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OurChildren
About

Useful Information for the Next Generation of Jewish Families

Teaneck resident Eitan Hiller, a Mitzvah Clown, invited his friends to get trained as Mitzvah Clowns as part of his bar mitzvah party. They then visited residents at the Jewish Home at Rockleigh.

Doing Good

Local Chesed Camp Launches in August


H E I D I M A E B RAT T

t may be just five days, but its impact


could last a lifetime.
At least thats what organizers of
Five Days/Five Ways, a new camp being
launched by local chesed organization,
Areyvut, are hoping: That is, that the exposure to a variety of nonprofit, charity
organizations on chesed-themed days,
which are filled with lessons, activities,
and fun, will make a positive imprint on
the hearts and minds of their middlegrade campers.
We live in a community where there
are lots of different options during the
summer, said Areyvut founder and director Daniel Rothner.
With many camps, including sleepaway camps, folding in chesed activities as part of its overall curriculum, Mr.
Rothner said that Areyvut wanted to
create a camp exclusively dedicated to
chesed every day.
Especially important, Mr. Rothner
added, was to target middle-grade students because many of the available
chesed opportunities are geared to
older students, those who are already in
high school and beyond.
The camp will be based at the
Friends of Lubavitch of Bergen County
in Teaneck, and meet the week of Aug.
8 through Aug. 12 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Each day there will be games, craft projects, and activities as participants learn
about a different Jewish value and how
to use that value to make the world a
better place. They will go on a field trip
and have the opportunity to put their
new skills to work visiting seniors, cleaning trails, packaging food, and reading
to children.
Chesed is integral to Judaism and
the world at large, and there are a multiplicity of ways to do chesed, said Alisa
Danon Kaplan, co-director of the camp.

Children from the Montclair Jewish Workshop participated in a tikkun olam tour facilitated by Areyvut. They created bags to be donated to Leket, a food
rescue organization in Israel.

At Areyvut, we want participants to


imbue chesed into their lives while having fun in a psychologically safe and
supportive environment. The camp will
show the participants the ways that
they can do kindness for themselves, for
those around them and for the greater
community at large.
The camp will inculcate core Jewish values, and help participants to develop skills in consensus building and
inclusion. They will be challenged and
pushed outside their comfort zone as
they deal with new situations and meet
new people. Participants in the program
will make friends, learn new chesed
skills, maximize their talents, and gain
new insights on community service and

Jewish tradition.
We want the kids actions to make a
difference, said Ms. Danon Kaplan. Its
not about the faade of doing good, but
to actually do something like improving
a trail or providing blankets to bone marrow donors.
Each day will feature a theme, and
will be put the theme within a context.
The day will include a guest speaker and hands-on volunteering. The
themes include: The Environment; Kol
Yisrael Arevim Zeh Bzeh (All of Israel
is Responsible for One Another)/Israel
Day; Caring for the Sick & Elderly; Hunger and Poverty; and Intergenerational Understanding.
Included in the weeklong curricu-

lum will be training to become a Mitzvah Clown, one of the most popular
programs put forth by Areyvut; weather permitting, weeding and trail maintenance at the Teaneck Creek Conservancy; a visit to the Community Food
Bank of New Jersey, and more, organizers said.
The exposure to these agencies
may prompt the students to become
future volunteers for the agencies and
to bring back their experiences to their
families, said Ms. Danon Kaplan. We
also hope that the kids have a lot of fun
during the week, and make new friends.
After all, they are still kids.
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of About
Our Children.
ABOUT OUR CHILDREN SUMMER 2016

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OurChildren
About

Summer 2016

Doing Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
New local camp focuses on chesed

Register Now for Fall


Pre School Ages 2 5

Special Bar Mitzvah Venue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..6

Open 7 am to 6:30 pm

Open House Week August 22-26

Teaneck teen celebrates at Daughters of Miriam

Generation G.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..7


Always Aunt Fritzie

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State Licensed Secure Building Kosher Snacks Provided

Your child needs special education.


You want her to have a Jewish education.
You want him to be included.

Hot picks for summer

Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..10
Things to do in August

Simchas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..11
Celebrating our milestones

MissionStatement
About Our Children is designed to help Jewish families in our area live healthy, positive lives that make the most of
the resources available to them. By providing useful, current, accurate information, this publication aims to guide
parents to essential information on faith, education, the arts, events, and child-raising in short, everything that
todays Jewish family, babies to grandparents, needs to live life to the fullest in North Jersey and Rockland County.

AdvisoryBoard

INCLUSION by DESIGN
Serving Children

with a

Broad range

of

SpeCial needS

Special education uniquely integrated within Jewish Day Schools

Dr. Annette Berger, Psy.D.

Jane Calem Rosen

Psychologist, Teaneck

Marketing and Communications Specialist

Michelle Brauntuch, MS,CCLS

Barry Weissman, MD

Child Life Specialist, Englewood Hospital, Englewood

Pediatrician, Hackensack and Wyckoff

Hope Eliasof

Cheryl Wylen

Marriage and Family Therapist, Midland Park

Director of Adult Programs and Cultural Arts


YM-YWHA of North Jersey, Wayne

Howard Prager, DC, DACBSP

Individualization Educational excellence


Meeting each childs academic, social, and emotional needs
Elementary Schools

High Schools

Adult Services

www.sinaischools.org/js 201-345-1974

Holistic Chiropractor, Oakland

About

OurChildren

James L. Janoff

Natalie Jay

Heidi Mae Bratt

Peggy Elias
Janice Rosen
Brenda Sutcliffe

Publisher
Editor

Deborah Herman

Art Director

Advertising Director

Dr. Katherine Orellano


Ed Silberfarb
Dr. Diana Volpert

Contributing Writers

Account Executives

Winner of July Contest!


The winner of the July contest for a Matisse Chocolatier Gift Certificate in
Englewood is:

Kate Rivas, Tenafly


Thanks to all who entered, and congratulations to our winner!

About Our Children is published 11 times a year by the New Jersey/Rockland Jewish Media Group,
1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666; telephone: 201-837-8818; fax: 201-833-4959.;
e-mail: AboutOC@aol.com.

ABOUT OUR CHILDREN SUMMER 2016

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musings from the editor


I

was thrilled when Yehuda read


Macbeth.
It brought back memories of
my sixth grade speak-out, a poetryperformance competition that I won in
that grade. At the time, I had not read
the Shakespearean play, nor did I understand the significance of the three
witches who steer Macbeth toward
his ambitions, and act as symbols of
fate, temptation, and the supernatural.
I only knew that the witchs chant
was very dramatic.
And so was I.
So I double, doubled in memorizing the famous lines of the Weird
Sisters, feigned a voice with a crackle
and a cackle, made sure to carefully
enunciate the stomach-turning ingredients of the witchs brew (eye
of newt and toe of frog, wool of bat
and tongue of dog) and brought a
touch of magic into the auditorium
of my Brooklyn middle school during
the performance.
It worked like the proverbial
charm, and I was on my way to
bigger competitions.
That was the last time I dabbled

in magic.
That is until one my
children anointed me
mighty with power.
Ma, do your magic,
Yehuda said.
My magic??
Exactly what kind of
hocus-pocus was he talking about?
Was it cajoling the
ear doctors office manager (having bypassed the scheduler)
for an appointment on a day when
the doctor had a double-booked, jampacked schedule? A day when I was already told: no way, no how, sorry but
we cant accommodate you, absolutely not. And after more pleading (there
was no other possible day and the kid
couldnt hear!), I got an appointment.
Is that the kind of hocus-pocus he
was talking about?
Okay, magic.
Or was it the time I managed to get
that silly prop for Pink Day after being
informed of its necessity pretty much
last-minute, and then called several
stores, and had to travel to the least

Fundraise ndmore!

convenient one, and


got there a few minutes
before the store closed,
but luckily found it and
bought it?
Is that the kind of
hocus-pocus were talking about?
Okay, magic.
Or, the more serious and frenetic runaround when I went
looking for the medicine that was necessary, but more than one of the bigbox drug stores in the neighborhood
didnt have it on its shelf, but after
an exhaustive and late-into-the night
hunt, I found a lone box.
Sometimes I wondered whether
my doggedness in these situations,
was not some kind of vestige of an occupational hazard. Was that trait left
over from my gunning and running
days when I was a hard-news street
reporter? If I was on the beat, I may
have come up against one too many
nos, but I knew that no was not an acceptable answer. I had to bring back
the story, not excuses. I knew that if I

wasnt getting in the front door, I needed to get through the window. And if
that window was closed, I needed to
climb down that chimney.
But then recently, I listened to another mother talk.
She is a friend, who was never
a journalist, and she was speaking
about her youngest daughter. She was
explaining that she needed to find out
what her daughter wanted to do in
a situation.
And then I heard her say, Please,
Rachel, make up your mind. If you
want to go, Ill make it happen.
Ah. She said shell make
it happen.
Not with a twitch of her nose, or
a swirl of a wand, or an abracadabra.
With her blood, sweat, and tears. And,
with a hefty dose of luck. Shell make
it happen. For her kid, shell make
it happen.
Okay. Magic.
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ABOUT OUR CHILDREN SUMMER 2016

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OurChildren
About

Four Generations Share Bar Mitzvah


in Special Place
H E I D I M A E B RAT T

ts not often that a bar mitzvah takes


place in the sanctuary at the Daughters of Miriam Center in Clifton.
But it was the recent venue of plenty
of simcha that was shared by four generations on a very happy occasion.
Yavnah Academy student and
Teaneck resident Joel Varnai took his
steps into Jewish manhood when he
was called up to the Torah on his Hebrew birthday last month, and recited
his first aliyah and then led the davening inside the Garfinkle Chapel at
Daughters of Miriam Center as he was
surrounded by family, friends and residents of the center.
Joel Varnais great grandmother, Marian Bernstein, 85, has resided in Miriam
Apartments II since 2010, and the family
thought it a great idea to bring the simcha to her, and make her journey easier
than put her through the ordeal of traveling elsewhere.
Mrs. Bernstein is the mother of Susan
Thaler of Teaneck, whose husband, Len
Thaler, is a board member of Daughters of
Miriam Center/The Gallen Institute.
We did this so my mother-in-law
could participate in the religious ceremony, said Mr. Thaler. My mother-inlaw is amazing. She is terrific. But she is
in a wheelchair so it is a challenge to
travel, said Mr. Thaler, a former health
care executive.
The bar mitzvah also pays homage
to one of the central concepts of Judaismldor vldorfrom generation
to generation. And what better place to
blend the generations than here?
Flanked by a proud family, which includes mother, Gila Varnai and 14-yearold brother, Adam Varnai, Joel flawlessly
led the service with the help of Rabbi
Moshe Mirsky as the glow of the stained
glass windows of the Garfinkle Chapel
made for a nice background.
A reception afterwards in the Daughters of Miriam Center celebrated both the
bar mitzvah young man as well as the spirit of intergenerational connections that
bind families and communities together.
Multigenerational programming at
the Daughters of Miriam Center regularly bring together nursing home residents, apartment tenants, and families
for religious celebrations, life events, as
well as for the simpler purposes of min-

6 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN SUMMER 2016

From bottom left, Marian Bernstein, Susan Thaler, Gila Varnai, Joel Varnai, and Len Thaler.

gling and enjoying activities together.


Needless to say, the centers residents
and staff were thrilled to share Joels
special event with him.

To me the takeaway is that Id like


to encourage similar family celebrations, Mr. Thaler said. It is a particularly beautiful way for all the genera-

tions to participate and feel an integral


part of the celebration.
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of About
Our Children.

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GENERATION G

Grand Aunt Fritzie


Always There for Her Family
E D S I L B E R FA R B

he had four grandchildren but they were just part


of her matriarchal flock. What about the children
and grandchildren of the two sisters who predeceased her? And lets not forget her brothers offspring.
Frieda (Fritzie) Wahl Schachner was a surrogate grandperson to some 20 young people. She preferred the title
grand aunt to great aunt because the latter put her an
additional generation apart.
And she worked at it. Was there a bat mitzvah in
Bowling Green, Ohio? A wedding in Baltimore? A brit in
New York? Fritzie was there, a materfamilias who took on
the joyful duty of celebrating simchas, sometimes representing a beloved grandparent, who was long gone.
She demonstrated family loyalty at an early age.
Born on Bastille Day, she was the second of four children growing up in Jersey City. When her kid brother
came home one day having been roughed up by the
neighborhood bully, Fritzies gentle sister said of the attacker, Well, Im going to give him a piece of my mind.
Fritz was more direct. She gave him a punch in the nose.
They became young adults in the midst of the Great
Depression. When they were ready for college there
was money for only one. It wasnt Fritzie, but she would
not be denied. She took up residence with a New York
cousin, thus becoming eligible for the prestigious, tuition-free Hunter College. She studied the sciences, but
her interests ranged far beyond, into art and music.
When I was bedridden with various childhood diseases, my Aunt Fritzie saw my confinement as an opportunity. You could be studying art, she said, and
thus began a bedside course in the Great Masters. But
she was still concerned that boredom and indolence
might set in so she introduced me to an activity that
seemed wild and mysterious.
Knitting?
Yes, knitting. Thats what firemen do in their station house during long periods between fires.
So equipped with needles and yarn, I began Knit
one, pearl two. I may even have finished a square for
an afghan by the time my fever broke and I was back in
school and out on the street.
Fritzie married Sam Schachner on her birthday. It

Never a dull moment with Aunt Fritzie, seen reading a book.

was a marriage that drew a mixed reaction in the family.


He was a person of multiple interests and enthusiasms,
not readily accepted by his more conservative in-laws,
but fascinating for the adventurous Fritzie. Like many in
the harsh days of the Depression, he was on the fringe
of communism, and if not a Party member, he was at
least a fellow traveler, ironic because his livelihood
was the loan business, a citadel of capitalism.
Though Fritzie shared his left-wing views, it was
a rocky marriage. They separated. Fritzie went off to
Mexico and returned with exciting stories and exotic
souvenirs. Now, 75 years later I still have the serape she
brought back.
She and Sam reunited and had two children. The
older brother had a congenital heart defect, and thus
may have been spared some of the usual parental
discipline. Not so the younger one who was a happygo-lucky under-achiever, and a natural target of adult
reprimand. Years later, he became a Ph.D., a prominent
psychotherapist, an instructor at the University of
Pittsburgh, father of two, and in his spare time, a successful real estate entrepreneur. Fritzie acknowledged
his achievements with a shrug of amazement.
Meanwhile, Frizies own career won an A-rating as a
high school science teacher, but not without bumps in
the road. When a dispute arose among biologists over
the efficacy of Mendelian genetics, Fritzie sided with
the politically tainted Russian, Trofim Lysenko. A new

voice, new ideas, was her reasoning.


As we grew older, the difference in our ages seemed
to shrink. At age 70, she was a frequent golf partner of
mine. She went skating with grandchildren until a fall
and a broken arm slowed her down. She was a vigorous sports fan, yet a virulent critic of the objects of her
affection. A season after winning the Super Bowl, her
beloved Giants let her down. Fortunately for Coach Bill
Parcells, she never got closer to him than the television
screen. Some of her sports heroes, however, could do
no wrong. One was a nephew who played ice hockey in
high school. His parents would cringe with embarrassment at her unrestrained cheering at games.
She loved to travel, and with the help of what was
then the elder hostels, her adventures knew no bounds.
There were trips to Russia and to China, and hardly a
year went by without one of her continuing education trips around the country or abroad. Yet she complained after every one, vowing never to go anywhere
again until she signed up for the next one. She eventually liked winters in Florida, and was older than 80
when she bought a condo there.
When her 80th birthday loomed in the near distance,
she was adamant, No party! No celebration! Nothing! So
naturally we all began planning the surprise party. There
was fierce competition among nieces and nephews as to
who would be the host. It was like bidding for the venue
of the next Olympic games. Preparing the guest list was
a challenge as we traveled the byways of her past. There
were cousins we had never met, but of whom she often
spoke. There was an award-winning pianist. There was
an elderly aunt who gained fame as a latter-day Grandma
Moses. And there were friends of her youth. Despite her
no-party commandment, she obviously enjoyed the affair, but refused to admit it.
Weddings in Pittsburgh and Vermont, funerals in
Amherst and New Jersey, Fritzie was there for joy and
comfort. It was a role she filled to the end.
Ed Silberfarb was a reporter for the Bergen Record in New
Jersey, then the New York Herald Tribune where he was City
Hall bureau chief. Later, he was a public information officer
for the New York City Transit Authority and editor of one of
its employee publications.

The Heschel School


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iriskl@heschel.org

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212.784.1234
www.heschel.org
30 West End Avenue, New York, New York 10023
ABOUT OUR CHILDREN SUMMER 2016

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OurChildren
About

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8 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN SUMMER 2016

Gluten-Free Diets for Children


Are Not for Everyone

luten-free products have become the all


the rage, from snacks
to restaurant menus
that feature gluten-free
meals. Its safe to say
that the popularity of
a gluten-free diet has
increased dramatically
over the past decade.
While in some
cases, going gluten
free is a health necessity, in most cases it is
not, said Dr Katherine Orellana, a pediatric gastroenterologist
with Valley Medical
Group. For people
who do not have celiac disease or a wheat
allergy, especially for
children, there is no
data supporting the
presumed health benefits of a gluten-free
diet. In fact, the opposite may be true in certain cases, particularly when the
diet is followed without the guidance of an experienced
registered dietitian or physician.
There are a few particular concerns to having a
gluten-free diet without a medical reason to be on such
a diet:
Gluten-free packaged foods frequently contain a
greater density of fat and sugar than their gluten-containing counterparts.
Individuals on a gluten-free diet are at risk of increased fat and calorie intake.
A gluten-free diet also may lead to deficiencies in B
vitamins, folate, and iron since many gluten-free products are not nutritionally fortified.
Many patients become constipated after starting a
gluten-free diet since most of their fiber intake previously came from fiber-fortified foods.
So how do you know if your child is in need of a
healthy diet change due to celiac disease, a wheat allergy or otherwise?
A queasy stomach can have many causes and celiac disease, as well as food intolerance, can be amongst
those causes, said Dr. Diana Volpert, a pediatric gastroenterologist with Valley Medical Group. As such,
queasiness may be the sign of celiac disease, an allergy
to food or intolerance to food, but it can be difficult to
pin down the source and severity of the reaction.
Celiac disease is an immune mediated inflammation secondary to exposure to gluten, which is a component in wheat and some other grains. Symptoms of
food intolerance and celiac disease can include nausea,

bloating, stomach pain, vomiting and diarrhea. Celiac


disease can present without any gastrointestinal symptoms and may instead manifest as short stature, poor
weight gain and iron deficiency anemia.
Food intolerance is a digestive system response,
which is the inability to properly digest certain proteins in food. It occurs as secondary response to an
enzyme deficiency such as lactose. The most common
type of food intolerance is lactose intolerance, when
the digestive system reacts adversely to milk or other
dairy products. It is due to low amounts of lactase,
which is the enzyme that breaks down lactose, the sugar in dairy.
A true food allergy is an immune system response,
the bodys way of fighting off a substance it has identified as harmful. In children, milk, eggs, peanuts, wheat,
soy and tree nuts, such as walnuts and pecans, cause
almost all food allergy reactions.
Avoiding whatever causes a reaction is the best
way to protect against the issues that arise from food
allergies and food intolerance. If you are not sure what
food is the culprit, keep a food diary for your child. This
may help you correlate reactions with a certain food.
It is important to see a doctor for help with identifying and testing for food allergies and intolerances,
understanding whether changes in your childs diet
are necessary and to learn how to safely change your
childs diet.
Dr. Katherine Orellana and Dr. Diana Volpert are pediatric
gastroenterologists with Valley Medical Group.

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OurChildren
About

TopChoices
S U M M E R 2 0 16

CO M P I L E D BY H E I D I M A E B RAT T

Up, Up, and Away


in my Beautiful Balloon!
You can watch them fly high at the annual QuickChek New Jersey Festival of Ballooning,
the largest summertime hot air balloon and music festival in North America. Held at
Solberg Airport in Readington, the festival has something to entertain everyone and is a
great family attraction. From twice daily mass ascensions of up to 100 special shape and
sport hot air balloons, to headlining concerts, family entertainment, hundreds of crafters and vendors, fireworks, a balloon glow, and more, the festival is packed with activities. Friday, July 29 though Sunday July 31. Solberg Airport, 39 Thor Solberg Road
Whitehouse Station.1-800-HOT-AIR-9, www.balloonfestival.com

Israels Stomp Drums


Near Museum of Jewish Heritage
Its been called Israels Stomp a reference to the long-running off-Broadway show
that uses percussion, visual and comedy Tararam, is an exciting musical theatrical and dance experience from Israel, and is making a special appearance in Robert
Wagner Park, located adjacent to the Museum of Jewish Heritage in Lower Manhattan.
The free show cleverly weaves together body drumming and a variety of extraordinary sounds and rhythms, which celebrate the world from a fresh Israeli and Middle
Eastern perspective. Sunday, Aug. 7, 4 p.m. Robert Wagner Park, 20 Battery
Place, Manhattan.

Rhythm Works
Integrative Dance Comes to
Cresskill Performing Arts
New this fall to the menu of the
many options offered at Cresskill
Performing Arts in Cresskill,
owner Betsy Daly has just added
Rhythm Works Integrative Dance
for special needs youngsters.
Cresskill Performing Arts is
a newly certified provider for
Rhythm Works Integrative Dance,
which is designed for students with
learning disabilities and special
needs, including autism, Down
syndrome, cerebral palsy, lowtone, sensory integration disorders,
and other developmental challenges. Rhythm Works Integrative Dance uses
basic hip-hop dance moves, rhythm, and games. Ms. Daly said the program
will be for youngsters 4 through teenager, and will be able to integrate the
work that other therapists are currently doing with the youngsters. Cresskill
Performing Arts, 300 Knickerbocker Road #1100, Cresskill. 201-3907513, www.cresskillperformingarts.com

Free Childrens Movie


Series in Washington Township
When youve had enough of the pool or park, or you know its going to be a rainy
day, or the heat is just too much head over to Washington Township Cinema and
get in some early-morning popcorn and enjoy the free summer movie series
on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Upcoming films include, Ramona and
Beezus on Aug. 2 and 3; Home on Aug. 9 and 10; and Alvin and Chipmunks, The
Road Trip on Aug. 16 and 17. Washington Township Cinema 3, 249 Pascack
Road, Washington Township. 201-666-8020, www.bowtiecinemas.com

ABOUT OUR CHILDREN SUMMER 2016

AOC-10

The Good Life With Kids

A U G U S T

To Our Readers: To Our Readers: This calendar is a day-by-day schedule of events. Although all information is as timely as we can make it, its a
good idea to call to verify details before you go.

Young Adult Book into Movie: Join a


young adult group discuss various books.
On tap, Divergent by Veronica Roth. 3
to 4 p.m. Englewood Library, 31 Engle St.,
Englewood. 201-568-2215. www.englewoodlibrary.org.

Friday, August 5
Preschool Story Time: Join in the story
fun for children 3 to 5 years old. 10:30 to
11:30 in the Childrens Room. Englewood
Library, 31 Engle St., Englewood. 201568-2215. www.englewoodlibrary.org.

Saturday, August 6
Bubblemania. See Thursday, August 11

Monday, August 1
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Celebration:
The store is opening early at 8 a.m. for fans to
rush in and pick up their copy of the just published
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. Barnes &
Noble, 765 Route 17 South, Paramus. 201-4454589, www.stores.barnesandnobel.com/store/2597.
Dino Dig at Liberty Science: LSC is transforming
its backyard into a paleontological dig site for a
limited time Dino Dig. Work alongside Dino Digs
teams to discover replica fossils of prehistoric
creatures. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free with admission.
Liberty Science Center, Liberty Science Center,
Liberty State Park, 222 Jersey City Boulevard,
Jersey City. 201-200-1000, www.lsc.org

Tuesday, August 2
Toddler Time: Bring your walking toddler up to
age 2 to the library for fun at a session at 10
or 11 a.m. Teaneck Public Library, 840 Teaneck
Road, Teaneck. 201-837-4171, www.teaneck.org.
Free Movie in Washington Township: Bow Tie
Cinema presents Ramona and Beezus. 10 a.m.
show. First come, first seated. Also on Aug. 3.
Washington Township Cinema 3, 249 Pascack
Road, Washington Township, 201-666-8020,
www.bowtiecinema.com.

Wednesday, August 3
Story Time Craft: Children ages 3 to 6 years
old, and their caregivers come and meet in the
Childrens Reading Garden, weather permitting,
for a story and a simple craft. 3 p.m. Teaneck
Public Library, 840 Teaneck Road, Teaneck. 201837-4171, www.teaneck.org.
Crocodile Tricks: For puppet story time come
hear a tale from India performed by puppeteer
Diane Koszarski. 7 p.m. The performance by Pink
Flamingo Puppets is free. Teaneck Public Library,
840 Teaneck Road, Teaneck. 201-837-4171, www.
teaneck.org.
A Look at Lenape Culture: The Passaic County
Historical Society hosts Lenape Culture: An
Introduction to American Indian Life in New
Jersey. 7 p.m. 3 Valley Road, Paterson. Free. 973247-0085, www.lambertcastle.org

Thursday, August 4
Filmstrip Story Time: Come and see classic
picture books come to life on the big screen. For
youngsters ages 3 and up. 10:30 a.m. No registration required. Groups welcome. Teaneck Public
Library, 840 Teaneck Road, Teaneck. 201-8374171, www.teaneck.org.

10 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN SUMMER 2016

Dinosaurs Love Underpants & Aliens


Love Dinopants: Join in for a wacky celebration of underpants from a bestselling
author-illustrator team featuring Dinosaurs Love
Underpants and Aliens Love Dinopants. Coloring
and activities to follow. 11 a.m. Barnes & Noble,
765 Route 17 South, Paramus. 201-445-4589,
www.stores.barnesandnobel.com/store/2597.

Sunday, August 7
Family Art Project: Celebrate the sun and discover its importance. Through handmade sundials,
learn about shadows and discover a simple way to
tell time. Work on a project. Free with admission.
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wave Hill House 675 W. 252 St.,
Bronx, NY, 718-549-3200, www.wavehill.org.

Monday, August 8
Dino Dig at Liberty Science: LSC is transforming
its backyard into a paleontological dig site for a
limited time Dino Dig. Work alongside Dino Digs
teams to discover replica fossils of prehistoric
creatures. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free with admission.
Liberty Science Center, Liberty Science Center,
Liberty State Park, 222 Jersey City Boulevard,
Jersey City. 201-200-1000, www.lsc.org.

Tuesday, August 9
Summer Hikes: Offered by the staff at the
Kearney House in Alpine, free hikes for youngsters 7 or older, accompanied by an adult. The
three-mile hikes will take place Aug. 9, 16 and
23 from 10 a.m. to noon. First hike will begin at
Allison Park in Englewood Cliffs. For details, 201768-1360, www.njpalisades.org/calendar.
Toddler Time: Bring your walking toddler up to
age 2 to the library for fun at a session at 10
or 11 a.m. Teaneck Public Library, 840 Teaneck
Road, Teaneck. 201-837-4171, www.teaneck.org.
Free Movie in Washington Township: Bow Tie
Cinema presents Home. 10 a.m. show. First
come, first seated. Also on Aug. 10. Washington
Township Cinema 3, 249 Pascack Road,
Washington Township, 201-666-8020, www.
bowtiecinema.com.
Pajama Hour: Children ages 2 to 5 are invited to
come in their jammies for a story at Englewood
Library. Children must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Englewood
Library, 31 Engle St., Englewood. 201-568-2215.
www.englewoodlibrary.org.

Wednesday, August 10
Stories in the Garden: Discover the creepy
crawlies and wiggly wormies as Wave Hill educators share some of their favorite nature tails.
Ideal for children 3 to 6 years old, accompanied
by an adult. Free with admission. 11 a.m. On the

OurChildren
About

To Add Your Event to Our Calendar


Send it to:
Calendar Editor
About Our Children
New Jersey/Rockland Jewish Media Group
1086 Teaneck Road
Teaneck, NJ 0766 AboutOCaol.com
or fax it to: 201-833-4959

Deadline for Sept. issue (published


Sept. 26): Tuesday, August 9

grounds. Wave Hill House 675 W. 252 St., Bronx,


NY, 718-549-3200, www.wavehill.org.
Story time Craft: Children ages 3 to 6 years
old, and their caregivers come and meet in the
Childrens Reading Garden, weather permitting,
for a story and a simple craft. 3 p.m. Teaneck
Public Library, 840 Teaneck Road, Teaneck. 201837-4171, www.teaneck.org.

Thursday, August 11
Filmstrip Story Time: Come and see classic
picture books come to life on the big screen. For
youngsters ages 3 and up. 10:30 a.m. No registration required. Groups welcome. Teaneck Public
Library, 840 Teaneck Road, Teaneck. 201-8374171, www.teaneck.org.
Library Lap Time: Enjoy your little one not yet
walking at the weekly lap time session. Meets
11 a.m. Teaneck Public Library, 840 Teaneck
Road, Teaneck. 201-837-4171, www.teaneck.org.
Bubblemania: Comic bubble artist Casey Carle
brings his show to the Teaneck Library. Its a
wild and wacky show. 7 p.m. For children 5 and
older. Teaneck Public Library, 840 Teaneck Road,
Teaneck. 201-837-4171, www.teaneck.org.

Saturday, August 13
Lake Tappan Family Paddle Day: Join a familyfriendly day of paddling on the Lake Tappan
Reservoir in Old Tappan. The partnership fundraiser between SUEZ and the Hackensack
Riverkeeper helps the Riverkeeper protect the
Hackensack River. From 9:30 a.m. to noon, and
12:30 to 3 p.m. To register and information, www.
hackensackriverkeeper.org, 201-968-0808.
Teen Science Fiction: Meet Karen Bao, science
fiction author who will discuss her books and sign
copies of sci-fi novels, Dove Arising and Dove
Exiled. 8 p.m. Barnes & Noble, 765 Route 17
South, Paramus. 201-445-4589, www.stores.
barnesandnobel.com/store/2597.

Monday, August 15

Thursday, August 18
Filmstrip Story Time: Come and see classic
picture books come to life on the big screen. For
youngsters ages 3 and up. 10:30 a.m. No registration required. Groups welcome. Teaneck Public
Library, 840 Teaneck Road, Teaneck. 201-8374171, www.teaneck.org.
Library Lap Time: Enjoy your little one not yet
walking at the weekly lap time session. Meets
11 a.m. Teaneck Public Library, 840 Teaneck
Road, Teaneck. 201-837-4171, www.teaneck.org.
Young Fantasy Reads: Join the Young Fantasy
Reads book group discuss The Giver by
Lois Lowry. Barnes & Noble, 765 Route 17
South, Paramus. 201-445-4589, www.stores.
barnesandnobel.com/store/2597.

Sunday, August 21
Auditions for The Wizard of Oz: Auditions for
the all-time favorite play will be held from 2 to 5
p.m. at the Wayne Y, 1 Pike Drive in Wayne. 973595-0100, www.wayneymca.org.

Monday, August 22
Dino Dig at Liberty Science: LSC is transforming
its backyard into a paleontological dig site for a
limited time Dino Dig. Work alongside Dino Digs
teams to discover replica fossils of prehistoric
creatures. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free with admission.
Liberty Science Center, Liberty Science Center,
Liberty State Park, 222 Jersey City Boulevard,
Jersey City. 201-200-1000, www.lsc.org

Monday, August 29
Dino Dig at Liberty Science: LSC is transforming
its backyard into a paleontological dig site for a
limited time Dino Dig. Work alongside Dino Digs
teams to discover replica fossils of prehistoric
creatures. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free with admission.
Liberty Science Center, Liberty Science Center,
Liberty State Park, 222 Jersey City Boulevard,
Jersey City. 201-200-1000, www.lsc.org.

Dino Dig at Liberty Science: LSC is transforming


its backyard into a paleontological dig site for a
limited time Dino Dig. Work alongside Dino Digs
teams to discover replica fossils of prehistoric
creatures. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free with admission.
Liberty Science Center, Liberty Science Center,
Liberty State Park, 222 Jersey City Boulevard,
Jersey City. 201-200-1000, www.lsc.org.

Tuesday, August 16
Free Movie in Washington Township: Bow Tie
Cinema presents Alvin and the Chipmunks: The
Road Trip. 10 a.m. show. First come, first seated.
Also on Aug. 17. Washington Township Cinema 3,
249 Pascack Road, Washington Township, 201666-8020, www.bowtiecinema.com.
Toddler Time: Bring your walking toddler up to
age 2 to the library for fun at a session at 10
or 11 a.m. Teaneck Public Library, 840 Teaneck
Road, Teaneck. 201-837-4171, www.teaneck.org.

Wednesday, August 17
Story time Craft: Children ages 3 to 6 years
old, and their caregivers come and meet in the
Childrens Reading Garden, weather permitting,
for a story and a simple craft. 3 p.m. Teaneck
Public Library, 840 Teaneck Road, Teaneck. 201837-4171, www.teaneck.org.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. See


Monday, August 1

AOC-11*

Simchas
B'nai mitzvah
MAX BENJAMIN
Max Benjamin son of Cindy
and Matthew Benjamin
of Tenafly and brother of
Zach celebrated becoming
a bar mitzvah on June 18
at Temple Sinai of Bergen
County in Tenafly. As a mitzvah project, he took one of
his dogs to visit residents
at the Jewish Home at
Rockleigh and spent time
with the residents.

PETER CLOSTERMAN

Tenafly. As a mitzvah project,


he worked with Project Night
Night, an organization that
collects and delivers a tote
filled with a security blanket,
age appropriate childrens
book, and a stuffed animal to
homeless children in Bergen
County shelters.

May 21 at Temple Sinai of


Bergen County in Tenafly. As
a mitzvah project, she volunteered at the Bergen Family
Center in Englewood working
with children to improve their
reading and writing.

Soccer Program. This is the


second year she supported
those with special needs by
raising money and running
in the Rubin Run on the Tutu
Team at the Kaplen JCC on
the Palisades.

LEAH KRANTZ

ISABEL SHKLYAR

LAURENCE FINE

Leah Krantz, daughter of


Marianne and Jonathan
Krantz of Franklin Lakes celebrated becoming a bat mitzvah on June 11 at Barnert
Temple in Franklin Lakes.

Isabel Shklyar, daughter


of Amy and Pavel Shklyar
of Demarest, and sister of
Ryan and Ava, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on
May 14 at Temple Sinai of
Bergen County in Tenafly. As
a mitzvah project she volunteered at the Kaplen JCC
on the Palisades in a special
needs class.

Laurence Fine celebrated


becoming a bar mitzvah on
July 21 at Masada in Israel.
He is the son of Alla and
Rabbi David Fine, spiritual
leader of Temple Israel &
Jewish Community Center
of Ridgewood.

Peter J. PJ Closterman
of Cresskill, son of Kim
Closterman and Joseph
Closterman and brother of
Logan and Samantha, celebrated becoming a bar mitzvah on June 18 at Temple
Sinai of Bergen County in

SKYLAR GREENBERG
Skylar Greenberg, daughter of Wazel and Kenneth
Greenberg of West Milford
and sister of Peyton, 7, celebrated becoming a bat mitzvah on June 18 at Barnert
Temple in Franklin Lakes.

ZOE KARAGEORGE
Zoe Karageorge, daughter of Samantha and John
Karageorge of Demarest
and sister of Ari, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on

LAUREN NAIDRICH
Lauren Naidrich, daughter
of Shari and Steven Naidrich
of Tenafly, and sister of
Danielle and Jack, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on
May 21 at Temple Sinai of
Bergen County in Tenafly.
As a mitzvah project, she
participated in the Challenger

ALEXANDRA SUNSHINE
Alexandra Sunshine, daughter of Pamela and Andrew
Sunshine of Tenafly, and the

sister of Daniela, celebrated


becoming a bat mitzvah on
May 28 at Temple Sinai of
Bergen County in Tenafly. As
a mitzvah project she collected spring and summer clothing for the Bergen Family
Centers Closet where BFC
families can go shopping for
summer clothing and have
a store-like experience. She
has been volunteering at BFC
since the 4th grade.

JACOB WOLMER
Jacob Patrick Wolmer, son of
Margaret and Robert Wolmer
of Tenafly, and brother of
Sophia and Makenna, celebrated becoming a bar
Mitzvah on June 4 at Temple
Sinai of Bergen County in
Tenafly. As a mitzvah project,
he organized a food drive
benefitting the Center for
Food Action in Englewood.

PARTY

Sgt. Steven Regula of Woodcliff Lake Police Department accepts the cookies and cards from Rabbi
Dov Drizin and teen volunteers.

Saying Thanks with Cookies for Cops


In light of the recent attacks on law enforcement throughout the country, teens
from Valley Chabads CTeen group decided they could do something to show
appreciation and say thank you to the local police officers for their commitment
and dedication to our communities.
So the teens gathered to bake cookies. When they were done, they delivered
the goodies to the Woodcliff Lake and

Hillsdale police stations. The edible gifts


were very appreciated and very tasty.
The Valley Chabads teen leadership initiative provides middle and high
school Jewish teens with meaningful
experiences through community service, education and recreation. Open
to all, membership or affiliation is not
required. For more information, 201-4760157, rabbiyosef@valleychabad.org.

973-661-9368

Include:
1 hours of skating (during public session)
Private decorated party room
Off ice party attendant
Skate rental
Invitations for party guests
Pizza and soda
Personalized Carvel ice cream cake
Favors and candy
FREE skating pass for future use
Birthday child receives FREE Ice Vault T shirt

ABOUT OUR CHILDREN SUMMER 2016 11

AOC-12

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