Day

3

Thursday
May 27, 2010
Publishers Weekly’s Show Daily is produced each day during the 2010 BookExpo in New York.
The Show Daily press office is in room 1C02. PW’s booth is #4841.

A L L

T H E

B U Z Z

O N

B O O K E X P O

A M E R I C A

Change Is Good for BEA

New Auel in
Multi Formats

Industry largely pleased with shorter,
midweek show

“Today I walked by Pele and
Scott Turow. Where else could
you do that?” said Allison
Hill, president/COO of Vroman’s Bookstore in Pasadena, Calif. Despite some
changes in the scheduling
and duration of this year’s
BookExpo, Hill’s comments
summarized that industry
members still love BEA for
what it’s traditionally been
about—bringing booksellers face-to-face with editors,
celebrities, and big-ticket
authors.
Overall, people thought
traffic on Wednesday was
strong. And booksellers,
despite some grumbling,
embraced the shift to midweek. Workman’s group
publisher, Bob Miller, called
the mood “rocking,” noting,
“It feels busier and more
energetic than it has in the
past five to six years.” Will
Weisser, v-p, associate publisher, marketing director
of Portfolio/Sentinel, said,
“People seem happier about
the midweek. It’s certainly
more convenient for New
York publishers.” And both
Miller and Weisser noted
that attendees seemed less
focused on the economy
this year.
Roger Cooper, publisher
of Vanguard Press, was happy
with the greater focus this
year on digital: “People are
talking about e-books and
different platforms, more
than just what’s the hot new
book.” Cooper elaborated
that it’s been exciting to see
people on the show floor,
tech entrepreneurs and
others in the digital space,
interested in the content
the industry creates and the

variety of ways it can, and will,
be used.
Penguin’s Susan Petersen
Kennedy said she was happy
with the turnout and that
there was a good mix of
booksellers and media at
this year’s show. Harlequin’s
Amy Jones added that she
thinks the move to midweek
has allowed more librarians
to come to the show: “the
mood is much more positive
even than last year.”
Of course, booksellers
weren’t without complaint.
Some were frustrated by the
lack of the galleys. Others
complained about having to
leave their stores on nights
dedicated to in-store events—

© Steve Kagan.com

By Rachel Deahl & Lynn Andriani

The shorter show made for long lines at the opening bell but they moved swiftly hallward.

as one marketing manager
noted, Monday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday nights are popular nights for in-store author
events. And still others, said
one sales rep, were disappointed with the switch to
midweek, since they could no
longer make a long weekend
out of their BEA trip.
Regardless of the inevitable complaints, the heart of
BEA, which allows booksellers to come together, is as

important as ever. As Miller
noted, with more and more
pressure on smaller retailers as the e-book business
grows, BEA allows booksellers to share ideas and
commiserate. “The more
bookselling is under siege,”
he said, “the more booksellers want to connect and
prosper.”
With additional reporting
by Judith Rosen and Claire
Kirch

MOTIV8N’ U
by Staci Boyer
Weight loss shouldn’t be your only
fitness goal. Motiv8n U helps you
strengthen 8 major components of life
essential for true health and fitness.

Signing in the Autograph
Area today at 10AM
Table 8
The Road Through Wonderland
Surviving John Holmes
by Dawn Schiller
A young girl, caught up in a lifestyle of drugs
and insanity, who overcame her past and
ultimately became a powerful example of the
courage and resiliency of the human spirit.

Signing in the Autograph
Area today at 3PM
Table 12
m e d a l l i o n p r e s s . c o m
Medallion Press is located within IPG booth #2723

BEA has its big book: today
Crown and the Jean Naggar
Literary Agency announced
that the sixth and final book
of the record-breaking, bestselling Earth’s
Children series
will be published
March 29, 2011.
Titled The Land
of the Painted
Caves, it will be
published in both
hardcover and e-book editions, and in a rare move, it
will be published simultaneously in all territories, in a
one-day laydown, orchestrated by Jennifer Weltz and
the Naggar Agency, with deals
so far in the U.K., Croatia,
Finland, France, Germany,
Holland, Japan, Norway,
Serbia, Spain, and Sweden.
The new book also marks a
significant first for the author:
The Land of the Painted
Caves will also be published
in an e-book edition, and for
the first time, Auel’s entire
series will be published in ebook format. Bantam will
bring out e-book editions of
the previous books in advance
of the new installment.
Auel’s groundbreaking
Earth’s Children series has
sold more than 45 million copies worldwide, and more than
22 million copies in the U.S.
alone. The series began with
the classic Clan of Cave Bear
(1980). In 1985, the third in the
series, The Mammoth Hunters, was the first hardcover
novel to have a one millioncopy printing. The last installment, The Shelters of Stones
(2002), debuted at #1 on 16
international bestseller lists.
Maya Mavjee, Crown president/publisher, said Auel’s
fans “will be thrilled with this
stirring and satisfying finale.”
—Andrew Albanese

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

TRADITIONAL
SIGNINGS

T d iin the
Today
h Autographing
A
hi Area
A
meet two women who overcame
violence and tragedy to become an
inspiration to others
THROUGH HER PERSONAL LIFE STORIES OF
STRUGGLES AND SUCCESSES STACI WILL SHOW
YOU HOW TO RESTRUCTURE YOUR BELIEFS AND
BEHAVIORS AND POINT YOU TOWARD A BETTER LIFE

Staci Boyer

MOTIV8N’ U
TABLE 8
10:00A.M.

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

HIGHLIGHTS
OF THE DAY

MEETINGS AND EVENTS
8-9:30 a.m. Adult Book & Author Breakfast. Master of Ceremonies,
Jon Stewart; Speakers, Condoleezza Rice, John Grisham, and Mary
Roach (Special Events Hall)
8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. “Big Ideas at BEA.” Sessions include Big Name Authors with|
Graphic Novels: How Will this Change the Market (1E14); Tomorrow’s
Library in a World of Digits (1E15); and Maximize Your Sales Potential:
Amazon for Small and Mid-Size Publishers (1E03)
8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Global Market Forum: Spanish Publishing Text
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit Hall, Author Stages
9 a.m.-5 p.m. International Rights & Business Center
Noon-2 p.m. Adult Book & Author Luncheon. Master of Ceremonies: Patton
Oswalt. Speakers: Christopher Hitchens, Sara Gruen, and William Gibson
(Special Events Hall)

AUTOGRAPHS
Diane Chamberlain, Charles Elton, Mo Williams, Dr. Wayne Andersen, Patti
LuPone, Tia Stewart, Jane Velez-Mitchell, James Gurney, Linda Lael Miller,
Deborah Coonts, Michael Connelly, M.J. Rose, Carla Neggers

LURED INTO A DARK AND ABUSIVE RELATIONSHIP
WITH THE KING OF PORN, A YOUNG GIRL ESCAPES
WITH HER LIFE . . . AND HER INSPIRING TRUE STORY.

Dawn Schiller
THE ROAD THROUGH WONDERLAND
SURVIVING JOHN HOLMES
TABLE 12

3:00P.M.
© Steve Kagan.com

2

GOAL! Hyperion hit the back of the net with an appearance
by soccer legend Pelé, who attracted a long line of fans for
his signing of For the Love of Soccer, written by Pelé and
illustrated by Frank Morrison. The book, for kids 9–12, tells
the story of Pelé’s life and weaves in a tale of a youngster
trying to follow in his fleet footsteps—no easy task!

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Daisy Maryles
MANAGING EDITORS Michael Coffey, Sonia Jaffe Robbins
ART DIRECTOR Clive Chiu
PICTURE PRODUCTION EDITOR Igor Tsiperson
PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Kagan

Medallion Press is located
within IPG booth # 2723

STAFF REPORTERS Andrew Albanese, Lynn Andriani, Rachel Deahl, Louisa Ermelino, Lynn
Garrett, Sarah F. Gold, Jim Milliot, Calvin Reid, Diane Roback, Mark Rotella, Jonathan
Segura, Parul Sehgal, John A. Sellers
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Gwenda Bond, Sue Corbett, Lucinda Dyer, Donna Freitas, Karen
Jones, Hilary S. Kayle, Bridget Kinsella, Claire Kirch, Sally Lodge, G. Jeffrey MacDonald,
Suzanne Mantell, Shannon Maughan, Marcia Z. Nelson, Diane Patrick, Karin Pekarchik,

m e d a l l i o n p r e s s . c o m

Karole Riippa, Judith Rosen, Liz Thomson, JoSelle Vanderhooft, Wendy Werris, Leigh-Anne
Williams, Kimberly Winston, Douglas Wolk
PRODUCTION MANAGER Paula Gordon, Kady Francesconi
TECHNOLOGY MANAGER Milan Patel

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Also Happening in

Booth 3751

10:30 am:

3:00 pm:
Enter a raffle to win
real ghost hunting
equipment, and learn
about Ghost Hunt, a
new middle grade book
by TV’s world famous
Ghost Hunters.

4:00 pm:
Are you a Gleek? Declare
it with a Glee-shirt and
find out more about the
new YA series, based on
the hit TV show!

Limited edition ARC
giveaways of Beautiful
Darkness, the sequel to
Beautiful Creatures. Say
“Some loves are cursed”
to claim your copy!

Thursday, May 27
All items available while supplies last!

Looking for resources for your store? Visit www.LBYR-Booksellers.com!

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

Big Books of the Show
Justin Cronin’s The Passage is the
book on everyone’s list. Ballantine
has been heralding it for months
and it’s being cradled by badge
holders all over the show.
“It’s a hot book, everyone’s talking
about it,” says Joshua
Jason, Mystery Pier
Books, West Hollywood, Calif. Juan
Vallejo of New York
City’s Biography Bookshop agrees. “Everyone at the bookstore
who’s reading it is loving it.” Arlene Kovach
from Borders at Garden State Plaza, N.J.,
thought the line was too long to wait
for a galley, but can’t wait to read it:
“I’ve heard it’s like Stephen King’s
The Stand, which was one of my alltime favorite books.”
Bill Cusumano, adult book buyer,
Nicola’s Books, Ann Arbor, Mich., is
touting Ape House by Sara Gruen
(Spiegel & Grau). “By page 20, you’re
totally drawn in. It’s better than
Water for Elephants.” Dan Radovich,
from the Deerfield, Ill., Barnes &
Noble, is looking forward to reading
it, hoping the apes will be as great as
the elephants. And speaking of primates, they are the stars of Twelve’s
The Evolution of Bruno Littlemore by
debut author Benjamin Hale, and the
word is “awesome.”
Radovich is also wild about Room
by Emma Donoghue (Little, Brown):
“One of the best reads of 2010.” As is
Ana McDaniel, manager of the
Bookseller in Brattleboro, Vt.: “It’s
got a sensational topic, but more
than that, the writing’s solid.”
Speaking of Room, Roberta Rubin
from the Book Stall, in Winnetka, Ill.,
and Barbara Theroux, from Fact and
Fiction, Missoula, Mont., both include
it in their top two picks; the other:
Bruno Littlemore again.
Steve Berry’s The Emperor’s
Tomb (Ballantine) has Michael Bursaw of Mystery Mike’s Bookstore, in
Carmel, Ind., excited. “I’m crazy for
Berry’s books, but we have to thank
Dan Brown for reviving the genre of
religious mystery. In fact, Steve
Berry has thanked Dan Brown for
making it all possible.”
Stephanie Singer of the Jewish
Community Center in San Francisco, Calif., is looking forward to
Scorpions, Harvard professor Noah
Feldman‘s biography of FDR and
four of his Supreme Court Justices.
Jonathan Karp of Twelve, Feldman’s publisher, says that these justices “would have a hard time being
confirmed today.”
Geri Diorio from the Ridgefield
Library in Ridgefield, Conn., is
thrilled about the new Brad Meltzer from Grand Central—The Inner
Circle, set in Washington, D.C.
Meltzer himself was talking about
his book from HarperStudio, Heroes

for My Son, a collection he’s been putting together since his son was born
eight years ago. “No publicity,” Meltzer says, “but the book is showing up
as #2 on the New York Times list.”
As BP makes another effort to
cap the oil spill in the
Gulf, the environment
is more front and center than ever, and
Rowman & Littlefield
has a timely book. In
fact, the publisher has
moved up the pub
date for Clean Energy
Common Sense,
thanks to the oil spill.
The introduction is by
Robert Redford. And Jon Stewart’s
Earth: A Visitor’s Guide to the
Human Race is a popular take on a
serious issue (Grand Central).
On the mystery front, David
Thompson of Murder by the Book,
in Houston, Tex., says Dead Zero by
Stephen Hunter (S&S) is excellent.

Small Press on the Radar:
Coffee House’s Extraordinary Renditions by Andrew Ervin has been
nominated for a Moby Award, which
has had booksellers asking for it all
day long. And at Graywolf, Per Petterson’s I Curse the River of Time, is
flying out of the booth. In the Dark
Streets Shineth: A 1941 Christmas
Story by David McCullough, from
Shadow Mountain Books, a Mormon
Press, has Sue Zumberge from Common Good Books in St. Paul, Minn.,
planning to do something new: “I
never sell Christmas books, but this
one is going to do well. Lovely book,
well-known author.”
Again with the mystery, Thompson
of Murder by the Book declares Innocent Monster by Reed Farrell Coleman (Tyrus Books, Madison, Wis.)
“absolutely fantastic, 50 pages in.”
Several indies expressed high
hopes for A Novel Bookstore (Europa)
by Laurence Cossé.

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

The Way She Was

Barbra Streisand insisted during Tuesday evening’s keynote that she was too
private and too busy to write her memoirs, so she decided to write a book about design instead. But My Passion for
Design (Viking, Nov. 16 ), reveals the woman behind the superstar as truly as
any autobiography she might have written.
As Gayle King, editor-at-large for O magazine, interviewed “the newest and
surely the hardest-working author” before an audience of 2,000, Streisand
recalled how a failed movie project, A Normal Heart, inspired her to “redirect
[her] passion into another form” and build her dream home—a complex of
buildings built in a rustic, quasi-European style—on California coast property.
Streisand made it clear that writing a book about her houses, her furniture, and her gardens became a vehicle for her to disclose how a childhood
of deprivation in Brooklyn—having a doll made out of a hot-water bottle,
growing up in a tiny apartment that lacked a couch—forced her to use her
imagination and develop her strong sense of style.
“I don’t regret anything. It makes you who you are. It made me responsible for my success,” she said to applause, while describing how she worked
closely with architects and contractors on her homes, which are furnished
with a lot of couches, as “couches to me are very special.”
While the interview was for the most part a lighthearted conversation
between two celebrity friends about one’s property and her attitudes toward
color and objects, there were several poignant moments, such as when Streisand talked about her late father’s love of books—Shakespeare, Ibsen, Russian
novels, and Greek tragedies—and how he passed his love of literature on to his
daughter, whose homes include collections of leather-bound literature carefully chosen to coordinate with the rest of that room’s interior.
As King and Streisand walked toward the stage left exit after the interview concluded, several in the crowd shouted, “We love you, Barbra!” Streisand paused briefly, seeming touched at being welcomed with such warmth
into the book world, before disappearing from sight behind the curtains.
—Claire Kirch

Cornelia Funke at her signing for
Reckless, first in a new series
from Little, Brown. With her are
Melanie Chang and Jennifer Hunt,
both of Little, Brown.

And Finally…
Travels in Siberia (FSG) by indie
favorite Ian Frazier, Man in the
Woods by Scott Spencer (Ecco), and
An Object of Beauty (Grand Central),
actor/comedian Steve Martin’s foray
into New York City’s art world, gained
significant mention on the floor.
Okay, let’s not forget the ubiquitous and megaselling James Patterson. Did we mention prolific? His
new galley from Little, Brown reads
in two directions, all the better to feature two books: Private (with Maxine
Paetro) and Cross Fire, an Alex Cross
thriller in which Alex gets married.
Coming upon the man himself and
inquiring which of his books at the
show was the biggest, he answered,
“They’re all big.”
And every author and publisher
on the floor might say the same.
—Louisa Ermelino

The Duchess of York tore herself away from a U.K.
scandal to help promote her children’s book and also
moderate Wednesday’s Book and Author Breakfast.

All photos © Steve Kagan.com

4

Carl Hiaasen signing copies of his
new book for Knopf, Star Island,
which publishes in July.
Bill Shinker (left), publisher at Gotham Books, chats with David
Gernert, who is John Grisham’s agent. They were at the Penguin
booth because Grisham’s first book for kids came out this week,
from Dutton.

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

PUBL I SHERS

Two Days Not Enough for
Some Foreign Visitors
While publishers visiting from abroad
are delighted by the level of traffic at
BEA, there is a growing chorus of disapproval that the show was cut from
three days to two without consultation with overseas publishers and
without offer of a refund. The discontent is fueled by what’s perceived to
be a lack of clarity on the Web site
(which refers to a three-day event)
and elsewhere as to what precisely is
happening when. Some publishers
arrived for meetings Tuesday only to
find that they were unable to get on
the floor without an exhibitor pass.
Sara Ballard, deputy managing
director and rights director of Amber
Books in the U.K., has been coming to
BEA for 15 years. She and her colleagues would normally have backto-back appointments for two-and-ahalf days, which left sufficient time
for follow-up meetings and for the
Amber team to walk the floor.
Indeed, a number of publishers
reported being unable to find a slot
for all those who wanted a meeting,
let alone accommodate new clients.

Many arranged
meetings for
Tuesday unaware
that only the
International Rights Center and the
remainder area was open for business. “I’m starting to feel aggrieved,”
said one. “If you spend a fraction of
the cost on a table at the rights center you can have a permanent base
for three days, but spend a fortune on
a stand and you get only two days.”
With the exchange rate no longer
as favorable for the British—a few
years ago the pound bought almost
two dollars—many said they would
need to consider their options: “We
are now starting to question whether
it is worth continuing to exhibit as it
has become extremely expensive for
just two days of meetings,” said one
publisher who declined to be named.
The irony of course is that, with
London having been buried under
an ash cloud and many publishers
scrambling to make late bookings
for New York, BEA could have perhaps whetted the appetite of new
exhibitors for the years ahead. As it
is, Reed Exhibitions may have
played in to the hands of their competitor—Frankfurt. —Liz Thomson

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

5

Kudos to the Audies

Author for Odd and the
Frost Giants (HarperOn Tuesday evening, the APA preChildrensAudio).
sented the 15th annual Audie
Crowd favorite The Help—whose
Awards at the Museum of the City
author and several of its narrators
of New York, celebrating
were in the audience—
another year of record
took the award for Distinsubmissions (1,058 to be
guished Achievement in
exact) and exceptional
Production. The evening’s
production and marketemcee Gary Dell’Abate
ing of audiobooks.
(aka “Baba Booey”), proNelson Mandela’s
ducer of the Howard
Favorite African FolkStern Show and self-protales (Hachette Audio)
fessed audiobook aficiotook top honors for
nado and “early adopter,”
Audiobook of the Year,
is a big fan. “I listened to it
beating out Time of My
while my wife read it,” he
Life (Simon & Schuster),
says. “And I think I had
Audie emcee Dell’Abate
Patrick Swayze’s memthe better experience.”
oir, and The Word Promise® Audio
Executive producer Patti Pirooz
Bible (Thomas Nelson).
admits that she knew she was onto
The award—presented by Ellen
something from the beginning with
Myrick, chair of the judging commitThe Help—which also took the
tee—honored the audiobook with
award for best fiction audiobook. “I
“the most distinguished production,
knew it was going to be special.
innovative marketing, and highest
With so many points of view in the
impact of sales on the industry.”
novel—you can think outside of the
Myrick praised all three nomibox with the audiobook. From the
nees—especially Swayze’s memoir,
get-go, the author, Kathryn Stockwhich he and his wife, Lisa Niemi,
ett, wanted Octavia Spencer to play
recorded in the weeks before his
the role of Mimi. They were old
death as “one case where the audiofriends, and as it turned out, the
book pushed sales of the book.”
character of Mimi was actually
But Nelson Mandela’s Favorite
based on Octavia. And Octavia will
African Folktales—whose proceeds
be playing Mimi in the upcoming
will go to African children orphaned
film.”
by HIV/AIDS—was singularly honWith digital downloads making it
ored for its humanitarianism and
easier than ever for candidates and
overall quality and wide appeal.
judges, Myrick envisions even
Solo narration awards, in the
greater growth in the coming years—
male and female categories, went
an optimism shared by presenter
to Charlton Griffin for Great Expecand narrator Richard Ferrone, who
tations (Audio Connoisseur) and
noted how well suited the Audies
Jenna Lamia for The Chosen One
were to the venue: a museum that
(Macmillan Audio). Neil Gaiman,
tracks “the perpetual transformaperennial audiobook favorite, won
tions” of one of the world’s most
—Parul Sehgal
in the category Narration by the
dynamic cities.”

Down with Technochondria
Harlequin author Tosca Reno signing Your Best Body Now.

Nelson DeMille and his audio narrator, Scott Brick, talk about DeMille’s The Lion, his new book for
Grand Central, which Hachette
Audio is publishing in audio.

A beshaded Paul Auster at the Henry Holt booth signing copies of his forthcoming
novel, Sunset Park.

If there was a theme to this year’s
7x20x21 panel, it was this: things
are changing; don’t be afraid, but
don’t be stupid, either.
From Jennifer Egan’s Powerpoint
about integrating Powerpoint into
her new novel (A Visit from the
Goon Squad) to Clay Shirky’s Twitter-friendly sound bites (many of
which can be found at #7xBEA) and
New York Times tech blogger Nick
Bilton’s humorous and enlightened
exhortation against “technochondria”—the irrational fear of new
technology—a packed room got a
few lessons in where words are
headed, and where and how they’ll
be consumed.
The panel’s format is for seven
speakers to each speak for 10 minutes and to illustrate their presentation with 20 slides, which are displayed for 21 seconds each.
Bilton began with a brief history
of technochondria, noting the
printing press was slagged as “a
whore” and that the New York
Times worried in 1876 that the tele-

phone would kill live music. He
went on to briefly debunk commonly held fears about the impact
of technology on reading.
Ed Nawotka, editor-in-chief of
PublishingPerspectives.com, also
suggested an inversion of conventional thinking, advocating that
schools teach “literature in reverse”
to involve the kids instead of alienating them with Beowulf. Instead, he
said, start with Justin Cronin’s super
buzzy The Passage and trace its literary heritage back to “King Lear.”
Jacob Lewis, formerly of Condé
Nast Portfolio and now CEO of Figment, talked about his firm’s vision
for an online, on-the-go reading and
writing community for teens. The idea
was inspired by Japanese youth’s fervent embrace of cellphone novels.
Agent Eva Talmadge and writer
Justin Taylor discussed The Word
Made Flesh, their book of literary
tattoos, as the giant projection
screen next to the stage was filled
with images of—you guessed it—lit—Jonathan Segura
erary tattoos.

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

Breakfast Bon Mots
Children’s book fans at the show
turned out bright and early Wednesday morning for the annual Children’s
Book and Author Breakfast, presented with the support of the ABA,
ABC, and CBC. Given her late-breaking influence-peddling scandal, all
eyes were on master of ceremonies
Sarah Ferguson, the Duchess of
York, who showed off a self-deprecating sense of humor in her opening
remarks. “Maybe I should take a leaf
out of one of my own books,” Ferguson joked (one of the titles is Ashley
Learns about Strangers).
Ferguson’s latest children’s book

project is the Helping Hand
Books series with Sterling. She
discussed founding the charitable organization Children in
Crisis and said that the “three
Cs”—“communication, compassion, and compromise”—
are at the core of her new series.
“At the end of the day, I’m a
children’s book author, I’m
Breaking bread with Doctorow, Peck, Fergy and Perkins.
Sarah Ferguson, I’m a mother,
and I’m very proud of that.”
adult writer—something he said
Cory Doctorow (For the Win, Tor)
was inextricably entwined with his
choked back tears at several points
being a young adult reader. His
during his presentation, which covearly experiences with storytelling
ered his path to becoming a young
included his father’s kid-friendly,

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THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

socialist reinterpretations of
Conan the Barbarian, reading
Daniel Pinkwater, and seeing
Star Wars on the big screen as a
six-year-old. “I had never seen
a story as complex as Star Wars
before,” he said, recalling that
he took to writing the story of
Star Wars over and over, “like a
piano player practicing scales.”
He has just finished touring for
his new book about gamers from
across the globe attempting to
unionize, and said that while the
experience of writing can grow more
banal over time, meeting fans is a
constant source of excitement and
energy. “Young adult literature is the
most serious literature we have,” he
said, “because it’s written for the
most serious audience we have.”
While discussing her path to
becoming a writer, Mitali Perkins
(Bamboo People, Charlesbridge)
dwelled on the idea of books serving as mirrors and/or windows for
readers. Perkins recalled her first
time entering the Queens Public
Library (“at seven years old, I felt
like I’d walked into Ali Baba’s cave
of treasures”), which began a love
affair with books like Little Women,
The Little Princess, and Emily of
Deep Valley. Despite being raised in
a “village Bengali” home environment in Queens and in California,
Perkins said she used these books
as mirrors to her own life (namely,
her love of her sisters and a growing sense of social awareness).
Perkins said she was gratified that
such a mirror worked both ways—
she described getting a letter from a
reader in Lancaster, Pa., who was
able to draw parallels between her
life and that of the protagonist in Perkins’s Secret Keeper, which is set in
1970s India. She praised booksellers’
ability to connect children with books
they might not immediately gravitate
toward, equating them with a “slant
of light” that has “the power to change
mirror books into window books and
window books into mirror books.”
“The English may have invented
childhood, but we Americans
invented adolescence,” said Richard
Peck (Three Quarters Dead, Dial),
who cited the 1973 abolishment of
the draft by Nixon as the moment in
which the balance of power shifted
from adults to youth. He tempered
his description of the current state of
YA publishing as a “golden age” by
calling this a “dark age to be young,”
in large part due to the technological
revolution, with “screens that stay
hot long into the night, long after parents have gone to sleep.”
Peck’s new novel grew out of a
real-life traffic accident, which killed
several teenagers (the driver was
on her cell phone). The novel’s protagonist “loses her entire peer group
and can’t speed-dial them back into
being. I had to tell the story slant,”
Peck said,” because real life is too
extreme for fiction.” —John Sellers
© Steve Kagan.com

6

Visit the Harlequin booth and meet
your favorite authors!
Thursday, May 27th
IN-BOOTH SIGNINGS
Time

Author

Title

10:00-10:45 am Fresh Fiction Hour

Event

Diane Chamberlain
Kristan Higgins
Dori Ostermiller
Deanna Raybourn
Antoinette van Heugten

The Lies We Told
All I Ever Wanted
Outside the Ordinary World
The Dead Travel Fast
Saving Max

11:00-11:45 am

Susan Mallery
Robyn Carr
Beth Ciotta
Carly Phillips
Linda Cardillo

Chasing Perfect
The House on Olive Street
Out of Eden
Kiss Me if You Can
Across the Table

Kathy Kinney &
Cindy Ratzlaff
Erin Bolger
Dr. Howard Shapiro &
Franklin Becker

Queen of Your Own Life

Contemporary
Romance Hour

12:00-12:45 pm Nonfiction Hour

The Happy Baker
Eat & Beat Diabetes with
Picture Perfect Weight Loss

1:00-1:45 pm

Linda Lael Miller Hour

Linda Lael Miller

McKettricks of Texas: Tate

2:00-2:45 pm

Paranormal Hour

Rachel Vincent
Gena Showalter
Laura Anne Gilman
Maria V. Snyder

Shift
Into the Dark
Hard Magic
Spy Glass

3:00-3:45 pm

Thriller/Suspense Hour

Pamela Callow
J.T. Ellison
Rick Mofina
Carla Neggers
Joshua Corin

Damaged
The Cold Room
The Panic Zone
The Mist
While Galileo Preys

Booth #3922

OFFICIAL BEA AUTHOR AUTOGRAPH SESSIONS
Time

Table

Author

Title

10:30-11:30 am
10:30-11:30 am
11:30 am-12:30 pm
11:30 am-12:30 pm
1:00-2:00 pm
1:00-2:00 pm
2:00-3:00 pm
3:00-4:00 pm

25
26
25
26
25
26
25
26

Debbie Macomber
Gena Showalter
Rick Mofina
Rochelle Alers
Pamela Callow
Antoinette van Heugten
Dori Ostermiller
Brenda Jackson

Hannah’s List
Unraveled
The Panic Zone
Sweet Deception
Damaged
Saving Max
Outside the Ordinary World
Sensual Confessions

8

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

Copyright may not be dead, but it is
irrelevant, noted Cursor’s Richard
Nash at a Wednesday morning
panel entitled Rights, Royalties &
Retailers: What Works. In his opening remarks, Nash spoke about
publishing in the “age of abundance,” telling attendees that success in the digital age is no longer
about securing lifetime monopolies
associated with copyright, or controlling the content pipe, but about

© Steve Kagan.com

Nash’s New Model
for Book Deals

“your moxie.” Nash,
who announced his
upstart Cursor
model in PW last
year, showcased the
centerpiece of his
business: three-year deals.
“That doesn’t mean after
three years, you lose your
author,” Nash noted. “You
renegotiate.”
He referenced TuesRights issues were debated by (l. to r.) Andrew Weinstein, Scott
day’s CEO panel where
Waxman, Laura Dawson, Richard Nash, and David Marlin.
panelists like Esther Newberg and Scott Turow engaged in “a
publishers have only explored a
pissing match” over who gets what
small range of prices, he explained,
slices of the pie. “You make a bigger
from $6 to $35 roughly, but the digipie,” Nash implored. Traditionally,
tal age, they can now explore a full

range of moneymaking opportunities. “For every writer there is a
reader who will pay 10 grand to
spend a weekend with the author,”
he said, and “a reader who would
pay a buck for a digital edition
because a blogger says the book
rocks.”
He stressed there was still a role
for agents in the age of abundance,
because “publishers can still suck.”
He said agents would serve important roles in auditing publisher service and identifying new opportunities.
Nash was joined on the panel by
literary agent Scott Waxman,
Ingram’s Andrew Weinstein, MetaComet’s David Marlin and moderator, consultant Laura Dawson. Waxman talked about his new e-book
venture called Diversion, which he
said was an attempt to explore digital options for writers for whom
fewer houses were taking chances.
He said he had 20 writers signed up
and another 30 on tap, writers he
characterized as “midlist, but worthy.”
Marlin told attendees that while
the digital realm brought with it a
degree of uncertainty, there was
also greater opportunity. “There
are so many ways to monetize content, more ways to consume it.” He
spoke of the need to create a more
transparent, and more easily navigated, rights realm, but said the
real challenge for authors is negotiating the “signal-to-noise ratio,” in
other words, helping users find
quality, and offering visibility to
authors and publishers.
During the Q&A came the inevitable question: piracy. For all the
promise of digital, what about the
ease with which content can be
pirated? Nash suggested that the
key to defeating piracy was to create ways to profit off un-piratable
content: “You can’t pirate a Malcolm Gladwell speech, you can’t
pirate a leather-bound book, and
you can’t pirate a dinner party with
Paul Auster.
Perhaps the session’s underlying
themes were best exemplified by a
question from first-time author
Kimi Puntillo, whose book Great
Races, Incredible Places was
recently published by Bantam. For
all the work authors do, they see so
little return, she noted, from traditional publishers. “Why bother?”
she asked. Marlin again referenced
the signal-to-noise argument, noting that publishers establish the
signal. “To be a brand,” he noted,
“you need to be a signal.” Nash said
the “key to happiness” is finding an
effective business partner. “Writers
write, readers read, and there are
intermediaries,” he said, to help
bring them all together. “Look for
those intermediaries who will help
maximally,” he said, “and reward
them appropriately.”
—Andrew Albanese

Junior.indd 1

5/14/2010 11:42:34 AM

10

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

A Double Celebration
Mary Higgins
art department,
Clark has been
editorial departon a bestselling
ment, and the protrajectory since
duction departher first suspense
ment. She is a great
novel, Where Are
lady.”
the Children?
Clark’s relationwas published by
ship with her editor,
Simon & SchusMichael Korda,
ter in 1975. Affecgoes back 34 years,
Signing today, 10–11 a.m., Table 9.
tionately dubbed
and she calls his
“The Queen of Suspense” by publisher David Rosenthal, she is celebrating 35 years with her publisher
and the release of her 40th book,
Tired of noshing on fast food snacks
The Shadow of Your Smile—a remarkto get you through a long afternoon
able feat in an industry where loyalon the floor? How about wrapping
ties can be fleeting.
your appetite around plantain chips
Loyalty is important to the author:
with your choice of avocado and
“While I have had offers over the years
palm heart ceviche or black bean
from other publishers, I am like the
roasted corn mango salsa? From 2 to
girl at the country dance. When some3 p.m. this afternoon, vegan chef
one asked her for a waltz, she said:
Terry Hope Romero will be serving
‘Thank you very much, but I’ll dance
up platters of these tasty treats and
with the fellow who brung me.’ ”
signing copies of Da Capo Press’s
With more than 100 million copies of
Viva Vegan!: 200 Authentic and Fabuher books sold in the U.S. alone, it’s a
lous Recipes for Latin Food Lovers at
mutual love affair, says Rosenthal, and
the Perseus Book Group booth (4225).
not just because of the numbers. “She
Romero, who lives, cooks, and
is a huge bestseller, but she is also
eats in Queens, N.Y., is best known
beloved by everyone in the building.
as the coauthor of Veganomicon;
That includes the kids in publicity, the

Viva Vegan!

W E E K LY

input “simply marvelous.” As editor
emeritus, Korda is officially retired,
but he still works with a few select
authors, says Rosenthal. “They have a
system worked out. It is a lot to write a
book every year. You need an editor
that is supportive, encouraging, and
one you can bounce ideas off of.”
Active in Catholic affairs, Clark
says she was “particularly intrigued”
by the subject of The Shadow of Your
Smile, which mixes dark family
secrets, the power of miracles, and

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

the ceremony of beatification. “After
attending the beatification ceremony
of a nun last year, I asked myself if I
could weave beatification into the
framework of a suspense novel. I
think it works.”
The secret of Clark’s succesful
run? Rosenthal says that, first, she
is an expert storyteller whose work
can be enjoyed by all age groups.
“One of her hallmarks is that she
has never used obscene language
—Karen Jones
or any expletives.”

Vegan Cupcakes Take Over
late mole veggie tamales;
the World; and Vegan Cookand vanilla-coconut flan
ies Invade Your Cookie Jar.
that may well convert
In her first solo cookbook,
even the most hard-core
she opens the world of Latin
carnivore to veganism.
flavor to vegans and skeptiAnd for all those who still
cal foodies alike and promharbor the misconception
ises to expand the palates Latin cooking, no carne. that vegan is nothing but
of anyone looking for a way to add
fringe food from the left and right
fresh, seasonal ingredients and
coasts, think again. “In a tough econauthentic Latin spice to their meals
omy,” says Lissa Warren, Da Capo’s
without relying on animal products.
v-p and senior director of publicity,
After supplying a few tips on essen“more people are cooking at home
tial Latin cooking basics (how to peel
and they want to cook in a healtha mango and operate a corn zipconscious, environmentally friendly
per), Romero offers up a wide selecway. Our vegan cookbooks are selltion of yummy vegan alternatives
ing like hot cakes... or, in Terry’s case,
such as potato-chickpea enchiladas
like savory fresh corn pancakes (aka
—Lucinda Dyer
with green tomatillo sauce; chococachapas).”

Join Jon Scieszka and four of the guys behind
the forthcoming GUYS READ series
as they ponder the lucrative, yet elusive
middle-grade boy demographic and how
booksellers can better tap into this audience.
Jon Scieszka
Jeff Kinney • Mac Barnett
David Lubar • Adam Rex
Thursday, May 27
1:00 p.m. • Downtown Stage
What more could a guy ask for?

©

An Imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers • www.harpercollinschildrens.com
1_2 hor.indd 1

5/7/2010 5:50:23 PM

delivering
the future

bundled physical & digital media

through best-of-breed technologies, Baker & Taylor now offers publishers and customers
bundled physical and digital media distribution services. And as always, the speed, selection and service you
expect — from one trusted source.

Stop by
23
booth 32 Blio,
o of
for a dem tionary
lu
the revo er
e-read
.
software

visit us at booth 3223
to experience the new generation of Baker & Taylor services.
www.baker-taylor.com

12

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

Bruce Feiler’s New Walk
In the summer of 2008, bestselling
author Bruce Feiler received a terrible diagnosis—a cancerous sarcoma
in his left femur would require chemotherapy, radiation, and a lifethreatening operation that could
leave him permanently unable to use
his leg—if he survived the cancer.
Very bad news for a man who
made his literary reputation retracing the footsteps of the biblical bigwigs—Moses (Walking the Bible),
Abraham (Abraham: A Journey to the
Heart of Three Faiths), and Joshua
(Where God Was Born). But Feiler,
then a 43-year-old new father, turned

inward and compiled a list of six
close male friends he felt could be
there for his young twin daughters if
he could not. He shares how he and
his wife crafted this support network
in The Council of Dads: My Daughters, My Illness, and the Men Who
Could Be Me (Morrow, May), which
he will autograph today at 10:30 a.m.,
Table 24. “The idea at the heart of this
is building a bridge between your
family and your kids,” Feiler tells
Show Daily. “It creates a new kind of
community. The secret behind The
Council of Dads is that we did it for
the girls, but we are the ones who

Surviving cancer through community.

have really benefited. It has become
our inner circle.”
Feiler hopes to help others construct their own Council of Dads and
has set up a Web site (www.councilofdads.com) to get them started. He
hopes the Web site and the book will
encourage people to do what he did.

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THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

“It changed me,” he says. “It encouraged me to build a new kind of community with my girls at the center.
These men as my council are a central part of that.”
In the book, Feiler speaks of his
time with cancer as “a lost year.”
Unable to walk, he spent a lot of time
thinking reading about walking. In
the process, he came across an interesting tidbit—a Parisian fad of 200
years ago had people taking turtles
out for walks. “I love this,” Feiler says.
“It became my motto for my girls—
learn to walk with a turtle. You hurry,
you get where you are going, but you
get there alone. You slow down, you
get where you are going, and you get
there with all the people you collect
along the way.” —Kimberly Winston

Barbecue
Worldwide
After a five-year writing hiatus during which Steve Raichlen traveled
the world in search of barbecue hot
spots, he gives readers Planet Barbecue!: An Electrifying Journey
Around the World’s
Barbecue Trail
(Workman, May)—a
hefty 638-page tome
featuring 309 recipes
from 60 countries.
Following the tried
and true formula
he’s perfected in
previous grill fests, Rachlen visits fire
Raichlen offers rec- fanatics.
ipes gleaned from his travel and
research, the kind that involve lots
of meeting, greeting, and eating in
exotic locales. The recipes are
sandwiched between features on
local grill-meisters, briefs on celebrity chefs like Bobby Flay and Michel
Nischan, and various fire fanatics
from diverse places like Morocco,
Belgium, Laos, and more. Raichlen
covers starters, vegetables, all of
the proteins (goat or impala, anyone?), and desserts, with the
detailed explanations of ingredients, local foods, and techniques
readers trust.
It’s a blueprint that’s both familiar
and successful, igniting sales of more
than four million copies for his previous books. Workman executive editor Suzanne Rafer says, “Steven
Raichlen is a fearless griller, who has
taught millions of us how rich with
possibilities the world, literally, of
grilling is.”
The author shows how varied is
this international cooking style, with
such dishes as a pared-down Aussie
recipe for cooking lamb chops on a
shovel (think of it as an Outback version of a cast-iron skillet); Germany’s
delicious-sounding street food, currywurst, and Turkey’s yogurt-marinated lamb tenderloin kebabs.
—Karin Pekarchik

• sterlingpublishing.com

PLEASE VISIT US IN ROOM 1A02

ARE WE RELIVING
THE COLLAPSE OF
ANCIENT CULTURES?
WHY DO WE BELIEVE
THINGS THAT
AREN’T TRUE?
ARE WE
INVESTED IN THE
CULTURE OF BLAME?
HOW CAN WE TRAIN
OUR BRAINS TO
THINK “SMARTER”?
IS INSIGHT THE HOPE
OF THE FUTURE?

To find out the answers
to these and other important
questions of our time come to
the VANGUARD PRESS booth
(BOOTH #4225) today at 11:00 am
and meet REBECCA D. COSTA who
will be signing her provocative
and game-changing new book,

Signing at

BOOTH #4225

11:00 am

THE WATCHMAN’S RATTLE.
© BRENT HOLLAND

YOU’LL NEVER LOOK AT THE
WORLD THE SAME WAY
THE WATCHMAN’S RATTLE by Rebecca D. Costa.
Available Everywhere from Vanguard Press (a member of The Perseus Books Group) on October 5th 2010.

www.rebeccadcosta.com

Vanguard Press
A Member of the Perseus Books Group

14

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

The Little Book That Could

© Lauren Nguyen

Authors’ first
back at the same
books usually
time,” Malcolm, a
don’t follow a path
former attorney
from small press
and journalist,
to self-published
recalls. On the
to a major house,
strength of the
but M.L. Malcolm’s
hardcover sales of
debut novel, Heart
the first book, she
of Lies (Harpersigned a distribuCollins, June),
tion deal with MidMalcolm’s self-publishing triumph.
took a most serenpoint and resumed
dipitous route to the big time.
traveling to book clubs.
Longstreet Press originally pubWhile on vacation last year on
lished the book in 2005, and because of
Pawley’s Island in South Carolina,
the author’s appearances at 50 book
Carl Lennertz, v-p of retail marketclubs in eight different states, the book
ing at HarperCollins, visited the
sold very well. A year later Longstreet
resort town’s Litchfield Books to buy
folded, and its distribution deal with
a few summer reads. Owner Tom
NBN allowed Malcolm to buy back the
Warner handed him a copy of Heart
rights to the book and continue having
of Lies—the store had hand-sold hunNBN sell it. Although she no longer
dreds of copies thanks to a local book
had a publisher, Heart of Lies
club. After reading it, the publishing
remained in print.
veteran was so impressed that he
Malcolm received numerous
hooked Malcolm up with agent
requests from readers to write a
Helen Zimmerman, who sold it to
sequel to her first novel. While recovHarper Paperbacks. The sequel will
ering from thyroid cancer in 2008,
be published next year, and Malshe was able to complete Deceptive
colm’s deal includes an option on a
Intentions. “To cheer me up, my wonthird book. Of Heart of Lies, which
derful husband told me that we’d
takes place in Hungary and Shanghai
self-publish the sequel in hardcover
after WWI, Lennertz says it reminds
and bring Heart of Lies out in paperhim of “old-fashioned James Clavell,

1_2 hor.indd 1

W E E K LY

along with the more modern Alan
Furst and his exile-on-the-run
drama. It’s a love story, spy story, and
historical time trip all in one.”
After attending several workshops
with romance writers because
“they’re very savvy women,” Malcolm enrolled in the summer writing program at the University of
Iowa. “I believe that writing is a

It’s a Dog’s Life
Books on particular dog breeds are
always the most stable part of pet
publishing, says Christopher Reggio, publisher of TFH Publications.
So when he was looking to develop
a new dog series, he knew that he
wanted it to be breed specific. At
the same time, says Reggio, he was
looking for something different.
For Reggio, the new DogLife bookand-DVD series, which launches this
fall, does just that. What makes the
series unusual, he says, is that each
book covers all three stages of caring
for a dog: bringing home a puppy and
training it, handling issues in adult
dogs like barking and not coming
when called, assisting older dogs.
In addition to hiring writers

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

craft,” she notes, “and that you can
always learn how to do it better.”
Apparently this was a self-fulfilling
prophecy, because Heart of Lies
(originally published as Heart of
Deception) won ForeWord magazine’s
2009 award for historical fiction.
The author is scheduled to sign
copies of her book today, 2–2:30
—Wendy Werris
p.m., at Table 17.

familiar with each
breed, TFH teamed
up with St. Hubert’s
Animal Welfare
Center in Madison,
N.J., for the series.
The center vetted
the information in
the books, and its
director of training and behavior,
Pia Silvani, narrates the accompanying DVD, which includes a link to
a Web site for $20 worth of coupons
for dog care products.
The first six DogLife books are on
display at the TFH booth (4461)—
Labrador Retriever; Golden
Retriever; American Pit Bull Terrier;
Boston Terrier; Boxer; and Bulldog.
TFH is offering an additional 5%
discount and free freight on BEA
—Judith Rosen
orders.

5/14/2010 11:25:27 AM

The Book Fair

Save the dates!
15 – 20 March 2011
… NETWORK with Arab and
international publishers
… MEET digital publishing pioneers
… BUY and SELL rights
… EXPAND your horizons
The most professional book fair in the region.
Come visit us at our stand 4429 | Hall 3A at the Book Expo America
Join us for a session on ‘Business Opportunities
for English Language Publishers in the Middle East/The Gulf Region’.
Wednesday, 26 May from 3.30-4.30 pm
Room 1E02, Javits Convention Centre, New York

www.adbookfair.com

Platinum Sponsor

16

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

Women at War
war. “We thought that photographs of women who are
mothers and wounded soldiers could have the power
to unsettle our fixed ideas
about Americans at war,”
says Browder, “and their narBrowder shares her insights about women soldiers.
ratives could add dimension
to the often flawed or fragmentary
ing. “I could easily imagine this
representations of women soldiers
book having been published by a
in popular culture: as novelties, but
commercial house, but I think it
not as real soldiers.
would have been quite different. We
For Sian Hunter, senior editor at
tailored the publication process to
University of North Carolina Press,
make sure Laura’s academic and
the book is a testament to the
Sascha’s photographic expertise
importance of university publishwere highlighted, and we kept their
© Eric Dobbs

Since the days when Matthew Brady
set up his camera on the Civil War’s
bloodiest battlefields, war photography has traditionally focused on men
as heroes and aggressors. Women
and children were simply victims of
the conflict. But the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan have radically altered
the role of women in war and within
America’s armed forces. In When
Janey Comes Marching Home: Portraits of Women Combat Veterans,
Laura Browder’s oral histories are
juxtaposed with 48 photographs by
Sascha Pflaeging to provide a dramatic portrait of today’s women at

Celebrate the final Knuffle Bunny
adventure with Mo Willems!

—Lucinda Dyer

Turner’s First
BEA Turn
art copyright © 2010 by Mo Willems

Mo will be signing
Knuffle Bunny
posters and F&Gs* at
HarperCollins Children’s
booth #3340 today at 10 a.m.
*The

first 150 people
will receive a limited edition,
signed Knuffle Bunny print.
www.GoMo.net

*While supplies last
1_4 hor.indd 1

5/14/2010 11:34:07 AM

VISIT PEACHTREE
Enter to win an Ice Cream Maker
Tea with Children's Authors*

read THREE SCOOPS AND A FIG!
(at no cost to you)

Thursday, May 27
3–4 pm, Javits 1E11

Have us donate to the ASPCA on your behalf

$10.00–advance registration through ABC

read THE BLUE HOUSE DOG.

14 COWS FOR AMERICA (Also in Spanish)
MARTINA THE BEAUTIFUL COCKROACH (Also in Spanish)
THE LIBRARY DRAGON
THE YELLOW STAR
AGATHA'S FEATHER BED (Also in Spanish)
THE SECRET OF OLD ZEB
THE LAST DANCE
GROWING UP CUBAN IN DECATUR, GEORGIA

Enter to win 16 books in the Peachtree sports lineup
from fiction author Fred Bowen, and
nonfiction author Steven Krasner

*Featuring Carmen Agra Deedy

www.peachtree-online.com
1_4 hor.indd 1

contributions and concerns in mind
as we made decisions on everything from thematic organization to
paper choice and publicity.”
The gallery exhibition of When
Janey Comes Marching Home, which
presents a series of 45 large-scale
color photographic portraits and
oral histories of women combat veterans, can be seen at the Women in
Military Service for America Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery
in Arlington, Va., May 1–September
5, 2010, and at the National Museum
of the Marine Corps in Triangle, Va.,
July 10, 2010–October 9, 2011.
Browder and Pflaeging are signing
today, 2–3 p.m., at Table 24 in the autographing area. Copies of When Janey
Comes Marching Home are also available at the UNC booth (3723).

5/14/2010 3:03:27 PM

The National Enquirer has come a
long way, from once being dismissed
as a sleazy supermarket tabloid with
little credibility to becoming a viable
contender last year for a Pulitzer
Prize in journalism, based on its
dogged investigation and exclusive
coverage of Sen. John
Edwards’s extramarital affair with Rielle
Hunter.
According to The
Deeds of My Fathers:
How My Grandfather
and Father Built New
York City and Created
the Tabloid World of
Today (Oct.) by David
Pope, we compulsive readers guilty
of sneaking peeks at the National
Enquirer’s blaring headlines while
waiting in grocery store checkout
lines don’t know the half of it: the
story behind the National Enquirer is
much steamier than any exposé published in its pages since the author’s
father purchased it 60 years ago: it’s a
juicy tale of politicians, media moguls,
and mobsters mixing it up, with
enough sex, loyalty, and betrayal
thrown in to satisfy the most discriminating tabloid aficionado. And it
begins right here, in New York City.
You can read for yourself this reallife drama, and you don’t even have
to sneak anything surreptitiously
into your grocery basket. Visitors can
pick up ARCs of The Deeds of My
Fathers at first-time BEA exhibitor
Philip Turner Books’ booth, located
inside the NBN pavilion (3776–3877).
Deeds is the debut release of the
eponymous imprint launched by
book industry veteran Philip
Turner, whose mission is to publish
“insider accounts” by investigative
journalists and others with exclusive access to hot stories that he or
she alone can write. He hopes to
publish three to five titles each
—Claire Kirch
year.

18

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

From Woodstock to Garland

© Calvin Ki

Without Elliot Tiber, “Three Days of Peace and Music,”
better known as the legendary Woodstock Festival
of August 1969 might never have happened,
according to his memoir Taking Woodstock (Square
One, 2007). As late as July, promoter Mike Lang was
still searching for a festival permit in upstate New
York. Every time he got close, local residents
became terrified about a massive hippie invasion
and pulled the plug.
Tiber was working nearby at his parents’ motel
Tiber made history!
and was also the president of the Chamber of Commerce in Bethel, N.Y. Max Yasgur, whose farm eventually hosted Woodstock, was his milkman. When Tiber heard about Lang’s trouble, he managed to get him on the phone with four fateful words: “I have a permit.” The
rest is history.
Tiber’s comedic countdown to Woodstock is delightfully described in Taking Woodstock. With a knack for being at the right place at the right time,
Tiber tells Show Daily he was sitting in the green room of a morning talkshow program while promoting the book when director Ang Lee walked in.
“I said to him, I love all your films but they are so sad, wouldn’t you like to do
a comedy?” Ang Lee replied, “I love humor, but I haven’t found the movie to
do yet.” Tiber quickly said, “Yes, you have!” and handed him Taking Woodstock. Ang Lee’s subsequent movie adaptation, along with the paperback
tie-in from Square One, were released in 2009 in time for the 40th anniversary of the festival.
Rudy Shur, publisher of Square One, tells Show Daily that though his specialty is alternative health, not memoir, he knew there was something
unique about Tiber. “He is a gifted humorist, an absurdist humorist. No matter what the circumstances, he would have a funny line. Elliot’s life is like a
movie. One day we were talking, and he said, ‘Did I ever tell you the story
about Judy Garland, the mob, and the birthday party?’ I said, that’s as good
as your Woodstock story.” This October, Square One will release Tiber’s new
book, Palm Trees on the Hudson: A True Story of the Mob, Judy Garland &
Interior Decorating.
It is a “prequel” to his Woodstock days and includes his adventures as an
interior decorator in New York City. The title refers to an A-list birthday
party he was asked to design circa 1968. The venue was a large ferry on the
Hudson River, and both the mayor of New York and Judy Garland were
guests. Tiber, who is gay, was later part of the Stonewall riot that ignited the
gay pride movement of the late 1960s. He says Judy Garland was a lifelong
hero to him and the gay community. “Her message in the song ‘Over the
Rainbow’ from The Wizard of Oz was [that] at the end of the rainbow there
was a chance for a better life, not a pot of gold, but a better life.”
As to what happened to the party, Judy Garland, some “wiseguys,” and
100 rented palm trees that ended up bobbing down the Hudson River, you’ll
have to wait for the new book or ask Elliot Tiber today. He will be signing
copies of Taking Woodstock at the Square One booth (3250), 11 a.m.–noon.

—Karen Jones

Dr. Raj Answers All

© Eric Dobbs

Are there questions you’re too embarrassed to ask your doctor—or even your
closest friends? Do you have a tough time separating urban myth from actual
medical fact? Still wondering if you can catch something from your thong? Too
many venti lattes might give you a heart attack? You’ll live longer if you only eat
every other day? Laptops will make your husband infertile?
Dr. Roshini Raj, a regular contributor to the Today Show and medical editor of Health Magazine, tackles more than 200 questions from real women
in What the Yuck?! The Freaky & Fabulous Truth About Your Body. From
celebrity diets and cellphone dangers to decoding your moles and finding
the best libido-boosting foods, Dr. Raj offers a thoroughly modern guide to
women’s health packed with informative, surprising, and sometimes downright funny information.
So bring all your questions
and stop by today to meet Dr.
Raj and pick up a signed galley
of What the Yuck? She’ll be at
the Oxmoor House booth
(3768), 11 a.m.–noon.
And just in case you’re still
too embarrassed to ask... there
are actually more germs on the
floor in a public restroom than
For Dr. Raj, there are no embarrassing questions.
on a toilet seat. So hang up your
—Lucinda Dyer
purse!

1_2 vertical.indd 1

5/14/2010 11:36:42 AM

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T th!
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20

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

AUTHORS

believe you might not be able to control your circumstances, but you can control how you react to your circumstances.” She credits them with making her
childhood a happy one even though she grew up in a segregated South—she
spent her first dozen years in the Titusville section of Birmingham, Ala. They
did their best to protect her from the violence surrounding her, including the
1963 bombing of a nearby church that killed four black girls. “I didn’t have a
white classmate until I moved to Denver,” says Rice.
As a teacher, professor of political science, and senior fellow at the Hoover
Institution at Stanford University, Rice says that she hopes the book will
teach young people about what segregation was like. She says that her
research assistants were “stunned” by what it was like to live under the Jim
Crow laws. Education and teaching are another strand gained from her parents and grandparents. She grew up reading the books her father’s father,
who was college educated, passed on from the Great Depression. Her grandfather on her mother’s side ensured that all four of his children attended college.
Rice is very involved in k–12 education and was a founding board member
of the Center for a New Generation, an educational support fund for schools
in East Palo Alto and East Menlo Park, Calif. She has also been an active
spokesperson for the Boys and Girls Clubs.
—Judith Rosen
She is one of the speakers at this morning’s breakfast.

AT THE S H OW

Condoleezza Rice

© Steve Gladfelter

ATribute to Her Parents
As the first black woman to become secretary
of state, Condoleezza Rice says that she is frequently asked how she got to where she is
today. Her answer: “You have to know my parents, John and Angelina Rice.”
Rice elaborates on that response and pays
tribute to her parents in Extraordinary, Ordinary (Crown, Oct.), her first book since leaving office. She not only relies on childhood
memories and her father’s letters and outlines of sermons but interviews neighbors,
family members, and her parents’ former
students—her mother was a teacher, her
father was a teacher and minister turned
university administrator.
The title, explains Rice, who was an only child, refers to the fact that “her
parents didn’t make much, yet there wasn’t a single opportunity I wanted
that I didn’t have.” When the family relocated to Denver when she was 12
and her father’s colleagues suggested that he buy a house, he said, “Condoleezza is my house.” Their home was filled with French classes, ice skating,
and music, which was her original major when she entered college at 15.
What also made John and Angelina so extraordinary, says Rice, “is the
sense of normalcy they gave in the midst of abnormalcy. They are people who

THURSDAY, MAY 27, 2010

John Grisham
Enjoying It All
John Grisham has been a fixture on the literary landscape since the phenomenal success of The Firm in 1991. Master of the modern legal thriller, he
is currently putting the finishing touches on The Confession (Doubleday,
Oct.), his 24th book. While some authors might find the creative process challenging after double-digit production, Grisham feels just the opposite.
“There are more and more stories I want to write. My kids are grown and I
am not coaching baseball anymore, so I have more time—but the most
important part is I am still having fun.”

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—Jeff Cox, Publisher, Snow Lion Publications
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—Bruce Shaw, President, Harvard Common Press
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1_2 hor.indd 1

5/7/2010 4:04:34 PM

PUBL I SHERS

Though he is reticent about revealing too
much about The Confession, his muse is still the
intricacies of the legal system. He does say it is
a contemporary work of fiction about a wrongful conviction in Texas plus “all the intrigue
that goes into a story like this as the execution
approaches.” He hopes it will give readers “a
better insight into the problems of wrongful
convictions and the problems with the death
penalty system.”
In addition to high-profile movie versions of
The Firm, which starred Tom Cruise, and The
Pelican Brief with Julia Roberts, Grisham has
seen a number of his books adapted by Hollywood. Though he thinks he has been lucky
overall with the big screen translations, he has
a personal favorite—Francis Ford Coppola’s The Rainmaker in 1997. “It was a
very faithful adaptation of the book, very well done, with a wonderful cast,
which included Matt Damon and Claire Danes.”
Another adaptation of Grisham’s books has just taken place—all have
been digitized. He believes part of the reason e-books are causing an industry upheaval is because publishers don’t know how to predict what the format of choice will be five or 10 years from now. “The huge question is, how
many of the current and next generation of readers are going to grow up on
Kindle and iPads and do all their reading electronically? One thing we have
learned over the past 20 years is you cannot bet against technology. There
will always be hardcover and paperback books, but I think the e-market will
increase dramatically.” Grisham is part of this morning’s Author Breakfast,
but it is not his first breakfast appearance at a BEA. “I did it once before in
Chicago,” he says. “I am not sure anyone ate breakfast, but it was a lot of fun.
You get a roomful of people who love books and that’s an easy crowd.” He
also admits he is enthusiastic about the entire show. “I love the atmosphere. I
love the energy. It’s book lovers and people doing deals. It’s my industry and
—Karen Jones
my business.”
© Bob Krasner

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

W E E K LY

21

Jon Stewart
Taking On the World
Jon Stewart thinks big. His bestselling 2004 book,
America (the Book): A Citizen’s Guide to Democracy Inaction was a delightfully irreverent look
at the entire nation. Now Stewart and the writers
of The Daily Show gleefully take on the globe in
The Daily Show with Jon Stewart Presents Earth
(the Book): A Visitor’s Guide to the Human Race
(Grand Central, Sept.).
“Basically, we are explaining who we are and
what we were to aliens we assume will colonize
the planet hundreds of years from now,” Stewart
tells Show Daily. He adds that what he hopes readers will take away from
Earth is a true aha moment. “I want them to say, ‘Oh, my god! The definitive
story of man has been written in 224 pages with pictures. I can’t believe I can
flip through the entire history of man while in the bathroom!’ ”
He explains that where America was “more of a narrative,” Earth (the
Book) relies heavily on visuals, though he admits that did complicate the
process. “I learned that a lot of pictures you’d like to use are actually owned
by someone else and you have to pay for them. It costs a lot to put a picture of
Mickey Mouse in a book. We might have to draw that one ourselves.”
Stewart was named one of the top entertainers of the decade (1999–2009) by
Entertainment Weekly magazine, while The Daily Show with Jon Stewart has
garnered 28 Emmy Award nominations, 13 Emmy Awards, and two Peabody
Awards. It is said that a large contingent of the under-35 set list the show as
their primary television news source. Meanwhile, he has hosted the Grammy
Awards and the Oscars ceremonies twice; asked about his “Master of Ceremonies” role at the BEA Author Breakfast this morning, he replies, “It all
depends on what they are serving. If it’s a continental breakfast, there could
be problems. If they have a nice spread, I think this could be okay.”
Stewart promises that the tone of Earth (the Book) is consistent with The
Daily Show point of view. “With America we were able to put out a great deal

THE ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHING GROUP, INC.
is one of the largest and fastest growing independent publishers in
North America. Consisting of many imprints, the company publishes
in virtually all fields in the humanities and social sciences.
While celebrating our 35th anniversary in 2010, we will publish over 1,500 new

Celebrating 35 years in publishing!

general interest, academic, and reference books, as well as several journals.

Stop by booth #3883 for these hot titles and more!

IMPRINTS INCLUDE:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Sheed & Ward
Taylor Trade Publishing
Ivan R. Dee
AltaMira Press
Bernan Press
Government Institutes
Jason Aronson
Lexington Books
Rowman & Littlefield Education
The Scarecrow Press

Surviving Your Doctors
by Richard Klein

Dust
by Paul Lioy

Lox, Stocks, and
Backstage Broadway
by Nancy Groce

Sundance-Newbridge

The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is located in booth #3883 within NBN booth #3777

1_2 hor.indd 1

5/7/2010 3:01:48 PM

© Norman Jean Roy

THURSDAY, MAY 27, 2010

BrillianceAudio
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BOOTH #

Thursday, May 27

Meet Author

TESS GERRITSEN

10AM–11AM
TODAY

Signing
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www.brillianceaudio.com

24

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, MAY 27, 2010

of misinformation, and we said, how can we expand on this? We then
thought—let’s do a very misguided look at all of humanity.”
—Karen Jones

Of his first book, Oswalt says, “It’s a shadow
autobiography done out of order through humorous essays.” With chapter titles like “Chamomile
Kitten Greeting Cards,” “I Went to an MTV Gifting
Suite and All I Got Was This Lousy Awareness of
My Shallowness,” and “About the Type,” the book
might be one of the more talked about humorous
memoirs of recent memory. In it, Oswalt describes
his childhood obsessions with Dungeons and
Dragons, gifts from grandma, and Edgar Allan Poe
as well as his early years on the standup circuit.
With an acerbic worldview that covers the gamut
from pop culture to foreign policy, Oswalt’s inventive spirit promises to bring a wallop of humor to

Patton Oswalt
Comedian, writer, and actor Patton Oswalt, author of Zombie Spaceship
Wasteland (Scribner, Jan. 2011) is emceeing today’s BEA Author Lunch, featuring Christopher Hitchens, Sara Gruen, and William Gibson.
Oswalt, whose most notable TV role was as Spence Olchin in the CBS hit
The King of Queens, has also appeared in such films as Zoolander, Magnolia,
The Informant, and The Fan. His two-decade career as a standup comic is
among the most successful in show business, and he’s typically booked for
100 shows a year on the comedy circuit. Oswalt’s Comedians of Comedy tour,
in which he shared the stage with Zach Galifianakis, later became a bestselling DVD and CD.

© Ryan Russell

Doing the Book Shtick

BEA.
Although he’s written comic books that have been published by Last Gasp,
Fantagraphics, and Quirk Books, Zombie Spaceship Wasteland is Oswalt’s first
foray into trade publishing. He was approached last year by agent Peter Greenberg about writing a book, which generated interest from eight publishers.
“It took longer for me to pick who I
wanted to go with than to actually sell
the book,” he says happily, acknowledging that he’s both excited and
nervous about his new role as author.
Sharing the stage with such heavyweights as Hitchens, Gibson, and
Gruen will be a world apart from
doing shtick at a comedy club, and
Oswalt is mindful of that. “I’ll act like
I’m a fan of these guys and show them
respect and enthusiasm rather than
put the focus on me,” he says. “These
are the guys who have books out right
now. I’m new at this. I think it should
be more about them than ‘By the
way, keep me in mind...!’” Asked if he
has a specific message for booksellers, Oswalt laughs and says, “Please
—Wendy Werris
sell my book!”

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Car Crazy

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Junior.indd 1

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“The auto industry is doing better
than anybody thought it would,
including us, including General
Motors and Chrysler,” says Steven
Rattner, chief architect of the auto
bailout and author of Overhaul: An
Insider’s Account of the Obama
Administration’s Emergency Rescue
of the Auto Industry (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Oct.). The book grew
out of a long
article that
appeared in
Fortune
magazine in
October
2009. “After
leaving the
auto task
force, I felt
the work we
did and the
momentousness of the events were
worth preserving for posterity,”
Rattner says. “I had often thought
about writing a book, but I never had
the focus or the time. This was my
chance.”
A former financial reporter for the
New York Times, Rattner reached
President Obama’s inner circle via

Carson - Dellosa
Publishing

5/7/2010 2:57:51 PM

PUBL I SHERS

THURSDAY, MAY 27, 2010

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

25

AUTHORS

executive positions on Wall Street (the Quadrangle Group, Lazard Frères,
and Bonk: The
Morgan Stanley, and Lehman Brothers). Despite the complexity of his subCurious Coupling
ject—the largest corporate restructuring in American history—or perhaps
of Science and
because of it, the biggest challenge to writing the book, he says, was the writing
Sex—Packing for
itself. “There was so much material, so many strands. Telling the story in a
Mars offers a lot
way that would be interesting was not without its challenges.”
of reporting, a lot
Bryan Burrough’s Barbarians at the Gate: The Fall of RJR Nabisco set the
of science, and a fair amount of goofiness. “It’s clearly a Mary Roach escanarrative standard he followed, along with a more recent example, Andrew
pade,” Roach says.
Ross Sorkin’s Too Big to Fail: The Inside Story of How Wall Street and WashRoach’s inspiration came from a chance encounter in Antarctica with a
ington Fought to Save the Financial System—and Themselves. “Also Bob
NASA employee whose job was to live in a space-simulation facility doing
Woodward’s books, in terms of telling the Washington story and melding all
nothing but living weightless for two weeks so researchers could find out
that together,” he says.
what happens to bone and muscle when they’re deprived of gravity. Roach
How much is about President Obama? “A fair amount. He gave three
was on assignment to write about the search for meteorites, but the space
national addresses during the course of our work, and he was very involved.
simulations appealed to her offbeat sensibility.
I was not in his office every day, but I wanted to bring to life the difficult deci“What’s amazing to me is just the extent to which you have to rethink, redo,
sions that had to be made. I had met him during the campaign, but this was a
and relearn every aspect of your life if you’re going to have no air,” she says,
different experience. This was being one of his team members.”
since no gravity implies nothing to hold an atmosphere. “It re-teaches you
The biggest lesson for other businesses, including the publishing industry,
basics of physics and life. It’s an environment in which we don’t belong. It’s a
Rattner says, is to stay lean and mean
and responsive, to confront challenges head on and not gloss over
them. “All this got Detroit in trouble,
and may have something do with the
8M8@C89C<
publishing industry’s problems. You
J<GK<D9<I
have to maintain a culture that is fast
moving and decisive, produce products people want to buy, and remember, the world changes and you have
to change with it.”
A pro now on corporate restructuring, Rattner is a total novice
when it comes to BEA. You can
catch him on the Uptown Stage
@EJG@I<;9PK?<)9@CC9F8I;?@KJFE>È:@KPFEFLIBE<<J%É
today at 2 p.m. with Jonathan Alter,
whose The Promise: President
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Obama, Year One (Simon & SchusKfYpDXZ_Xji\XZ_\[)%*d`cc`fei\X[\ijn`k__`jgi\m`flj
ter) has just been published.
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—Suzanne Mantell
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Mary
Roach
Living Light
The idea of living without gravity
was like a siren’s call to Mary Roach,
who heard the strains of something
strange and compelling in the subject. Following her instincts, she
spent time at research facilities and
simulated space stations across the
globe; interviewed space scientists,
American astronauts and Japanese
cosmonauts; and came up with
Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void (Norton,
Aug.). The book explores what she
calls “a surreal scenario,” the reality
and ramifications of weightlessness.
Like her earlier books—Stiff: The
Curious Lives of Human Cadavers;
Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife;

© David Paul Morris

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Junior.indd 1

5/17/2010 11:00:13 PM

28

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

AUTHORS

fascinating challenge.”
Her favorite
chapter, titled
“Houston, We
Have a Fungus,”
looks at space simulation studies from the ’60s that tested what happens
when a person, locked into a space suit and a helmet, doesn’t shower for two
weeks. “What they found out was in fact you don’t just get smellier and smellier and filthier and filthier. The body only builds up filth so far, and then it
plateaus.”
The most difficult thing about the book was access, Roach says. “I tend to
want to go and poke around in places where people don’t want you to go.
NASA isn’t interested in discussing sex and death and the nitty-gritty of life.”
Roach has been to BEA with each of her previous books and calls it a “big
wonderful frenzied party.” Her participation as a breakfast speaker is a first.
“It was announced that the Thursday lineup included John Grisham, Jon
Stewart, Condoleezza Rice ‘and more,’” she says. “The more is me.” She will
also be signing ARCs at 10 a.m. at the Norton booth (3423). —Suzanne Mantell

AT THE S H OW

Rebecca Costa
Complexity Is Her Game
Rebecca Costa is variously described as a “futurist,” an “evolutionary thinker,” “a provocative new
voice in the tradition of thought leaders Thomas
Friedman, Jared Diamond, and Malcolm
Gladwell,” but asked how she describes herself,
she says, simply, “I’m a writer.”
The simplicity of that statement is in radical contrast to Costa’s subject, which is complexity. The Watchman’s Rattle: Thinking
Our Way Out of Extinction (Vanguard, Oct.) argues that the world has grown
more complex than our brains can handle—not just in how many choices we

1_2 hor.indd 1

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, MAY 27, 2010

face as consumers, or how sophisticated or rapidly changing our electronic
equipment is, or how hard it is to understand, say, the financial markets, but
all of these things combined, and more. Civilizations before ours have
reached a similar point and been destroyed because of it, she says, but we can
save ourselves if we learn from what science has to teach us.
“Evolution moves in increments and our discoveries are happening in pico
seconds,” Costa says. “It sounds dim but we’re the first civilization to
acknowledge that a gap occurs. And we’re the first civilization to have the
technology to stop it. We can look inside the human brain and observe it. We
can see it not be able to solve a problem.” But scans of the brain also show
that people can solve problems through what she calls “aha! moments.” We
can all learn to do it. And therein lies hope.
What does Costa do to relieve the worry that her work has instilled in her?
“I live in Big Sur. I walk the beach, hike the canyons, look at things made by
nature and untouched by mankind. It relaxes me and reminds me that I am a
biological organism subject to evolution. This is the most important principle
governing life forms on earth. We act as though it happened in the past, as
though it doesn’t happen to us. How could we move forward without
acknowledging this?”
Costa will be signing copies of her book at 11 a.m. today at the Perseus
booth (4225). In case you’re concerned that her heady thoughts may make
her unapproachable, consider that she calls herself a serial processor, not a
parallel processor. “I can barely drive and drink my coffee at the same time,”
—Suzanne Mantell
she says.

Sara Gruen
Going Ape over Bonobos
An e-mail link from Gruen’s mother about the Great Ape Trust in Des
Moines, Iowa, rekindled the author’s early love of apes. “I’ve always been fascinated by ape/human discourse,” Gruen tells Show Daily. “I was really
interested in language-competent apes, but I had never heard about bonobos. The more I learned about them and their very unique culture, the more I

5/14/2010 11:20:12 AM

10:30-11:30am
TABLE 17

Going Rouge
Betsy Reed and
Richard Kim

11:00am
The Power of Hope Anthony Scioli, Ph.D.

11:00am-12:00pm
TABLE 28

The Paranoid Parents Guide Christie Barnes
Stop Second Guessing Yourself: Baby’s First Year
Jen Singer

The Tiger Woods Syndrome
Dr. J.R. Bruns and
Dr. R.A. Richards II

12:00pm

TABLE 4

iWant
Jane Velez-Mitchell

iWant
Jane Velez-Mitchell

11:00am-12:00pm
TABLE 5

Going Rouge
Betsy Reed and Richard Kim

Étre the Cow and
Stop Effing Yourself
Sean Kenniff

1:00pm

11:30am-12:30pm
TABLE 7

A Jew Grows in Brooklyn Jake Ehrenreich

A Jew Grows in Brooklyn
Jake Ehrenreich

Étre the Cow and
Stop Effing Yourself
Sean Kenniff

1:00-2:00pm
TABLE 6

Dear Dad
Ky-Mani Marley

2:00pm

Farrah Gray Publishing

INTRODUCING

1:00-1:30pm
TABLE 4

The Paranoid Parents
Guide
Christie Barnes
TABLE 5

The First
Reality-Based RomanceTM
Series to Rock the
Romance World

Stop Second Guessing
Yourself: Baby’s First Year
Jen Singer
Hard to Hold
Julie Leto

Meet Me
in Manhattan
Judith Arnold

The Icing on the Cake
Alison Kent

2:00pm

2:00-2:30pm
TABLE 5

Stop Calling Him Honey
and Start Having Sex
Julienne Davis and
Maggie Arana
TABLE 10

Naked in Eden
Robin Easton

The Power of Hope
Anthony Scioli, Ph.D.
2:30-3:00pm
TABLE 4

Sex for Grownups
Dr. Dorree Lynn

3:00pm
Unstoppable in Stilettos
Lauren Ruotolo

3:30-4:00pm
TABLE 4

Naked in Eden
Robin Easton
TABLE 5

Central Recovery Press and Farrah Gray Publishing Books are distributed by Health Communications, Inc.

Leave the Light On
Jennifer Storm
Central Recovery Press

30

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

AUTHORS

wanted to know,
so I stopped writing the book I
had already
abandoned once
to write Water for
Elephants, and instead wrote Ape House (Spiegal
& Grau, Sept.).
The author underwent a rigorous process in
order to be allowed to meet the bonobo family
that is housed at a special Iowa research facility.
“A lot of people want to meet these apes,” says
Gruen. “So the first thing they do to weed out people is give them gobs of homework. I had to read
this $137 hardcover book called Functional
Dimensions of Ape-Human Discourse.” The
author read about a dozen more books and took a
crash course in linguistics at York University in
Toronto. “The best part of my research was that I
did get to go and meet these apes and had an
actual two-way conversation with them. It was
wonderful, and I felt so honored.”
These particular apes understand the English language and communicate
to humans using a lexigram—a chart with symbols that represent words.
“The apes carry around laminated versions of these lexigram boards—they
just fold them up under their arms and when they want to say something,
they unfold them and speak in complete sentences. They point to sequences
of words—there are subject and verb lexigrams and tenses—I was not
expecting ‘is’ and ‘was.’ ”
In Ape House, a family of bonobos ends up on a TV reality show. The author
skewers such shows as well as tabloid culture, gossip rags, and vicious gossip blogs. “I want readers to see the harm that these things can do in hardening people toward humanity and toward nonhumanity. The fact that we
can communicate very clearly with another animal has to make us at least

AT THE S H OW

© Jerry Bauer

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, MAY 27, 2010

consider the way that we’ve historically treated these first cousins of ours.
Whether a person believes in evolution or not really has nothing to do with
the fact that they are sentient, intelligent, feeling creatures, and maybe it’s
time to re-evaluate what we do to them in terms of experiments and quality
of life.”
The author is speaking at today’s Book & Author Lunch (Special Events
Hall) and will sign ARCs of her book at the Random House booth (4341) at 2:30
—Hilary S. Kayle
p.m.

Lauren Belfer
Love in theTime of Penicillin
With A Fierce Radiance (HarperCollins, June), Lauren Belfer is furthering
her claim to a very particular niche: historical dramas that shed light on
taken-for-granted technologies. Like her enthusiastically received first
novel, City of Light (1999), a love story set amid the struggles of the burgeoning electric industry, A Fierce Radiance uses the emerging field of antibiotics
as a springboard for what the publisher
describes as “a thriller, a love story, a family
saga, and a window onto American history.”
Set in New York City during the early days of
WWII, the novel interweaves the personal life
of its heroine, photojournalist Claire Shipley,
with the dramatic story of the development of
penicillin.
“Someone once told me you should write the
type of book you most enjoy reading,” says
Belfer, a Greenwich Village resident. “I find
those moments very compelling when human
beings create something that changes all of
society, their own lives, and their view of all
around them. It’s something I always have in
the back of my mind.”

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1_2 hor.indd 1

5/14/2010 11:22:38 AM

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

AUTHORS

The miracle of
penicillin was
brought home to
Belfer by her
aunt, whose
brother died
when he was 11 years old. “He contracted an infection after a Fourth of July
celebration, and he was dead within a few days. There was nothing the doctors could do. I started talking to my friends and discovered this was a common story—a child who died too soon, a breadwinner who died of a scratch
on a knee. I felt compelled to tell the story of the great changes antibiotics
brought.”
A medieval studies major in college, Belfer knew nothing about penicillin
or the details of life during the war when she started out. It took her eight
years of research to become fluent in her subjects. But, she says, research
has always been enjoyable for her. “The writing is the difficult part, especially
the meticulous creation of characters.”
Back when City of Light was published, writers didn’t have their own Web
sites and Facebook didn’t exist. But using these things, Belfer says, has been
a lot of fun. “They make me think about my work in a new way—not about the
work itself, but about how to interact with people about my work. There’s a
certain joy to it.”
Belfer will be at Table 1 signing finished books today, 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
“Writers think of BEA as a holy grail,” she says. “I am thrilled and honored to
—Suzanne Mantell
be here.”

AT THE S H OW

William Gibson
The Wary Writer
Gibson’s legions of fans may be surprised that the writer never sets out to
write trilogies, though he has several under his belt. “I’m kind of allergic to
the term, ‘trilogy,’ with all its dire commercial associations,” he says. Zero History (Putnam, Sept.), his 10th novel, though not specifically part of a trilogy,

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, MAY 27, 2010

features characters from his two previous books,
Pattern Recognition and Spook Country. “I usually begin with some strong and inexplicable
sense of place and wait for the characters to
emerge from that. Sometimes the characters are
new to me and sometimes they’re characters I’ve
known before, but they seem to have changed in
some way since I last saw them.”
It is in retrospect that the author sees connections in his books and becomes aware of what
he is exploring in his work. “Pattern Recognition
now seems to me a sort of early post-9/11 novel.
The second one, Spook Country, has a lot to do
with the atmosphere of the middle of the Bush
administration. This new one, I suspect, is early
post–global financial crisis. Most of the characters have money and career
worries that they didn’t have the last time I saw them—though some others
have become more ambitious and rapacious with the change.”
For all his success, the renowned author is surprisingly anxious every time
he sits down to write a book. “I go through the same horrible processes of selfdoubt, and constant and perpetual writer’s block that has to be written
through anyway. There are parts of it that I very actively enjoy, but I’m never
very comfortable with the process overall. I should be able to sit down and say,
Well, the last time, and the time before that, I felt this way and it all worked
out. But somehow the insecurity always comes from a different direction. It
seems to have a different flavor.”
Asked if his latest novel continues past themes or goes in new directions,
Gibson says, “I won’t know for a couple of years. The real themes are things
that I’m not even conscious of when I’m writing—I discover them later, or
when I’m starting the next book. I don’t write books because I think there’s
anything I know that other people should know. In fact, I don’t write books to
find answers, I write them to find what my questions are.”
Gibson will be appearing at today’s Book and Author Luncheon.
—Hilary S. Kayle
© Michael O’Shea

32

CONVERSATIONS SELL BOOKS
PLANNED TELEVISION ARTS CAN HELP START THE CONVERSATION ABOUT YOUR BOOK

In this time of fundamental shifts in the media landscape, one thing remains constant: word of mouth
sells books. Planned Television Arts offers a full range of custom media services designed to get the
conversation started. From national print and television campaigns, speaking engagements, and radio
tours to social media marketing, blog tours, and website development, PTA can put together a strategic
media plan that targets your audience and gets people talking.
To reach us during the show call Brian Feinblum at 914-462-2038 or David Hahn at 914-646-6963. After
the show contact Brian at 212-583-2718 feinblumb@plannedtvarts.com.
1_2 hor.indd 1

plannedtvarts.com
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5/14/2010 11:24:27 AM

34

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

AUTHORS
AT THE S H OW

Melissa Anderson
A ‘Little House’ RoadTour
Although Melissa Anderson, one of the stars
of the beloved Little House on the Prairie TV
series prefers to live in the moment rather
than look back, she approached the writing
of her memoir, The Way I See It: A Look Back
at My Life on Little House (Globe Pequot,
May) with a fond enthusiasm for the past.
“I never thought I’d write a book,” she
tells Show Daily. “My husband is a writer,
and it just didn’t occur to me.” An interview
with Greg Hardesty of the Orange County
Register set the idea in motion. He contacted literary agent Laura Dail, who in turn
persuaded Anderson of the importance of a memoir. “I sat down and wrote
the proposal and was so pleased to end up with Erin Turner at Globe
Pequot.” Anderson dedicated herself to writing the book, which she finished
in a few months. “I worked on it daily. I don’t type, so my husband transcribed
my handwritten notes for me—and acted as my personal thesaurus.”
Anderson was surprised by how much she remembered of her eight
years on Little House, where she started at the age of 11 in the role of Mary,
the blind sister. “Overall, I have pleasant memories, and I poured them into
the book,” she says. After she left the show, Anderson went on to star in several TV movies and built a body of work independent of Little House: “I
never wanted to be known for just one thing, and it was healthy for me to

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, MAY 27, 2010

branch out as an actress.” In the intervening years she married producer
and screenwriter Michael Sloan, with whom she has two children.
The Way I See It includes stories of life on the Little House set as well as
Anderson’s relationships with Michael Landon and her other co-stars on
the show. Her 15-city tour will take her all over the country and bring her
back into the Little House spotlight that she’s shied away from for decades.
“I haven’t participated in any of the cast reunions; that is not my cup of tea,”
Anderson muses. “In the absence of Michael, I didn’t see the point. I try
not to glorify the past.” She’ll likely be in for a surprise, though, when the
past—and her many fans—come back to find her at her book signings.
At BEA they can meet up with her today, 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m., at Table 23.
“I’m proud of the book,” she says, “and hope people find it interesting and
—Wendy Werris
funny. It’s a feel-good story.”

Scott Spencer
Exploring the Dark Side
Expect the unexpected from acclaimed novelist
Spencer in his 10th novel, Man in the Woods (Ecco,
Sept.). Instead of his trenchant and wide-ranging
perspective on love relationships, the author delves
into an irrevocable act of brutality and the full
range of its ramifications.
“I wanted to explore what it means to take a life—what does it feel like,
what is the actual physical sensation of being that close to violence when
you’ve never had violence in your life before—to step into that dark place in
human possibility.”
Set in the familiar upstate fictional town of Leyden, N.Y., in which Spencer
places many of his novels, the story includes Kate Ellis—who first appeared
in his bestselling A Ship Made of Paper, a National Book Award finalist—and
her now eight-year-old daughter, Ruby. “I enjoyed Kate the first time
through, and I didn’t feel finished with her. I was entertained and intrigued
by the idea of her falling in love again.”

Visit The
London B
ook Fair
Lounge o
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The London Book Fair Lounge offers a great place to
hold meetings, take a break from the show floor or
just catch up on your emails.
There will be a selection of seminar highlights from
The London Book Fair shown throughout the day so
why not join us for English Tea, served every day at
4pm, and check out the content you may have missed.
The London Book Fair Lounge is open from
Tuesday 25th May to Thursday 27th May so
come along and meet the team.

The London
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5/13/2010 10:54:47 AM

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

AUTHORS

Spencer’s protagonist, Paul
Phillips, a carpenter, is another
new direction for
the author, whose
heroes are generally literate, articulate men. “He is a departure for me in
that he is really taciturn. I spend a lot of time writing in the first person, in
which the narrator is so talkative that he can narrate an entire book. Paul
could never do that, so this is in third person. Paul is a man of action and a
man of craft—it’s not that he’s not verbal, but it’s not his main means of selfexpression. It was a challenge for me to have somebody going thorough such
a trying and morally complex situation, and have him be able to express his
experience in a way that I thought was true to the character.”
Spencer regards his writing six hours a day as a civic duty. He tells Show
Daily, “Writing for me is a form of citizenship. It’s paradoxical because I’m
participating in the world by withdrawing from it. In the end, I’m just adding
my voice to the conversation that is taking place in my time. I’m not weighing
in on health care or what our policy ought to be in Afghanistan, but I’m trying
to weigh in on what it means to be a human being.”
This is the author’s first visit to BookExpo. “I’m really looking forward to
meeting booksellers because we are all in this together,” he says. The author
—Hilary S. Kayle
is signing books today at Table 18, 10:30–11 a.m.

AT THE S H OW

Mark Rotella
Italian Music Is His Amore
“It’s funny to be on the other side,” says Mark Rotella, senior editor at Publishers Weekly. “It’s odd to see galleys go out to other reviewers. I’m usually
deciding what gets reviewed.” Even though Amore: The Story of Italian American Song (FSG, Sept.) is his sophomore effort—after Stolen Figs and Other
Adventures in Calabria—he still finds the process “nerve-racking.”
He needn’t worry. Stolen Figs received a starred review in PW and was part of

THURSDAY, MAY 27, 2010

the Borders Original Voices series. Both books
reflect Rotella’s Italian heritage. He describes
Amore as “a personal journey through music
rather than a physical journey across landscape and terrain.” He guides readers through
what he calls the “Italian decade” of the 1950s,
when jukeboxes, the radio, and the ready
availability of records and turntables turned
singers like Perry Como, Dean Martin, and
Frank Sinatra into superstars.
While songs like That’s Amore, O Sole Mio,
Night and Day, and Mack the Knife formed
more of a soundtrack for his Italian father’s
life—his mother is a French-Canadian born in Montreal—they seeped into
Rotella’s life as well. “Many people of my generation know these songs,” he
says, “especially Sinatra and Louis Prima. My father would break out into
song every once in a while, and there were two Italian delis in St. Petersburg [Fla.] where we went that played Italian music.”
In the book, Rotella chronicles what he regards as the top 40 ItalianAmerican songs, interviewing many of the singers, including Vic Damone,
Connie Francis, and Frankie Laine before his death in 2007. “Some were
really receptive to the book,” says Rotella. “Many are still performing for
sold-out crowds, be it Frankie Valli or Dion, who’s opening for Bob Dylan in
Europe.” It took months for some to agree to talk with him, but once they
did, many reminisced as if they were talking to a son or grandson. For others, like Frankie Valli, whom Rotella interviewed around the opening of
Jersey Boys, the musical about Valli and the Four Seasons, Rotella may
have been just one more interviewer.
Rotella says that his wife accused him of writing the book so that he
could play the music of artists like Jimmy Roselli at home and claim that
he was doing research. But the truth is that he never stopped listening to
the stars of the Italian decade. On his commute to work he still listens, but
not exclusively. He sometimes switches to mid-’80s New Wave.
Rotella will appear on the Author Stage today at 11 a.m. —Judith Rosen
© Sigrid Estrada

36

Tosca Reno will be signing
her most recent book,
The Eat-Clean Diet ® Recharged,
on

Wednesday May 26
and

Thursday May 27
from

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
at

Robert Kennedy Publishing
Booth #3776.
At the age of 40, Tosca Reno reinvented herself, leaving a destructive
marriage, losing her excess weight, solving her health problems and
becoming the woman she had always wanted to be. She now lives a
fulfilled, meaningful life, and through her appearances and best-selling
series of books she has inspired millions of other women to do the same.

1_2 hor.indd 1

5/14/2010 3:11:42 PM

L E A R N H OW P E R M A N E N T PA P E R P R E S E R V E S T H E W R I T T E N WO R D AT B O OT H 3 6 3 1 .

38

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

AUTHORS

know and love well, because the subject is so difficult to illustrate—with photos
or art,” she reflects. “This story deals with sounds and you can’t photograph
sounds—but it’s also a challenge to illustrate them. I think Lisa Desimini did an
amazing job of making clear what sounds might look like.”
Alda’s experience at a show of her photographs some 20 years ago led to
her children’s book career. “This particular show included a lot of candid
shots of animals, and, in terms of sales, I realized that people were buying
them for their children’s bedrooms,” she recalls. “I saw a connection I
hadn’t seen before, and I spread the photos out and said to myself, ‘There’s a
story here.’ ” That story became Sheep Sheep, Sheep, Help Me Fall Asleep,
Alda’s first children’s book, published by Doubleday in 1992.
Though she has attended past BEAs in L.A. and Chicago, New Yorker
Alda notes she’s “happy to be able to just hop in a cab” to get to this year’s
show. “With the isolation of writing and photographing, I love this exposure
to other people in publishing and meeting my potential audience.”
Alda will meet some of her audience today, 11–11:30 a.m., when she and
—Sally Lodge
Desimini sign copies of Lulu’s Piano Lesson at Table 1.

AT THE S H OW

Arlene Alda
Playing on Her Musical
Past

Becky Garrison
© Alan Alda

“When I was a kid, I loved music but hated to
practice,” says Arlene Alda, who ultimately
abandoned the piano, but went on to play
clarinet in the Houston Symphony. Her latest picture book, Lulu’s Piano Lesson (Tundra, Aug.), introduces a girl who would
rather listen to the squeak of a swing or the
ring of her bike bell than the sound of the
piano at practice time. Luckily, Lulu has a
wise piano teacher who knows how to
inspire his reluctant student.
“When I got older and playing an instrument was my own choice, I loved playing the clarinet and took off with it—
and I had some very creative teachers,” says the author. “I drew from all of
my past experiences with music to create this book. I want to spread the
word that a child will naturally not want to practice, but there are ways of
hooking kids on music without making them feel guilty for not practicing.
It’s important to tap into the love of music that’s inside kids.”
An accomplished photographer before she became a children’s author, Alda
has illustrated many of her books with her photos. She realized from the start
that the theme of Lulu’s Piano Lesson didn’t lend itself to photographic treatment. “I’ve written 14 books, but have never done one on music, a subject I

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

Satire Keeps Her Centered
Many Christian leaders have big platforms these days. From megachurches
to megabook deals, they enjoy resources galore to help bring attention to
their messages and bigger-than-life personalities. But all that noise and
showmanship tends to make Jesus hard to find.
That’s a central theme in the recent work of Becky Garrison, a prolific
religious satirist with a platform of her own at BEA. She’ll be sharing observations on a panel—“The Future of Fundamentalism in an Obama Era”—at 2
p.m. today in Room 1E17.
In Garrison’s new book, Jesus Died for This? (Zondervan, Aug.), she brings
readers inside what she calls “the Christian publishing empire” and into the
crowd at many a well-publicized event, where headliners seem to know

Soho Press: Booth #4505

From the author of the
Los Angeles Times Book Prize Winner
comes the
h next in
i the
h thrilling
h illli
Detective Jack Lennon series set
in Northern Ireland

STUART NEVILLE
“Stuart Neville is Ireland’s
answer to Henning Mankell.”
—Ken Bruen
ARCs available at
the Soho Press booth
So Good It’s a Crime
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www.sohocrime.com
5/14/2010 11:37:33
1_4
AM
vertical.indd 1

5/14/2010 6:10:03 PM

PUBL I SHERS

more about marketing than about making
disciples.
“The author loses [his or her] authentic
voice,” Garrison says. “They start to be concerned with, ‘How do I present myself so I can
be a good author/speaker? How do I put on a
good show? How do I craft my message so it
will sell well?’ That’s instead of asking:
‘Where is that inner drive within me that’s
compelling me to speak?’ ”
Garrison has made a name for herself by
drawing on humor and directing barbs at
both the religious right and left alike. Her
previous books include Red and Blue God,
Black and Blue Church (Jossey-Bass, 2006)
and The New Atheist Crusaders and Their
Unholy Grail (Thomas Nelson, 2008). These days she notes how politically
liberal Christians often fault their foes in the faith for bowing down to GOP
politicians. But she finds these same people “worshipping Obama” instead
of maintaining a prophetic voice.
Garrison admits it’s not easy to retain integrity on today’s religious landscape. Fresh voices within American Christianity quickly get caught up in a
branding machine that links them to a movement—the Emerging Church,
New Monasticism, or Organic Church, to name a few—and, ironically,
makes them irrelevant as they cater to a marketplace.
Still, hope is not lost. Signs of authentic faith and committed discipleship
are percolating in grassroots settings, far from the spotlights and marquees, in Garrison’s assessment. She applauds select figures such as writer
Shane Claiborne for recommitting to roots in religious communities and
resisting temptations to cash in on celebrity.
Garrison says she’s somewhat insulated from the problems that plague
other Christian writers because, as a satirist, she’s always an outsider. Per—G. Jeffrey MacDonald
haps being on the margins has its benefits.

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BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

W E E K LY

39

Alyson Noël
Steps onto Middle-Grade Turf
With more than 1.8 million books in print, Alyson Noël’s the Immortals
series has clearly scored a hit with teen readers. In Radiance (Square
Fish, Sept.), the author makes her middle-grade debut, launching a
paranormal series that’s a spinoff of
her bestselling YA series. At the center
of the new story arc is Riley, first introduced in Evermore, the first Immortals
novel, who is the younger sister of protagonist Ever. St. Martin’s/Griffin will
release Dark Flame, the fourth Immortals novel, next month.
The idea for the middle-grade series
came from Square Fish publisher Jean
Feiwel, says Noël. “When Jean proposed
this to me, I jumped at the chance to
write about Riley again,” she recalls.
“Riley ended up having a bigger part in
Evermore than I’d envisioned because I
enjoyed writing her so much.”
But the author had an initial moment
of self-doubt. “Before I began to write
Radiance, I went into a panic,” she says.
“I’m so used to writing for teens, and that’s my state of mind anyway. No
matter how old I really am, I am a teen in my head, so I thought, ‘How am I
going to write for 12-year-olds or in the voice of a 12-year-old?’ But I told
myself not to worry about Riley’s age, just recreate the character, and
that worked.” Noël calls Radiance “one of the easiest books I’ve ever written. It really flowed, and I enjoyed the entire process. And, honestly, that is
not true of every book I write.”
Noël published her first YA novel, Faking 19, back in 2005, while working

© Nancy Villere

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

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5/7/2010 6:05:15 PM

40

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

AUTHORS

PUBL I SHERS

as a flight attendant. “We’d
have a lot of
downtime
between flights,
and of course
delays, so I was constantly writing—on cocktail napkins or anything I could
find,” says the author, who had been determined to become a writer since
reading Judy Blume in sixth grade. She turned to writing full-time after
September 11: “I knew that my job as flight attendant would never be the
same. When we had to take pay cuts and do bomb searches, I realized that
it was time to get serious about my writing.”
After writing six subsequent novels, Noël decided to venture into paranormal fiction with the Immortals and didn’t know how her readers would
respond. “I didn’t know what to expect, but it was a great and almost surreal
moment when I realized that readers embraced it.”
Noël will sign galleys of Radiance today, 10:30–11 a.m., at the Macmillan
—Sally Lodge
Children’s Publishing Group booth (3953).

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

David Wiesner
Brings Creative Process to Life
A three-time Caldecott Medalist, most recently in 2007 for Flotsam, David
Wiesner has a new picture book for the fall, Art and Max (Clarion, Oct.). A
250,000-copy first printing is on order for the title, which centers on two lizard friends: Arthur, an accomplished artist, and Max, who is a beginner—
but a fast learner.
Wiesner says that his most recent work took him in new directions. “When
I finished Flotsam, it felt like a culmination of the way I had been working
for a long time, in terms of both the media and the visual storytelling process,” he says. “When that book won the Caldecott, it occurred to me that if
that didn’t give me license to try something new, I didn’t know what would.”
His response was to explore various media, which is exactly what ends up
in Art and Max. “Basically, I saw a character rendered in an opaque media
that then cracks open,” says Wiesner. “Underneath is the character rendered in pastel, which is then blown off, revealing the character in watercolor, and then that is washed off and there’s a line drawing, which snaps
and collapses. I thought that was all
very interesting—but then I had to
figure out what the story is that sets
this all in motion—why is this happening?”

© Peggy Morsch

AT THE S H OW

W E E K LY

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5/12/2010 9:44:25 AM

Though Wiesner says it took him a
while to find the answer, he finally
realized this was about the media
themselves: “To a certain degree it
is an exploration of the creative process. Once the line-drawing character disappears, the other character
has to figure out how to recreate
him. The book really grew organically.”
Arthur and Max began as what
the author calls “cuddly creatures,”
but, he adds, “that was just a placeholder until I could figure out who
the characters were going to be.”
The characters became lizards,
since Wiesner finds they “have character traits that are more interesting to draw.”
Wiesner says it’s been a few years
since he’s been to BEA, and he’s
happy to return and get caught up
in what he calls the show’s “extraordinary energy level.” He praises
independent booksellers for their
skill at guiding visitors to their
stores. “For me, walking into a bookstore is like walking into a gallery.
There is so much great stuff that
grabs the eye. It’s nice to know that
a bookseller knows the books and
can help decipher all that is there.”
Wiesner signs copies of Flotsam
and posters promoting Art and Max
this morning, 10–11 a.m., at Table 6.
—Sally Lodge

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5/7/2010 3:48:06 PM

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

W E E K LY

41

Free First; Then Pay
Two summers ago when Robert Kiyosaki was recovering from open heart
surgery and America’s financial
institutions were undergoing a meltdown, the bestselling personal
finance author decided that he
wanted to write about past economic
history at the same time that modern
economic history was being made.
The only trouble was, as Rick Wolff,
publisher and editor-in-chief of
Hachette’s Business Plus, explains,
“We in publishing take pride in being
on the cutting edge of 19th-century
technology.” Instead of going the typical trade publishing route, Wolff
suggested Kiyosaki write a blog.
Rather than give away free chapters or even the entire book online
after the print version came out,
Kiyosaki wrote Rich Dad’s Conspiracy of the Rich online and posted a
new chapter every month. Then in
September 2009, Business Plus published it in paperback. In the intervening months, says Wolff, Rich
Dad’s Conspiracy of the Rich has continued to sell steadily. It is up to about
105,000 copies and is in its fifth printing. The conspiracyoftherich.com
Web site has generated more than a

Healthy Carbs
Touting The Carb Lovers Diet: Eat
What You Love, Get Slim for Life
(Oxmoor House, Aug.) as the first
book to promote the idea that carbohydrates are a fundamental part
of our diets, coauthors Ellen Kunes,
Health magazine’s editor-in-chief,
and senior food and nutrition editor
Frances Largeman-Roth, are determined to prove that eating carbs is
the best way to get and stay thin.
“After I attended a conference on
whole grains in 2004, I began to
research some of the ideas I heard
about the weight-loss benefits found
in carbs,” Largeman-Roth says.
Intrigued by what she discovered,
The Carb Lovers Diet was finally
conceived as Health magazine’s
first diet book, and Kunes enthusiastically joined the project. With
four-color illustrations throughout,
the book includes 75 recipes, helpful
tips, and dietary calculations. One
of its main features is the 7-Day Carb
Lovers Kickstart Plan, developed
by registered dietitians on the
Health staff and in clinical practice.
“All the research was carefully
vetted,” Kunes says. “The diet really
works and includes great food. You
don’t have to change what you eat
to lose weight.” Coconut French
toast, homemade scones, pesto turkey club sandwiches, and pasta primavera are some of the many recipes provided. While many other
diets forbid eating between meals,
this one actually requires two
snacks a day, such as a bag of potato
chips and Reese’s Peanut Butter

million page views for chapter reads
through last September, and more
than 133,135 people have signed on
as members. The site, which currently supports English, Spanish,
and Polish, will soon add German;
the book itself has been translated
into 25 languages.
Although the free model is
clearly working for Kiyosaki, it
might not be right for every book.
His wife, Kim Kiyosaki, is looking at
a more traditional publishing
model for her next two, which are
scheduled for release in 2011. Next
spring, she will publish a sequel to
her debut book, Rich Woman. In it,
she follows five of her classmates as
they make decisions around
money, investing, and life on the
path to retirement. Then, in the fall,
Rich Couple—which showcases the
stories of women, and men, from
around the world who will share
their challenges and opportunities
on the road to a rich and financially
free life—will be out.
As for Robert Kiyosaki? “Stay
tuned,” he teases, as the financial
and economic headlines continue
to fuel his passions. —Judith Rosen

Cups. “You never feel deprived on
our diet,” Kunes emphasizes.
“Carbs make hunger go away, and
they’re satisfying.”
Oxmoor (3768) will take advantage of Health’s social media networking presence on Facebook and
Twitter. “We’ll also have a designated Web site, Carblovers.com,
that will include a blog, testimonials from people who are on the diet,
and more.” Announced first printing is 86,000 copies. —Wendy Werris

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42

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

THURSDAY, MAY 27 , 2010

Skyhorse’s New Autism Line
Skyhorse Publishing (3430) is officially
launching a new line of books devoted
to the issue of autism, a neuraldevelopment disorder that affects
as many as one million Americans.
Its new line (as yet unnamed) will
consist of nonfiction titles in a variety of genres, including cookbooks,
reference guides, and memoirs.
For Skyhorse publisher Tony Lyons,
reaching this underserved market
is also personal—his six-year-old
daughter is autistic. “Only 20 years
ago, autism was a rare disorder.
Now it affects one in 100 children.

We as a civilization are on the precipice of an epidemic. I feel certain it
will soon affect every family—a child,
a cousin, a distant relative, a neighbor, a friend.”
At BEA, he is showcasing six 2010
titles, with expectations for about
10–12 titles annually thereafter. The
2010 releases include Cutting Edge
Therapies for Autism 2010–2011 by
Skyhorse publisher Lyons and Ken
Siri, the first in what will be an
annually updated manual written
for parents of children and aimed
at providing them with all of the lat-

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Two books that are launching the new line.

est in research and developments
for that year; The Autism Cookbook: 101 Gluten Free and Dairy
Free Recipes by Susan Delaine, the

mother of an autistic child; Callous
Disregard: Autism and Vaccines—
The Truth Behind a Tragedy by
Andrew Wakefield, with a foreword
by Jenny McCarthy; 1001 Tips for
the Parents of Autistic Boys by Ken
Siri; 1001 Tips for the Parents of
Autistic Girls (Oct.) by Lyons; and
All I Can Handle: I’m No Mother
Teresa (Nov.) by Kim Stagliono, with
an introduction by McCarthy, in
which the author explores her
experiences raising three autistic
—Claire Kirch
girls.

Ayers Palling Around with Cartoonist
A controversial 1960s-era activist
as comic book superhero? Well, not
quite, but close. William Ayers, the
University of Illinois at Chicago
education professor, is best known
as a cofounder of the radical
Weather Underground, which
bombed government buildings to
protest the Vietnam War—now he is
starring in a graphic novel adaptation of his 1993 memoir from Teachers College Press, To Teach: The
Journey of a Teacher, a pretty heavy
tome in which Ayers explains his
theories about education reform. It
is often assigned as a text in college
and university education course
and has sold a total of 75,000 copies.
When Teachers College Press
asked Ayers a few years ago to
update To Teach, he was reluctant,
because, he says, he was “bored
with the idea.” He agreed to revise
the book only if the press would let
him do something different—such
as write it in a graphic novel format.
“I thought that’d be the end of it,” he
recalls. “They called my bluff.”
Ayers’s coauthor, cartoonist Ryan
Alexander-Tanner, moved from

Oregon into Ayers’s Chicago home
for several months to work on the
adaptation with him, a collaboration that Ayers describes as “wonderful,” although there was a “steep
learning curve.” The process
involved more than simply illustrating Ayers’s words; it meant
writing an entirely new book, with
characters and a plot.
Ayers is not worried that his
ideas will be overshadowed by
readers focusing on AlexanderTanner’s cartoons—just the opposite. In fact, emphasizing the
unconventional combination of
serious prose and irreverent
images reinforces his radical theories about teaching.
“I’ve written about different
approaches to education,” Ayers
points out. “This is a different
approach to how ideas are presented. Humor is embracing in a
way didactic writing isn’t.”
The two will sign finished copies
of To Teach: The Journey, in Comics
in the autographing area today at
Table 24, 3:30–4:30 p.m.
—Claire Kirch

5/14/2010 11:35:33 AM

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