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English I: Curriculum Map

20162017

Curriculum Map is Subject to Change (For Review Only )


Introduction
In 2014, the Shelby County Schools Board of Education adopted a set of ambitious, yet attainable goals for school and student performance. The District is committed to these goals, as further
described in our strategic plan, Destination 2025.
By 2025,
80% of our students will graduate from high school college or career ready
90% of students will graduate on time
100% of our students who graduate college or career ready will enroll in a post-secondary opportunity.
In order to achieve these ambitious goals, we must collectively work to provide our students with high-quality, College and Career Ready standards-aligned instruction. Acknowledging the need to
develop competence in literacy and language as the foundations for all learning, Shelby County Schools developed the Comprehensive Literacy Improvement Plan (CLIP). The plan ensures a quality
balanced literacy approach to instruction that results in high levels of literacy learning for all students and across content areas. Destination 2025, the Comprehensive Literacy Improvement Plan, and
TN State Standards establish common goals and expectations for student learning across schools and are the underpinning for the development of the curriculum maps.
Purpose - This curriculum map is meant to help teachers and their support providers (e.g., coaches, leaders) on their path to effective, college and career ready (CCR) aligned instruction and our
pursuit of Destination 2025. It is a resource for organizing instruction around the TN State Standards, which define what to teach and what students need to learn at each grade level. The map is
designed to reinforce the grade/course-specific standards and contentthe major work of the grade (scope)and provides a suggested sequencing and pacing and time frames, aligned resources
including complex texts, sample questions and tasks, and other planning tools. Our hope is that by curating and organizing a variety of standards-aligned resources, teachers will be able to spend
less time wondering what to teach and searching for quality materials (though they may both select from and/or supplement those included here) and have more time to plan, teach, assess, and
reflect with colleagues to continuously improve practice and best meet the needs of their students.
The map is meant to support effective planning and instruction to rigorous standards; it is not meant to replace teacher planning or prescribe pacing or instructional practice. In fact, our goal is not to
merely cover the curriculum, but rather to uncover it by developing students deep understanding of the content and mastery of the standards. Teachers who are knowledgeable about and
intentionally align the learning target (standards and objectives), topic, text(s), task, topic, and needs (and assessment) of the learners are best-positioned to make decisions about how to support
student learning toward such mastery. Teachers are therefore expected--with the support of their colleagues, coaches, leaders, and other support providers--to exercise their professional judgement
aligned to our shared vision of effective instruction, the Teacher Effectiveness Measure (TEM) and related best practices. However, while the framework allows for flexibility and encourages each
teacher/teacher team to make it their own, our expectations for student learning are non-negotiable. We must ensure all of our children have access to rigorhigh-quality teaching and learning to
grade level specific standards, including purposeful support of literacy and language learning across the content areas.
A standards-based curriculum, performance-based learning and assessments, and high quality instruction are at the heart of the ELA Curriculum maps. Educators will use this map and the standards
as a road map for curriculum and instruction. Carefully crafted curricular sequences and quality instructional resources enable teachers to devote more time and energy in delivering instruction and
assessing the effectiveness of instruction for all learners in their classrooms, including those with special learning needs.
To support literacy and language learning across the content areas and support deeper knowledge building in the content area, throughout this curriculum map, you will see high-quality texts from
both the textbook(s) and external/supplemental texts to ensure students are reading appropriately complex, worthwhile material. These texts have been evaluated by district staff to ensure that they
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meet criteria for text complexity--Quantitative, Qualitative, and Reader & Task Factors. Lexile Levels are listed on the Curriculum Maps, and additional information is cited, where available.

How to Use the Literacy Curriculum Maps


Our collective goal is to ensure our students graduate ready for college and career. This will require a
comprehensive, integrated approach to literacy instruction that ensures that students become college and
career ready readers, writers, and communicators. To achieve this, students must receive literacy
instruction aligned to each of the elements of effective literacy program seen in the figure to the right.
This curriculum map is designed to help teachers make effective decisions about what literacy content to
teach and how to teach it so that, ultimately, our students can reach Destination 2025. To reach our
collective student achievement goals, we know that teachers must change their instructional practice in
alignment the with the three College and Career Ready shifts in instruction for ELA/Literacy. We should see
these three shifts in all SCS literacy classrooms:
(1) Regular practice with complex text and its academic language.
(2) Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and
informational.
(3) Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction.

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Throughout this curriculum map, you will see high-quality texts that students should be reading, as well as some resources and tasks to support you in ensuring that students are able to reach the
demands of the standards in your classroom. In addition to the resources embedded in the map, there are some high-leverage resources around each of the three shifts that teachers should
consistently access:

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The Tennessee State Literacy Standards


The Tennessee State ELA Standards (also known as the College
and Career Ready Literacy Standards):
http://tn.gov/education/article/english-language-arts-standards

Teachers can access the Tennessee State Standards, which are featured throughout this curriculum map and represent
college and career ready student learning at each respective grade level.

Shift 1: Regular Practice with Complex Text and its Academic Language
Student Achievement Partners Text Complexity Collection:
http://achievethecore.org/page/642/text-complexity-collection

Teachers can learn more about how to select complex texts (using quantitative, qualitative, and reader/task measures)
using the resources in this collection.

Student Achievement Partners Academic Word Finder:


http://achievethecore.org/page/1027/academic-word-finder

Teachers can copy and paste a text into this tool, which then generates the most significant Tier 2 academic vocabulary
contained within the text.

Links to Support Vocabulary Instruction & Development


http://www.learningunlimitedllc.com/2013/07/5-steps-vocabularyinstruction/
https://wvde.state.wv.us/strategybank/VocabularyStrategies.html
https://wvde.state.wv.us/strategybank/VocabularyGraphicOrganizer
s.html
Shift 2: Reading, Writing and Speaking Grounded in Evidence from the Text
Student Achievement Partners Text-Dependent Questions
Resources:
http://achievethecore.org/page/710/text-dependent-questionresources

Teachers can use the resources in this set of resources to craft their own text-dependent questions based on their
qualitative and reader/task measures text complexity analysis.

Shift 3: Building Knowledge through Content-Rich Non-fiction


Student Achievement Partners Text Set Project:
http://achievethecore.org/page/2784/text-set-project-buildingknowledge-and-vocabulary

Teachers can use this resource to learn about how to sequence texts into expert packs to build student knowledge of
the world.

Using the Curriculum Maps, Grades 9-12


Begin by examining the text(s) selected for the week. Read them carefully and become familiar with both the text(s) and the big idea. (Note: Teachers should carefully review texts to
understand and plan for the demands/challenges learners might be expect to face, deliberately model specific literacy skillsincluding reading fluency, leverage student annotations, and
carefully sequence text-dependent questions leading to higher order thinking.)
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Locate the TDOE Standards in the left column. Analyze the language of the standards, and match each standard to an evidence statement in the center column.
Consult your Pearson Literature Teachers Edition (TE) and other cited references to map out your week(s) of instruction.
Plan your weekly and daily objectives, using the evidence statements to help. As a reminder, standards and objectives are not synonymous and mastery of the standards develops over
time.
Study the suggested writing prompts/performance assessments in the right-hand column, and match them to your objectives.
Plan the questions you will ask each day using these three types of questions: those that derive general understanding, those that address craft and structure, and those that elicit an overall
meaning of the text. Be sure that the questions you ask will lead students to success on your selected performance assessments.
Examine the other standards and skills you will need to addresswriting, vocabulary, language, and speaking and listening skills.
Using your Pearson TE and other resources cited in the curriculum map, plan your week using the lesson plan designated by your administrator. Remember to include differentiated
activities for teacher-led small group instruction and literacy stations.

Using the WIDA MPIs


WIDA English Language Development (ELD) standards and example Model Performance Indicator (MPI) strands appear within this document to provide teachers with appropriate scaffolding
examples for ELLs and struggling readers. Strands of MPIs related to the domain of Reading are provided and linked to the corresponding set of CCR standards. By referencing the provided MPIs
and those MPIs within the given links, teachers can craft "I can" statements that are appropriately leveled for ELLs (and struggling readers) in their classrooms. Additionally, MPIs can be referenced
for designing new and/or modifying existing assessments.

Quarter 1 At-a-Glance

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Adhering to the shifts, instruction for ELA/Literacy should build knowledge through content-rich nonfiction. During Quarter 1, students will learn from three modules and a culminating miniresearch project. Week 2 through Week 8 comprises two units and two writing workshops on the topic of environmental issues. Please review the following At-a-Glance table to become more
familiar with the instructional plan for Quarter 1.
English I, Quarter 1

Week 1

Texts

Recommendations

Maya Angelou, And Still I Rise

Instruction will routinely focus on close reading, annotation, modes of writing, critical thinking, Accountable Talk, and
POW+TIDE. Use the starter texts on the left to model your expectations for students.

Literature
New Directions by Maya Angelou
My English by Julia Alvarez pg. 114
Sojourner Truth, Aint I a Woman

Homework Outside reading complete questions, vocabulary and talk about narrative writing
(Grammar Lessons) Nouns, pronouns,
Pg.122 Literature Book practice A and Practice B (Pronouns)
Pg. 150 Literature Book practice A and Practice B (Relative Pronouns)

(Students will write a narrative essay about an experience they have had in their lives and how it has affected them)
Honors I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings Literary Response----One Week to read book
Standard The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman
Week 2

John Vidal, The Sumatran Rainforest Will Mostly


Disappear Within 20 Years

And
Ian Sample, Amazons Doomed Species Set to Pay
Deforestations Extinction Price

At the beginning of week 2, distribute The Sumatran Rainforest.... text, with prompt (these texts have been provided to your
school). Ask each class to read the text and respond to the prompt. This is your first data point to score what your students
know and are able to do. This will be helpful as you plan for the Instructional Design (GRRM).
For the remainder of week two and three, plan for students to read both texts. Follow the recommendations in the
Curriculum Map. The topic is environmental issues, and the central idea is the negative consequences resulting from the
loss of forests.
Sentence Structure, Fragments, run-ons,

Week 3
Week 4

Writing Workshop

Task: After reading the two texts about deforestation, students will write an essay that argues which of these two texts more
effectively describes the consequences of deforestation, based on the reasoning and evidence in the texts, including an
explanation of the specific claims of both texts and citing strong and thorough evidence from both texts to support their
argument. Follow the conventions of standard written English. [RI.2] [R.I.6]

Week 5

If I Forget Thee, Oh Earth

Reading Literature
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The Interlopers

Week 6

The Necklace

Complete all assignments associated with stories

Blues Aint No Mockin Bird

Plot Structure, Irony, conflict, Dialect

Silent Spring or teacher selected Article

Reading Informational Text


(Honors) Complete Current Events Assignment ) QI
Use Current Event Assignment template

Week 7

Articles adapted by News ELA staff or teacher selected


articles

Reading Information Text (self-selected from a provided list see Week 7)

Week 8

Writing Workshop

Task: After reading the texts for this unit, write an essay in which you analyze the development of the theme/central ideas
from literary fiction and nonfiction selections. Analyze the authors perspective on the topic and discuss specific details that
contribute to the development of theme/central idea. Cite evidence from the texts used to support your argument. Follow
the conventions of standard written English. [RL.9.2; RI 9.2]

Week 9

Mini-Research Project

Environmental Issues

In the second module, weeks 2-3, students will be introduced to the concept of environmental issues. To build their background knowledge, they will read tow informational texts: The Sumatran
Rainforest Will Mostly Disappear Within 20 Years by John Vidal and Amazons Doomed Species Set to Pay Deforestations Extinction Debt by Ian Sample. Alongside a close reading of passages
from these texts, students will also practice their ability to pinpoint the central ideas and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text. It is recommended students provide an objective
summary of the text. Students will also determine an authors point of view or purpose in a text and will analyze how rhetoric is used to advance the authors purpose. Examples of text dependent
questions are also provided. Additional resources are listed to further support students with critical thinking and the mode of argument writing.
For module three, weeks 5-7, students will look at literary and informational texts while still exploring the topic of environmental issues. Students will be able to continue to reinforce their mastery
levels in identifying themes, central ideas, how conflict is established, and the comparing of points-of-view. Examples of text dependent questions are also provided. It is recommended teachers
model a think aloud for one of the news articles for week 7. The teacher picks out passages that lead to the readers understanding of central idea. The teacher models how details are developed
over the course of the text and segues into summary strategies for the Newsela article. After the teacher models the first text, students are asked to select from the list of news articles listed. In this
way, students could be grouped by text interest instead of ability or mastery levels. The Literature Circle reading strategy (Daniels) could be helpful for students working in peer groups.
To further embrace the focus topic of environmental issues, students will engage in a mini research report on global changes of the climate and/or environment. Time is built in for students to
prepare for Accountable Talk before they begin their discussion. The purpose of that is to make sure every student is ready to contribute to the conversation. After the Accountable Talk experience
on the topic of environmental issues, students will write their finding using a suitable research format.
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Quarter 1
TN DOE Standards

Evidence Statements

Content

WEEK 1
Module 1 Getting Started
Text: Aint I a Woman? by Sojourner Truth (960L)
Text: Still I Rise by Maya Angelou (NP)
Performance Task: Read, Aint I a Woman? by Sojourner Truth and Still I Rise, by Maya Angelou. Both of these texts use rhetoric to advance point of view or purpose. Write an
essay that compares and contrasts the authors purposes and how their purposes are conveyed in the two texts. Be sure to cite evidence from both texts to support your analysis.
Follow the conventions of standard written English. (RI 9. 6, 9.1,9.10; W 9.2)
Building
Knowledge
through Contentrich Nonfiction

Standards
RI 9.1. Cite strong and thorough textual

Evidence Statements
Provides strong and thorough textual evidence

Selections
Text: Aint I a Woman?, by Sojourner Truth
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And
Reading Complex
Texts

evidence to support analysis of what the text


says explicitly as well as inferences drawn
from the text.
RI 9.2. Determine a central idea of a text and
analyze its development over the course of the
text, including how it emerges and is shaped
and refined by specific details; provide an
objective summary of the text.
RI 9.5. Analyze in detail how an authors
ideas or claims are developed and refined by
particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger
portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).
RI 9.6 Determine an authors point of view or
purpose in a text and analyze how an author
uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or
purpose.
RI 9.10. By the end of grade 9, read and
comprehend literature, including stories,
dramas, and poems, in the grades 9-10 text
complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding
as needed at the high end of the range.

Evidence Statements
to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly RI.1
Provides strong and thorough textual evidence
to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly and/or inferences drawn from the
text. RI.1
Provides a central idea of a text. RI.2
Provides an analysis of how a central idea is
developed over the course of a text. RI.2
Provides an objective summary of a text. RI.2
Provides an analysis of how an authors
choices are developed and refined RI.5
Provides an analysis of a particular point of
view showing how the author uses rhetoric
RI.6
Demonstrates grade 9 comprehension of
literary and informational texts. RI.9.10

Content
Text: Still I Rise, by Maya Angelou
Angelou Text:
Still I Rise
https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/still-i-rise
Anticipation:
Ask students to share their own reading experiences. Guide
students to examine the ways in which reading has
influenced or changed their outlook on various life situations.
Read:
Read the poem by Maya Angelou. As you read ask students
to note the main idea and supporting details. Ask students to
write a response to the question:
1. Is this poem Maya Angelous way of telling her own story
in the form of a poem?
Or,
2. Did Maya Angelou create a voice for all people with this
poem?
Close Read:
Aint I a Woman?, by Sojourner Truth
Introduce, Aint I a Woman, by Sojourner Truth
Sojourner Truth Text : Aint I a Woman
http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/E151FA9D-6017-4556981FShelby County Schools
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Quarter 1
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Evidence Statements

Content
CD076D731A72/0/SecondaryTextGuideAnswerKeyAintWom
an.pdf
Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without
interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students:
They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with
accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at
and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to
set clear expectations that students read along silently in
their heads as you read the text aloud.
1. The first time the student reads along, the student is
reading for comprehension.
What is the speech about?

Who is Sojourner Truth?

What do you know about her?

2. On the second reading of the text, ask students to read


for significance.
Identify a moment that strikes you as significant to
Truths argument.
Explain why you consider this moment to be
significant.
3. On the third reading of the text, ask students to read for
interpretation.
Why does Truth keep repeating the phrase, and
aint I a woman?
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Evidence Statements

Content
For additional Resources:
Elements of Fiction and Nonfiction (pg. 4)

www.pearson.com
Literary Analysis (pg. 84)

www.pearson.com
Theme or Central Idea

www.pearson.com
Accountable Talk
http://ifl.pitt.edu/index.php/educator_resources/accounta
ble_talk

Regular Practice
with Complex Text
and Its Academic
Language

Language Vocabulary

Evidence Statements

Tier 2 Vocabulary

L.9.4 Determine the meaning of words and


phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze
the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with
multiple meanings or language that is
particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful.
(Include Shakespeare as well as other
authors.)

Demonstrates the ability to determine the


meaning of words and phrases as they are
used in a text (e.g., figurative, connotative)
L.4

High frequency words used by mature language users across


several content areas. Because of their lack of redundancy
in oral language, Tier 2 words present challenges to students
who primarily meet them in print. Examples of Tier 2 words
from Aint I a Woman?, are:

L 9. 6 Acquire and use accurately general


academic and domain-specific words and
phrases, sufficient for reading, writing,
speaking, and listening at the college and
career readiness level; demonstrate
independence in gathering vocabulary
knowledge when considering a word or phrase
important to comprehension or expression.

Provides an analysis of the impact of specific


word choice on meaning and/or tone. L.4

Racket
Fix
Ditch
Provides a statement demonstrating general
and domain-specific words and phrases L.6
Puddle
Gather
Demonstrates gathering vocabulary knowledge Lash
of important words and phrases independently Grief
L6
Intellect
Measure
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Writing to Texts

Evidence Statements

Content

Tier 3 Vocabulary
Review the word list below. Some students
may need to additional work with foundational
skills and understanding of:
Evidence
Cite
Analysis
Inference
Central Idea
Summary
Objective Summary
Claims
Point of View
Authors Purpose
Rhetoric
Essay
Compare
Contrast
Organization
Close Read
Annotate

Oblige
Bear
Grief
Kilter
Sojourner

Writing

Writing

Writing Fundamentals

W9.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to


examine and convey complex ideas, concepts,
and information clearly and accurately through
the effective selection, organization, and
analysis of content.

Written Expression Evidence Statements


Development of Ideas:
The student response addresses the prompt
and provides effective and comprehensive

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence


Select and integrate quotations, details, and
examples
Use appropriate organizational pattern
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Quarter 1
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Evidence Statements

a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas,


concepts, and information to make
important connections and distinctions;
include formatting (e.g., headings),
graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and
multimedia when useful to aiding
comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with well-chosen,
relevant, and sufficient facts, extended
definitions, concrete details, quotations, or
other information and examples
appropriate to the audiences knowledge
of the topic.
c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to
link the major sections of the text, create
cohesion, and clarify the relationships
among complex ideas and concepts.
d. Use precise language and domainspecific vocabulary to manage the
complexity of the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style and
objective tone while attending to the
norms and conventions of the discipline in
which they are writing.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section
that follows from and supports the
information or explanation presented
(e.g., articulating implications or the
significance of the topic).

development of the claim, topic and/or


narrative elements4 by using clear and
convincing reasoning, details, text-based
evidence, and/or description; the development
is consistently appropriate to the task,
purpose, and audience.
Organization:
The student response demonstrates
purposeful coherence, clarity, and cohesion5
and includes a strong introduction, conclusion,
and a logical, well-executed progression of
ideas, making it easy to follow the writers
progression of ideas.
The student response establishes and
maintains an effective style, while attending to
the norms and conventions of the discipline.
The response uses precise language
consistently, including descriptive words and
phrases, sensory details, linking and
transitional words, words to indicate tone6,
and/or domain-specific vocabulary.
Knowledge of Language and Conventions:
The student response demonstrates command
of the conventions of standard English
consistent with effectively edited writing.
Though there may be a few minor errors in
grammar and usage.

Content
-

Write strong thesis statements


Plan, draft, revise, edit, and rewrite
Use appropriate style and tone for purpose

Routine Writing:
Write a summary of Aint I a woman
Routine Writing:
What parts of the speech seem designed to motivate or
excite the crowd? How do you know?
Analysis Writing:
When Truth uses language like, racket, out of kilter, and
in a fix, what impression do we get of her personality?
Character?
Analysis Writing:
What is the effect of repeated lines?
Other resources to consider for 9th grade writers:
POW / POW-TIDE
P- Pull apart the prompt
O- Organize notes
W-Write
+
T-Topic
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Quarter 1
TN DOE Standards

Evidence Statements

Content
I- Ideas
D- Details
E- End
http://kc.vanderbilt.edu/projectwrite/resources-srsd.html

Reading, Writing
and Speaking
Grounded in
Evidence from
Text, Both Literary
and Informational

Speaking and Listening

Speaking and Listening

Speaking and Listening

SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in


a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse
partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and
issues, building on others ideas and
expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having
read and researched material under
study; explicitly draw on that preparation
by referring to evidence from texts and
other research on the topic or issue to
stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned
exchange of ideas.
b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial
discussions and decision-making (e.g.,
informal consensus, taking votes on key
issues, presentation of alternative views),
clear goals and deadlines, and individual
roles as needed.
c. Propel conversations by posing and
responding to questions that relate the
current discussion to broader themes or
larger ideas; actively incorporate others
into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or
challenge ideas and conclusions.

1. Students will be able to effectively


participate in collaborative discussions
(we do, they do)
2. Students will be able to refer to textual
evidence as ideas are exchanged. SL1.a
3. Students will be able to question posed
ideas and themes when agreeing and/or
disagreeing with text summaries. SL. 1
4. Students will be able to evaluate a
speakers evidence and reasoning. SL.1
5. Students will build speaking and listening
skills through Accountable Talk toward
peer-led Socratic Seminars. SL.3

After reading the text, Aint I a Woman, by Sojourner Truth,


students will engage in evidence based claims, where they
will extract detailed information from the text and then make
an evidence-based claim using those details. This will help
students make meaning from the text that is important to
them. In the activities that follow, students will learn to make
a text-based claim by moving from literal understanding of its
details, to simple supported conclusions or inferences, to
claims that arise from and are supported by close
examination of textual evidence.
http://www.achieve.org/files/EBC%20Unit%20Plan%20%20Aint%20I%20A%20Woman%20082213.pdf
Some additional resources for teachers :
http://www.wordsift.com/ Word maps, word clouds
http://quizlet.com/ Make flash cards
http://www.vocabulary.com/ Latin & Greek roots
www.worldwidewords.com Definitions, history and short
essays on words
http://www.visualthesaurus.com/ Visual thesaurus
www.vocabgrabber.com
www.wordle.com

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Quarter 1
TN DOE Standards
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse
perspectives, summarize points of
agreement and disagreement, and, when
warranted, qualify or justify their own
views and understanding and make new
connections in light of the evidence and
reasoning presented.
SL.9-10.3. Evaluate a speakers point of view,
reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric,
identifying any fallacious reasoning or
exaggerated or distorted evidence.

Evidence Statements

Content
Resources for Annotation
http://www.teachingthecore.com/purposeful-annotationclose-reading/
http://www.elacommoncorelessonplans.com/literaturereading-standards/teaching-literary-annotations.html
Speaking and Listening
Oral presentations

Whole group discussions, teacher led

Whole group discussions, student led

Jigsaw historical elements (politics, economics,


other art media, etc.).

Suggestions for Quarter 1:


Group roles and responsibilities should be established
starting at the beginning of the school year. Students need to
know teacher expectations for various formats of delivery.
Accountable Talk
Accountable Talk is conversation that works in the classroom.
This academic talk helps students to achieve at higher levels
using standards and targeted effort. Clear expectations will
allow students the opportunity for continual growth. The
"accountable" in Accountable Talk comes from its three
dimensions: Accountability to the Learning Community,
Accountability to Accurate Knowledge, and Accountability to
Rigorous Thinking. To get started with Accountable Talk, go
to:
http://ifl.pitt.edu/index.php/educator_resources/accountable_t
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Quarter 1
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Evidence Statements

Content
alk

WEEKS 2-3
Topic: Environmental Issues
Module 2 Deforestation
Text 1: The Sumatran Rainforest Will Mostly Disappear Within 20 Years by John Vidal (1440L)
Text 2: Amazons Doomed Species Set to Pay Deforestations Extinction Price by Ian Sample (1590L)
Performance Task: Read The Sumatran Rainforest Will Mostly Disappear Within 20 Years by John Vidal and Amazons Doomed Species Set to Pay Deforestations Extinction
Debt by Ian Sample, two articles about deforestation, then write an essay that argues which of these two texts more effectively describes the consequences of deforestation, based on
the reasoning and evidence in the texts. Include an explanation of the specific claims of both texts and cite strong and thorough evidence from both texts to support your argument.
Follow the conventions of standard written English. [R.I.2] [R.I.6]
Building
Knowledge
through Contentrich Nonfiction
and
Reading Complex
Texts

Tennessee Standards

Evidence Statements

RI.9.1 Cite strong and thorough textual Provides strong and thorough textual evidence to
evidence to support analysis of what the text support analysis of what the text says explicitly
says explicitly as well as inferences drawn and/or inferences drawn from the text. 9.1
from the text, including determining where the
text leaves matters uncertain.
Provides a statement of central idea(s) of a text. 9.2
RI.9.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a
text and analyze in detail its development over
the course of the text, including how it
emerges and is shaped and refined by specific
details; provide an objective summary of the
text

Provides an analysis of the development of central


idea(s) over the course of the text, including how the
central idea emerges and is shaped and refined by
specific details. 9.2
Provides an objective summary of a text. 9.2

RI.9 3: Analyze how the author unfolds an


analysis or series of ideas or events, including Provides an analysis of how the author unfolds an
the order in which the points are made, how analysis or series of ideas or events, including the
they are introduced and developed, and the order in which points are made. 9.3
connections that are drawn between them.

Informational Text- Reading Selections


Week 2
The environmental issues unit of study begins here.
Text: The Sumatran Rainforest Will Mostly Disappear
Within 20 Years by John Vidal
To begin this unit, start with a cold read and write; give
the students the Sumatran Rainforest text, provided to
your school. Have students to read the text and follow
the prompt. Allow students approximately 90 minutes
for this task. Upon completion, quickly score the
essays in the traits areas of Organization and
Development. This is your first data point for your
students for the year pertaining to their present skill
level for reading and writing. By doing this, teachers
will be able to make an informed decision on student
placement for small group and flexible group pertaining
to the Gradual Release of Responsibility Model
(GRRM).
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RI.9 5: Analyze in detail how an authors ideas
or claims are developed and refined by
particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger
portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).
RI .9 6: Determine an authors point of view or
purpose in a text and analyze how an author
uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or
purpose.
RI 7: Analyze various accounts of a subject
told in different mediums (e.g., a persons life
story in both print and multimedia),
determining which details are emphasized in
each account.
RI 8: Delineate and evaluate the argument
and specific claims in a text, assessing
whether the reasoning is valid and the
evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify
false statements and fallacious reasoning.

Evidence Statements
Provides an analysis of how the author unfolds an
analysis or series of ideas or events, including how
they are introduced and developed. 9.3

Provides an analysis of how the author unfolds an


analysis or series of ideas or events, including the
connections that are drawn between them. 9.3
Provides a detailed analysis of how an authors
ideas or claims are developed and refined by
particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions
of a text (e.g., a section or chapter). 9.5
Provides a statement of an authors point of view in
a text. 9.6
Provides a statement of an authors purpose in a
text. 9.6
Provides an analysis of how the author uses rhetoric
to advance his or her point of view or purpose. 9.6

Content
After students have completed the cold read and write,
introduce the unit by showing a video or pictures to
build student knowledge and interest in the topic.
Teacher Actions (I do)
1. Connect to Prior Knowledge: Explore what
students already know about the topic.
2. Model Annotation strategies
3. Model how to complete SOAPSTone and POW+
TIDE analyses
4. Model the how to of an Analytic Summary
Note that the analytic summary is intended to give the
student the opportunity to identify the speakers
purpose for the given speech and how that purpose is
conveyed through the use of rhetoric.
Student Actions (we do, they do)
Overview:
Students answer text dependent questions. Encourage
students to answer the following questions for each
practice text.

Provides a delineation of the argument and specific


claims in a text. 9.8

Examples of Text Dependent Questions:


1. What is the claim and what textual evidence is
cited about the claim? (Key Details/Authors
Provides an assessment of whether the reasoning in
Purpose)
the argument is valid. 9.8
2. How is the text structured to show explicit
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Evidence Statements
Provides an assessment of whether the evidence is
relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 9.8
Provides identification of false statements and
fallacious reasoning. 9.8

Content
meaning (in relationship to the claim)? (Vocabulary
and Text Structure)
3. What is the authors purpose? What evidence do
you have of this? (Authors Purpose)
4. How does the authors tone help communicate the
authors purpose? (Authors Purpose)
5. How are rhetorical devices (ethos, pathos, logos,
repetition, irony, etc.) used to present and support
the claim? (Vocabulary and text structure)
Pre-writing/Charts
Students prepare to write by completing a what, how,
and why analysis. What is the claim? How does the
author develop the claim (using rhetoric)? Why does the
author choose to communicate the claim in this way?
Week 3
Text: Amazons Doomed Species Set to Pay
Deforestations Extinction Price by Ian Sample
Teacher Actions
1. Bridge: Make connections between text
selections
2. Model Annotation strategies
3. Model how to complete SOAPSTone and
POW TIDE analyses
4. Model the how to of an Analytic Summary
Note that the analytic summary is intended to give the
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Evidence Statements

Content
student the opportunity to identify the speakers
purpose for the given speech and how that purpose is
conveyed through the use of rhetoric.
Student Actions (we do, they do)
Overview: Students answer generic text dependent
questions. Encourage students to answer these
questions for each practice text.
Examples of Text Dependent Questions:
1. What is the claim and what textual evidence is
cited about the claim? (Key Details/Authors
Purpose)
2. How is the text structured to show explicit
meaning (in relationship to the claim)? (Vocabulary
and Text Structure)
3. What is the authors purpose? What evidence do
you have of this? (Authors Purpose)
4. How does the authors tone help communicate the
authors purpose? (Authors Purpose)
5. How are rhetorical devices (ethos, pathos, logos,
repetition, irony, etc.) used to present and support
the claim? (Vocabulary and text structure)
Pre-writing/Charts
Students prepare to write by completing a what, how,
and why analysis. What is the claim? How does the
author develop the claim (using rhetoric)? Why does the
author choose to communicate the claim in this way?
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Content
Synthesizing Information
Once students have analyzed each text, encourage
students to discuss and consider which one is more
effective at describing the effects of deforestation.
Begin by exploring what makes a good argument.
For additional support with argument, go to Purdue Owl,
modes of discourse.
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/685/05/
The University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, know that
teachers are looking for two things: Proof that students
understand the material, AND a demonstration of their
ability to use or apply the material in ways that go
beyond what they have read. See the argument
handout at http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/argument/
For Argument Talk Protocol, see
http://readingandwritingproject.com/public/themes/rwpro
ject/resources/Content
%20Support/writing/Arugment_Talk_Protocol.pdf
George Hillocks Jr., along with Heinemann, has several
books in print about his research in teaching argument
for critical thinking and writing. For a free pdf. file on
the basics of argument, go to https://www.heinemann.com/shared/onlineresources/E0
1396/introAndChapter1.pdf
For students who already know the difference between
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Content
the act of reading to extract information and the act of
reading critically, Critical Reading of an Essays
Argument can be found
https://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/reading_basic.html

Regular Practice
with Complex Text
and Its Academic
Language

CCR Language Vocabulary


L.10.4 Determine the meaning of words and
phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze
the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with
multiple meanings or language that is
particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful.
(Include Shakespeare as well as other
authors.)
CCR Language
L.10.1.A: Apply the understanding that usage
is a matter of convention, can change over
time, and is sometimes contested.
L.10.2: Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
L.10.3: Apply knowledge of language to

Tier 3 Vocabulary
Review the word list below. Some students may
need to additional work with foundational skills and
understanding of:
Summary
Anticipate
Background
Bias
Distortion
Individual
Insight
Interpretation
Manipulate
Perspective
Thesis
Expository
Narrative
Argument
Persuasive
Ethos

Review of:
Writing skills
Vocabulary
Quote incorporation
Organization
Tier 2 Vocabulary
Text 1:
Vast
Dissected
Distraught
Fragmented
Corruption
Legacy
Text 2:
Casualty
Habitat
Halted
Optimistic
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understand how language functions in different
contexts, to make effective choices for
meaning or style, and to comprehend more
fully when reading or listening.

Evidence Statements
Pathos
Logos
Claim
Counterclaim

Content
Extinction
Vital

Demonstrates the ability to determine the meaning


of words and phrases as they are used in a text
(e.g., figurative, connotative) and/or provides an
analysis of the impact of specific word choice on
meaning and/or tone. L.4
Provides a statement demonstrating accurate
meaning and use of grade-appropriate general
academic words and phrases. L.6

Writing to Texts

CCR Writing

CCR Writing

Writing Fundamentals
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence

W.9.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to


examine and convey complex ideas, concepts
and information clearly and accurately through
the effective selection, organization and
analysis of content.
a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas,
concepts and information to make
important connections and distinctions;
include formatting (e.g., headings),
graphics (e.g., figures, tables) and
multimedia when useful to aiding
comprehension.

Written Expression Evidence Statements

Development of Ideas:
The student response addresses the prompt and
provides effective and comprehensive development
of the claim, topic and/or narrative elements4 by
using clear and convincing reasoning, details, textbased evidence, and/or description; the
development is consistently appropriate to the task,
purpose, and audience.

Select and integrate quotations, details, and


examples
Use appropriate organizational pattern

Write strong thesis statements

Plan, draft, revise, edit, and rewrite

Use appropriate style and tone for purpose

Argumentative Rubric
Narrative Rubric
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Reading, Writing
and Speaking
Grounded in
Evidence from
Text, Both Literary

Evidence Statements

Content

b. Develop the topic with well-chosen,


relevant and sufficient facts, extended
definitions, concrete details, quotations, or
other information and examples
appropriate to the audiences knowledge
of the topic.
c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to
link the major sections of the text, create
cohesion and clarify the relationships
among complex ideas and concepts.
d. Use precise language and domainspecific vocabulary to manage the
complexity of the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style and
objective tone while attending to the
norms and conventions of the discipline in
which they are writing.
f. f. Provide a concluding statement or
section that follows from and supports the
information or explanation presented
(e.g., articulating implications or the
significance of the topic.

Organization:
The student response demonstrates purposeful
coherence, clarity, and cohesion5 and includes a
strong introduction, conclusion, and a logical, wellexecuted progression of ideas, making it easy to
follow the writers progression of ideas.

Speaking and Listening

Speaking and Listening

Speaking and Listening

SL.9. 1. Initiate and participate effectively in a


range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse

Students will be able to effectively participate in


collaborative discussions (we do, they do) Students
will be able to refer to textual evidence as ideas are

By leading students through discussions about both texts,


students will be better prepared for the Writing Workshop
next week. For next weeks Writing Workshop students write

The student response establishes and maintains an


effective style, while attending to the norms and
conventions of the discipline. The response uses
precise language consistently, including descriptive
words and phrases, sensory details, linking and
transitional words, words to indicate tone6, and/or
domain-specific vocabulary.
Knowledge of Language and Conventions:
The student response demonstrates command of
the conventions of standard English consistent with
effectively edited writing. Though there may be a
few minor errors in grammar and usage.

Informational Rubric
(Find all writing rubrics on the TN DOE website see
below)
Analysis Writing:
In The Sumatran Rainforest the writer develops
several central ideas. Determine one central idea from
the text and write an essay that summarizes and
analyzes how that central idea is developed over the
course of the text, including how it emerges and is
shaped and refined by particular details. Cite strong and
thorough evidence from the text to support your
analysis. Follow the conventions of standard written
English. [R.I.2.]
Analysis Writing:
In Amazons Doomed Species, the writer develops
several central ideas. Determine one central idea from
the text and write an essay that summarizes and
analyzes how that central idea is developed over the
course of the text, including how it emerges and is
shaped and refined by particular details. Cite strong and
thorough evidence from the text to support your
analysis. Follow the conventions of standard written
English. [R.I.2]

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and Informational

partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and


issues, building on others ideas and
expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having
read and researched material under
study; explicitly draw on that preparation
by referring to evidence from texts and
other research on the topic or issue to
stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned
exchange of ideas.
b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial
discussions and decision-making (e.g.,
informal consensus, taking votes on key
issues, and presentation of alternative
views), clear goals and deadlines, and
individual roles as needed.
c. Propel conversations by posing and
responding to questions that relate the
current discussion to broader themes or
larger ideas; actively incorporate others
into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or
challenge ideas and conclusions.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse
perspectives, summarize points of
agreement and disagreement, and, when
warranted, qualify or justify their own
views and understanding and make new
connections in light of the evidence and
reasoning presented.
SL.9-10.2. Integrate multiple sources of
information presented in diverse media or
formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally)

Evidence Statements

Content

exchanged. Students will be able to question posed


ideas and themes when agreeing and/or
disagreeing with text summaries. SL. 1

an essay that argues which of these two texts more


effectively describes the consequences of deforestation,
based on the reasoning and evidence in the texts. Include an
explanation of the specific claims of both texts

Students will be able to evaluate a speakers


evidence and reasoning. SL.1

Using Accountable Talk, ask students to discuss the


authors point of view or purpose in a text, and analyze
how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of
view or purpose, including which of the two authors is
more effective.

Students will build speaking and listening skills


through Accountable Talk toward peer-led Socratic
Seminars. SL.3

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Evidence Statements

Content

evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each


source.
SL.9-10.3. Evaluate a speakers point of view,
reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric,
identifying any fallacious reasoning or
exaggerated or distorted evidence.

W
I
D
A

English Language Development Standard 1

English language learners communicate for Social


and Instructional purposes within the school setting

Social and Instructional language

English Language Development Standard 2

English language learners communicate


information, ideas and concepts necessary for
academic success in the content area of Language
Arts

The language of Language Arts

Standard 1 recognizes the importance of social language in student interaction with peers and teachers in school and the language students encounter across
instructional settings.
Standard 2 addresses the language of the content-driven classroom and of textbooks, which typically is characterized by a more formal register and a specific
way of communicating (e.g., academic vocabulary, specific syntactic structures, and characteristic organizational patterns and conventions).

WEEK 4
Writing Workshop

W.9-10.1 Write arguments to support claims in


an analysis of substantive topics or texts,
using valid reasoning and relevant and
sufficient evidence.
a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the
claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims
and create an organization that
establishes clear relationships among
claim(s), counterclaims, reasons and
evidence.
b. Develop claim(s) and counter claims fairly,
supplying evidence for each while pointing

Written Expression Evidence Statements


Development of Ideas:
The student response addresses the prompt and
provides effective and comprehensive development
of the claim, topic and/or narrative elements4 by
using clear and convincing reasoning, details, textbased evidence, and/or description; the
development is consistently appropriate to the task,
purpose, and audience.

Overview:
The writing workshop is designed to give students
adequate practice with the writing process. Students
should collect their writings from weeks two and three in
preparation for responding to the performance task.
Task:
Read The Sumatran Rainforest Will Mostly Disappear
Within 20 Years by John Vidal and Amazons Doomed
Species Set to Pay Deforestations Extinction Debt by
Ian Sample, two articles about deforestation, then write
an essay that argues which of these two texts more
effectively describes the consequences of
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out the strengths and limitations of both in
a manner that anticipates the audiences
knowledge level and concerns.
c. Use words, phrases and clauses to link
the major sections of the text, create
cohesion and clarify the relationships
between claim(s) and reasons, between
reasons and evidence, and between
claim(s) and counterclaims.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style and
objective tone while attending to the
norms and conventions of the discipline in
which they are writing.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section
that follows from and supports the
argument presented.
W.9-10. 2 Write informative/explanatory texts
to examine and convey complex ideas,
concepts and information clearly and
accurately through the effective selection,
organization and analysis of content.
a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas,
concepts and information to make
important connections and distinctions;
include formatting (e.g., headings),
graphics (e.g., figures, tables) and
multimedia when useful to aiding
comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with well-chosen,
relevant and sufficient facts, extended
definitions, concrete details, quotations, or

Evidence Statements
Organization:
The student response demonstrates purposeful
coherence, clarity, and cohesion5 and includes a
strong introduction, conclusion, and a logical, wellexecuted progression of ideas, making it easy to
follow the writers progression of ideas.
The student response establishes and maintains an
effective style, while attending to the norms and
conventions of the discipline. The response uses
precise language consistently, including descriptive
words and phrases, sensory details, linking and
transitional words, words to indicate tone6, and/or
domain-specific vocabulary.
Knowledge of Language and Conventions:
The student response demonstrates command of
the conventions of standard English consistent with
effectively edited writing. Though there may be a
few minor errors in grammar and usage

Content
deforestation, based on the reasoning and evidence in
the texts. Include an explanation of the specific claims
of both texts and cite strong and thorough evidence
from both texts to support your argument. Follow the
conventions of standard written English. [R.I.2] [R.I.6]
Day 1: Preparing to write: spend time annotating the
prompt and rubric. Have student create a checklist for
what should be included in their essays. Review each
piece and engage students with the what, how, and why
questions.
Day 2: Thesis Workshop: The teacher should provide
some sample introductory paragraphs to correspond to
rubric scores of 2, 3, and 4 and discuss with students
the strengths and challenges of each one. Then, using
their notes from the Accountable Talk discussion in
week 2, students formulate their argument and craft an
introductory paragraph. Engage students (and ask
students to provide feedback to one another) to ensure
that students are able to support their claims (verbally
and in writing) with evidence from both texts.
Whole group review of student writing might also be
included to allow for student modeling.
Day 3: Outlining and Synthesizing: students pull their
work together so that they can extract and analyze
appropriate evidence in support of their claims. The
teacher should model the thought process involved in
this action (using think aloud) so that students are able
to distinguish between relevant and irrelevant
information. It is also necessary to model (and teach)
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other information and examples
appropriate to the audiences knowledge
of the topic.
c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to
link the major sections of the text, create
cohesion and clarify the relationships
among complex ideas and concepts.
d. Use precise language and domainspecific vocabulary to manage the
complexity of the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style and
objective tone while attending to the
norms and conventions of the discipline in
which they are writing.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section
that follows from and supports the
information or explanation presented
(e.g., articulating implications or the
significance of the topic.

Evidence Statements

Content
paraphrasing, quoting and citing, how to integrate
quotes effectively, and how to analyze quotes in a way
that supports a thesis. Following this, students should
begin to organize their thoughts into a cohesive outline.
*Note: it is important to communicate to students that
there is no set required number of paragraphs for this
type of essay. Teachers may wish to offer students an
essay structure formula that they can recreate in testing
situations. For example: introductory paragraph and
thesis, summary of claim in Text 1 (what, how, and why
-abbreviated analytic summary), summary of claim in
Text 2 (what, how, and why-abbreviated analytic
summary), discussion of why Text 1 or Text 2 is more
effective at describing the consequences (with
reference to both texts), conclusion.
Day 4 and Day 5: Writing the essay. Allow students
adequate time to write the full essay. If time permits,
engage students in peer review and discussion.
Writing Organizer
SRSD along with POW+TIDE
http://kc.vanderbilt.edu/projectwrite/resourcessrsd.html

WEEKS 5-7
Topic: Environmental Issues
Module 3: Human Impact on the Environment
Texts:
1. If I forget Thee, Oh Earth... pg. 162- Lexile Level: 1220
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Evidence Statements

Content

2. Silent Spring, pg. 167 Lexile Level: 1080


A short video to engage students: http://www.teachertube.com/video/human-effects-on-environmental-quality-26276
3. One pesticide doesnt harm bees, but two do; Study by Damian Carrington, The Guardian, adapted by Newsela staff; 05.06.16 Lexile Level: 1140
https://newsela.com/articles/bee-insecticide/id/17126/
4. Hotter temperatures are setting more of the world on fire, scientists say; Associated Press, adapted by Newsela staff, 05.17.16 Lexile Level: 1160
https://newsela.com/articles/albertawildfire-climatechange/id/17643/
5. Study warns Great Lakes in worse shape than thought from chemicals; by Detroit Free Press, adapted by Newsela Staff, 10.02.13 Lexile Level: 1250
https://newsela.com/articles/greatlakes-chemicals/id/1275/
6. Melting Arctic ice tempts cruise ships; officials brace for Titanic sequel ; by Suzanne Goldenberg, The Guardian, adapted by Newsela Staff; 04.11.16 Lexile Level - 1170
https://newsela.com/articles/arctic-cruise/id/16234/
7. Opinion: Our actions today can help save the planet tomorrow; by Kevin Quinn, adapted by Newsela staff; 04.05.16; Lexile Level 950
https://newsela.com/articles/kquinn-climateoped/id/16239/
8. Want to eat? Then save pollinators from extinction, U.N. report says; by Associated Press, adapted by Newsela staff; 03.14.16; Lexile Level 1140
https://newsela.com/articles/pollinator-decline/id/15380/
Performance Task: After reading the texts for this unit, write an essay in which you analyze the development of the theme/central ideas from literary fiction and nonfiction pieces.
Analyze the authors perspective on the topic and discuss specific details that contribute to the development of the theme/central idea. Be sure to cite evidence from the texts used to
support your argument. Follow the conventions of standard written English. (RL.9.2; RI 9.2)
Building
Knowledge
through Contentrich Nonfiction

RL 9.1 Cite strong and thorough textual


evidence to support analysis of what the text
says explicitly as well as inferences drawn
from the text.

and

RL 9.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a


text and analyze in detail its development over
the course of the text, including how it
emerges and is shaped and refined by specific
details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

Reading Complex
Texts

Provides strong and thorough textual evidence to


support analysis of what the text says explicitly
and/or inferences drawn from the text. RI.1
Provides a statement of a theme or central idea of a
text. RI.2
Provides an analysis of how a theme or central idea
emerges and is shaped and refined by specific
details over the course of the text. RI.2

Prentice Hall Literature Reading Selections


Week 5
Text:
If I forget Thee, Oh Earth, pg 162
Overview:
Students will review the following elements relating to
story structure and character development:

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RI.10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual
evidence to support analysis of what the text
says explicitly as well as inferences drawn
from the text, including determining where the
text leaves matters uncertain.
RI.10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of
a text and analyze in detail its development
over the course of the text, including how it
emerges and is shaped and refined by specific
details; provide an objective summary of the
text
RI.910.4. Determine the meaning of words
and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative, connotative, and technical
meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of
specific word choices on meaning and tone
(e.g., how the language of a court opinion
differs from that of a newspaper).
RI.910.6. Determine an authors point of view
or purpose in a text and analyze how an
author uses rhetoric to advance that point of
view or purpose.

Evidence Statements

Content

Provides an objective summary of a text. RI.2

Theme / Central Idea


What are the themes/central ideas of the text?

Provides statements of word choices impacting the


meaning and tone of the text. RI 4
Provides an analysis of a particular point of view or
cultural experience reflected in a work of literature
from outside the United States. RL.6

How do the themes/central ideas interact or build


on each other?

Setting
What details describe the physical setting?

What problems are caused by the setting?

How do key elements interact and change over the


course of the text?
How the conflict is established, intensified, and
resolved?

Comparing Points of View


See Comparing Literary Works on pg 80.
Narrative point of view
First person point of view
Third person point of view
Omniscient point of view.
Teacher Actions: (I do, we do)
Review the definitions of POV on page 80. Model
the skill with think aloud.
Review literary elements and Cultural Perspective
with students
Student Actions (we do, they do)
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Evidence Statements

Content
Consider the following text dependent questions:
1. In the first paragraph of the story, what information
about Marvins environment appears in this
description of the Farmlands? (Key Ideas and
Details)
2. What do the words burning beneath the fierce
sun suggest about what Marvin is observing?
(Key ideas and Details)
3. On page 165, what does Marvin notice in a portion
of the disk? (Key ideas and Details)
4. What evidence from the text indicates that the story
is set on the moon? (Craft and Structure)
5. What do the words, burning beneath the fierce
sun?, suggest about what Marvin is observing?
(Theme)
6. Which details in the story provide an insight into
what Marvin and others in his colony have lost?
(Theme)
Week 6
...from Silent Spring, pg 167
(descriptive non-fiction)
Comparing Themes and Central Ideas
The selections for this module share a similar basic
topic: the effects of human behavior on the
environment; however, If I Forget Thee, Oh Earth... is
a short story, and Silent Spring is nonfiction. Because
they represent two different genres, the two works
develop meaning in different ways. As you read,
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Content
complete a Venn diagram like the one shown to analyze
how theme and central ideas develop.
Comparing Literary Works, pg 160
Introduction:
Prepare students for reading by modeling the skill with
a Think aloud. You will model a way of understanding
theme. See pg 160, TE.
Teacher Actions: (I do, we do)
Engage students in a discussion about the central
idea
Using the background notes on pesticides on page
167, discuss the dangers that pesticides have on
the environment. Explain this is nonfiction, but told
as a fable.
Have students list the changes in the environment
described in the fable.
Central Idea What is the lesson Rachel Carson is
trying to teach the readers of Silent Spring?
Student Actions (they do, you do)
Students will engage in multi-draft readings
identifying key ideas and details and answering any

Reading Checks designated in the text.

analyzing craft and structure and responding to the


side-column prompts.
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Content

integrating knowledge and ideas, connecting to


other texts and the world, and answering the endof-selection questions.

Consider the following text dependent questions:


1. What is the condition of life at the beginning of this
excerpt? (Key Idea)
2. How does the condition of life change as the
narrative continues? (Key Idea)
3. What happens to the farm animals and the
vegetation? (Key Detail)
4. What causes this sudden change? (Key Detail)
5. What information about the town does Carson
reveal at the end of the excerpt? (Text Structure)
6. Do you think the narrative would be more effective
if the town was real? Why or why not? (Text
Structure)
7. According to Carson, who caused the
environmental problems? (Inference / opinions)
8. Is the Central Idea stated directly or is it implied?
(Inference / opinions)

Week 7
During week 7, students will read articles from
Newsela.com for deeper understanding of the theme
and central idea from texts If I forget Thee, Oh Earth
and Silent Spring.
The text from week 5 helps us to understand, If the
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Content
Earth is destroyed by radiation, it will be uninhabitable.
This is the authors perspective on theme, from the text
- If I forget Thee, Oh Earth
The text from week 6 helps the reader understand how
the actions of humans impact the environment. This is
the central idea from the text Silent Spring.
Teacher Actions (I do, We do)
Teacher models a think aloud for one of the news
articles for week 7. The teacher picks out passages
that lead to the readers understanding of central idea.
Teacher modes how details are developed over the
course of the text. Teacher models summary strategies
and activities for the Newsela article.
After the teacher models the first example of text
summarization the teacher moves to the We do step
and works with the students as they begin writing
objective summaries of the text.
Suggestion:
Teacher could let students select a text of choice, then
group students by their text selection, similar to how
Literature Circles are set-up in the classroom. Students
are grouped by text interest instead of ability or mastery
grouping.
Newsela.com provides a variety of tools for teacher
use. When using the study on bees, consider a quick
assessment using evidence and inferencing:
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Content
There is strong evidence that neonicotinoids harm
individual bees but little evidence so far that colonies
suffer as a result. The European Union banned the use
neonicotinoids on flowering crops in 2013.
Which inference can BEST be drawn from this excerpt?
A. Neonicotinoids have little effect on individual bees.
B. Neonicotinoids are harmful to flowering crops.
C. Harm to individual bees does not necessarily mean
harm to bee colonies.
D. Harm to individual bees has no effect on the
productivity of crops.
In addition, the teacher can use the Write feature that
allows students to answer open-ended questions. For
example:
Write a short paragraph that explains the central idea of
the article. Use at least two details from the article to
support your response.

Regular Practice
with Complex Text
and Its Academic
Language

CCR Language Vocabulary


L.10.4 Determine the meaning of words and
phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze
the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with
multiple meanings or language that is
particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful.
(Include Shakespeare as well as other
authors.)

Tier 3 Vocabulary
Review the word list below. Some students may
need to additional work with foundational skills and
understanding of:
Plot
Symbol
Characterization
Protagonist
Antagonist
Summary

Tier 2 Vocabulary
Week 5
Purged
Ozone
Cairn
Precipitous Headland
Phosphorescence
Armageddon
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CCR Language
L.10.1.A: Apply the understanding that usage
is a matter of convention, can change over
time, and is sometimes contested.
L.10.2: Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
L.10.3: Apply knowledge of language to
understand how language functions in different
contexts, to make effective choices for
meaning or style, and to comprehend more
fully when reading or listening.

Writing to Texts

Evidence Statements
Perspective
Theme
Central Idea
Authors Purpose
Point of View
Rhetoric
Inference
Summary

Content
Perennial
Week 6
Pesticides
Blight
Maladies
Moribund
Anglers

Demonstrates the ability to determine the meaning


of words and phrases as they are used in a text
(e.g., figurative, connotative) and/or provides an
analysis of the impact of specific word choice on
meaning and/or tone. L.4
Provides a statement demonstrating accurate
meaning and use of grade-appropriate general
academic words and phrases. L.6

Writing

Writing

Writing Fundamentals
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence

W.9-10. 2 Write informative/explanatory texts


to examine and convey complex ideas,
concepts and information clearly and
accurately through the effective selection,
organization and analysis of content.
a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas,
concepts and information to make
important connections and distinctions;
include formatting (e.g., headings),
graphics (e.g., figures, tables) and

Written Expression Evidence Statements

Development of Ideas:
The student response addresses the prompt and
provides effective and comprehensive development
of the claim, topic and/or narrative elements by
using clear and convincing reasoning, details, textbased evidence, and/or description; the
development is consistently appropriate to the task,

Select and integrate quotations, details, and


examples
Use appropriate organizational pattern

Write strong thesis statements

Plan, draft, revise, edit, and rewrite

Use appropriate style and tone for purpose

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b.

c.

d.

e.

f.

multimedia when useful to aiding


comprehension.
Develop the topic with well-chosen,
relevant and sufficient facts, extended
definitions, concrete details, quotations, or
other information and examples
appropriate to the audiences knowledge
of the topic.
Use appropriate and varied transitions to
link the major sections of the text, create
cohesion and clarify the relationships
among complex ideas and concepts.
Use precise language and domainspecific vocabulary to manage the
complexity of the topic.
Establish and maintain a formal style and
objective tone while attending to the
norms and conventions of the discipline in
which they are writing.
f. Provide a concluding statement or
section that follows from and supports the
information or explanation presented
(e.g., articulating implications or the
significance of the topic.

Evidence Statements
purpose, and audience.
Organization:
The student response demonstrates purposeful
coherence, clarity, and cohesion5 and includes a
strong introduction, conclusion, and a logical, wellexecuted progression of ideas, making it easy to
follow the writers progression of ideas.
The student response establishes and maintains an
effective style, while attending to the norms and
conventions of the discipline. The response uses
precise language consistently, including descriptive
words and phrases, sensory details, linking and
transitional words, words to indicate tone6, and/or
domain-specific vocabulary.
Knowledge of Language and Conventions:
The student response demonstrates command of
the conventions of standard English consistent with
effectively edited writing. Though there may be a
few minor errors in grammar and usage.

Content
Week 5
Routine Writing: write an objective summary [R.L.2;]
Week 6
Routine Writing: write an objective summary.
[R.I.2]
Routine Writing: write a response that outlines the
ways a person can help a loved one make an
important change in their lives. [W.10]
Argument writing: select one of the statements
from the anticipation guide. Then write an essay in
which you argue for or against the claim, citing
evidence from the text to support your argument.
[W.1.]
Narrative Writing: choose two characters, then
retell the story from each persons perspective. Be
sure to include specific details to help distinguish
one perspective from another. [W.3.b] [R.L.6]
Week 7
Routine Writing: Write an objective summary.
[R.L.2; RI. 2]
Analysis Writing: Select two texts and compare
how each authors choices concerning how to
structure the text supports the development of
character. Cite evidence to support your claim.
[R.L.1; RI.1][R.L.5 ; RI.5]
Argument writing: select one of the statements
from the anticipation guide. Then write an essay in
which you argue for or against the claim, citing
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Evidence Statements

Content

Reading, Writing
and Speaking
Grounded in
Evidence from
Text, Both Literary
and Informational

evidence from the text to support your argument.


[W.1]
Narrative Writing: Select one character from one
of the selections weve read. Identify that
characters main character trait (or flaw) and use
that as a model for a protagonist for your own short
story. Write a description of your character and the
primary conflict associated with that character.
[W.3.b] [R.L.3]

Speaking and Listening

Speaking and Listening

Speaking and Listening

SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in


a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse
partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and
issues, building on others ideas and
expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Students will be able to effectively participate in


collaborative discussions (we do, they do) Students
will be able to refer to textual evidence as ideas are
exchanged. Students will be able to question posed
ideas and themes when agreeing and/or
disagreeing with text summaries. SL. 1

Before a teacher begins a Speaking and Listening


component, the teacher should adhere to classroom
routines and responsibilities. Students need to know
their roles and responsibilities; likewise for groups (what
is the expectation for Group roles and responsibilities.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having


read and researched material under
study; explicitly draw on that preparation
by referring to evidence from texts and
other research on the topic or issue to
stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned
exchange of ideas.
b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial
discussions and decision-making (e.g.,
informal consensus, taking votes on key
issues, and presentation of alternative
views), clear goals and deadlines, and

Students will be able to evaluate a speakers


evidence and reasoning. SL.1
Students will build speaking and listening skills
through Accountable Talk toward peer-led Socratic
Seminars. SL.3

For example:
Discuss why people have difficulty changing old
habits.
Discuss new habits of mind classroom
expectations for the GRRM Instructional Design
Discussion of Anticipation Guide Statements

Accountable Talk (the teacher may want to use


Accountable Talk stems to help direct students to
the routine of forming and asking appropriate
questions or giving appropriate answers.

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Evidence Statements

individual roles as needed.


c. Propel conversations by posing and
responding to questions that relate the
current discussion to broader themes or
larger ideas; actively incorporate others
into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or
challenge ideas and conclusions.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse
perspectives, summarize points of
agreement and disagreement, and, when
warranted, qualify or justify their own
views and understanding and make new
connections in light of the evidence and
reasoning presented.

Content
Discussions Questions
1. What are some of the most serious environmental
problems we face today?
2. Where will we get our energy when we run out of
oil?
3. What will happen if we keep polluting the
environment?
4. Nuclear energy is relatively new. Do the positive
outcomes of nuclear energy outweigh the negative
effects including the nuclear fallout, nuclear
meltdown, radioactive waste, and the population's
reliance on nuclear power?
5. While there are many threats to the environment
that have a significant impact, what is the major
environmental threat facing the world today? Cite
evidence from text readings during this module.

SL.9-10.2. Integrate multiple sources of


information presented in diverse media or
formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally)
evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each
source.
SL.9-10.3. Evaluate a speakers point of view,
reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric,
identifying any fallacious reasoning or
exaggerated or distorted evidence.

WEEK 8
Writing Workshop

CCR Writing
W.9-10.1 Write arguments to support claims in

CCR Writing
Written Expression Evidence Statements

Writing Fundamentals
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence
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an analysis of substantive topics or texts,
using valid reasoning and relevant and
sufficient evidence.
a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the
claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims
and create an organization that
establishes clear relationships among
claim(s), counterclaims, reasons and
evidence.
b. Develop claim(s) and counter claims fairly,
supplying evidence for each while pointing
out the strengths and limitations of both in
a manner that anticipates the audiences
knowledge level and concerns.
c. Use words, phrases and clauses to link
the major sections of the text, create
cohesion and clarify the relationships
between claim(s) and reasons, between
reasons and evidence, and between
claim(s) and counterclaims.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style and
objective tone while attending to the
norms and conventions of the discipline in
which they are writing.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section
that follows from and supports the
argument presented.
W.9-10. 4 Write informative/explanatory texts
to examine and convey complex ideas,
concepts and information clearly and
accurately through the effective selection,

Evidence Statements

Content

Development of Ideas:
The student response addresses the prompt and
provides effective and comprehensive development
of the claim, topic and/or narrative elements4 by
using clear and convincing reasoning, details, textbased evidence, and/or description; the
development is consistently appropriate to the task,
purpose, and audience.
Organization:
The student response demonstrates purposeful
coherence, clarity, and cohesion5 and includes a
strong introduction, conclusion, and a logical, wellexecuted progression of ideas, making it easy to
follow the writers progression of ideas.
The student response establishes and maintains an
effective style, while attending to the norms and
conventions of the discipline. The response uses
precise language consistently, including descriptive
words and phrases, sensory details, linking and
transitional words, and/or domain-specific
vocabulary.

Select and integrate quotations, details, and


examples
Use appropriate organizational pattern

Write strong thesis statements

Plan, draft, revise, edit, and rewrite

Use appropriate style and tone for purpose

Skills Focus:
Metacognition (thinking about how you think), peer
review, teacher/student conferences, and revising
content and structure of essay.
Responding to the Performance Task:
After reading the texts for this unit, write an essay in
which you analyze the development of the
theme/central ideas from literary fiction and nonfiction
selections. Analyze the authors perspective on the
topic and discuss specific details that contribute to the
development of the theme/central idea. Be sure to cite
evidence from the texts used to support your argument.
Follow the conventions of standard written English.
(RL.9.2; RI 9.2)

Knowledge of Language and Conventions:


The student response demonstrates command of
the conventions of standard English consistent with
effectively edited writing. Though there may be a
few minor errors in grammar and usage
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Evidence Statements

Content

organization and analysis of content.


a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas,
concepts and information to make
important connections and distinctions;
include formatting (e.g., headings),
graphics (e.g., figures, tables) and
multimedia when useful to aiding
comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with well-chosen,
relevant and sufficient facts, extended
definitions, concrete details, quotations, or
other information and examples
appropriate to the audiences knowledge
of the topic.
c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to
link the major sections of the text, create
cohesion and clarify the relationships
among complex ideas and concepts.
d. Use precise language and domainspecific vocabulary to manage the
complexity of the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style and
objective tone while attending to the
norms and conventions of the discipline in
which they are writing.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section
that follows from and supports the
information or explanation presented
(e.g., articulating implications or the
significance of the topic.
WEEK 9
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Comprehensive
Assessment

Evidence Statements

Content

Complete a mini Research Project on global changes of climate and environment


W 9.7. -Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or
broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
Focus topics might include:
1. What are the effects of climate change?
2. How will climate change affect us?
3. The impact of green growth on the environment
4. Supporting effective systems to make agriculture better
Requirements:
- Find 3 or 4 sources of varied types (use the school library, online search engines and databases, and the TEL)
- Evaluate the reliability of each source
- Cite each source in a Works Cited page
Related Readings:
Department of the Environment: Climate Change
http://www.environ.ie/environment/climate-change/other/climate-change
Climate Change: The Paris Agreement
http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/urgentissues/global-warming-climate-change/the-paris-agreement-what-does-it-mean.xml?
src=sea.AWG.prpari.crv1&gclid=CIey_-Xku8wCFVA8gQodQKMP2Q
You cant separate the Amazons forest from its freshwater, scientists say, by Washington Post, adapted by Newsela staff; 01.11.16: Lexile Level : 1220
https://newsela.com/articles/amazonbasin-conservation/id/13876/
The North faces a Titanic challenge as melting ice lures more Luxury liners, by Suzanne Goldenberg, The Guardian, adapted by Newsela staff, 04.11.16;
Lexile Level: 1010 ; https://newsela.com/articles/arctic-cruise/id/16233/
In danger of disappearing: weakened plants in the wild, by Damian Carrington, The Guardian, adapted by Newsela staff; 05.20.16; Lexile Level: 1080
https://newsela.com/articles/plants-extinct/id/17594/

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