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NAME OF SUBJECT: LAW OF SPECIAL CONTRACT INCLUDING INDIAN

PARTNERSHIP ACT & NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENT ACT


PAPER CODE: Law- 306
MAXIMUM MARKS: 30+70=100
TIME ALLOWED: 3 HRS.
INTERNAL ASSESSMENT: 30 MARKS
TERM-END EXAMINATION: 70 MARKS
OBJECTIVE: This is a follow- up course on contract. When students are familiarized with the
general principles of contract, special contracts are studied in the light of statutory provisions and
decisional law. Some of growing sectors of economy such petroleum, mining, transportation and
power etc. today require specialized legal professionals to handle growing contractual
requirements, joint ventures etc. Special contracts justify special statutory provisions for some
kinds of contracts.
MODULE-I: Indemnity & Guarantee / Bailment & Pledge.
a) Meaning, Distinction between Indemnity and Guarantee.
b) Indemnity in cases of MNC and new industrial transactions such as Power and Energy.
(SECS: 124-125).
c) Rights/ Duties of Imdemnifier, Indemnified and Surety.
d) Discharge of Surety.
e) Kinds of Guarantee. (SECS: 126-147)
f) Bailment (SECS: 148-171, 180) & Pledge (SECS: 172-179)
i. Meaning and Distinction.
ii. Rights and Duties of Bailor/ Bailee, Pawnor/ Pawnee.
iii. Lien.
iv. Termination of Bailment.
MODULE-II: Agency
a) Definition of Agent and Principal.
b) Essentials of Relationship of Agency.
c) Creation of Agency: By agreement, Ratification and Law.
d) Relation of Principal/ Agent, Subagent and Substituted Agent.
e) Termination of Agency. (SECS: 182-210 & 226-238).
MODULE-III: Specifically enforceable Contracts
a) Contracts which cannot be specifically enforced (SECS: 14).
b) Discretion of the Court (SEC: 20).
c) Rectification of Instruments (SEC: 26).
d) Rescission of Contracts (SECS: 27-30).
e) Cancellation of Instruments (SECS: 31-33).
f) E- Contracts including Standard form of Contract.
MODULE-IV: The India Partnership Act, 1932.
a) Nature and concept of Partnership firm and limited partnership.

b) Relations of partners to one and another and outsiders.


i. Rights/ Duties of partners inter se.
ii. Partnership Property.
iii. Relations of Partners to Third parties: doctrine of holding out.
iv. Liability for holding out minor as a partner.
c) Incoming and outgoing partners.
d) Dissolution of firm: Modes and consequences.
e) Registration of firms and effects on non-registration.
MODULE-V: Negotiable Instrument Act.
a) Definitions.
b) Types.
c) Crossing of Cheques
d) Dishonour of cheques and Penalities.

SUGGESTED READING
1. Indian Contract Act--- Pollock and Mulla
2. Indian Contract Act--- Avtar Singh.
3. Principles of Mercantile Law--- R.K. Bangia.
4. Law of Contracts and Partnerships and Sale of Goods Act--- T.R. Desai.
5. Equity, Trust and Specific Relief--- G.P. Singh.
6. Equity, Trust and Specific Relief--- Akil Ahmed.
7. Contract--- Tata McGrow.
8. Sales of Goods Act, 1930--- Avtar Singh.
9. Indian Partnership Act, 1930--- Avtar Singh.
10. Pollock and Mulla on Contracts and Specific Relief Act (1999)---R.K. Abhichandani (ed.).
11. Law of Contract (1999)--- Krishnan Nair.
12. The Negotiable Instrument Act--- Bhashyam and Adiga.
13. The Negotiable Instrument Act--- M.S. Parthasharthi (ed.), J.S. Kheragaamvala.
14. The Sales of Goods Act--- Saharay, H.K.
15. Ansons Law of Contract (1998)--- Beatson (ed.).

NAME OF SUBJECT: FAMILY LAW-I


PAPER CODE: Law- 308
MAXIMUM MARKS: 30+70=100
TIME ALLOWED: 3 HRS.

INTERNAL ASSESSMENT: 30 MARKS


TERM-END EXAMINATION: 70 MARKS
OBJECTIVE: Main objective of this course is to provide adequate sociological perspectives to
expound concepts relating to family in their social settings. It also highlights some of the current
problems arising out of foundational inequalities in different family concepts. Another objective
is to view family law not merely as a separate system of personal laws based upon religions but
as the one system cutting across the religious lines and eventually enabling us to fulfill the
constitutional directive of uniform civil code at jurisprudentially at the academic study by
identifying the core concepts in marriage laws of all communities to evolve a Uniform Civil
Code devoid of political nest. Women and children have special family relations and hence in
family law administration students are expected to develop insight so that they could protect
constitutional rights of women and children. Conversion is another problematic area. It affects
the family and whether it is compatible with the concept of secularism and to what extent such
problem would stand resolved with the enactment of a Uniform Civil Code etc. are some of the
issues that need proper examination.
MODULE-1: Sources and Schools.
a) Sources of Hindu Law
i. Ancient Sources- Shruti, Smriti, Digest & Commentaries and
Customs.
ii. Modern Sources- Equity, Justice and Good Conscience, Precedent and
Legislation.
b) Schools of Hindu Law:
i. Mitakshara School-Sub-schools of Mitakshara.
ii. Dayabhaga School.
c) Sources of Muslim Law
i. Ancient sources: The Quran, The Sunna (Practice of Prophet), Ijma
(Consensus of Opinion) and Quias (Analogical Deduction).
ii. Modern sources: Equity and Legislation.
d) Schools of Muslim Law
i. Sunni School of Muslim Law.
ii. Shia School of Muslim Law
e) Sources and Schools of Parsi and Christian Law.
MODULE-II: Marriage Laws
a) Hindu Marriage Act, 1955.
i. Evolution of the institution of marriage.
ii. Nature and concept of Hindu marriage.
iii. Essential conditions of a Hindu marriage and consequences for
violation.
iv. Forms, validity and voidability.
b) Nikah (Muslim Marriage).

i. Nature and concept of Muslim marriage.


ii. Essential conditions of a valid marriage, prohibition/ disabilities,
classification of marriage and effects of valid, irregular and void
marriage.
iii. Obligations arising out of marriage- Mahr, Maintenance etc.
c) Law governing Christian and Parsi marriages.
MODULE-III: Matrimonial Remedies/ Dissolution of Marriage.
a) Theories of Divorce.
b) Separation and Dissolution of Marriage under Hindu Law
i. Non-judicial resolution of marital conflict problem- Customary
dissolution of marriage, unilateral divorce, divorce by mutual consent
and other modes of dissolution.
ii. Grounds of Divorce.
iii. Jurisdiction and procedure.
c) Dissolution of marriage under Muslim Law.
i. By death.
ii. By the act of either party.
iii. By mutual concent.
iv. By court.
v. Talaq and Talaq-e- Tafweez.
d) Nullity of Marriage.
e) Option of Puberty.
f) Restitution of conjugal rights.
g) Judicial separation.
h) Bar to matrimonial relief under Hindu Law.
i) Grounds for divorce under Indian Dissolution of Muslim Marriage Act, 1939.
j) Reference to Parsi and Christin Law.
MODULE-IV: Protection of Rights of Muslim Women.
a) Muslim Women (Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act, 1986.
b) Maintenance of neglected wives, divorced wives, minor children, disabled parents
who are unable to support themselves vide sections 125-127 of the Code of Criminal
Procedure, 1973.
c) Reference to Parsi and Christian Law.
MODULE-V: Special Marriage Act.

SUGGESTED READINGS.
1. Hindu Law--- Paras Diwan.
2. Family Law--- Paras Diwan.

3. Muslim Law of India--- Tahir Mahmood.


4. Principles of Hindu Law--- D.F. Mulla.
5. Principle of Muslim Law--- D.F. Mulla.
6. History of Dharmashastra Vol-2 pt.1 at 624-632 (1974)--- P.V. Kane.
7. Hindu Law: Past and Present--- J.D.M. Derrett.
8. Death of Marriage Law--- J.D.M. Derrett.
9. Inequalities and Law--- B. Sivaramayyas.
10. Law and Practice of Divorce in India--- S.C. Manchanda. (Universal).
11. Marriage and Divorce Law Manual--- Kusum (Universal).
ESSENTIAL CASE LAWS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.

Shastri v. Mooldas A.I.R 1966 S.C. 1119


Dr. Surajmani Stella Kujur v. Durga Charan Hansdah, A.I.R. 2001 S.C. 938
Maneka Gandhi v. Indira Gandhi AIR 1984 Del. 428
Bhaurao Shankar Lokhande v. State of Maharashtra, AIR 1965 S.C. 1564
Lily Thomas v. Union of India A.I.R. 1977 A.P. 43
Pinninti Venkataramana v. State, A.I.R. 1977 A.P. 43
Dr. A.N. Mukerji v. State, A.I.R. 1969 All. 489
Seema v. Ashwani Kumar, A.I.R. 206 S.C. 1158
Amina v. Hassan Koya, A.I.R. 2004 S.C. 1227
Gullipilli Sowria Raj v. Bandru Pavani alias Gullipilli Pavani,
A.I.R. 2009 S.C. 1085
T. Sareetha v. T. Venkata Subbaiah A.I.R.1983 A.P. 356
Harvinder Kaur v. Harmander Singh A.I.R. 1984 Del. 66
Smt. Saroj Rani v. Sudarshan Kumar Chaddha, A.I.R. 1984 S.C. 1562
N.G. Dastane v. S. Dastane A.I.R. S.C. 1534
V. Bhagat v. D.Bhagat A.I.R. 1994 S.C. 710
Naveen Kohli v. Neelu Kohli A.I.R. 2006 S.C. 1675
Samar Ghosh v. Jaya Ghosh 2007 3 SCJ 253
Sumar Kapur v. Sudhir Kapur A.I.R. 2009 S.C. 589
Bipin Chandra v. Prabhavati A.I.R. 1957 S.C. 176
Savitri Panday v. Prem Chandra Pandey A.I.R. 2002 S.C. 591
Hirachand Srinivas Managaonkar v. Sunanda A.I.R. 2001 S.C. 1285
Sureshtra Devi v. Om Prakash A.I.R. S.C. 1904
Ashoka Hurra v. Rupa Bipin Zaveri A.I.R. 1997 S.C. 1266
Yousuf Rawather v. Sowramma A.I.R. 1971 Ker. 266
Shamim Ara v. State of U.P. 2002 CrLJ 4726 (SC)
Daniel Latif v. Union of India A.I.R. 2001 S.C. 3758
Mohd. Ahmed Khan v. Shah Bano Begum A.I.R. 1985 S.C. 945
Savitaben Samabhai Bhatiya v. State of Gujarat A.I.R. 2005 S.C. 1809
Itwari v. Asghari A.I.R. 1960 All. 261

30.
31.
32.
33.

Sawan Ram v. Kalawanti A.I.R. 1967 SC 1761


Sitabai v. Ramachandra A.I.R. 1970 SC 343
Lakashmi Kant Panday v. Union of India A.I.R. 1986 SC 272
Githa Hariharan v. Reserve Bank of India 1999 SCC 228

NAME OF SUBJECT: SOCIOLOGY-III: INDIAN SOCIETY


PAPER CODE: BA,LL.B- 315
MAXIMUM MARKS: 30+70=100
TIME ALLOWED: 3 HRS.
INTERNAL ASSESSMENT: 30 MARKS
TERM-END EXAMINATION: 70 MARKS
OBJECTIVE:
MODULE-I: It is presumed that the student has some familiarity with the Indian society
by virtue of the fact that he is a member of it and that he has observed and experienced

some facets of it. However, this familiarity is likely to be superficial, selective and rather
fragmentary. This course aims at rectifying these limitations by presenting a
comprehensive, integrated and empirically based profile of Indian society.
The continuity between the present and the past is an evident feature of Indian society.
Though this continuity is reflected in the structure of the course, the focus is on the
contemporary Indian society. It is hoped that the sociological perspective on Indian society
presented in this course will also enable students to gain a better understanding of their
own situation and region.
MODULE-I:
The textual and the field view of Indian society; the significance of the field view; the
interface between the present and the past.
MODULE-II:
The structure and composition of Indian society: villages, towns, cities; rural- urban
linkages; tribes; weaker section, dalit, women and minorities, population profile and
related issues.
MODULE-III:
Cultural and ethnic diversity: historically- embedded diversities in respect of language,
caste, religious beliefs and practices and cultural pattersns.
MODULE-IV:
Basic institutions of Indian society: caste, kinship, family, marriage, religion; caste and
class; changing dimensions.

MODULE-V:
Convergence and integration: the sharing of material traits, cultural space, language and
regional ethos; the evolution of composite cultural legacy; change and transformation in
Indian society; nation building and national identity.
MODULE-VI: Theoretical Perspectives
a) Indological / Texual.
b) Structural- Functionalism.
c) Marxism.
d) Synthesis of Textual and Field views.
e) Civilizational View.
f) Subaltern Perspective.

RECOMMENDE READINGS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Culture and Society in India--- N.K. Bose. Asia Publishing House, Bombay.
Structure of Hindu Society--- N.K. Bose. 1975. New Delhi.
Society in India--- S.C. Dube (National Book Trust, New Delhi).
Indian Village--- S.C. Dube. Routlege. London.
Indias Changing Villages--- S.C. Dube. Routlege and Kegan Paul. London.
Hindu Society: An Interpretation--- Iravati Karve. Deccan College. Poona.
The Speaking Tree: A Study of Indian Society and Culture. Oxford University Press.
Delhi.
8. Society in India--- D.G. Mandelbaum. Popular Prakashan. Bombay.
9. Social Structure--- M.N. Srinivas. Hindustan Publishing Corporation. New Delhi.
10. Social Change in Modern India--- M.N. Srinivas. 1963. University of California
Press. California Berkley.
11. Modernization of Indian Tradition---Yogendra Singh. 1973. Thomson Press.
12. Family, Kinship and Marriage in India--- Patricia Uberoi. Oxford University Press.
13. Contemporary India: Transitions--- P.R. DeSouza. 2000. Sage, New Delhi.
14. Themes and Perspectives in Indian Sociology--- D.N. Dhanagre. Rawat. Jaipur.
15. Social Sciences in a Changing Society--- S.c. Dube. Lucknow University Press.
16. Homo Hierachichs: The Caste System and its Implecations--- Louis Dumont. Vikas,
New Delhi.
17. Diversities--- D.P. Mukherjee. 1958. Peoples Publishing House, Delhi.
18. Indian Sociology: Reflections and Introspections --- T.K. Oomen and P.N.
Mukherjee (ed.). 1986. Popular Prakashan , Bombay.
19. Indian Sociology: Social Conditioning and Emerging Concerns--- Yogendra Singh.
1986. Vistaar, Delhi.
NAME OF SUBJECT: POLITICAL SCIENCE-III: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
PAPER CODE: BA, LL.B- 316
MAXIMUM MARKS: 30+70=100
TIME ALLOWED: 3 HRS.
INTERNAL ASSESSMENT: 30 MARKS
TERM-END EXAMINATION: 70 MARKS
OBJECTIVE:
Module-I
(A)Introduction to International Relations
(B)Evolution of State and International Relations

(C) Politics and Industrial Relations in ancient, medieval and modern periods
(D)International Relations and International Law.
Module-II
(A) Theories of International Relation
(1)Liberalism and International Relations - merits and demerits
(2)Realist theory-- merits and demerits
(3)Marxian theory merits and demerits
(4)Neo-realist and Neo-liberalist theories of Modern World
(5)Feminist, Post-colonial and Post-modern theories
(B)Theories of International Law.
Module-III
(A)Concept of Power
(B)Concept of Political power
(C)Importance and relevance of Political power of the State
(D)Elements of National power
(E)Limitations on National power
Module-IV
(A)Role of Political power in International Relations
(B)Struggle for Political power and consolidation of Political power
(C)War as a method of wielding power --military, economic and cultural motives and
repercussions
Module V
(A)World History post 19th century till 2001
.World Wars,Cold War and Related Concepts
(B)Imperialism in I.R.
(C)Bipolarity , Unipolarity and Multipolarity
(D)Non Alignment Movement
(E) League of Nations and United Nations
Module VI
(A)Balance of Power in I.R.
Patterns of Balance of Power
Methods of Balance of Power
Divide and rule
Compensations
Importance and relevance of Balance of Power.
(B) Issues in I.R.
Balance of Power and International morality
Balance of Power and World Public opinion

Balance of Power and International Law


Ideological differences and Balance of Power
Module VII
(A) Important Concepts And Issues in I.R.
Alliances & Counter alliances
Disarmament
Role of wars in international relations
Wars in International Law
Armament - -developments in Warfare
Total War and Changing character of War
Treaties
(B)Conventions and the Development of International Law through international Relations
SALT-I, II
Regional arrangements
Module- VIII
(A)Diplomacy
Functions of diplomacy - Future of diplomacy - Types of diplomacy
Diplomacy and Terrorism
Contemporary developments
(B) International Organisations
(C)U.Ns Role in International Peace & Security.
Module - IX
(A)Globalization and international relations
Theories of Globalization (Realists, Liberalists, Marxist and Constructivist),
(B)Role of Science and Development in International Relations and their Impact on
Globalization.
Module - X
Contemporary issues of International Relations
Non-State actors
Terrorism
Environmental issues
Nuclear proliferation
Global trade and finance
Poverty and Development
Human Security and Human rights
International Humanitarian Laws and interventions.

RECOMMENDED READINGS

1. Hans J. Morgenthau, Politics Among Nations: The Struggle for Power & Peace,
Kalyani Publishers (Indian Reprint), ND 1997
2. Norman D. Palmer & Howard C. Perkins, International Relations: The World
Community in Transition, CBS Publishers & Distributors, ND, 1985
3. John Baylis, Steve Smit & Patricia Owens, The Globalization of World Politics, OUP,
London, 4th ed. 2008.
4. Charls W. Kagley JR & Eugene R. Wittkopt, World Politics: Trend & Transformation,
4th ed. St. Martins Press, N.Y. 1993.

NAME OF SUBJECT: ECONOMICS-III: THEORIES OF DEVELOPMENT AND


INDIAN ECONOMICS
PAPER CODE:BA, LL.B- 318
MAXIMUM MARKS: 30+70=100
TIME ALLOWED: 3 HRS.
INTERNAL ASSESSMENT: 30 MARKS
TERM-END EXAMINATION: 70 MARKS
OBJECTIVE: India is a fast developing economy. The major economic ailments which
engulfed our country in the pre-independence era, have gradually and steadily paved way for
rapid economic activities. We have witnessed an entirely new era as regards the structural
changes and the new openings in the primary, secondary and tertiary sectors. During this phase
of transition, our economy had to go through crucial shortages and constraints that were the

outcome of our unutilized and underutilized human resources. Besides the major problems in our
economy that is, the explosive growth rate of population, inflationary price tendencies, the ever
increasing unemployment, deficits in balance of payments, declining value of rupee etc. etc. have
alarmingly hindered the growth of the economy to a large extent.
Ever since the onset of the globalization era, despite the enormous benefits brought by it,
alarming signs of issues inhibiting the growth process of the developing world have been
observed. Growth on the global lines has not only widened the income disparities worldwide, but
has also impoverished the already disadvantaged nations and has benefited more the previously
disadvantaged ones. This course has been introduced with an aim to enlarge the vision of the
students of law regarding the changes in the international arena, more especially in the post
liberalized and post globalized times. It also provides an insight into examining the problems of
economic growth and development in the less developed countries and analyzing the causes of
growth in such parts of the world. It is an attempt to enable the students of the law course to
understand the conditions conducive to economic growth and also its deterrents. This would not
only facilitate their knowledge of the contemporary issues of development but would also help in
a better understanding of the economic implications of the alternative development strategies and
policies. An effective planning and an appropriate policy framework required for the
development and growth of an economy can be worked out only after a comprehensive
knowledge of the conditions and limitations of the developing system.
Model 1: Economic Development and Growth: concept of development, human right
dimension in economic growth, economic development and economic growth, features and
indicators of economic development vicious cycle of poverty and determination of BPL
classical model of economic growth models indicators of development and growth
Model 2: Capital formation significance of capital formation capital formation during pre
and post independence period - hypothesis of capital formation and theory of economic growth
Model 3: Strategies of economic growth balanced vis- a- vis unbalanced growthfeatures and
distinctions theory of Big Push, critical appraisal critical minimum effort thesisshocks and
stimulus population growth and per capita income techniques, meaning. Choice and typessustainable development, requirements and strategies.
Model 4: Problem of Agrarian economy in India land, labour, capital and organization
subdivision and fragmentation, land distribution and lad use planning - unorganized labour and
implementation of special schemes of employment paucity of agricultural capital and issues on
corporatization of agriculture issues of agricultural marketing and commodity market.
Model 5: Problem of Industrial economy in India land, labour, capital and organization
controversy on acquisition of land for industry critical issues of industrial labour and labour
legislationdomestic capital and foreign capital, various issueslimited liability and bankruptcy
issues
Model 6: Black money and corruption two sides of same coindomestic and international
movements.

Model 7: Poverty and PDSvarious schemes and functional impactsdetermination of BPL


under World Bank standard Various issues on PDSFood security
Model 8: Unemployment, under-employment and featuresremedial measures.
Model 9: Planning in India: Planning Commission and various plans and success and failures
Eleventh plan and resource generation Revenue Commissionvarious types of taxation in
India- cannons of taxationsuccess and failure.
Model 10: Special Economic Zones various considerations and issues.
RECOMMENDE READINGS
(1) Agarwal, A.N., Indian Economy: Problems of Development and Planning, New Age
International Publishers, New Delhi, Twenty Third Editions, 2007.
(2) Dutt Ruddar and K.P.M. Sundharam, Indian Economy, S. Chand and Company Limited,
New Delhi, Fifty Fifth Edition, 2007.
(3) Jhingan, M.L., The Economics of Development and Planning, Vrinda Publications Private
Limited, New Delhi, Thirty Eighth and enlarged Edition, 2005, Reprint 2006.
(4) Lekhi R.K., The Economics of Development and Planning, Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana,
Tenth Revised Edition, 2005.
(5) Meier G. M. and James E. Rauch, Leading Issues in Economic Development, Oxford
University, Press, New York, Seventh Edition, 2004.
(6) Myneni, S.R., Indian Economics for Law Students, Allahabad Law Agency, Faridabad,
First,
Edition, 2006.
88
(7) Sury, M.M., (Ed.), Economic Planning In India, Indian Tax Publishers, New Delhi 2006.
(8) Todaro, Michael P. and Stephen C. Smith, Economic Development, Pearson Education,
London, 2006.
(9) Dhingra, I.C., Indian Economy, Sultan Chand Educational Publishers, New Delhi, 2006.
(10) Taneja M.L., and R.M. Myer, Economics of Development and Planning, Shoban Lal
Nagin
Chand and Company Educational Publishers, Jalandhar, 2000.
(11) Lekhi R.K. and Joginder Singh, Agricultural Economics: An Indian Perspective, Kalyani
Publishers, Ludhiana, 2006.
(12) Misra, S.K. and V.K. Puri, Indian Economy: Its Development Experience, Himalaya
Publishing House, Mumbai, 2007.
(13) Dhar, P.K., Indian Economy and Its Growing Dimensions, Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana,
2008.
(14) Ghosh, B.N., (Ed.), Contemporary Issues in Development Economics, Routledge
Publishers, New Delhi, 2001.
(15) Ray, Debraj, Development Economics, Princeton University Press, New Jersey, 1998.

NAME OF SUBJECT: HISTORY-III: LEGAL HISTORY OF MODERN INDIA UPTO


2000
PAPER CODE:BA, LL.B- 317
MAXIMUM MARKS: 30+70=100
TIME ALLOWED: 3 HRS.
INTERNAL ASSESSMENT: 30 MARKS
TERM-END EXAMINATION: 70 MARKS
OBJECTIVE: This paper deals with the changes that took place in the colonial times in the
Indian society and the economy in general, the legal system in particular. It seeks to answer some
basic questions. How did contemporary India emerge? What were the processes and events that
shaped it? Why and how did the present legal system evolve? What were the various ideas and
elements that went into the making of British policies? What were the changes that took place in
the courts and laws in the colonial times and how they impacted the Indians and their old

systems? How did Indian Nationalism emerge & what were the forms it took? What was the
genesis of some of the problems like communalism? What were the concerns of the framers of
the constitution and the major debates? Finally how the concept of Indian secularism emerged
during the national movement and was adopted post independence.
Module 1: India under Mughal rule since Akbar economic history, history of legal and
judicial system, administration in war and peace
Module 2 : Colonialism, its nature and various stages in India
i.
Impact on Indian economy agriculture, industry and trade.
ii.
Land revenue policy & the emergence of the idea of land as a commodity.
Module 3 : Early Changes in legal and Judicial system
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.

Early settlements in Surat, Madras, Bombay, Calcutta


Introduction of authoritative and uniform judicial pattern between 1726 1773
Establishment of Supreme Court in Calcutta and cases of Nand Kumar, Patna case,
Cossijurah, and Kamaludin
Establishment of Adalat system and reforms
Judicial Plans of Warren Hastings, Lord Cornwallis and Lord William Bentinck.
Charter Act of 1833 & 1853 and Codification of laws.
The great debate on the introduction of English law in India The Whigs, The
Paternalists and The Utilitarians.
Development of personal laws and their administration by the British.
Development of criminal law.
Establishment of High Courts under the Indian High Courts Act, 1861.
Federal court and Privy Council an appraisal
Development of the Legal profession.

Module 4: Social awakening and law reforms


a) Socio Religious reform movement in the 19th Centaury, Struggle against caste and the
efforts made for the emancipation of women .
b) Progressive social reforms The Abolition of Sati Act, 1828, Abolition of slavery Act,
1833, Caste Disability Removal Act, 1850, Infanticide act
Module 5: Rise and Growth of the Indian National Movement
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.

The revolt of 1857 and its impact


Causes of the rise of Indian Nationalism & Social basis of Indian
National Movement.
Indian National Congress its genesis, aims and objectives;
Moderates and extremists.
Partition of Bengal and Swadeshi movement.
The rise of Revolutionary Terrorism

viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.
xiii.
xiv.
xv.
xvi.
xvii.
xviii.
xix.

The 1st world war and its effect on India.


Emergence of Mahatma Gandhi.
Non Cooperation and Khilafat movement 19191922
Growth of Communalism
Civil Disobedience Movement 19301934
Socialist ideas: Role of Nehru and Bose
Quit India movement
The Simla conference
The Cabinet Mission
Lord Mountbattens plan
Partition of India
The Independence act, 1947

Module 6 Constitutional development


i.
Indian Councils Act, 1861
ii.
Indian councils Act, 1892
iii.
Government of India Act,1909l
iv. Government of India Act,1919
v. Government of India Act, 1935
Module 7: Independent India
Module 8: Birth of Constitution of India:
The Constituent assembly, framing of the constitution & the issues of federal polity vs
centralism, Fundamental Rights & Directive principles, National vs Official Language,
secularism reservation, uniform civil code and the Hindu law reform. Accession of the princely
states, reorganisation of the states and growth of regionalism.

RECOMMENDED READING
1. M.P. Jain, Outline of Indian Legal History
2. Abdul Hamid, Constitutional and Legal History of India.
3. A.B. Keith, Constitutional and Legal History of India.
4. Rama Jois, Legal and Constitutional History of India, Vol. II.
5. H.V. Sreenivasamurthy, History for Law students, Vol. II
6. Radhika Singha , A Despotion of Law, Crime and Justice in early Colonial India.
7. J. Duncan M. Derrett, Religion, Law and the state in India.
8. Marc Galanter, Law and the Society in Modern India.
9. Upendra Baxi, Towards a Sociology of Law.
10. Indra Deva ed. Sociology of Law.
11. Flavia Agnes, Law and Gender inequality.
12. A.R. Desai, Social background of Indian Nationalism.
13. Bipan Chandra, Indias Struggle for Independence.

14. Bipan Chandra, Nationalism and Colonialism.


15. Bipan Chandra, Communalism in Modern India.
16. Granville Austin, The Indian Constitution, Cornerstone of a Nation

NAME OF SUBJECT: PSYCHOLOGY-III: PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH AND


STATISTICS
PAPER CODE:BA, LL.B- 319
MAXIMUM MARKS: 30+70=100
TIME ALLOWED: 3 HRS.
INTERNAL ASSESSMENT: 30 MARKS
TERM-END EXAMINATION: 70 MARKS
OBJECTIVE:
Module 1: The nature of quantitative research:
The main steps in quantitative research, the main preoccupations of quantitative research, the
critique of quantitative research Sampling: types of probability sampling, the qualities of
probability sample, types of nonprobabilitysampling.Techniques of data collection: survey,

questionnaire, schedule and structured interview,structured observation, content analysis,


primary and secondary sources of data.
Module II: The nature of qualitative research:
The main steps in qualitative research, reliability and validity in qualitative research, the critique
of qualitative research, some contrasts between quantitative and qualitative research, combining
the quantitative and qualitative research, feminism and qualitative research. Participant
observation as method of data collection, interview in qualitative research, focus groups.
Module III: Nature of psychological data and psychological measurement:
Levels of measurement; categorical and continuous variables; applications of statistics in
Psychology
Module IV: Frequency Distribution:
Drawing of frequency distribution, bivariate frequency distribution, graphical representation of
grouped data.
Module V: Measurement of Central Tendency:
Purpose and types of measures; characteristics of mean, median and mode; computation of mean,
median and mode
Module VI: Measures of variability:
Concept of variability; range and semi inter quartile range; standard deviation and variance;
coefficient of variation.
Module VII: Normal Distribution:
Concept of probability; laws of probability, characteristics of normal probability curve, deviation
from NPC, skewness and kurtosis: normalization of skewed distributions, applications of NPC;
binomial distributions.
Module VIII: Correlation
The concept of correlation linear and non-linear correlation; pearsons product moment
correlation, spearmans rank order correlation; familiarity with other correlation methods,
biserial and point biserial r, tetrachoric r, and lambda; prediction using correlation.
Module IX: Computer in social research:
SPSS for beginner, computer assisted qualitative data analysis, e-research: using the internet as
object and method of data collection.

RECOMMENDED READINGS

1. K.D.Broota, 1992, Experimental design in behavioral research, New Delhi, Wiley


Eastern.
2. E.W.Miniurn, B.M.King and G.Bear, 1993, Statistical reasoning in psychology and
education,
3. New York, John Wiley
4. S.Siegel, 1994, Non parametric statistics, New York, McGraw Hill
5. Alan Bryman, 1988, Social research methods, New York, Oxford University Press

NAME OF SUBJECT: PHILOSOPHY-III: ETHICS (INDIAN & WESTERN)


PAPER CODE:BA, LL.B- 320
MAXIMUM MARKS: 30+70=100
TIME ALLOWED: 3 HRS.
INTERNAL ASSESSMENT: 30 MARKS
TERM-END EXAMINATION: 70 MARKS
OBJECTIVE:
MODULE-I: Indian Ethics
a) Introduction; concerns and presuppositions; theory of karms.
b) Dharma: its meaning, definition, classification; vidhi. nisedha & arthavada : Purva
Mimansa

c) Niskama Karma.
d) Purusarthas and their inter-relations; purusartha sadhana.
e) Buddhist ethics: the Four Noble Truths and the Eight-fold Path.
f) Jaina ethics: anuvratas and Mahavratas.
MODULE-II: Western Ethics
a) Nature and Scope of ethics.
b) Introduction: concerns and presuppositions: free will.
c) Teleological ethics: egoism; hedonism; utilitarianism.
d) Deontological ethics: Kant.
e) Intuitionism (excluding Neo-..)
f) Virtue ethics: Socrates. Plato and Aristotle.
g) Theories of punishment.
RECOMMENDED READINGS
1. Ethical Philosophy of India--- I.C. Sharma.
2. The Ethics of the Hindus--- S.K. Maitra.
3. Development of Moral Philosophy in India--- Surama Dasgupta.
4. The Indian Conception of Values--- M. Hiriyanna.
5. The History of Dharmashatra Vo.-I.
6. An Introduction to Ethics--- W. Lillie.
7. Theories of Ethics--- Philippa Foot (ed.).
8. A Manual of Ethics--- J.N. Sinha.
9. A Manual of Ethics--- Diwakar Panday.
10. A Manual of Ethics--- Sanganlal Panday.
11. A Manual of Ethics--- Ved Prakash Verma.

NAME OF SUBJECT: JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION-III: MEDIA


LAW AND ETHICS
PAPER CODE: BA, LL.B- 321
MAXIMUM MARKS: 30+70=100
TIME ALLOWED: 3 HRS.
INTERNAL ASSESSMENT: 30 MARKS
TERM-END EXAMINATION: 70 MARKS

OBJECTIVE:
MODULE-I: Media Law
a) Constitution of India: Fundamental Rights- Freedom of Speech and Expression and
their limits.
b) Directive Principles of State Policy.
c) Provisions of Declaring Emergency and their effects on Media.
d) Provision for Amending the Consititution.
e) Provision for Legislature Reporting.
f) Parliamentary Privileges and Media.
g) Theory of Basic Structure: Union and State.
h) Election Commission and its machinery.
MODULE-II: Specified Press Laws
a) History of Press Laws in India.
b) Contempt of Court Act, 1971.
c) Civil and Criminal Law of Defamation.
d) Relevant Provisions of Indian Penal Code with reference to edition, crime against
women and children.
e) Laws dealing with obscenity.
f) Official Secrets Act, 1923 vis--vis Right to Information.
g) Press and Registration of Books Act, 1867.
h) Working Journalists and Other Newspaper Employees (Conditions of Service &
Miscellaneous Provisions) Act, 1955.
i) Cinematography Act, 1953.
j) Prasar Bharati Act.
k) WTO agreement and Intellectual Property Right Legislations including Copyright
Act, Trade Marks Act and Patent Act.
l) Information Technology, Convergence Legislation including Cyber Laws and Cable
Television Act.
m) Media and Public Interest Litigation.
MODULE-III: ETHICS
a. Medias Ethical Problems including Privacy, Right to reply, Communal Writing and
Sensational and Yellow Journalism.
b. Freebies, Bias, Coloured Reports, Ethical Issues related with ownership of Media.
c. Role of Press and / or Media Councils and Press Ombudamen in the World.
d. Press Council of India and its broad guidelines for the Press--- Codes suggested for
the Press by Press Council and Press Commissions and other National and
International Organizations.

e. Codes for Radio, Television, Advertising and Public Relations.


RECOMMENDED READINGS
1. Laws of Press in India---Durgadas Basu. Prentice Hall New Delhi, 1986.
2. Whose News Where Freedom--- D.R. Mankekar. Karion, New Delhi. 1978.
3. Law Relating to Publishers and Printers--- P.C. Sarkar.