carefully. How was Paula feeling at the start of the conversation? (1) sad (2) resentful (3) ashamed ( ) ) 19.indd 18 68 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. • Play the rest of the audio file. Pupils should listen for information related to the parts in the text. 16 When a goose is sick. These spoken texts will help them further develop their listening skills. Text 6 17. parent or teacher as shown in the options) • What are some things you would expect from the text? (irregular sentences. What can we learn about wild geese from the text? (1) how they survive in the wild (2) how they fly against the wind (3) how they cooperate in a flock 15. Who is speaking in the poem? (1) a child (2) a parent (3) a teacher ( ) ( ) 20. news. (3) Obtain information about one’s family members. Get pupils to make connections with their knowledge of the text type structure. audio stories and poems. poetic language) 18 Unit 6 (E)MCEngELTG6_06.indd 68 2/12/14 7:47 am (b) During Listening Listening Strategy: Connect • Get pupils to listen to the audio file and pause at the first paragraph. Encourage pupils to listen to a variety of spoken texts. Dad encouraged the children to recognise that everyone (1) can do everything well (2) has his or her own talents (3) should be ahead of the others . 11. What did Paula win at her school’s talent contest? (1) first prize (2) second prize (3) third prize ) ( 13. (3) It can ride on the force of the goose ahead of it. © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd 30/12/14 10:12 AM .indd 67 2/12/14 7:47 am Instructional Procedure: Like reading. Why does a goose fly in “V” formation with other geese? (1) It can fly with the flock in a beautiful outline. Get pupils to listen to the questions carefully as they are being read. What first step did the speaker propose in making the scrapbook? (1) Decorate the scrapbook artistically. two other geese will (1) be shot down (2) keep it company (3) join another flock of geese . Have them answer as many of the questions as they can during the first listening. (2) It cannot fly in a straight line with other geese. for example.LISTENING Text 4 it 6 Family Un Narratives 18. Get them to scan questions in the practice sheet and predict quickly what each text is about. Text 7 Text 5 14. tell pupils that good listeners use listening strategies to make sense of a text. (2) Paste family photographs in a scrapbook. Review the strategies of predicting and connecting. Which of the following qualities does the child possess? (1) a gentle nature (2) a great awareness about things (3) a high and important view of himself ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( 12. radio programmes. (c) After Listening Play the audio file once more for pupils to check their answers. What is the main purpose of making a family scrapbook? (1) to recycle scraps (2) to remember the past (3) to restore traditions and hobbies 67 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06.

Which of the three lines on the map below shows the route that Mark took to look for his brother? (1) (2) (3) ( ) Listening Comprehension Listen carefully to the text that is read to you and answer the following questions. The main purpose of the Family Day event is for families to (1) bond together (2) visit Marina Bay (3) sample good food ( ) 9. 2 or 3 in the brackets provided. Where were Mark and his sister when their little brother ran away? The Gift Shop Music Shop 11 Escalator to second floor 4. What did Matilda look like? 1 2 3 ( ) 7. What was the children’s mother doing just before this conversation took place? Stationary Shop Chocolate Shop 2 2 Supermarket Exit 1 2 3 ( ) Toy Shop 2. (20 marks) Text 1 The Pet Shop 33 1. with television celebrities.indd 65 2/12/14 7:47 am it Un 6 Family 6. Which of the following rewards is offered to the person who finds Matilda? 1 2 3 ( ) Text 3 8. the cat.indd 19 2/12/14 7:47 am Family 19 30/12/14 10:12 AM . Write 1.Narratives it ra Date: ctice Shee 7 t P Un 6 Family 3. 10.indd 64 2/12/14 7:47 am (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. Where was Matilda.indd 66 © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd (E)MCEngELTG6_06. Participants can (1) eat and drink (2) chat and bond (3) take photographs ( ) ( ) . Who organised Family Day? (1) MediaComm (2) Glutton’s Place (3) National Family Association 66 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. last seen? 1 2 64 65 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. Where on the map above did everyone think Little Brother had gone? (1) 1 (2) 2 (3) 3 1 2 3 ( ( ) 3 ( ) Text 2 ) 5.

It’s terrible — I’m so upset. way better than me! Paula Thanks. Mother Isn’t that where the pet shop is located? Mimi Yes. Paula Text 2 (for Questions 5–7) A millionairess makes an appeal on television.indd 20 5/12/14 9:51 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd 30/12/14 10:12 AM . Little Brother was so intrigued with the puppies in the shop the last time we came to this mall. it feels the resistance of flying alone. So is Patrick. We should be there to build each other up. not tear each other down. Text 7 (for Questions 19–20) Listen to the following poem. you are a talented singer and artist. ‘Laser Tag’ competition and ‘Dunk Your Dad’ game stations. such as their birthdates and places of birth. so they can be passed down from generation to generation. Ma! Mark and I were watching him at the doorway when he made a run out of the supermarket! Before we knew it. I am Sally Whitfield. I remember now. Come along with your family for a day of bonding over fun-filled activities like the ‘Family River Cruise’.indd 77 Dad. Paula. Follow me step-by-step as I show you how you and your family can create a family scrapbook: 1. Remember. There is a special reason for this formation. Families can learn much about teamwork from wild geese. I will reward handsomely a sum of $100 000 to the person who finds her and returns her to me. It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words. No one can sing or paint like you do. Mimi I asked some passers-by whether they had seen him but nobody has! Mother Try to remember now. Admission is free. 4. Also. Write 1.m. Mathematics and Science for the end of the year school examinations! That’s not fair! I didn’t get any prize at my level! Patrick 5/12/14 9:51 am 78 (E)MCEPPBEL6_LS(Part2). Little Brother is missing! Mother What? Oh no. hobbies and stories of interest. 3. You can use ribbons. Family scrapbooking is a meaningful activity. Patrick. and I don’t see the need for you to be competitive. the world’s third-largest media company. These birds always fly in a ‘V’ formation and travel as a community in the wild. Paula is good at music and art. vanished from my mansion at Beverly Hills two days ago.Unit 6 Text 3 (for Questions 8–10) Family A radio announcer promotes a Family Day event. stickers or even recycled materials. Which direction did he go? Mark Hmmm … He ran straight towards the exit. You arrived my infant pure and sweet with the softest skin and tiniest feet You grew up my toddler cute and bright with quite an imagination and keen insight You are now my child tall and brave You have always been and will ever be The apple of my eye My dearest sweetie pie 79 (E)MCEPPBEL6_LS(Part2).sg. their occupations. When a goose falls out of formation. They said that a couple of neighbours had seen Matilda wandering about in a neighbour’s garden. Then. Patrick got most of the subject prizes for English. The birds that follow can take advantage of the lifting power of the bird in front of it and fly more easily.indd 79 20 Unit 6 (E)MCEngELTG6_06.m. I just want to get my Matilda back. collect photos of your family that show how they look. your painting received a Commendation Award at the National Junior Art Competition. But I think each of you has different gifts. you’re jealous! Paula No. Matilda. Paula. log on to the National Family Association website at www. Geese flying in formation honk to encourage those in front to keep up their speed. Mother Yes! He’s likely to be there! Let’s go look for him now! Text 4 (for Questions 11–13) A family has a conversation together. Text 5 (for Questions 14–16) A family counsellor talks to a group of parents. She is a very gentle and timid cat and much loved by the family. they join another flock of geese or catch up with the original flock. it creates an ‘uplift’ or a lifting force that pushes it forward through the air. As each goose flaps its wings. is wounded or shot down. Listen carefully to the text that is read to you and answer the following questions. Our generous Family Day supporter. I have had her for five years and now she’s gone. Be sure to stay till the evening for a spectacular fireworks display at 8 p. dress or pose. kids. decorate your scrapbook as creatively as you like. People may think that everyone should strive to be ahead of each other. Then it promptly moves back into formation. family traditions.indd 78 12/15/14 11:04 AM Text 6 (for Questions 17–18) A craft teacher introduces the following activity. he was lost in the crowd! Mark Ma. It is a good recreational activity and helps to relieve stress. Mark Ma. Wild geese can teach us so much about beauty and harmony in the wild. 2 or 3 in the brackets provided.m. So don’t miss out on taking photographs with them. two geese drop out of formation and follow it down to help and protect it. I’m not! You’re so mean! Dad Hey. Patrick Yes. (20 marks) Text 1 (for Questions 1–4) Listen to the following conversation. My beloved cat. First. We should encourage one another to pursue our talents and interests. you two. It helps to preserve your family memories. and have a personalised thank-you letter published in the newspapers. Finally. Glutton’s Place. I tried looking in the toy shop but he wasn’t there either. stop it. Our MediaComm television celebrities will be there to grace the event at 4 p. buttons. Next. Celebrate Family Day with us on 29 June at Marina Bay from 10 a. I’m sorry for being so nasty to you earlier on. For more information. managing director of the global media company News Corp. She wears a diamond-studded pink collar. Dad. My Matilda is a tabby cat with distinct grey and white stripes all over her body. I tried searching in the chocolate shop next door but couldn’t find him. 2. until it dies or is able to fly again. you were the second runner-up in your school’s talent contest. Then. you are special in my eyes. When a goose falls sick. gather information about your family members. Each member of our family is special in his and her own way. There will also be family lucky draws held throughout the day and fantastic prizes to be won. Dad That’s good.m. find an A4 sized scrapbook where you can paste photos and write down the information you have gathered about your family. you’re right. My bodyguards have been out looking but to no avail. Then. will sponsor a big spread of delicious food and drinks for the day. She’s like family to me. hobbies and any interesting and admirable qualities. 77 (E)MCEPPBEL6_LS(Part2). for example. to 9 p.nfa. this is such a big shopping mall! Where could he have gone? I told you to watch over him while I paid for some fruit! Mimi We did. Paula. They stay with it.

They can change partners and read the text again. Focus on articulating the stresses in these multi-syllabic words in the text: • sigNIficance • reLAtionships • underSTANding • DIfficulty • coMMEmorate • appreciAtion c ra Date: tice Shee 8 t P Narratives Reading Aloud Read the following passage aloud. family members may be quirky at times. giving and receiving. Read these two examples aloud together: • What is family? (question) Family is about relationships. celebrate an achievement.indd 21 Family 21 30/12/14 10:12 AM . patient. • Pair reading – In pairs. you can do the following with pupils: • Echo reading – The teacher reads the text aloud and the class follows. showing respect and understanding. pupils take turns to read the text. and every day. paying attention to pronunciation. • Repeated reading – Pupils read the same text with the same partners (taking turns) up to four times for fluency practice. offering support in times of doubt. it is through these trials that we can become more tolerant. let us show our appreciation for our family members today. To provide maximum reading practice. (10 marks) Ladies and gentlemen. Get pupils to think of new words they have learnt. (statement) • They may have different opinions and views from us. The passage below is a speech. (statement) They may test us and even challenge us! (exclamation) Then divide the class into different groups to read each paragraph that follows. They may have different opinions and views from us. They may test us and even challenge us! However. Family Day marks how important a family is. fluency and expression. today as we celebrate Family Day. It is about sharing someone’s joy. The reading should provide pupils with new background knowledge about the theme. Yes. giving comfort during times of difficulty. and appreciative of one another. cook a meal for our parents and give hugs to one another every now and then — little things which can go a long way. Ask pupils to read the speech with expression and dramatic effect. give little gifts. Get pupils to rehearse reading the text. 2/12/14 7:47 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd (E)MCEngELTG6_06. let us take some time to reflect on why this day holds so much significance. As we commemorate this special day. stress. Relationships are about love and caring. trusting and confiding. learning and helping. Model the reading by reading aloud the first paragraph. How can we strengthen family ties? We can enjoy looking at family photographs together.indd 69 Appendix 4: Reading Aloud Rubrics Get pupils to use the rubrics to monitor their reading aloud. 69 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. Remind pupils to read different types of sentences with expression.ORAL (READING ALOUD) Instructional Procedure: Tell pupils to skim the oral text to have an idea what kind of text it is and its purpose. What is family? Family is about relationships.

They can think at different levels: • Literal – Describe what you see. get them to study the picture and think of all the things they can talk about. why did I not succeed? How can I learn them? How can my teacher help me? Plan to meet pupils individually or in groups to gather their responses and facilitate their learning.indd 22 2/12/14 7:47 am © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd 30/12/14 10:12 AM . when and how can I apply them in my work? • If no.ORAL (STIMULUS-BASED CONVERSATION) Instructional Procedure: Give pupils the picture without the prompts. Date: Stimulus-based Conversation Have a conversation based on the following stimulus. What does this family enjoy doing? • Would you like to be a part of a family like this? Why / Why not? (b) What activities do you enjoy doing with your family? • Do you think families should spend time together? Why / Why not? (c) Who do you look up to in your family? Why? • Is it important to have someone in the family who sets a good example? Why / Why not? 70 (E)MCEPPBEL6_06. Alternatively. Un c ra tice Shee 9 t Unit Review Help pupils to constantly review what they have learnt. Get pupils to review their learning process further by asking themselves these questions: • Have I learnt the unit well? If yes. (20 marks) (a) Look at this picture of a family. Then get the groups to contribute their ideas before the class. it 6 Family P Appendix 5: Rubrics for Stimulus-based Conversation Get pupils to use the rubrics to evaluate their conversation. speaking and listening? • Have I mastered the text type? • Have I learnt the language items well? If yes.indd 70 22 Unit 6 (E)MCEngELTG6_06. Summarise the learning outcomes of the unit. • Inferential – How does what you see link to the related topics? • Evaluative – What are your views on the theme based on what you see? Example: A multi-generational family Literal: Who makes up this family? What is the family doing? Inferential: How does the family feel about the activity they are doing together? Evaluative: Do you think families are important? Do you think having role models within a family is necessary? Divide pupils into groups and get them to discuss the prompts. get pupils to look at the picture and predict what they might be asked. As part of their preparation. Suggest to pupils to form opinions and substantiate their views with suitable reasons. when and how can I apply it in my reading and writing.

© 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd (E)MCEngELTG6_06. 1. He laughed. phrases or sentences. 4. He was her pet dog. They were looking for money and goods. He stared at the small boy. Ling’s best friend was Rover.indd 23 Family 23 30/12/14 10:12 AM . He followed her wherever she went. 3. 2.1 SENTENCE EXTENSION Extend the following sentences. creating a variety of short and long sentences. The bully came in. The robbers made their move.Resource 6. You can add new words. The pirates climbed on board the ship. It was nightfall.

24 Unit 6 (E)MCEngELTG6_06. They had a special ability. Daniel’s family had a secret.indd 24 © 2015 Marshall Cavendish Education Pte Ltd 30/12/14 10:12 AM . He acted upon it. He got into his car. 6. The spy received a message.5.