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Table of Contents
MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR OF THE REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL III AND GOVERNOR OF BULACAN ............ iii

MESSAGE FROM THE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE 3RD DISTRICT OF PAMPANGA ............................................ iv


MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR OF THE SECTORAL COMMITTEE ON TOURISM AND MAYOR OF ANGELES CITYv
MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM III ..................................................... vi
MESSAGE FROM THE VICE-CHAIR OF THE REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL III AND DIRECTOR OF NEDA
REGION III .......................................................................................................................................... vii
ACKNOWLEDGMENT ...................................................................................................................................viii
ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................................... ix
FOREWORD ................................................................................................................................................... x
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.................................................................................................................................. xi
I.

Background/Rationale ......................................................................................................................... 1

II.

Planning Area....................................................................................................................................... 2

III.

Current Situation ................................................................................................................................. 3


A. Global Trend.................................................................................................................................. 3
B. Local Performance ........................................................................................................................ 5
C. Tourism Development Challenges ................................................................................................ 6

IV.

The Region in the Context of the National Tourism Development Plan (NTDP) .................................. 8

V.

Action Plan......................................................................................................................................... 10
A. Core Strategy .............................................................................................................................. 11
B. Developing and Marketing Competitive Tourist Destination and Products ................................ 17
C. Improving Tourism Institutional, Governance and Human Resource Capacities ........................ 23
D. Improving Market Access and Connectivity ................................................................................ 26

VI.

Policy Recommendations .................................................................................................................. 34

VII.

Implementation Arrangement ........................................................................................................... 35

VIII. Monitoring and Evaluation ................................................................................................................ 36


ANNEXES ..................................................................................................................................................... 37
REFERENCES ................................................................................................................................................ 45

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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List of Tables
Table 1. Top Ten Country Destinations, 2011 ............................................................................................... 4
Table 2. Strategic Cluster Destination Profile ................................................................................................ 9
Table 3. TRIPs with Approved Allocation .................................................................................................... 28
Table 4. TRIPs Proposed for FY 2014 .......................................................................................................... 29
Table 5. Central Luzon Tourism Action Plan Matrix ..................................................................................... 31

List of Figures
Figure 1. Regional Economy .......................................................................................................................... 2
Figure 2. W-Growth Corridor Strategy .......................................................................................................... 3
Figure 3. International Tourist Arrivals .......................................................................................................... 3
Figure 5. International Tourist Arrival by Region ........................................................................................... 4
Figure 4. International Tourist Arrival by Economy ....................................................................................... 4
Figure 6. Visitor Arrival to the Philippines ..................................................................................................... 5
Figure 7. Region III Visitor Arrival .................................................................................................................. 5
Figure 8. Domestic Visitor Arrival, by province/Tourism Area, 2011 ............................................................. 6
Figure 9. Foreign Visitor Arrival, by province/Tourism Area, 2011 ................................................................ 6
Figure 10. Central Luzon Tourism Development Framework ...................................................................... 11
Figure 11. Tourism Development Areas/Service Centers ............................................................................ 12
Figure 12. Central Luzon Tourism Clusters .................................................................................................. 18
Figure 13. Tourism Road Infrastructure 2012/2013 Approved/Proposed TRIP ........................................... 27

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR OF THE REGIONAL


DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL III AND GOVERNOR OF
BULACAN

The Regional Development Council (RDC) takes pride of the completion of the
Central Luzon Tourism Action Plan (CLTAP) 2011-2016. The Council is grateful to
the Special Committee on Tourism headed by Mayor Edgardo D. Pamintuan and
to all the individuals who have taken time and effort to participate in the crafting
of the plan.
But more than being pleased in having a document as another RDC
accomplishment, I am gratified by the thought of a plan that will guide and
coordinate tourism development efforts in the region. I see this as crucial given
the wide array of players involved in tourism promotion whose actions and
activities need to be coordinated so that tourism may bear the full fruits of its
benefits and share more to economic growth as synergy from said efforts is
achieved. As Central Luzon holds so much potential in tourism, it will no doubt
stand to benefit from a planned and integrated approach to tourism
development. Harnessing of such potential will definitely go a long way in
contributing to the economic growth of the region, at the same time, in
preserving the regions natural, historical, and cultural wonders.
As the current chairman of the RDC, I enjoin all stakeholders to be guided by the
Tourism Action Plan, to put their acts together and actively participate in
fostering tourism growth and development as a strategy towards achieving rapid,
sustained and inclusive growth, which is one of the goals espoused in the Central
Luzon Development Plan 2011-2016.

WILHELMINO C. SY-ALVARADO

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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MESSAGE FROM THE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE


3RD DISTRICT OF PAMPANGA

Kudos to the Regional Development Council - Special Committee on Tourism


headed by Angeles city Mayor Edgardo D. Pamintuan, for the earnest work in
completing the Central Luzon Action Plan.
Indeed the region needs to be proactive and to capitalize on the fact that it is a
major gateway in order to capture a larger share of the booming tourism market.
The region cannot afford to be complacent and leave to chance or market forces
tourism promotion and growth, because of the huge opportunity cost that is lost
by simply maintaining the "status quo" and allowing competitors in other regions
dominate those of Central Luzon. While the Clark International Airport provides
the region an advantage over the other regions, it would benefit more from such
physical advantage if these will be coupled by excellent tourism products and
services.
The plan can guide the identification, development and implementation of
tourism programs that would meaningfully and effectively create an atmosphere
attractive enough for tourists to want to visit the region. To be truly competitive,
we will have to enhance infrastructure, strengthen support services, and
intensify promotion.
Now that the framework has been drawn for achieving the region's tourism
development goal, the next important step is to translate the plan to concrete
actions. It is thus with great note that I enjoin all tourism stakeholders in Central
Luzon help bring to fruition the Tourism Action Plan, for the sake of the region's
development and that of its people in particular.
Mabuhay ang Central Luzon!

OSCAR S. RODRIGUEZ

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR OF THE SECTORAL


COMMITTEE ON TOURISM AND MAYOR OF
ANGELES CITY

As chairman of the RDC Special Committee on Tourism, it is with honor and pride
that I present to the regions stakeholders the Central Luzon Tourism Action Plan.
I am grateful to the RDC for taking the initiative and providing the cue for the
plans preparation, opportune as it is because of the growing tourist arrival in the
region, and the increasing number of tourists in the global market. The region is
fortunate that it has in its midst the Clark International Airport which has allowed
easier access to the region to both local and foreign travellers. The region though
should not be content in just having a gateway, but must work on developing
more reasons for tourists to want to stay and spend more time here, to maximize
the benefits that the region could gain from tourism in the form of revenues and
jobs.
The CLTAPs value is in providing a framework of action for developing and
promoting tourism in the region. It suggests of the concerns that the region
should be directing its attention that would help it raise the level and quality of
tourism in the region. As such actions require commonly and essentially the
collective efforts of all concerned stakeholders, I call on the participation of all
interest and responsible groups to work together and give their share in ensuring
that we achieve our vision of being a favored tourism destination.
I would like to thank Director Ronaldo P. Tiotuico of the DOT and all the other
members of the Technical Working Group for the commitment they have shown
in preparing and completing the CLTAP.

EDGARDO D. PAMINTUAN

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR OF THE


DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM III

As the governments primary arm in promoting tourism development, the


Department of Tourism (DOT) is grateful for the initiative taken by the Regional
Development Council in coming up with the Central Luzon Tourism Action Plan.
Indeed the plan is vital and timely as the region braces for more tourist arrival
with the expansion and modernization of the regions primary gateway the
Clark International Airport. With this as forthcoming, the region needs to be able
to prepare and set an environment for tourists to want to stay, explore and
experience the region.
Such an environment, however, requires the creative and integrated work of all
the players involved in tourism promotion, not just the DOT. It is therefore with
high hopes that through the CLTAP, collaboration among stakeholders may be
strengthened and that efforts at building a more attractive tourism climate be
better contrived with all the players contributing their share towards said end.
My deepest appreciation to the members of the Technical Working Group for
their shared time and inputs that made possible the completion of the CLTAP,
and to Mayor Edgardo D. Pamintuan for his unrelenting support to this endeavor
as well as championing the cause of tourism development in the region.

RONALDO P. TIOTUICO

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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MESSAGE FROM THE VICE-CHAIR OF THE


REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL III AND
DIRECTOR OF NEDA REGION III

The Secretariat is thankful to all who have extended their help and made possible
the completion of the Central Luzon Tourism Action Plan.
The idea for the plan was hatched in 2011 through the inspiration of former RDC
Chairman, Congressman Oscar Rodriguez. The intent is to have a blueprint that
would guide the region to better seize the opportunities from a growing tourism
market and the improvement in access to the region brought about by the
modernization of the regions international gateway and seaports. As more
tourists are bound to enter our gateway, it only behooves the region to prepare
itself in responding to the demands of the tourism market. This could be done,
however, with a well laid-out plan and a tourism industry collaborating and
acting in sync.
The plan, which is anchored on the National Tourism Development Plan (NTDP)
and the Central Luzon Tourism Master Plan 1998, was framed as a guide for
action to planners, decision-makers, support institutions, and investors in the
tourism industry. We hope that the plan would truly serve its purpose and help
the region develop into a must-see destination comparable to the leading
destinations of the country.

SEVERINO C. SANTOS

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The Central Luzon Tourism Action Plan 2011-2016 owes its completion to the Special Committee on
Tourism Technical Working Group led by DOT Regional Director Ronaldo P. Tiotuico and with members
composed of:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

Name
Ronaldo P. Tiotuico
Michael Palispis
Cesar Cuayson
Sonny Crisitobal
Limuel Jan Lobederio
Carolina Uy
Grace Irabagon
Arwin Paul Lingat
Ma. Asuncion Fronda
Elmer Bulaon
Maria Domitela D. Mora
Benito Bon
Christine Nunag
Rico Suarez
Lorela Montoya
Erlinda Lim
Noemi Garcia
Josephine Poyaoan
Linda Pamintuan
Rommel De Jesus
Frankie Villanueva
Mitch Otsuro
Jem Camba
Nida Roio
Gilda Padua

Agency/LGU
Department of Tourism Region III
Aurora
Bataan
Bulacan
Bulacan
Nueva Ecija
Nueva Ecija
Pampanga
Tarlac
Tarlac
Zambales
Zambales
Angeles city
Angeles city
Olongapo City
Olongapo City
Clark Development Corporation
Clark Development Corporation
Subic-Clark Alliance Development Corporation
Subic-Clark Alliance Development Corporation
Metro Angeles Chamber of Commerce and Industries
Metro Angeles Chamber of Commerce and Industries
Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority
Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority
Alliance of Travel and Tour Agencies of Pampanga

Special thanks to the Policy Formulation and Planning Division of NEDA III for packaging the plan and to
Ms. Rowena Victoria P. David for doing the cover and layout. Pictures used on this action plan were taken
from the web and from DOT Region 3.
Appreciation is above all extended to Angeles City Mayor Edgardo D. Pamintuan for pushing for the
completion of the plan and in advocating for the plans adoption.

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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ACRONYMS
ATOCEL

- Association of Tourism Officers in Central Luzon

BPLS

- Business Permit and Licensing System

CDC

- Clark Development Corporation

CLTAP

- Central Luzon Tourism Action Plan

DepED

- Department of Education

DILG

- Departement of the Interior and Local Government

DMIA

- Diosdado Macapagal International Airport

DOT

- Department of Tourism

DPWH

- Department of Public Works and Highways

DSWD

- Department of Social Welfare and Development

DTI

- Department of Trade and Industry

LGU

- Local Government Unit

MICE

- Meetings, Incentives, Conferencing, Exhibitions

NLEX

- North Luzon Expressway

NTDP

- National Tourism Development Plan

PNP

- Philippine National Police

PPA

- Philippine Ports Authority

PPP

- Public-Private Partnership

RDC

- Regional Development Council

RGA

- Regional Government Agency

RTAP

- Regional Tourism Action Plan

SBMA

- Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority

SCAD

- Subic-Clark Alliance for Development

SCT

- Special Committee on Tourism

SCTEX

- Subic-Clark-Tarlac Expressway

TDA

- Tourism Development Area

TESDA

- Technical Education and Skills Development Authority

TEZ

- Tourism Enterprise Zone

VIC

- Visitor Information Center

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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FOREWORD
In 2011 the worlds tourists recorded 980
million, a 4.4 percent increase from the previous
years level of 930 million. If the projection for
2012 is proven correct, that is a 3-4 percent
increase, the number of tourists for the year
would already be surpassing the one billion mark
by year-end. And if the trend continues its way
up, the UNWTO projects that by 2030 the
volume of tourists would be 1.8 billion.
Not only is the number of international tourists
growing but the Asia-Pacific region is taking a
growing slice of the global travel market, with
share in 2011 of 22 percent. This share is second
to Europe with a 51 percent share of the global
market, while the Americas slid to third with a
16 percent share. Apparently the growth in
volume of tourists in Asia-Pacific has been more
robust with the region securing a 5.6 percent
growth in 2011 compared to 6.0 percent for
Europe and 4.2 percent for the Americas.
Given the above scenario, the opportunity for
the Philippines is high to capture more of the
ballooning number of tourists particularly in the
Asia-Pacific, with its own unique set of

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

attractions. The figure in fact has already gone


up to 3.5 million in 2011, the highest ever
recorded for the country. Nevertheless, the
number still pales in comparison with that of
other ASEAN countries, reason for us now to
think about how to increase our chance of
attracting more tourists and maximizing the
benefits that may be derived from it.
The Central Luzon Tourism Action Plan was
formulated to help in the countrys quest for
higher tourism growth. In the same way that the
National Tourism Development Plan 2011-2016
was crafted to provide a strategic framework
and guide to the tourism sector for its
development, the regional tourism action plan
provides a guide or a way forward to the
regions
tourism
stakeholders
towards
enhancing the regions tourism industry, making
it more robust and able to contribute to job
creation and economic growth. The plan
includes interventions for strengthening
institutions and partnerships, developing
competitive
attractions
and
improving
marketing as well as building the necessary
support infrastructure.

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Despite uncertainties in the global market, travel
and tourism kept its growth, even breaching the
one billion mark in 2012. The number of
international tourists grew by 4 percent,
expanding to 1.035 billion from 996 million in
2011. This growth helped cushion the impact of
economic crisis in countries worldwide including
the Philippines, with the tourism industry
providing the revenues and creating the jobs
that helped sustain the economy and kept it
afloat.
The countrys foreign tourists are increasingly
finding its way to Central Luzon because of more
air traffic at the Clark International Airport (CIA).
From about 39 flights per week in 2005, the
current flight count has climbed to 224
international flights and 72 domestic flights per
week. This apparently increased access to
Central Luzon, which coupled with improved
road access, had visitor arrival surging up from
only 396,569 (147,808 foreign tourists) in 2005
to 2.06 million (354,560 foreign tourists) in
2012.
Nevertheless, said number remains a paltry
share of the countrys tourists, although the
sense is that the region is rich in potential which
when tapped and harnessed could further the
regions tourism industrys growth. Hence, to
take on the opportunity of creating a more
vibrant tourism industry, the RDC initiated the

creation of a special committee on tourism with


the mandate to formulate a regional master
plan for the development of tourism in Central
Luzon. The Committee was formed on February
25, 2011 by virtue of RDC Resolution No. 03-032011, with Mayor Edgardo D. Pamintuan of
Angeles City named as chairman of the
committee.

The Committee, however, agreed that instead of


a master plan, an action plan that is anchored on
the National Tourism Development 2012-2016
would be prepared. The regional tourism action
plan is intended to identify the key interventions
needed to propel regional tourism growth, as
well as clarify and harmonize the roles of the
various tourism stakeholders and local tourism
areas.
The Central Luzon Tourism Action Plan (CLTAP)
takes off from the development approach and
strategies identified in the NTDP. Geared
towards building the regions own tourism
competitive strength, the plan focuses on
measures or steps falling under the three major
thrusts of the NTDP: a) improving market access
and connectivity; b) developing and marketing
competitive tourist destinations and products;
and c) improving tourism institutional,
governance and human resource capacities.

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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Primarily, the main strategy is to develop a core
area in each province as main attraction or
service center, while developing Subic and Clark
as the nuclei or hub for tourism in the region,
with these areas providing the gateways. The
core areas shall be called the tourism centers of
the region. While the strategy does not preclude
the development of other areas or attractions in
the provinces, priority attention shall be given to
developing the tourism centers as the regions
major tourism showcase. The idea is to have in
each province a convergence point where

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

visitors would have the amenities, facilities and


attractions of interests to tourists all in one
place. Each tourism center would promote a
different theme or carry a unique feature that
would engage tourists to a different experience
as they go from one province to another. This
would allow also the province or tourism center
to stand alone and provide visitors a feeling of
must experience even without seeing the
other areas of the region. Shown below is an
illustration of said concept:

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Tourism development of the provinces or tourism development areas (TDA) would also be pursued
around the following themes:
Province/TDA
Aurora

Core Theme
Surfing and Country Get Away

Bataan
Bulacan
Nueva Ecija
Pampanga
Subic-Clark
Tarlac
Zambales

Historic Place of Valor


Arts, Cultural and Historical Center
Agri-Tourism and Nature Adventure Destination
Culinary Hotspot
Leisure, Sports, MICE Hub
Pilgrimage and Ecotourism Site
Beach and Mountain Hideaway

To realize the above strategies and respond to meeting the thrusts and goals of the NTDP, the Region
shall endeavor to carry out the following measures:

NTDP Strategic Direction 1:

Developing and marketing competitive tourist destination and products


Action

Responsible/ Participating
Entity(ies)

Time Frame
Short

Medium

Long

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT
Organize Clusters of TDAs

DOT, ATOCEL

Rehabilitate/redevelop TDAs
Conduct diagnostic assessment of sites
Formulate local tourism area/site development
plans/business plan
Implement site improvement
Developing unique features, such as architecture,
customs and traditions
Enhancing the aesthetic character or
environment/ beautification
Open space/ amusement or green park
development
Development of walk paths, local art or craft
shops
Providing areas or venues for sports or outdoor
recreation
Develop new market-competitive destinations and
products

LGUs, DENR, DOT, DTI,


SBMA, CDC

Development of Subic for cruise tourism

SBMA, DOT

Develop facilities for large conventions in


Clark and Subic
Develop potential for
entertainment/amusement, sports,
ecotourism, wellness, medical and retirement
tourism

SBMA, CDC, DOT

LGUs, DOT, DENR, DTI,


SBMA, CDC, private
sector

LGUs, DOT, TIEZA

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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NTDP Strategic Direction 1:

Developing and marketing competitive tourist destination and products


Action

Development of integrated resort

Responsible/ Participating
Entity(ies)

Time Frame
Short

Private Sector

Establish TEZs and investment incentives

TIEZA, LGUs

Conduct Cultural Mapping

LGUs, NHI

Implement preservation and development of


cultural and historical heritage
Develop or improve accommodation and other
service facilities

LGUs, NHI, DOT

Long

DOT, private
sector/associations of
hotels, resorts and
restaurants, LGUs
DTI, DOT, private sector

Develop and promote a unified tourism brand

LGUs, DOT, SBMA, CDC

Determine target markets

DOT, ATOCEL, CDC, SBMA

Mobilize various media to promote CLs


attractions
Harmonize marketing and promotion collaterals

DOT, LGUs, CDC, SBMA

*
*

Organize tour operators

DOT, tour operators

Develop tour packages

Tour operators, SBMA,


CDC

Intensify promotion of tourism-local industry


linkage

Medium

MARKETING AND PROMOTION

Strengthen market research and database


management
Build DOTs market research database

Network with academic and other institutions

SBMA, CDC, LGUs, DOT

DOT
DOT, academe, market
research institutions

NTDP Strategic Direction 2:


Improving tourism institutions, governance and human resource
Action

Responsible/ Participating
Entity(ies)

Time Frame
Short

Develop and implement a tourism enterprise


accreditation system and standards

DOT, LGUs, RDC

Institutionalize/establish policies for regulating


and monitoring tourism enterprises

DOT, LGUs

Streamline business permit and licensing system


and reduce cost of doing business

DTI, LGUs

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

Medium

Long

P a g e | xv

NTDP Strategic Direction 2:


Improving tourism institutions, governance and human resource
Action

Responsible/ Participating
Entity(ies)

Time Frame
Short
*

Institutionalize local tourism offices and build


capacities of LGUs

LGUs, DOT

Determine and establish an appropriate


mechanism for facilitating tourism investment
promotion[Investors Assistance Office (IAO)]
Strengthen stakeholder partnerships

RDC, DTI, SCAD

DOT

Strengthen DOTs capacity as coordinating and


facilitating body
Mobilize public and private resource for tourism
promotion and product development
Develop competent and productive tourism
workforce
Intensify tourism security

DOT, TIEZA

ATOCEL, LGUs, NGAs

LGUs, SBMA, CDC, DOT,


TESDA
LGUs, PNP

Develop and implement programs for


safeguarding vulnerable groups
Formulate and adopt local tourism codes
Organize tourist transport services and rationalize
transport fares
Study the possibility of alternative transport
mode, in particular the revival of the port of Orion
for Metro Manila and Central Luzon connection
through the western seaboard
Identify and build priority tourism road
infrastructure
Build, install VICs, clean rest stops, directional
signage
Improve traffic management
Note:

LGUs

DOTC, LGUs

LGUs, DPWH, DOT,


DOT, TIEZA, DPWH
LGUs, DOTC

Long

LGUs, DSWD

LTFRB, SBMA, CDC, CIAC,


DOTC

Medium

* - continuing activity

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

P a g e | xvi

In pursuit of the Action Plan, the following


policies are also recommended:

Support tourism industry development


through provision of appropriate incentives,
infrastructure and services.
Ensure management and protection of the
environment and natural resources in
tourism development areas.
Preservation and development of the
tourism potential of historical and cultural
heritage sites/assets for the perpetual
enjoyment, education and appreciation of
both local people and tourists.
Ensure reasonable transport fares for
locally-regulated public utility vehicles.
Ensure ease of access through provision of
road infrastructure and traffic management.
In the rehabilitation or upgrading of tourism
road infrastructure, preserving trees
alongside roads to be rehabilitated is given
premium to the extent that it is practicable,
otherwise replacement of trees that have to
be cut must be ensured.
Ensure the accreditation of tourism
establishments with the DOT and the

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

maintenance of facilities, amenities and


services within standards.
Promote skills upgrading and licensing of
tourism workers.
Ensure that the local areas physical
development should be in harmony with
nature and its scenic attractions/ambiance.
No signboards shall be installed in areas that
would block, diminish or ruin the regions
scenic views/landscapes.
Provide for the protection of children,
women, indigenous people and other
vulnerable groups from the adverse social
impacts of tourism.
Ensure safety and security of tourists in
TDAs at all times.

Given the enormity of the task for implementing


the Plan, it is therefore crucial that all industry
players play a role or participate in this effort.
Hence, all are enjoined to give their share
because it is only truly through partnership and
collaboration could the intent of the Plan be
achieved and the tourism sectors sustainable
development be a reality.

Page |1

I.

Background/Rationale

The last five years saw the world economies,


particularly those of advanced nations, reel
from the impacts of the global financial
meltdown in the U.S. and from natural
calamities that hit many parts of the world.
Many economies teetered on the brink of
collapse due to the crises, while activities
were widely disrupted as an aftermath of the
disasters. On the other hand, travel and
tourism sustained its growth momentum,
even picking up gas by breaching the one
billion mark in 2012. The number of
international tourists grew by 4 percent,
expanding to 1.035 billion from 996 million in
2011. This growth helped cushion the impact
of economic crisis in countries worldwide
including the Philippines, with the tourism
industry providing the revenues and creating
the jobs that helped sustain the economy and
kept it afloat.
But while the countrys visitors swelled, the
numbers remain a paltry share of the worlds
total and a remote comparison of even the
countries in the ASEAN. For example, while
the number of tourists in the Philippines rose
to a high of 3.9 million in 2011 as compared
to only 3.5 million in 2010, inbound tourists
already counted 24.7 million in Malaysia and
19.10 million in Thailand. Nevertheless,
hopes are still high that with more creative
marketing, the country will be able to attract
more visitors and breach the 5-million mark
as it already hit 4.3 million in 2012.
A good number of the countrys foreign
tourists are increasingly finding its way to
Central Luzon because of more air traffic at
the Clark International Airport (CIA). From
about 39 flights per week in 2005, the
current flight count has climbed to 224
international flights and 72 domestic flights
per week. This apparently increased access to
Central Luzon, which coupled with improved
road access, had visitor arrival surging up

from only 396,569 (147,808 foreign tourists)


in 2005 to 2.06 million (354,560 foreign
tourists) in 2012.

The sense, however, is that for a region


endowed with an international gateway,
tourism attractions and strategic location
vis--vis Metro Manila the numbers would
have been higher than what Central Luzon
currently generates. Apart from the low
reporting of accommodation establishments
of their visitor count as apparent reason for
the relatively low number, the general
impression is that the region needs to step
up and consolidate its efforts towards raising
the quality of tourism experience in the
region to enable it to compete with the rest
of the major regional destinations like
National Capital Region, Southern Tagalog,
Central Visayas and Northern Mindanao.

Perceiving therefore the need and


opportunity to create a more vibrant tourism
industry, the RDC initiated the creation of a
special committee on tourism with the
mandate to formulate a regional master plan
for the development of tourism in Central
Luzon. The Committee was formed on
February 25, 2011 by virtue of RDC
Resolution No. 03-03-2011. Mayor Edgardo
Pamintuan of Angeles City was named
chairman of this committee.

Coinciding with the committees creation is


the completion of the NTDP, which outlines
the foci of development efforts for the
promotion of tourism in the country.
The plan provides for the strategic direction
appropriate for each region or tourism
development cluster, and as such is meant to
serve as a guide for the local governments in
the region in preparing their respective local
tourism development plans.
CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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With the NTDP already providing the


framework and development direction, the
SCT formulated a regional tourism action plan
(RTAP) instead of crafting a master plan. The
RTAP is intended to identify the key

interventions needed to propel regional


tourism growth, as well as clarify and
harmonize the roles of the various tourism
stakeholders and local tourism areas.

Essentially, with the RTAP providing the roadmap, the region aims to attract a bigger share of the growing
number of tourists. As more tourists mean more business, more work and more income for the people of
Central Luzon, the regional tourism action plan, as formulated, shall guide actions towards enhancing
tourism development and its accompanying benefits.

II.
a.

Planning Area
Regional Economy

Figure 1. Regional Economy

Central Luzons economy is endowed with


diverse resources, from the highlands to its
coastal waters. The region has vast alluvial plains
that produce an array of agricultural products
from the countrys main staple, i.e. rice, among
other crops, to livestock and aquaculture. These
products make the region a major contributor to
the countrys GVA in agriculture, fishery and
forestry, accounting for 10 percent.
Providing balance to agriculture are the regions
services and manufacturing sectors which now
account for the bigger share of the regional
economy. In 2011, the services sector (that
includes tourism) accounted for about 41
percent of the regions economy, the industry
sector for 42 percent and agriculture for 17
percent

b.

(Figure 1). Together, the three sectors serve as


backbone of the regions economy, and help
push the region as a vital cog in national
economic growth and development.

Growth Strategy

With services, industry and agriculture as main


economic drivers, Central Luzon adopted a
three-pronged spatial strategy that strongly
pushes for the promotion and development of
the said sectors. Figure 2 shows the conceptual
design of the regions growth strategy referred
to as the W-Growth Corridor Strategy. The

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

strategy involves the development of tourism in


the western section of the W referred to as the
tourism belt; industry in the central section or
the industrial belt; and agriculture in the eastern
section or the green belt.

Page |3
The strategy is based on the resource
endowments, potentials and opportunities
present in the various areas of the region. The
tourism belt covering Bataan and Zambales
provinces has a long coastline with fine beaches.
The central section has been identified as the
industrial corridor because of the presence of
industrial estates or economic zones as well as
the concentration of industrial establishments
here. On the other hand, the green belt covering
portions of Bulacan and Tarlac, Nueva Ecija and
Aurora provinces has been described as such
because of the primarily agricultural nature of
this section of the regions economic activities.
Nonetheless, the regional strategy also
recognizes that each province may have
something unique to offer especially in tourism
and, therefore, encourages the promotion and
development of such tourism potential region
wide. This is to help achieve the regions vision of

III.

Figure 2. W-Growth Corridor Strategy

becoming a favored tourist destination in the


country.

Current Situation
Figure 3. International Tourist Arrivals

A.

Global Trend

Notwithstanding current global economic


challenges, international tourism continued its
way up, surpassing previous levels and making
milestones. For the first time ever in 2012,
tourist arrival count worldwide crossed the 1billion mark, reaching 1.035 billion or a growth
of 4 percent from last years 983 million tourists.
Said growth is also the long-term average
according to the UNWTO for the period 1995 to
2012 (Figure 3). For 2013, a similar or slightly
slower pace (3-4 percent) is expected taking into
account prevailing global conditions, while the
UNWTOs long-term outlook Tourism Towards
2030 projects an average growth of 3.8 percent
for the period 2010-2020. If proven correct, this
will help push international tourist level to 1.8
billion in 2030.

Source: UNTWO

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The advanced economies led by France, remain
to capture the bigger slice of the international
tourists (53.1 percent), albeit the emerging
economies performed relatively better at 4.1
percent (as opposed to 3.6 percent for the
advanced economies) according to the UNWTO
(Figure 4).

arrivals with 9 percent, followed by Central and


Eastern Europe with 8 percent. In terms of
share, however, Europe tops the list with a 51
percent share, followed by Asia and the Pacific
(23 percent), Americas (16 percent), Africa (5
percent) and the Middle East (5 percent). (Figure
5)

The latter also reported that by region, Asia and


the Pacific saw the highest relative growth at 7
percent, while by sub-region South-East Asia and
North Africa recorded the largest increase in

Figure 5. International Tourist Arrival by


Economy

Figure 4. International Tourist Arrival by


Region

Source: UNTWO

Table 1 shows that in 2011, the top ten


destinations were: France (79.5 million), United
States (62.3 million), China (57.6 million), Spain
(56.7 million), Italy (46.1 million), Turkey (29.3
million), United Kingdom (29.2 million), Germany
(28.4 million), Malaysia (24.7 million), and Mexico
(23.4 million). In the Asia-Pacific region, trailing
China and Malaysia are: Hong Kong (22.32
million), Thailand (19.10 million), Macau (12.93
million), Singapore (10.39 million), South Korea
(9.80 million), Indonesia (7.65 million), India (6.29
million) and Japan (6.22 million).

Table 1. Top Ten Country Destinations, 2011

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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B. Local Performance
In the Philippines, the trend has in general also
been positive, with growth averaging 9 percent
in the last ten years. Although its share of the
Asia-Pacific traffic remains comparatively
minuscule, it is increasingly getting attention
and recognized as one of the worlds best
destinations by travel and tourism organizations.
Thus, the outlook as earlier mentioned is
promising with the DOT projecting volume of
tourists to exceed the 5-million mark in 2013.
The top ten sources of tourists for the country in
2012 as shown in Figure 6 are: Korea (24.13
percent), USA (15.27 percent), Japan (9.65
percent), China (5.87 percent), Taiwan (5.07
percent), Australia (4.47 percent), Singapore
(3.47 percent), Canada (2.90 percent) and
Malaysia (2.68 percent).

On the other hand, visitor arrival in Central


Luzon (Figure 7) is also in the upswing, with
positive annual growth from 2001 up to 2012. In
2011, the region breached the 1-million mark for
the very first time when it recorded 1.7 million
during the year [more tourists were captured
this time because of the improved recording and
reporting system of visitor survey adopted by
the SBMA]. A 20-percent increase followed in
2012, bringing the figure to an all-time high
record of 2.06 million. A bigger volume is
expected this year and beyond with the coming
in of more airlines: The Emirates is expected to
launch flights in Clark in October 2013.

Figure 6. Visitor Arrival to the Philippines


2002-2012

Figure 7. Region III Visitor Arrival


2001-2012

Domestic tourists share for about 70 percent of


Central Luzons visitors, while foreign tourists
account for 30 percent. Major drawers are Clark
(for foreign tourists) and Subic (for domestic
tourists) as illustrated in Figures 8 & 9.

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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Figure 8. Domestic Visitor Arrival
by province/Tourism Area, 2011

Figure 9. Foreign Visitor Arrival


by province/Tourism Area, 2011

C. Tourism Development Challenges


The tourism industry faces a host of challenges,
such
as
institutional
weaknesses,
underdeveloped and poor tourism products and
destinations, as well as deficiencies in marketing
and promotion. Poor coordination, underpreparation, and under-investments mark the
sector reason for the country and the region in
particular to underperform and fall behind other
destinations. Annex A shows a list of the issues
and challenges the regions tourism sector faces

as identified in the NTDP, the SCAD Tourism


Roadmap and from the results of the Central
Luzon Tourism Summit.
A comprehensive discussion of the challenges
has already been made in the SCAD Tourism
Roadmap, but a brief description is also given
here if only to give another forum for
recognition of these challenges as well as to
provide a fresh perspective of the tourism
situation in the region.

Tourism Product Development and Marketing


Central Luzons wealth of diversity is also
reflected in its tourism products or attractions,
with natural, cultural to man-made recreations
dotting the regions tourism landscape.
However, it lags behind in visitor statistics
compared with other regions of the country
even as the region lies geographically proximate
to Metro Manila, which serves as the biggest
local source-market for tourism. If any this only
reflects the lack of competitiveness or readiness
of the regions products to meet visitors
expectations and needs. In this regard, the
CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

sector needs more help in terms of developing


and packaging tourist attractions/destinations
into something more competitive and
sufficiently interesting as to stimulate curiosity
and visits.
As earlier mentioned the regions tourism
attractions are numerous and varied, from the
West Philippine Sea to the Pacific, and across all
seven provinces. Many of these attractions,
however, are underdeveloped or poorly
maintained hence they do not get the desired
attention or interest. Albeit the number of

Page |7
visitors is growing, these largely converge in the
provinces of Zambales and Pampanga, or in
particular the Subic-Clark area. As tourists go
where they naturally could gain tourism
experience, the influx of tourists in the SCAD
Corridor only suggests that this destination has
more to offer than the other areas/provinces.
Still the general observation is that the region
has little to offer in terms of experience, with
the attractions, although numerous, not
connected or organized into interesting
packages. A big factor to this is the fragmented
nature of tourism planning and development,
with the latter being a responsibility of local
governments. This being the case, there is little
of joint or collaborative action that is done to
make tourism promotion and development
more efficient and produce more impact.
The responsibility of the LGUs in the
formulation, implementation and monitoring of
their own local tourism development plans is
reflected in the National Tourism Act of 2009
under Rule VIII (Shared Responsibilities of
National and Local Governments) where it states
that LGUs shall prepare, adopt, implement and

monitor their local tourism development plans,


enforce standards for tourism enterprises and
collect statistical data for tourism purposes. The
same Act likewise emphasizes the need for DOT
and DILG to integrate all local tourism
development plans by LGUs in the formulation
and annual updating of the national tourism
development plan.
Marketing is also not given enough push
because of limited resources, lack of organized
tourism packages and poor coordination among
tourism industry players. There is little also of
market research to generate the information
needed for sound tourism product planning and
development. At best such information or task is
left to the central agency or individual industry
player to generate or undertake. As provided for
in the same Act, LGUs shall implement a system
for the collection and reporting of tourism
statistics (including global tourism market
trends), status of tourism plans and programs,
as well as inventory of tourism resources in their
area of responsibility for submission to the
Department of Tourism.

Access
Travel between points outside of the Subic-Clark
Corridor is hampered by traffic; inefficient,
inadequate and uncoordinated transport
system; and the lack of directional signage and
visitor information centers from which tourists
could get assistance or information. Within
Subic and Clark, tourists are faced by the lack of
regular public transport system and high
transport fares. Regular public transport is
unavailable in strategic areas such as the airport
terminal where passengers are bound to seek

low-fare transport service en route to the main


gate of Clark. In the absence of this, passengers
are left at the mercy of overcharging taxi drivers
or car rental companies.
On the other hand, access to major tourist
destinations or tourist centers in the region has
been a major concern of the department and
for this reason has put in place the so-called
DOT-DPWH convergence program where roads
leading to destinations have been identified
and accorded funding by DPWH.

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

Page |8

Governance and Human Resource Development


The challenge in this concern is in gathering and
harmonizing the individual actions of industry
players, so that the impact of such actions is felt
and equitably enjoyed by all players in the
region. The DOT is doing its best to bring
together the industrys key players to pave the
way for concerted action. Such effort, however,
remains to be translated to tangible actions in
terms of delivering the necessary quality and
quantity of products and services that tourists
look for.
Concerns needing attention include improving
systems and policies for facilitating tourism

investment, and developing capacities for


tourism planning and for delivering quality
services. For this purpose, the Department of
Trade and Industry Region III may well be the
support system to promote investment in
tourism under its trade and investment
promotions group while the Department of
Tourism, in coordination with TESDA and private
tourism-related institutions/schools, may well
handle the capacity building program for
tourism planning, delivery of quality service and
conduct of human resource development
among
workers
in
tourism-related
establishments and services.

In summary, lifting the status of the region in the tourism market necessarily requires more than
putting in the necessary resources to build the attractions, but also establishing and piecing
together the institutions and systems essential for the efficient development, promotion and
management of tourism.

IV.

The Region in the Context of the National Tourism


Development Plan (NTDP)

The national government through the DOT


recently completed the preparation of the
National Tourism Development Plan 2011
2016. The plan outlines how the country shall
build its competitive strength as a tourist
destination and realize its vision of becoming a
must experience destination in Asia. The plan
takes on a spatial strategy which involves the
development of tourism cluster destinations the
identification of which was based mainly on the
presence of access infrastructure or gateways
and the areas tourism potential.

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

Because of its airport, sea port and excellent


road network, Central Luzon has been identified
in the NTDP as one of the priority cluster
destinations. The plan is to build on the regions
strength
in
the
areas
of:
entertainment/amusement, sports, beach resort,
events, MICE, ecotourism, wellness, medical and
retirement tourism.
A profile of the region, which describes the
regions tourism development potential,
opportunities and needs, is here shown in Table
2. It would be on this basis that the regional
tourism action plan is formulated.

Page |9

Table 2. Strategic Cluster Destination Profile


Name of Cluster

NP-6 Central Luzon Cluster

Location &
Composition

The Cluster comprises seven Tourism Development Areas, namely: NP-6A Subic-ClarkTarlac Corridor, NP-6B Nueva Ecija, NP-6C Pampanga, NP-6D Bulacan, NP-6E Zambales,
NP-6F Bataan Coast and Hinterland, and NP-6G Aurora.

Main Tourism
Resources /
Assets

Coastal beaches and coves, protected forested mountain landscapes and ecotourism
resources, rich cultural heritagehistoric sites and buildings, customs, tradition, cuisine
and festivals of its peoples, and its leisure, entertainment, sport and meetings facilities.

Access

Direct international air services to Clark and Subic and by road (mostly expressway)
from Metro Manila, as well as from Northern Luzon.

Tourist
Accommodation
Facilities

2,089 hotel rooms in DOT-accredited facilities located mainly in urban centers operating
at +65% room occupancy. Many smaller scale hotels, resorts, inns, and guesthouses are
not accredited.

Tourism Metrics

533,847 arrivals in tourist accommodation in 2008 of which 165,322 were international


and 368,525 were domestic arrivals. 2000 to 2008 CAGR was 10.65%. The Subic-ClarkTarlac Corridor accounted for around 60% of total arrivals.

Development Potential
Internal Strengths

Internal Weaknesses

Clark and Subic international gateways


Well- developed road access to and within the
cluster
Diversity of tourism assets
Strong private sector regional tourism
association

Substandard access and visitor infrastructure and


services at most tourist sites
Insufficient accommodation capacity to allow for
sustained growth
Weak public sector coordination and tourism
governance

External Opportunities

External Threats

Expanding international and domestic tourism


markets
Positioning the Cluster as a major mixed use
tourism destination attracting niche to mass
international and domestic markets
Consolidate Clark as the premier international
tourism gateway to the Philippines

Uncoordinated and uncontrolled development


leading to overdevelopment, congestion, pollution
and loss of natural and cultural heritage value
Volcanic eruptionsMt. Pinatubo and
earthquakes
Typhoons

Market Product Development Opportunities


Developing beach and island resort, leisure, entertainment sport and ecotourism facilities as well as major
multi-purpose convention and exhibition facilities directed at the regional international and domestic tourist
markets supported by broad range of nature and culture sightseeing activities.

Key Products:
Strategic Products/Markets:
Opportunity/Niche:

Nature Based, Sun and Beach, Cultural Tourism


MICE, Leisure & Shopping, Health & Wellness, Cruise Tourism
Nautical Tourism, Education, Retirement Tourism

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Key Development Deficiencies and Needs
Access &
Connectivity

Completion of phase 2 of terminal 1 (budget carrier terminal) and second terminal at


Clark
Completion of national road improvements linking the provinces within the cluster
and to the clusters to the North
Gaining access to legacy flight carriers or markets

Tourist Site &


Attraction
Development

Improving last mile access road access and at-site visitor infrastructure and
operations and maintenance to key natural and cultural heritage tourist sites coastal,
island and mountain landscapes and protected areas

Tourist
Accommodation
Needs

Develop small, medium and large beach resorts


Develop major leisure, entertainment, sport, and convention and events facilities in
Clark, Subic and Tarlac
Develop extensive day tour sightseeing, theme attraction, adventure, and sports
products.
Well-maintained facilities and services in every tourism destination (airports, parks
etc.)
Forecasts Arrivals 2010 2016

Baseline (2010)

Low Growth Scenario 2016

High Growth Scenario 2016

Foreign: 145,767
Domestic: 446,338

Foreign: 195,342
Domestic: 598,136

Foreign: 435, 258


Domestic: 790,715

Total: 592,105

Total: 793,478

Total: 1,225,973

Note: Lifted from the NTDP

V. Action Plan
Figure 10 illustrates the framework and the
general direction of action towards achieving
tourism development in the region. It shows
how the Central Luzon Tourism Action Plan
(CLTAP) will take off from the development
approach and strategies identified in the NTDP,
and contribute to achieving the national tourism
goals and vision.

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

Relevant to said pursuit, the CLTAP is therefore


geared towards building the regions own
tourism competitive strength, with focus on the
measures or steps falling under the three major
thrusts of the NTDP: a) improving market access
and connectivity; b) developing and marketing
competitive tourist destinations and products;
and c) improving tourism institutional,
governance and human resource capacities.

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Figure 10. Central Luzon Tourism Development Framework

A. Core Strategy
Development of Tourism Centers and Themes
Said activities shall build on the main strategy,
which is to develop a core area in each province
as main attraction or service center, while
developing Subic and Clark as the nuclei or hub
for tourism in the region, with these areas
providing the gateways. The core areas shall be
called the tourism centers of the region. While
the strategy does not preclude the development
of other areas or attractions in the provinces,
priority attention shall be given to developing
the tourism centers as the regions major
tourism showcase. The idea is to have in each
province a convergence point where visitors
would have the amenities, facilities and
attractions of interests to tourists all in one
place. Each tourism center would promote a
different theme or carry a unique feature that

would engage tourists to a different experience


as they go from one province to another. This
would allow also the province or tourism center
to stand alone and provide visitors a feeling of
must experience even without seeing the
other areas of the region. As such, province
would have its unique attractions and capacity
to meet tourist expectations.
Figure 11 shows an illustration of the regions
basic design concept or core strategy. The
colored points or circles are the tourism centers,
with the biggest circle as the gateway and jump
off point. The arrows show that from the
gateway, tourists can choose to go to any of the
various tourism centers as destination.
CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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Figure 11. Tourism Development Areas/Service Centers

For the themes, the provinces have chosen to develop their tourism centers around the following
concept:

Province/TDA
Aurora
Bataan
Bulacan
Nueva Ecija
Pampanga
Subic-Clark
Tarlac
Zambales

Core Theme
Surfing and Country Get Away
Historic Place of Valor
Arts, Cultural and Historical Center
Agri-Tourism and Nature Adventure Destination
Culinary Hotspot
Leisure, Sports, MICE Hub
Pilgrimage and Ecotourism Site
Beach and Mountain Hideaway

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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Aurora: Surfing and Country Get Away

Bataan: Historic Place of Valor

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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Bulacan: Arts, Cultural & Historical Center

Nueva Ecija: Agri-Tourism & Nature Adventure Destination

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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Pampanga: Culinary Hotspot

Subic-Clark: Leisure, Sport & MICE Hub

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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Tarlac: Pilgrimage and Eco-tourism Sites

Zambales: Beach & Mountain Hideaway

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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As earlier mentioned, development of tourism
centers will be pursued taking into consideration
the core potential of the provinces. The target is
to develop the areas or tourism centers into
hubs of attractions in the respective provinces,
by creating a physically appealing and secure
environment and by making available the
amenities, facilities, services and infrastructure
needed.

The strategy will be supported by the following


interventions to be carried out in the next four
(4)
years,
from
2011-2016.
Such
actions/measures shall serve as platform for
LGUs and other tourism stakeholders for
development of tourism in their respective
sphere of influence. Table 5 shows the plan in
matrix form with corresponding expected
outputs or outcome.

B. Developing and Marketing Competitive Tourist Destination and Products


Product Development
Tourists travel beyond borders for leisure and
fun and to experience and learn from what
other places have to offer. It is important
therefore that tourist destinations are ready to
provide or meet the expectations of tourists,
otherwise, anything less may diminish tourists
interests and enthusiasm and limit the
opportunities for return visits or free word-ofmouth promotion.
Earlier assessment of the regions tourist
attractions describes these as needing
enhancements, not being enough and not
connected. Although the region has the
advantage of access, it is not the preferential
choice as statistics also indicate. Thus, the
challenge for the region is to develop its tourist
attractions into something that would truly be a
must experience for tourists.
Below are the steps the region shall take
towards achieving the above-said objective:

1. Organize clusters of tourism development


areas.
The region shall pursue clustering of the TDAs as
a strategy in the development and promotion of
tourism destinations. This is to facilitate
integrated planning and convergence of efforts
of areas in the cluster --- such approaches being
necessary in coming up with tourism products
capable of generating a bigger impact than that
created by individual TDA. The approach is
likewise recommended to help in organizing and
promoting tour packages covering attractions
from one or several TDAs. The TDAs shall be
divided into four (4) clusters (see Figure 12):
C-1:
C-2:
C-3:
C-4:

West Central Luzon Cluster consisting of


Zambales, Bataan, SCADC, the Subic
Freeport and Olongapo City;
North Central Luzon Cluster with
Pampanga, Angeles City, CSEZ, Tarlac and
SCADC;
South Central Luzon Cluster
with
Bulacan and Pampanga; and
East Central Luzon covering Nueva Ecija
and Aurora.

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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Figure 12. Central Luzon Tourism Clusters

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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2. Rehabilitation/redevelopment of TDAs
2.1.
Formulate local and site tourism
development and management plans for
enhancing the regions tourist attractions.
Each tourism development area is assigned a
product theme based on the areas natural
assets and tourism potential. However, much of
the existing related tourist attractions, including
facilities, in the TDAs are underdeveloped and
needing enhancement. As such, local
development plans including site development
and management plans shall be prepared to
lay down how the attractions and facilities in the
TDAs may be enhanced to provide tourists high
quality experience.
2.2.

Site improvement

In enhancing the tourist destinations, attention


shall be given to increasing the activities that
tourists can engage in including the following:
Developing unique features, such as
architecture, customs and traditions;
Enhancing
the
aesthetic
character/environment or beautification;
Open space/amusement or green park
development;
Development of walk paths, local art or
craft shops;
Providing areas or venues for sports or
outdoor recreation;

3. Develop
new
market-competitive
destinations and products.
The clusters long-run objective is to develop
new market- competitive destinations and
products, identify areas of complementation,
and accordingly work towards said end. One
promising venture that may be explored is the
development of Subic as one destination in
several island-hopping cruise packages, the like
of Subic-Puerto Galera-Boracay-Palawan cruise.
Priority shall also be given to developing the
regions strength as identified in the NTDP:

entertainment/amusement, food, sports, beach


resort, events, MICE, ecotourism, wellness,
medical and retirement tourism.
Developing these attractions would be done
according to the TDAs core themes, to facilitate
complementation of attractions as well as to
ensure that resources are invested in areas or
activities that would have a bigger chance of
being sustained. The DOT, ATOCEL and the
appropriate agencies (i.e. DENR for ecotourism;
DTI and PRA for wellness, medical and
retirement tourism) shall engage themselves in
identifying the attractions to be developed and
in preparing the plan for each category of
attraction (i.e. ecotourism development plan,
retirement tourism development plan, beach
development plan, etc.).

For ecotourism, the sites initially identified for development are:


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Mt. Tapulao
Subic-Bataan Rainforest
Mt. Arayat National Park
Biak-na-BatoNational Park
Pinagrealan National Park
Mt. Pinatubo
Bataan National Park
Minalungao National Park
Hermana Mayor Marine Protected Area

* no pictures available

10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

Pawikan Conservation Project Site


Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed
Balanga Wetland and Nature Park
Matanda River and Mangrove Stand*
Yaha Mangrove Patch and Panglit Marine
Sea Bed Protected Area*
15. Talavera Watershed Forest Reserve*
16. Roosevelt National Park*

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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From top to bottom: (1) Mt. Tapulao; (2) Subic-Bataan Rainforest; (3) Mt. Arayat National Park; (4) Biak-na-Bato
National Park; (5) Pinagrealan National Park; (6) Mt. Pinatubo; (7) Bataan National Park; (8) Minalungao National
Park; (9) Hermana Mayor Marine Protected Area; (10) Pawikan Conservation Project Site; (11) PantabanganCarranglan Watershed; and, (12) Balanga Wetland and Nature Park
CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

P a g e | 21
The potential of the region, particularly Clark
and Subic, as destination or site for big
conventions shall be looked into. Currently, only
small to medium-scale conventions are being
catered to by the freeports because of limited
facilities. Efforts hence shall be taken towards
establishing the appropriate incentives for
encouraging
investment
on
large-scale
convention facilities.
The region shall also look into opportunities for
developing integrated resorts such as the like of
Resort World in Manila, Genting Highland of
Kuala Lumpur and Sentosa in Singapore. This
could be an output of the clustering approach or
of individual local government unit or private
group or individual.
4. Establish Tourism Enterprise Zones and
relevant incentives for encouraging tourism
investments.
Relatedly, to encourage investments in tourism
(i.e. investments in new facilities, expansion,
rehabilitation or upgrading), the TDAs shall look
into the establishment of Tourism Enterprise
Zones and the development of the appropriate
incentives for such endeavors. Identified zones
shall be delineated or mapped and incorporated
in the land use plans of the municipalities or
cities encompassing the TEZs.

6. Develop or improve accommodation and


other service facilities
The region could benefit from more and better
accommodation facilities as these were
described as relatively fewer than in other
regions and of poorer quality. Hence, efforts
shall be taken towards establishing the
appropriate
incentives
for
encouraging
investments in developing or rehabilitating
accommodation facilities and for maintaining
these. Programs and policies for monitoring and
regulation of such facilities shall also be put in
place to ensure sustainability and continuous
improvement. Priority or focus shall be given to
tourist service centers or urban core.

Marketing and Promotion


Equally essential in the promotion of tourism is
effective marketing and promotion. This entails,
among others, raising awareness on tourist
destinations and providing easy access to
information that would help tourists decide and
plan on their travel.
To facilitate marketing and promotion of the
regions tourist destinations, the following shall
be undertaken:
1. Tourism branding

5. Conduct cultural mapping and implement


preservation and development of cultural and
historical heritage sites.
Another priority as emphasized in the NTDP is
cultural tourism. Efforts are now underway in
various parts of the country for the mapping of
these areas cultural heritage. The same shall be
pursued in the region, with the mapped sites
subsequently preserved and developed into
tourist attractions for the perpetual appreciation
of both local and foreign visitors. To encourage
such development, local governments shall put
in place the necessary policies and incentives.

The region shall engage its stakeholders in the


formulation of a tourism brand for the region.
More than an advertising tool, tourism branding
shapes and bestows on a tourism destination an
identity uniquely its own, the purpose of which
is to build recognition of and to elicit interest
and excitement about the destination. Tourism
brands are also developed to differentiate a
tourist destination from its competitors, and to
direct efforts on the relevant tourism
development interventions or areas.

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

P a g e | 22
2. Target marketing
The region shall initially focus its marketing
efforts on existing and priority destinations or
attractions, and then to gradually extend to
new products. To optimize use of limited
resources, the region shall adopt target
marketing as an approach, which is
implementing programs or campaigns directed
at specific target markets, such as beach buffs,
culinary
enthusiasts,
ecotourists,
sports/adventure enthusiasts. Use of multimedia shall increasingly but judiciously utilized
to generate as much interest as is widely
possible, particularly in the domestic market as
the regions main source.
3. Harmonize promotional collaterals
expand use of other marketing media.

and

Industry stakeholders, i.e. DOT, LGUs, SBMA,


CDC, private organizations, shall review and
harmonize promotional collaterals for their
efficient production and greater impact. Travel
guides/ flyers/brochures shall be unified and
made available in visitor information centers.
Also, the internet and other forms of social
media will be used extensively for posting
information or travel guides to include
important information such as transport routes
and cost.
4. Organize and encourage participation of
tour operators in local tourism promotion.
Tour operators in Tarlac, Nueva Ecija, Aurora
and Zambales in particular (other areas have
organized tour operators) shall be encouraged
to organize and participate in promoting
destinations in their areas. Presently, tour
operators are focused on the outbound market
because tourism packages from outside of the
region are more mature and ready for selling.

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

5. Develop day-trip and weekend tours.


In the short term period, the clusters shall work
on organizing their day-trip and weekend tours
or packages. The clusters shall work closely with
tour operators to develop tour packages with a
better chance of being marketed. For this
attention may be given to developing:
Nature and eco-trail
Historical and cultural trail
Culinary trail
Outdoor recreation trail
Green trail
6. Market research build-up and database
management
Market research shall be intensified via public
and private sector collaboration. Apart from
improving DOTs market research function, the
agency shall tap into the network of academic
institutions offering tourism as a course for
research support. Likewise, the possibility of
extending DOT and ATOCEL partnership to cover
research shall be examined, while the private
sector (e.g. hotels and travel agencies) may be
engaged to conduct market surveys. The DOT
shall work with these institutions in identifying
the needed market research and the mechanics
for partnership. Ultimately, the DOT shall serve
as the repository of all data and researches done
on the industry and by various entities.

P a g e | 23

C. Improving Tourism Institutional, Governance and Human Resource Capacities


Sustaining tourism requires that attractions are
not only present in the right quantity and
quality, but the relevant support institutions,
systems and manpower are robust and
adequately equipped to respond to the needs of
the industry. Thus, steps to enhancing the
institutions capacities for governance of the
regions tourism sector and equipping of the
regions human resources shall also be pursued.
Some of the measures are described below:
1. Pursue
the
development
and
implementation of a tourism enterprise
accreditation system.
All efforts to developing tourist attractions and
luring tourists to come would be futile if the
quality of tourism enterprises and services are
proven to be inferior or below standards. The
latter undermines customer satisfaction and
ultimately drives away tourists. In a recent world
travel and tourism competitiveness index report,
the Philippines has been shown not only to lag
behind other ASEAN countries but that its index
has fallen farther. In this connection, RA 9593
has made it a mandate of the DOT to ensure the
promotion and enforcement of tourism
standards and the accreditation of tourism
enterprises, to help enhance the delivery of the
countrys tourism services and push it to a more
competitive level.
Consequently, the DOT Region 3 together with
Angeles City and other parties had taken the
initial steps of improving and instituting a
system of accreditation in the region, with
Angeles City serving as the pilot implementing
channel. An output of this collaboration is a
guidebook for tourism industry frontliners,
investors and expatriates. But as the guidebook
and accreditation system are yet in their initial
runs, refinement of these will continue. Once
the final form is prepared, it will then be
disseminated to other LGUs or TDAs for possible
replication. To facilitate adoption by other LGUs,

RDC endorsement of the same shall be secured


through the RDC Special Committee on Tourism.
Subsequently, LGUs shall institute their set of
policies governing the operation and activities of
tourism enterprises, which shall include rules
and regulations on compliance to standards,
monitoring, and penalties for violations.
2. Implement streamlining of business permit
and licensing system and lower cost of doing
business.
The region has already made headway in the
streamlining of LGU business permit and
licensing system and consequently in reducing
the cost of doing business. Effort on this
continues with the DTI and the DILG
collaborating to ensure a 100-percent adoption
by LGUs. As the latter is a work in progress and
needs persistency of pursuit for this to
materialize, the RDC shall look into ways of
encouraging LGUs to implement BPLS
streamlining and reduce permitting and
licensing cost.
3. Institutionalize local tourism offices and
build capacities of LGUs
The LGUs are at the forefront of actions in
tourism development and promotion. While the
Tourism Act mandates the creation of local
tourism offices, budgetary constraints are
preventing LGUs to create such an office. Few
LGUs have people assigned to tourism
development while for some those designated
are handling multiple roles and are functioning
in an ad hoc capacity. The effect is that while
LGUs have identified tourism as one of
development areas, attention to this as well as
efforts fall short of a holistic and winning
tourism development.
What is needed and, therefore, what will be
pursued is the promotion of local
CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

P a g e | 24
institutionalization of tourism offices or
strengthening of such an office if one already
exists through equipping of the appropriate
manpower as well as provision of budget for the
needed promotion and development of tourism
assets. Consequently, the RDC shall help by
advocating or endorsing to the concerned LGUs
the establishment of local tourism offices and to
DBM for the review of the funding possibilities
for the local tourism offices operating budget.
In conjunction with establishing an office,
building capacities of LGUs to manage local
tourism affairs shall also be a priority
undertaking, with DOT providing the necessary
support through trainings.
4. Establish an Investors Assistance Office
(IAO)
While creation of local tourism offices
responsible for coordinating and promoting
tourism development at the local level (i.e.
provincial and municipal) shall be pursued, the
region shall also look into the establishment of
an Investors Assistance Office at the regional
level that would connect and integrate current
development and opportunities at the local
level. Specifically, the task of the IAO would be
to help promote investment, provide
information that would help investors decide
where to put in their investment, and facilitate
in the investment process.
The region shall initially look at existing
structures, such as the NERBAC, ATOCEL, and
the SCAD, as possible mechanism or facility for
tourism investment facilitation. NERBAC and
SCAD are currently into investment facilitation,
but their scope of work is limited to local
businesses for NERBAC and the Subic-ClarkTarlac corridor for SCAD. One option is to
establish areas of complementation of these
two offices to create a network and system for
responding to investment facilitation needs.
ATOCEL could be tapped for support in terms of
information and other forms of assistance as
CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

appropriate in the members respective areas.


Another option is the creation of an entirely new
office that would be the hub for all investment
promotion and facilitation in the region on
tourism. This could take the form of an authority
or commission especially dedicated to tourism
investment facilitation and promotion in the
region.
5. Strengthen multi-stakeholder partnerships
and industry integration
Tourism is more than a governments job. It is a
pursuit that requires concerted partnerships
among the sectors stakeholders. Vital in said
alliances is the private sector, this being at the
frontline of tourism activities, i.e. providing the
products and services enjoyed by tourists.
Getting the sector to engage in the decisionmaking processes for the promotion of tourism
is not only beneficial but critical to ensuring
sustainability of tourism.
Local tourism councils have been formed in all
TDAs but most are inactive. Tapping on the
wealth of public and private resources to stir
tourism development shall be pursued to help
bring the region to where it wants to go.
Corollary, revival and strengthening of said
councils shall be among the activities, including
a look at a proposal to increase private sector
membership in the councils, as well as
encouraging sub-sector integration in the
private sector. The latter is to have better
coordination among sub-sector members,
encourage these to carry only one voice and to
participate more actively in the development
process, to complement those in the public
sector such as the Association of Tourism
Officers of Central Luzon (ATOCEL).
6. Strengthen DOTs role as facilitator and
coordinator of regional tourism development
and promotion.

P a g e | 25
DOT support is especially crucial in building
capacities of LGUs in planning for and
responding to the challenges to tourism
development and management at the local
level. However, active and effective rendering of
its role requires that it is equipped with the
necessary resources, both human and capital, or
that it taps on other institutions to help provide
the necessary assistance. Relatedly, DOT shall
7. Public and Private Resource Mobilization
As public funds are most often not enough to
finance tourism promotion and development,
building on public-private sector collaboration is
vital to securing the resources for supporting the
sectors pursuits. This is also to ensure that
limited government funds are invested in areas
where it would most matter, such as in
infrastructure
support
and
enhancing
government services, while leaving or allowing
private sector participation in areas where these
have the expertise such as in site development
and marketing. This way also the region is able
to ensure that no area is left out in the process
of developing the sector.
To help augment national government
resources, the local government units shall
examine and institute measures for raising local
funds, such as from taxes or fees from tourismrelated activities or enterprises.

8. Develop competent and productive tourism


workforce.
Tourism is a people to people enterprise. It
needs good, competent workforce to deliver the
services that would meet customer satisfaction.
Superb service in addition to excellent
attractions guarantees repeat visits or
patronage. Hence, it shall be the regions quest
to develop the quality of human resources fitted
for the industrys requirement. This shall be
done by tapping on the formal and informal
institutions to provide the necessary education
and training. Consequently, a review and

seek to strengthen its manpower complement


and budget, and to network with other entities
in providing assistance to LGUs and other
industry stakeholders. It shall also strengthen
coordination and partnership with ATOCEL, and
assist the association develop its capacity for
helping promote tourism development.
matching of the needed skills and training
courses shall be done through the combined
effort of the DOT, TESDA, DepEd and DOTaccredited tourism schools including state
universities and colleges. Specific attention shall
be given to tour guiding which is basically lacking
in the region. The target is to train service
providers including transport service operators
in tour guiding for additional value added.
9. Improve governance in the area of safety,
security and in dealing with tourists
Tourist safety and security is fundamental to
tourism
promotion
and
development.
Depending on the security risk, tourists either
flock to or shun going to a destination. Hence,
maintaining peace and security is a necessary
condition for tourism to thrive.
While there is already a PNP tourist protection
program, a boost in implementation would go a
long way into providing a secure and safe
climate for tourists. Increased visibility in tourist
convergence points shall be ensured that
includes installation of tourist police assistance
outposts in strategic locations and provision of
the necessary tools for police quick response. In
addition, barangay orientation shall also be
undertaken to raise tourism awareness and elicit
cooperation in the maintenance of peace and
order in the concerned barangays.
10. Develop and implement programs for
safeguarding vulnerable groups
Tourism promotion and development should not
be at the expense of vulnerable groups,
CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

P a g e | 26

especially women, children and the indigenous


groups. Hence, consideration for these sectors
protection from possible adverse impact must
be taken in tourism planning and promotion.
Safeguarding of the welfare of such vulnerable
groups requires the collaboration of DOT, DSWD
and other relevant parties in the conduct of
social
awareness
campaigns,
and
implementation of programs on response and
enforcement of related statutes.
11. Formulate and adopt local tourism codes

Codes are necessary guide for action or set of


principles that act as limits or boundaries to
what individuals and entities can or cannot do.
As service standards or guidelines for regulating
and managing actions, tourism codes therefore
are formulated to ensure that tourism
development is sustainable. Currently, only
Olongapo City and Angeles City have legislated
tourism codes. To ensure that growth from
tourism is inclusive and that no area in Central
Luzon is left out, the region shall hence
encourage LGUs and other relevant agencies
(e.g. DENR for ecotourism) to craft their tourism
code.

D. Improving Market Access and Connectivity


Infrastructure is key to mobility and access of
tourists to tourism destinations. This makes it
hence an indispensable component that
government must provide among other
elements in order that tourists may be
encouraged to visit. Ease of access may be
facilitated through provision of paved roads and
transport facilities that are convenient, safe and
reasonably priced. In ensuring this for the
regions visitors, the following measures shall be
pursued:

the western seaboard. The PPA shall be


requested to look into the possibility of reviving
port operations, such as in Orion, to provide
alternative mode of transport connecting
Central Luzon to Metro Manila and other
islands.
3. Identify and construct priority road
infrastructure that shall connect the regions
gateways
with
the
tourist
service
centers/destinations and attractions.

1. Study how to rationalize transport fares and


organize transport services from the Clark
International Airport to points of destination to
ensure reliable and reasonably cost transport
service. In the interim, the region shall work on
setting the transport cost from point to point
and posting such information online or on
signages in transport terminals. This shall be
realized through the collaborative effort of the
relevant agencies/entities: DOT, CIAC, LTFRB,
DOTC, CDC, SBMA, transport organizations,
LGUs.

A number of road infrastructure projects have


already been identified under the DOT-DPWH
Convergence Program (see Figure 13). Tables 3
& 4 show the list of approved projects and
proposed projects for 2012 to 2014. The DOT
shall continue to work with the LGUs and the
DPWH for other road projects to be proposed
for the succeeding years.

2. Provide alternative transport modes other


than land-based transport. The potential of seabased transport shall be explored especially in

The above-said services are needed for ease of


mobility and travel convenience. The target is
for all TDAs to have their VICs and to establish

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

4. Develop minor tourism infrastructure such


as visitor information centers (VICs), rest stops,
and directional signage.

P a g e | 27

these in areas frequented by tourists, such as in


malls and major service centers.

the signages. Annex B lists the tourist spots to be


indicated in the signages.

Directional signage on the tourist spots shall also


be put up along major and minor thoroughfares
including expressways. Also, signage providing
direction to transport terminals or routes shall
be installed to help tourists find their way in and
around the region. Public and private resources
or partnerships shall be tapped to help put up

5. Ease flow of traffic


Ease of access means not only the presence of
roads but also easy or manageable traffic.
Improving traffic particularly in tourist service
centers and gateways shall be pursued to make
travel in and around the region more convenient
for visitors and residents alike.

Figure 13. Tourism Road Infrastructure 2012/2013 Approved/Proposed TRIP

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

P a g e | 28

Table 3. TRIPs with Approved Allocation


Name/Location of Project
I.
1.

FY 2012
Pantabangan-Canili Bypass Road (Aurora)

2. Aquino Byway Manila North Road (via


Mabalacat-Magalang Road)-Pampanga

II.
1.

Subtotal
Proposed for FY 2013
Pantabangan-Canili Bypass Road (Aurora)

2.

Sabang, Baler Road (Aurora)

3.

Clark-Angeles-Magalang Road (Angeles City)

Allocation
(P000)

Status

100,000 Phase 1: 27.19 % completed


(Target Date of Completion:
February 2014)
100,000 1.5% completed (TCD: April 16,
2014); suspended due to RROW
issues
200,000
150,000 Phase 2 : Ongoing preparation of
Program of Work (POW)
50,000 22.2% completed (TCD: October
2013)
100,000 Target Start: May 2013/TCD: May
2014

4. West Circumferential Road (Friendship


Highway, Angeles City section)

100,000 Bidded out/Post Bid evaluation


ongoing

5. Aquino Byway MNR (via San Jose MalinoAnao


Road and del Rosario-Calulut, San Fernando City,
Pampanga)

150,000 Ongoing survey works for the


preparation of plans thru
outsource by BOD

6.

100,000 Ongoing As staked survey /Target


Start: May 2013/ TCD: January
2014
650,000
850,000

Lourdes-Clark Airbase Road-Tarlac


Subtotal
Grand Total

Source: DOT-RIII and DPWH-III


Note: Status as of June 20, 2013

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

P a g e | 29

Table 4. TRIPs Proposed for FY 2014


Name of Project
Bagac-Mariveles Road (Upgrading)-(access road leading to Anvaya
Cove and Bataan Technology Park)
Paseo del Congreso (access road leading to Barasaoin Church and Casa
Real)
Concreting/Improvement of Duhat-Bunducan Road, Bocaue,
Bulacan(access road leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

Project Cost
(P,000)
572,000.00

Location
Bataan

152,988.00

Bulacan

109,005.84

Bulacan

Concreting/Improvement of Bocaue Sta. Maria via Taal Road Bocaue,


Bulacan(access rd leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

273,929.91

Bulacan

Concreting/Improvement of Bocaue Old Road, Bocaue, Bulacan(access


rd leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

53,730.68

Bulacan

Concreting/Improvement of Bintog-Liciada-Pandi Rd. (access road


leading to Ciudad de Victoria)
Concreting/Improvement of SantolBintog Rd, Balagtas, Bulacan (access
road leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

238,007.02

Bulacan

170,684.16

Bulacan

7,584.87

Bulacan

Concreting/Improvement of Balubaran Rd, Bocaue, Bulacan (access


road leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

13,977.13

Bulacan

Concreting/Improvement of Bolocan Road, Bocaue, Bulacan (access


road leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

12,428.43

Bulacan

Concreting/Improvement of Binang 1st Road, Bocaue, Bulacan (access


road leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

5,999.12

Bulacan

Concreting/Improvement of Binang 2nd Rd, Bocaue, Bulacan (access


road leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

1,734.52

Bulacan

Bocaue-San Jose-Bagbaguin-Puso Rd., Sta. Maria, Bulacan (access road


leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

63,412.04

Bulacan

Widening of Sta. Maria Bridge and Approaches (access road leading to


Ciudad de Victoria)

75,324.42

Bulacan

Construction of San Gabriel By-Pass Bridge, Sta. Maria, Bulacan(access


road leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

73,910.23

Bulacan

San Gabriel_MahabangParang Rd., Sta. Maria, Bulacan (access road


leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

64,190.02

Bulacan

Paso-San Gabriel Rd., Sta. Maria, Bulacan (access road leading to


Ciudad de Victoria)

67,280.39

Bulacan

Paso-TabingBakod Rd., Sta. Maria, Bulacan (access road leading to


Ciudad de Victoria)

48,509.79

Bulacan

San-Gabriel-Camangyanan-Kaybitin Rd., Sta. Maria, Bulacan (access


road leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

61,293.35

Bulacan

Concreting/Improvement of Igulot Municipal Rd, Bocaue, Bulacan


(access road leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

P a g e | 30
Name of Project
Duhat-Marilao Exit Rd. (service road), Sta. Maria, Bulacan (access road
leading to Ciudad de Victoria)

Project Cost
(P,000)
32,028.23

Location
Bulacan

TabingBukod-Bagbaguin By-Pass Rd., Sta. Maria (access road leading to


Ciudad de Victoria)

15,692.86

Bulacan

San Gabriel By-Pass Rd., Sta. Maria, Bulacan (access road leading to
Ciudad de Victoria)

20,612.14

Bulacan

Patubig Road, Marilao, Bulacan (access road leading to Ciudad de


Victoria)
Sta. Rosa II-Camangyanan Road, Marilao, Bulacan (access road leading
to Ciudad de Victoria)

22,130.35

Bulacan

50,787.68

Bulacan

Camangyanan Road, Sta. Maria, Bulacan (access road leading to Ciudad


de Victoria)

26,533.64

Bulacan

Camangyanan-Kaybitin Road, Sta. Maria, Bulacan (access road leading


to Ciudad de Victoria)

16,575.68

Bulacan

Rehabilitation/Improvement of Mayantoc San Clemente


Circumferential Road (access road leading to Kalaw National Park and
Timangguyob)
Concreting of Eco Park Downhill access road leading to Eco-Tourism
Park
Asphalt Overlay of Tibag Eco Park Road and Construction of Lubigan
Bridge (access road leading to Eco-Tourism Park and Monasterio de
Tarlac)
Rehabilitation/Improvement of Cycling Circuit Road (access road
leading to Mt. Ngile Picnic Ground)

114,470.00

Tarlac

78,205.00

Tarlac

641,600.00

Tarlac

181,108.00

Tarlac

24,840.00
277,640.00
136,305.00

Tarlac
Tarlac
Tarlac

78,205.00

Zambales

Concreting of Road Network within Eco-Tourism Park


Concreting of LubiganBueno Access Road leading to Bueno Hot Spring
Construction of BuenoODonnel Rest.-Dapdap Road (access road
leading to Bamban hills and cave)
DampaySalaza Road (access road leading to Mount Tapulao EcoTourism Project)
Total

Source: DPWH-RIII

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

3,782,723.51

P a g e | 31

Implementation Program
Table 5. Central Luzon Tourism Action Plan Matrix
NTDP Strategic Direction 1:
Developing and marketing competitive tourist destination and products
Action

Responsible/Participating
Entity(ies)

Time Frame
Short

Medium

Long

Product Development
Organize Clusters of TDAs

DOT, ATOCEL

Rehabilitate/redevelop TDAs

Conduct diagnostic assessment of sites


Formulate local tourism area/site
development plans/business plan
Implement site improvement

LGUs, DENR, DOT, DTI,


SBMA, CDC
LGUs, DOT, TIEZA

Developing unique features, such as


architecture, customs and traditions

Enhancing the aesthetic character or


environment/ beautification
Open space/ amusement or green park
development
Development of walk paths, local art or
craft shops
Providing areas or venues for sports or
outdoor recreation

Develop new market-competitive destinations


and products
Development of Subic for cruise tourism SBMA, DOT

Develop facilities for large conventions in


Clark and Subic
Develop potential for
entertainment/amusement, sports,
ecotourism, wellness, medical and
retirement tourism

SBMA, CDC, DOT

LGUs, DOT, DENR, DTI,


SBMA, CDC, private sector

Development of integrated resort

Private Sector

Establish TEZs and investment incentives

TIEZA, LGUs

Conduct Cultural Mapping

LGUs, NHI

Implement preservation and development of


cultural and historical heritage
Develop or improve accommodation and

LGUs, NHI, DOT

DOT, private

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

P a g e | 32

NTDP Strategic Direction 1:


Developing and marketing competitive tourist destination and products
Action
other service facilities
Intensify promotion of tourism-local industry
linkage

Responsible/Participating
Entity(ies)
sector/associations of
hotels, resorts and
restaurants, LGUs
DTI, DOT, private sector

Time Frame
Short

Medium

Long

Marketing and Promotion

Develop and promote a unified tourism


brand
Determine target markets
Mobilize various media to promote CLs
attractions
Harmonize marketing and promotion
collaterals
Organize tour operators
Develop tour packages
Strengthen market research and database
management
Build DOTs market research database

Network with academic and other


institutions

LGUs, DOT, SBMA, CDC


DOT, ATOCEL, CDC, SBMA
DOT, LGUs, CDC, SBMA

*
*

SBMA, CDC, LGUs, DOT

DOT, tour operators

Tour operators, SBMA,


CDC

DOT
DOT, academe, market
research institutions

NTDP Strategic Direction 2:


Improving tourism institutions, governance and human resource
Action
Develop and implement a tourism enterprise
accreditation system and standards
Institutionalize/establish policies for regulating
and monitoring tourism enterprises
Streamline business permit and licensing
system and reduce cost of doing business
Institutionalize local tourism offices and build
capacities of LGUs
Determine and establish an appropriate
mechanism for facilitating tourism investment
promotion[Investors Assistance Office (IAO)]
CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

Responsible/
Participating Entity(ies)

Time Frame
Short

DOT, LGUs, RDC

DOT, LGUs

DTI, LGUs

LGUs, DOT

RDC, DTI, SCAD

Medium

Long

P a g e | 33
NTDP Strategic Direction 2:
Improving tourism institutions, governance and human resource
Responsible/
Participating Entity(ies)

Action
Strengthen stakeholder partnerships

DOT

Strengthen DOTs capacity as coordinating and


facilitating body
Mobilize public and private resource for
tourism promotion and product development
Develop competent and productive tourism
workforce
Intensify tourism security

DOT, TIEZA

Develop and implement programs for


safeguarding vulnerable groups
Formulate and adopt local tourism codes

Time Frame
Short

LGUs, SBMA, CDC, DOT,


TESDA
LGUs, PNP

LGUs

Long

ATOCEL, LGUs, NGAs

LGUs, DSWD

Medium

NTDP Strategic Direction 3:


Improving market access and connectivity
Action

Responsible/Participating
Entity(ies)

Organize tourist transport services


and rationalize transport fares

LTFRB, SBMA, CDC, CIAC, DOTC

Study the possibility of alternative


transport mode, in particular the
revival of the port of Orion for Metro
Manila and Central Luzon connection
through the western seaboard

DOTC, LGUs

Identify and build priority tourism


road infrastructure

LGUs, DPWH, DOT,

Build, install VICs, clean rest stops,


directional signage

DOT, TIEZA, DPWH

Improve traffic management

LGUs, DOTC

Note:

Time Frame
Short

Medium

Long

- continuing activity

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

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VI. Policy Recommendations


Policies are needed to guide and set the
basis for actions. Such are important to
facilitate the implementation of the plan as
well as in eliciting the cooperation and
participation of all concerned stakeholders.
The following policies are recommended for
adoption especially at the local level
(national policies are already in place):

maintenance of facilities, amenities and


services within standards.

Promote skills upgrading and licensing of


tourism workers.
Ensure that the local areas physical
development should be in harmony with
nature
and
its
scenic
attractions/ambiance.

Support tourism industry development


through provision of appropriate
incentives, infrastructure and services.

Ensure management and protection of


the environment and natural resources
in tourism development areas.

No signboards shall be installed in areas


that would block, diminish or ruin the
regions scenic views/landscapes.

Provide for the protection of children,


women, indigenous people and other
vulnerable groups from the adverse
social impacts of tourism.

Ensure safety and security of tourists in


TDAs at all times.

Preservation and development of


tourism potential of historical
cultural heritage sites/assets for
perpetual enjoyment, education
appreciation of both local people
tourists.

the
and
the
and
and

Ensure reasonable transport fares for


locally-regulated public utility vehicles.
Ensure ease of access through provision
of road infrastructure and traffic
management.

In the rehabilitation or upgrading of


tourism road infrastructure, preserving
trees alongside roads to be rehabilitated
is given premium to the extent that it is
practicable, otherwise replacement of
trees that have to be cut must be
ensured.

Ensure the accreditation of tourism


establishments with the DOT and the

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VII.

Implementation Arrangement

As the task of tourism promotion and


development encompasses broad range of
activities and players from various fronts
national government agencies, local
governments,
government
corporations/authorities
and
private
organizations coordination and integration
of all said entities actions is therefore
crucial to the successful accomplishment of
our tourism goals. More important is the
actual delivery or discharge of the tasks or
roles of the network of stakeholders in the
promotion of tourism. Delineation of the
roles of the various sectors or institutions is
important to provide clear guide for actions,
and avoid duplication of functions and nonaction.
DOT: As the lead agency in the promotion of
tourism development, the DOT shall be at
the forefront of the RTAPs implementation.
Primarily, DOTs role shall include the
following:

Oversee/coordinate the implementation


of the CLTAP and report on progress to
the RDC;
Provide technical assistance to tourism
stakeholders for the effective discharge
of their roles or functions;
Assist LGUs build their capacities for
implementing activities supportive of the
tourism action plan and the promotion
of tourism in general;
Provide direction or guidelines as may
be necessary in the implementation of
programs or activities relative to the
Plan.

RDC-SCT: As the body created to formulate


the CLTAP, the Committee shall have the
primary role of monitoring and assessing the
Plans implementation; providing policy
directions and recommendations that would
help push for the attainment of the Plans
objective; and ensure consistency of
contribution to the overall regional
development thrust and priorities.
LGUs: Also at the forefront of tourism
promotion and development, the LGUs shall
take the following roles:

Facilitate implementation of the plan at


the local level through provision of the
necessary mechanisms and systems;
Provide for the environment conducive
to tourism development in the area; and
Promote the culture of tourism at the
local level to help create a touristfriendly environment and enhance the
local areas tourism attraction.

ATOCEL:

Assist the DOT in ensuring the


harmonious and coordinated
implementation of the plan
Provide technical assistance in the
implementation of the Plan
Ensure plan implementation at the local
level

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Concerned RGAs/government offices:

Support implementation of the RTAP


through appropriate programs and
budget

VIII.

Private Sector/Associations of Tourism


Stakeholders:

Ensure that activities are in line with and


supportive of the objectives of the plan.
Develop products in accordance with the
Plan

Monitoring and Evaluation

The RDC-SCT through the RDC Secretariat


shall conduct annual monitoring of the plan with
the assistance of the DOT and ATOCEL. This is to
keep track of the progress of the plan
implementation, and to identify gaps that need
to be addressed as well as to make adjustments
in the plan as may be necessary.

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016

Evaluation of the plan and its


implementation after the plan term shall be
carried out to assess the plans effectiveness vis-vis the attainment of the plans objectives.
This is to identify areas of strengths and
weaknesses to serve as basis for the crafting of
future interventions appropriate for raising the
level of tourism in the region.

P a g e | 37

ANNEXES

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Annex A. Tourism Development Issues/Challenges in Central Luzon

Issues/Challenges
Market

Lack of information/knowledge on behavior and characteristic of current markets (e.g. no visitor sample
survey results)
Lack of information/knowledge on the visitor experience e.g. satisfaction levels for tour packages,
amenities, facilities and services
Lack of market intelligence on the needs and preferences of existing and potential MICE, adventure,
religious, historical, culinary
Lack of promotion on Subic-Clark as one destination
Lack of funds for professional marketing campaign and promotions
Poor coordination between the public and private sectors on the responsibilities and roles in the packaging
and promotion of events and tour packages.
Lack of synergy in the marketing efforts of Subic and Clark
Development and promotions are focused on Clark and Subic, with little emphasis on the environs such as
Tarlac, Bataan and Zambales

Products

Need for development of new products and experience (local and regional)
Packages are limited to site visits or holding of events but lack focus on visitors experience
Limited organized tour packages in Aurora, Bataan, Nueva Ecija
Lack of packaged tourism attractions resulting in tourism operators focusing on outbound market
promotion.
Limited number of integrated destinations offering a variety of things to see and do (especially the highly
attractive leisure, entertainment, sport, and MICE complexes) able to support a large volume of tourists at a
price that is competitive. (NTDP)
Fragmented activities and attractions. No program that ties up the various destinations or attractions. This
tends to limit the choices of tourists in terms of places to visit or attractions to enjoy.
No identified brand of products specifically for the Region. Brand that would project good image of the
region.
For Subic and Clark, no institutionalized supplier of products from other regions
Limited activities within Subic Bay and Clark Zone.

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Facilities

Less competitive level of MICE in Subic and Clark compared to other Asian countries. (less than 3000 rooms
for the standard and deluxe category)
Limited number of first class to deluxe room services
Lack of hotel accommodation in Zambales and Aurora areas
Lack of clean public amenities between Clark and Subic
Underdeveloped beaches in Zambales and Bataan;
Accreditation ratings do not reflect the quality of services provided
Lack of information about tourism sites and activities that can be easily accessed from hotel lobbies, airport
terminals, malls
Below tourist standards facilities and services (e.g. Bataan, Iba, Dingalan and Dinalungan, Baler, DMIA)
Lack of good and highly visible signages leading to tourism sites
Limited number of convention facilities
Infrastructure

Lack of international commercial flights to connect DMIA to source markets such as Japan, Australia, China
and the Middle East
Lack of domestic flights connecting DMIA and other destinations such as Puerto Princesa, Davao, Bohol,
Iloilo, Bacolod in order to motivate visitors to use DMIA as entry point
Need for new Terminal for DMIA to accommodate future growth of carriers, especially low-cost carriers
Absence of an integrated transportation system that will seamlessly move visitors from Subic to other
destinations in the region
Lack of regular public transport system to move visitors within Subic and Clark
Lack of regular public transport system to move from Subic and Clark to surrounding areas, e.g. Tarlac,
Zambales
High taxi fares in DMIA
Improve transport system to include railway (high speed train) to reduce travel time between Metro Manila
and DMIA and the Corridor
Lack of connectivity between and among provincial tourist destinations
Poor lighting system along SCTEX
Inability to develop and expand air accessibility to key growth markets in terms of routes, frequencies, and
capacities. (NTDP)
Inadequate air, sea, and road connectivity between the major international gateways and domestic market
centers and destinations of interest (NTDP)

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Institutional

Long process for application and renewal of visa


Weak/poor coordination among government institutions
Lack of professional tourism officers at the local level because of the lack of support from LGUs
Setting up one-stop shops for business and investments
Promoting sustainable tourism programs
Infrastructure development for inter-municipality roads
Few tour operators for in-bound tourism
Lack of tour guides that private tour operators which can easily tap
Overlapping institutional functions between and national government and LGUs resulting in uncoordinated,
fragmented, and inefficient outcomes (NTDP)
Need for visitor information and assistance centers in tourism areas to help/assist tourist in moving around
the region
Need to develop tourism in Tarlac

Source: National Tourism Development Plan 2011-2016, Subic-Clark Corridor Tourism Roadmap, Regional
Development Plan

Other issues/challenges as identified in previous workshops:


Issues/Challenges

Need to ensure safety standards as one of the primary concerns of tourists.


Need to develop self-guided, intra-provincial tours for the domestic market with detailed itineraries and
maps.
The region should think about where it would position itself vis--vis other competing regions in the
Philippines and how it would be more competitive.
As with other countries, tourism offices need to be located along highways or main road for easy access
of tourists.
Airport hustling or poor tourist handling in airports. Tourist handlers should be able to put in place
appropriate and excellent services for tourists using our airports.
Need to promote a culture of tourism among the regions populace to help in creating an environment
conducive to tourism.
There should be more activities and places to see and enjoy and interact with the people.
Need to revive value-formation slogans.

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Annex B. Central Luzons Tourist Attractions, By Province/TDA


Tourism Sites/Activity/Products by TDA

ANGELES CITY
Culinary

Culinary museum, cooking demo


Culinary Tour: Kapampangan (Bale Dutung)
International cuisine:
Thai Balibago
Middle Eastern Food - Fields District
European, Mexican, Japanese - Don Juico
Korean - FilAm Friendship Highway
Sisig hotspots

Historical/Cultural /Religious

Heritage Tour, Museum and Art Tour, Architectural Tour: Museo


Ning Angeles, Pamintuan house, Center for Kapampangan Studies ,
Founders house
Independence day reenactment @ Pamintuan House
Lantern Festival (Lubenas ning Pasku)
Fiesta Tour: Religious Processions , Kapampangan Fiesta Buffet,
Filipino traditional childhood games (Palusebo, luksong tinik, etc.
Tilbury Horse Competition, Open Air orchestra (Serenata),
Local and International Cultural Performances, Street dance party sa
araw at gabi
Sapang Bato Bagius Festival : Wing theme dancing
Red Tour: History tour of the red light district
Religious Tour: Siete Palabras (Crucifixion/passion of Christ during
Holy Week) October Fiesta Month: Apu Archdiocesan Shrine and
Holy Rosary Church

Entertainment and Gaming

Casino Filipino

Sports Tourism

Deca Clark Wakeboarding

CLARK
Sports Events

Hot Air Balloon Festival, Clark Parade Grounds sports events (cricket,
rugby, paintball, Frisbee, softball, baseball, ect.), Clark International
Speedway, Clark Eagle Firing Range

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Tourism Sites/Activity/Products by TDA


Golf Course

Mimosa Golf and Country Club, Fontana Water Park and Golf Club,
FACC (Korean Golf Club)

Eco-adventure

El Kabayo Riding Stables, Paradise Ranch/Zoocobia

Educational

Clark Educational Tours

OLONGAPO CITY
Historical/Cultural /Religious

Historical Tours in Olongapo City museum and landmarks


Groto sa Mabayuhan , Three Cross at Mt. Balimpuyo

Entertainment

Olongapo Nightlife (original Gapo sounds/bands)

Eco-tour

Mountain and hill treks, falls


Scuba Diving and other water activities

SBMA
Theme Parks

Ocean Adventure, ZOOBIC safari, Treetop Adventure

Eco-tour

Pamulaklakin forest trail, bird watching

Sports Tourism

Asean Triathlon (swimming, bike and run), International regatta


sailboat

Diving

Subic dive site

MICE

AURORA
Surf

Sabang Beach, Baler; Charlies Point, Baler; Cobra Reef, Baler;


Dicasalarin Cove, Baler; Lindys Point, Baler; Secret Point, Baler;
Lobbot, Dipaculao; Dinadiawan, Dipaculao; Ditale, Dipaculao;
Dalugan Beach, Casiguran; Diniog Point, Dilasag; Dimanayat Point,
San Luis; Dicapinisan, San Luis

Trek

Mt. Mingan, Dingalan; Ditumabo Falls, San Luis; Dibudalan Trail, San
Luis; Mt. Minoli, San Luis; Mt. Danayag, San Luis; Mt. Maaling-aling,
San Luis; Mt. Udok, Maria Aurora; Bazal-Baubo Watershed, Maria
Aurora; Mt. Anacuao, Dinalungan; Kasaysayan, Dilasag; Kayak at
Manggitahan River, Dilasag; Mountain Biking, Bird Watching

Dive

Munitng Gasang, Baler; Cobra Reef, Baler; Tariktik Point, Baler; Aniao
Point, Baler; Nabaliw, Baler; Dibutunan, Dipaculao; Digarin Point, San
Luis; Mabudo, Dinalungan; Ditangol, Dinalungan; Tordil, Casiguran;
Pandungan, Casiguran; Canawer, Casiguran

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Tourism Sites/Activity/Products by TDA


Festivals

Aurora Day Celebration, Kinagunasan Festival (A Festival of Hope, a


Celebration of Life), Sabutan Festival, Coco-Sabutan Festival, Rang-ay
Festival, Pagbiagan Festival, Saba Festival, Diget Sayahan Festival,
Penitensya (Holy Week) in Baler and Casiguran, Komedya de Baler,
Phil-Spanish Friendship Day

Local Cuisine/Delicacies and


Products

Ensaladang pakpo; ginataang pako; ginataang suso; suman; peanut


butter; coco jam; sabutan hats, bags, slippers & accessories; buting;
katid; pelishokin

Historical/Cultural

Sabutan Festival, Coco sabutan Festiva, Holy Week Rites (Ermita Hill,Casiguran- Nuestra Senora de la Ermita), Aurora Day Celebration,
Phil-Spanish Friendship Day, Aurora Surfing Competitions

BATAAN
Historical/Cultural

Araw ng Kagitingan (March 30 to April 9)


May Flower Festival ng Pagbubunyi (May)
Las Casas; Holy Week ritual

Pilgrimage Tour
Eco Tour

Pawikan Festival and wetland migratory birds

Sports Tourism

Mountain biking

Beach/Inland Resort Tourism

BULACAN
Historical/Cultural

Kakarong De Sili, Biak na Bato, Barasoain Church


Fertilility, Carabao, Singkaban Festivals
Capitangan Crucifixion, Groto Vista

Educational

Arts and crafts, Tour of old houses, Barasoain Kalinangan Theater


Group, culinary

Nature/ Ecotourism

DRT caves and falls, river cruise/sports

Products

Buntal Hats, Minasa

MICE

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NUEVA ECIJA
Eco-Adventure

Trekking, mountaineering, white water tubbing, rafting, sports


fishing, jetski, wild duck hunting

Educational Tour/agri-tourism

PAMPANGA
Heritage/Cultural

Old Churches: Minalin, Betis


Festivals: Giant Lantern, Lubenas , aguman sandok Fellowship of
the Laddle, Kuraldal Fertility Dance, Holy Week rituals, Apo Iru
fluvial procession

Ecotourism

Candaba wetlands bird watching, Mt. Arayat

Arts and Crafts

Wood carvings, lantern making

Culinary

Delicacies, processed meat

TARLAC
Historical/Cultural /Religious

Capas Shrine, Ninoy Aquino Museum


Monastery

Eco-adventure

Pinatubo trek, San Jose mountain climbing, kayaking, bird watching

Sports

Tarlac Recreational Park

ZAMBALES
Historical/Cultural /Religious

Magsaysay Ancestral House Museum, Casa San Miguel, PMMA


Garden of Prayer, Subic
Ina Poonbato, Loob-bunga, Botolan
Old Churches: Sta. Monica Church,St. Augustine Cathedral, San
Andres Church
Festivals: Zambales Mango Festival, Domorokdok Festival, Binabayani
Festival

Eco-adventure

Capones Island, Anawangin Cove


Mapanuepe Lake, Sunken Village (Pundaquit)
Mountain Treks in Cinco Picos, Subic and Mt. Tapulao, Palauig

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References:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

DENR. List of Priority Ecotourism Sites in Central Luzon.


DPWH FY 2014 Proposed Budget.
DOT Region III. Central Luzon Tourism Master Plan 1993.
DOT. National Tourism Development Plan, 2011-2016.
En.wikipedia.org. World Tourism Ranking.
http://www.clarkairport.com. Clark International Airport: The Future Is Here.
http://www.nscb.gov.ph. Contribution of Tourism Industry to the Economy Averages 5.8 Percent.
Dec. 21, 2011.
http://www.unwto.org. UNWTO World Tourism Barometer. Volume 11, Jan. 2013.
http://www.visitmyphilippines.com. Report on the Regional Distribution of Travellers, 2010, 2011,
2012.
NEDA III. Central Luzon Tourism Summit 2005 Workshop Output.
RDC III. Central Luzon Economic Forum. 2002.
RDC III. Regional Development Plan 2011-2016.
SCADC. Subic-Clark Tourism Roadmap.

CENTRAL LUZON TOURISM ACTION PLAN, 2011-2016