Você está na página 1de 49

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

A functional for shells of arbitrary geometry and a mixed "nite


element method for parabolic and circular cylindrical shells
A. Y. AkoK z*,s and A. OG zuK tokt
IQ stanbul eknik ;G niversitesi, Ins, aat Faku( ltesi, 80626 Maslak, IQ stanbul, u( rkey

SUMMARY
In this study a higher-order shell theory is proposed for arbitrary shell geometries which allows the
cross-section to rotate with respect to the middle surface and to warp into a non-planar surface. This new
kinematic assumption satis"es the shear-free surface boundary condition (BC) automatically. A new internal
force expression is obtained based on this kinematic assumption. A new functional for arbitrary shell
geometries is obtained employing Ga( teaux di!erential method. During this variational process the BC is
constructed and introduced to the functional in a systematic way. Two di!erent mixed elements PRSH52
and CRSH52 are derived for parabolic and circular cylindrical shells, respectively, using the new functional.
The element does not su!er from shear locking. The excellent performance of the new elements is veri"ed by
applying the method to some test problems. Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
KEY WORDS:

"nite element; Ga( teaux di!erential method; arbitrary shell geometry; parabolic shell; circular
cylindrical shell

1. INTRODUCTION
Shells are assumed to be thin-walled structures in which the valid interval for the ratio of
thickness (h) to two other linear dimensions (a, b) ranges within the limit (a/h)+20}1000. Shell
structures have found wide application in engineering "elds ranging from water tanks to arch
dams. Many works exist about shell structures; as general treatises see References [1}4]. Often
shell problems are reduced to two-dimensional problems due to the smaller thickness ratio with
respect to their other dimensions. This reduction is accomplished by proposing certain hypotheses regarding the kinematics of deformation and shell theories of varied accuracy and complexity
are obtained. Because of its versatility in handling complex geometries and boundary conditions,
the "nite element method (FEM) is the most suitable choice for the structural analyst. There exist
extensive literature for FEM [5}9]. We may classify the FEM for shells, as follows:

* Correspondence to: A. Y. AkoK z, I0 stanbul Teknik UG niversitesi Ins, aat FakuK ltesi, 80626 Maslak, I0 stanbul, Turkey
s E-mail: akoz@itu.edu.tr
t E-mail: aozutok@srv.ins.itu.edu.tr
Contract/grant sponsor: Technical University of Istanbul Research Fund

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Received 20 November 1998


Revised 20 August 1999

1934

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

(i) The theory of shells used in the formulation of thin or thick shells theories (Kirchho!,
Reissner and higher-order shell theories)
(ii) The chosen element, independent parameters, element interpolation function and special
techniques such as reduced/selective integration, discrete Kirchho! theory, etc.
(iii) The method used to derive FEM such as potential energy theorem, Hu}washizu and
Hellinger}Reissner theory, variational formulation, weak formulation, Ga( teaux derivatives.
Kirchho! hypothesis states that the normal remains straight and normal to the middle surface.
The conventional treatment of shell structures based on Kirchho! hypothesis de"nes fully the
displacement pattern by the middle surface. A great di$culty arises in satisfying the necessary
continuity of slopes at interface. Also, Kirchho! hypothesis cannot take into account the
transverse shear [6].
Despite these di$culties, an extensive literature exists on applications of the FEM to Kirchho!
shells. Detailed references to these approaches can be found in Zienkiewicz and Cheung [10],
Przemieniecki et al. [11], De Veubeke [12], Zienkiewicz and Holister [13], Argyris [14], Clough
and Tocher [15], and Jones and Strome [16]. In Reissner plate theory only C0 shape function
continuity is required; hence, an interpolation "eld is more easily constructed [17, 18].
Most of the C0 shell elements that have appeared in the literature, have been derived by means
of the potential energy theorem assuming the displacement and two rotations as independent
parameters [19]. These elements, often exhibit the well-known shear-locking phenomenon [5, 6].
Shear-locking mechanism has been studied and explained by numerous authors [19, 20].
To alleviate shear locking, Zienkiewicz et al. [20] have introduced the reduced integration,
followed by Pawsey and Clough who have introduced the selective integration [22}26]. In
dynamic analysis the last method leads to zero energy modes to avoid the di$culty. Belytschko
[27] has developed the stabilization matrix.
Also discrete Kirchho!}Mindlin element has been developed by numerous authors [27}29].
Discrete Kirchho! elements impose the Kirchho! conditions are at a discrete number of points.
The degeneration concept, introduced by Ahmad et al. [19], allows the direct discretization of
the three-dimensional "eld equations in terms of nodal variables in the middle surface. The
degenerate solid shell concept adopts the basic assumptions in shell theory, which allow transverse shear deformation. The "nite element analysis of shells took a new direction after the
introduction of the degenerate shell element. Di!erent alternatives of these approaches have
appeared in the literature [30]. However, unless special care is taken, the shear-locking e!ect is
encountered as in the other approaches. To alleviate the locking various mixed formulations are
introduced based on the Hellinger}Reissner, and Hu}Washizu principles [31, 32]. Also, to
remedy the problem, higher-order shell deformation theories for cylindrical shells, general shells
of revolution and rectangular plates have been proposed by Bhimaraddi et al. [33]. A new thick
shell element has been formulated recently by Koziey, which eliminated the need for shear
correction factors [34]. To be able to develop a reliable element for thick}thin shells, besides the
theory for shells (ranging from Kirchho!}Love to the higher-order theory), the means for
deriving the FEM equations is of importance. In most of the studies the potential energy theorem
has been employed to obtain the element equations. Other well-accepted theories are especially
Hellinger}Reissner and Hu}Washizu for mixed element formulation [31, 32]. Variational
method is also adapted to formulate the mixed element formulation [35, 36]. Recently, AkoK z and
his co-workers have employed Ga( teaux di!erentials to construct the functional for various
problems [37}41]. For a relatively simple problem, the same functional can be obtained by the
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

1935

Hellinger}Reissner and Hu}Washizu principles. But Ga( teaux di!erential approaches have some
important advantages:
(1) Any linear or non-linear shell and plate theory can be adopted. For KaH rmaH n plate a functional boundary conditions is obtained by AkoK z [42].
(2) Any constitutive equation can be used in this formulation. Recently this approach has been
applied to viscoelastic beams [43].
(3) It gives a very accurate result. Using only a single element the exact result is obtained for
a cantilever beam [38]. This approach satis"es the convergence requirements.
(4) It does not exhibit shear locking [44].
(5) It does not use any arti"cial numerically adjusted factors.
(6) It is capable of predicting accurately the displacement, stress and frequency in both thin and
thick plates and shells.
(7) A Ga( teaux approach allows a direct formulation of the elements of the sti!ness matrix
without requiring a matrix inversion.
(8) It is easy to implement.
(9) The given "eld equations are enforced to the functional in a straightforwad manner and also
the boundary conditions for given problem can be constructed easily.
(10) It provides the consistency of the "eld equations [1, 45].
In this study, a higher-order shell theory is proposed for general shell geometries which allows the
cross-section to rotate with respect to the middle surface, and to warp into a non-planar surface.
This assumption satis"es the shear-free surface boundary condition automatically.
Then a functional and the boundary condition are obtained for the general thin}thick
shells based on Ga( teaux di!erential approaches. Using this functional, quadrilateral FEM
PRSH52 and CRSH52 are obtained for parabolic and cylindrical shells with variable thickness,
respectively.

2. SHELL GEOMETRY
A point P in the middle surface of the undeformed shell can be denoted by the position vector R
R"xi#yj#zk

(1)

where i, j, k are the base vectors of the Cartesian axes (see Figure 1(a)).
Since the shell surface establishes a constraint in 3-D space, x, y, z are not independent.
We choose two independent parameters as a, b, to de"ne the position vector R. We assume
a, b, coincide with the lines of principal curvatures and we denote the base vectors in directions
of a, and b, by A and A , respectively. The base vector A and A can be obtained by
1
2
1
2
di!erentiating the position vector with respect to paremeters a, b, respectively
LR
LR
A " "R , A " "R
1 La
,1
2 Lb
,2
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

(2)

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1936

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Figure 1. (a) The shell geometry and reference frame; (b) the positive directions of internal force; (c) the
positive direction of internal moment.

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

1937

The length of a line element dS, between two points on the middle surface for orthogonal
co-ordinates, is given by
dS2"A da2#A db2
11
22

(3)

A "A ' A , A "A ' A


11
1 1
22
2 2

(4)

where A and A are


11
22

The base vector perpendicular to the middle surface is denoted by n. The partial derivative of the
base vectors with respect to independent parameters (a, b) can be de"ned as
A "!k A #B n
ij k
ij
i,j
Ai "!!i Ak#Bi n
j
jk
,j
n "!Bk A
j k
,j

(5)

where !k , Bj are Christo!el symbols and curvature tensors, respectively


ij i
1A
!1 " 11,1 ,
11 2 A
11

1A
1A
!2 "! 11,2 , !1 "! 22,1 ,
11
22
2 A
2 A
22
11

1A
!2 "! 22,2
22
2 A
22

1A
!1 " 11,2 ,
12 2 A
11

1A
1A
1A
!2 " 22,1 , !1 " 11,2 , !2 " 22,1
12 2 A
21 2 A
21 2 A
22
11
22

1
1
B1"! , B2"!
1
2
R
R
1
2

(6)

in which R and R are principal curvatures, unit vectors E can be obtained as


1
2
i
A
A
E " 1 , E " 2 , E "n
1 A
2 A
3
1
2

(7)

The derivatives of unit vectors are


1 LA
A
1 E ! 1 n,
E "!
1,1
2
A Lb
R
2
1
1 LA
2E ,
E "
1,2 A La 2
1
A
n " 1E ,
,1 R 1
1
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

1 LA
A
2E ! 2n
"!
2,2
1
A La
R
1
2
1 LA
1E
E "
2,1 A Lb 1
2
A
n " 2E
,2 R 2
2

(8)

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1938

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

where comma implies a derivative with respect to the following indices (i.e. (a b)). Using the above
relations and continuity of these vectors, we can show that [2]

A B
A B A

A
1
2 " A ,
R
R 2,a
2 ,a
1

A B
B

A
1
1 " A
R
R 1,b
1 ,b
2

1
1
A A
A
#
A
"! 1 2
2,a
1,b
A
A
R R
,a
,b
1
2
1 2

(9)

These relations are known as the Codazzi and Gauss conditions that relate the quantities A , A ,
1 2
R , and R of a given surface. Once the middle surface has been speci"ed, the position of any point
1
2
of shell outside the middle surface may be de"ned by
Q"R#zn

(10)

The derivatives of the position vector Q de"ne the base vectors G at this point. The base vectors
i
at this point can be obtained by using (7) and (8) as
G "G E , G "G E , G "n
1
1 1
2
2 2
3

(11)

where

z
z
G "A 1#
, G "A 1#
1
1
2
2
R
R
1
2

(12)

3. KINEMATICS
We now de"ne the deformation at any point Q in the shell by the following displacement vector:
U (a, b, z)"; (a, b, z) E #< (a, b, z) E #= (a, b, z) n
1
2

(13)

Referring to literature on the theory of elasticity, strain components in orthogonal curvilinear


coordinate systems can be obtained as follows [4, 46]:

G
G

H
H

1
<
A =
e "
;# A # 1
1 G
,a A 1,b
R
1
2
1
1
;
A =
e "
< # A # 2
2 G
,b A 2,a
R
2
2
2
e "=
n
,z
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

A B
A B
A B A B

;
1
c " = #G
1n G
,a
1 G
1 ,z
1
<
1
c " = #G
,b
2 G
2n G
2 ,z
2
G <
G ;
c " 2
# 1
12 G G
G G
2 ,a
1 ,b
1
2

1939

(14)

In this study we assume the following displacement functions that allow the cross-sections to
rotate relative to the middle surface, as the Mindlin type theories, and to warp into a non-planar
surface:
; (a, b, z)"u (a, b)#b z#c F (z)
1
1 1
< (a, b, z)"v (a, b)#b z#c F (z)
2
2 2
= (a, b, z)"w(a, b)

(15)

where b and b are rotations, and c and c are shears of the principal cross-sections of shell. We
1
2
1
2
can de"ne b and b so that the "rst two terms do not create c and c as classical thin shells
1
2
1n
2n
theory. Thus if we substitute the "rst two terms of ;, <, and = in Equation (14), and imposing
c and c equal to zero, we "nd that
1n
2n
u
1
v
1
b " ! w , b " ! w
1 R
2 R
A ,a
A ,b
1
1
2
2

(16)

F (z) and F (z) have been chosen so as to create reasonable shear distribution. We choose F (z)
1
2
1
and F (z) as follows:
2
F (z)"H f (z), F (z)"H f (z)
1
1
2
2

(17)

where H , H and f (z) are de"ned as


1 2
z
H "1# ,
1
R
1

z
4z2
H "1# , f (z)"z 1!
2
R
3h2
2

(18)

Similar functions have been used for general shells of revolutions by Bhimaraddi et al. [33]. Third
terms in Equation (15) yield the following shear distributions:

4z2
4z2
c "c H 1!
, c "c H 1!
1n
1 1
2n
2 2
h2
h2

(19)

This shear distribution satis"es free shear on the shell surfaces.


Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1940

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

The other strain component can be obtained easily by inserting the displacement into (14):
1
e " Me #i z#s f (z)N
1 H
10
1
1
1
1
e " Me #i z#s f (z)N
20
2
2
2 H
2
c "c #iz#s f (z)
12
120

4
c "c H 1! z2
1n
1 1
h2
4
c "c H 1! z2
2n
2 2
h2
where e

(20)

e i i s , s , c , i, s are
10, 20, 1, 2, 1 2 120
1
v
w
e " u #
A #
10 A ,a A A 1,a R
1
1 2
1
1
u
w
e " v #
A #
20 A ,b A A 2,a R
2
1 2
2
1
b
i " b # 2 A
1 A 1,a A A 1,b
1
1 2
b
1
i " b # 1 A
2 A 2,b A A 2,a
1 2
2
c H
H
s " 1c # 2 2 A
1 A 1,a A A 1,b
1 2
1
H
c H
s " 2c # 1 1 A
2 A 2,b A A 2,a
2
1 2
c

A B
A B
A B

A B
A B
A B

G
v
u
G
" 2
# 1
120 G G
G G
1
2 ,a
1 ,b
2
G b
G b
i" 2 2 # 1 1
G G
G G
2 ,a
1 ,b
2
1
G c
G c
s" 2 2 # 1 1
G A
G A
2 ,a
1 ,b
1
2

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

(21)

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1941

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

4. STRESSES, INTERNAL FORCES AND EQUILIBRIUM EQUATION


Assuming Hooke's law as the constitutive relation, stresses are obtained as follows:
E
E
Me #le N, p "
Me #le N
p "
2
2 1!l2 2
1
1 1!l2 1
q "Gc ,
1n
1n

q "Gc , q "Gc
2n
2n
12
12

(22)

The internal forces that correspond to the stresses are given by

GHP GH GHP GH
P

h@2

p
2
"
H dz
q
2
1
21
~h@2
Q
q
2n
N

"
H dz ,
q
1
2
12
~h@2
S
q
1n

G H P G H
K

"

p
1 zH dz ,
2
q
~h@2 12
h@2

h@2

(23)

G H P G H
M

"

p
2 zH dz
1
q
~h@2 21
h@2

The positive direction of internal forces are shown in Figures 1(b) and (c). After evaluating the
integrals and carrying out some simpli"cations, the internal forces are obtained as follows:

A
A
A
A

B
B
B
B

1
1
P"B Me #le N#
!
DiN
10
20
1
R
R
2
1
1
1
!
DiN
N"B Me #le N#
2
20
10
R
R
1
2
1
1
K"D MiN #liN N#D
!
e
1
2
10
R
R
2
1
1
1
M"D MiN #liN N#D
!
e
2
1
20
R
R
1
2
B (1!l)
B (1!l)
S"
c , Q"
c
1
2
3
3

A uh#(4/5) (I/R ) c
A vh#(4/5) (I/R ) c
2 2 #G 1
1 1
"G 2
1
A
A
A
A
2
1
,a
2
,b
1

G H

I
A )
2
#G 2
R !R
A A
2 ,a 2
1
1
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1942

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

A uh#(4/5) (I/R ) c
A vh#(4/5) (I/R ) c
2 2 #G 1
1 1
"G 2
2
A
A
A
A
2
1
,a
2
,b
1

G H
G H
G H

I
A )
1
#G 1
R !R
A A
1 ,b 1
2
2

G
G

HA
HA

)
v#(4/5) c
I
A
A
A
I
2 #G 1 I) #G 2 I
2
"G 2 I
!
1
1
A
A
A
A
A
R
R
2 ,a
2
1
2
1
,a
2
1

B
B

)
u#(4/5) c
I
A
A
A
I
1
"G 2 I 2 #G 1 I) #G 1 I
!
2
1
A
A
A
A
A
R
R
2 ,a
1
1
2
2
,b
1
2

(24)

where
4
4
) "b # c , ) "b # c
1
1 5 1
2
2 5 2
c LA
1 Lc
c LA
1 Lc
1# 2
1 , sN "
2# 1
2
sN "
2 A Lb A A La
1 A La
A A Lb
1 2
1 2
2
1
4
4
h3
Eh
Eh3
iN "i # sN , iN "i # sN , I" , B"
, D"
1
1 5 1
2
2 5 2
12
12(1!l2)
(1!l2)

(25)

Although these equations are very similar to those obtained by Novozhilov [2] there are some
important di!erences. Here we have added a parabolic shear distribution. This additional term
represents the contribution to non-vanishing transverse shear stresses. Also the relation between
shear stresses and its resultant shear forces are precisely given by Equation (20). The e!ect of
lateral shear can also be observed in the moment equation as 4 s and 4 s (Equation (25)). These
5 1
5 2
equations are valid for thick shells but it is very di$cult to use them in the solution of shell
problems. For a large number of practical applications, the thicknesses of shells lie in the range
(1/1000(h/R(1/50). Therefore, (h/R)2@1 can be omitted for the sake of simplicity, as
compared with unity. Using this simpli"cation the following relations are obtained:
P"B Me #l e N ,
10
20
K"D MiN #liN N ,
1
2
B (1!l)
S"
c ,
1
3

N"B Me #le N
20
10
M"D MiN #liN N
2
1
B (1!l)
Q"
c
2
3

B (1!l)
"
MA v !v A #A u !uA N
2 ,a
2,a
1 ,b
1,b
2A A
1 2

)
1
)
D (1!l) 1
) ! 2 A # ) ! 1 A
"
A 2,a A A 2,a A 1,b A A 1,b
2
1
1 2
2
1 2
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

(26)

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

1943

The e!ect of the new kinematic assumption appears in the bending moment as additional terms
and more importantly, non-vanishing shear represents a contribution to the shell theory. Now, as
a result of the study of the equilibrium of middle surface of shell the following "ve di!erential
equations are obtained [2]:
1
S
M(A P) #(A ) !NA #A N# #q "0
2
,a
1
,b
2,a
1,b
1
A A
R
1 2
1
1
Q
M(A ) #(A N) #A2,a!PA1, b N# #q "0
2
,a
1
,b
2
A A
R
1 2
2

P
1
N
M(A S) #(A Q) N!
#
#q "0
2
,a
1
,b
n
R
R
A A
1
2
1 2
1
M(A K) #(A ) #A1,b!MA2,aN!S"0
2 ,a
1 ,b
A A
1 2
1
M(A ) #(A M) #A2,a!KA1, b N!Q"0
2 ,a
1 ,b
A A
1 2

(27)

The boundary conditions of shells are written in symbolic form as follows:


!R#R< "0, !M#M
< "0, )!)) "0, u!u; "0

(28)

The explicit form of boundary conditions will be obtained through the variational process.
In Equation (28) quantities with hat are the moment, force, rotation and de#ection vectors,
respectively.

5. FUNCTIONAL FOR SHELLS


All "eld equations including boundary conditions for shells can be written in operator form as
Q"Ly!f

(29)

This operator can be written as follows:


D
0
ij
------D------------------------D 0 0
0 !1
D 0 0 !1
0
0 D 0 1
0
0
D 1 0
0
0
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

GHG H
y
f
i
i
----u
!u;
"
)
!))
M
M
<
R
R<

(30)

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1944

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

where , y and f are


ij i
i
B
M(A ' ) !lA N ,
"
2,a
2 ,a
1,6 A A
1 2

B
"
Ml (A ' ) !A N
1,7 A A
2,a
2 ,a
1 2

B (1!l)
5 B (1!l)
"
M(A ' ) ! A N ,
"
1,8
1 ,b
1,b
1,12 12 R
2A A
1 2
1
B
B
"
M!A #l(A ' ) N , "
M(A ' ) !lA N
2,6 A A
1,b
1 ,b
2,7 A A
1 ,b
1,b
1 2
1 2
B(1!l)
5 B (1!l)
"
M(A ' ) #A2,aN ,
"
2,8
2 ,a
2,13 12 R
2A A
1 2
2

1
l
l
1
"!B
#
, "!B
#
3,6
3,7
R
R
R
R
1
1
2
2

12B

"!
M(A ' ) #l(A ' ) N
3,12
2 ,a
1 ,b
5(1!l)A A
1 2
12B

"!
Ml (A ' ) #(A ' ) N
3,13
2 ,a
1 ,b
5(1!l) A A
1 2
D
D
" ,
" ,
4,10 B 1,7
4,9 B 1,6

D
5

" ,
" B (1!l)
4,11 B 1,8
4,12 12

D
D
" ,
" ,
5,9 B 2,6
5,10 B 2,7

D
5

" ,
" B (1!l)
5,11 B 2,8
5,13 12

B
B
"!
MlA #A ( ' ) N , "!
MA #lA ( ' ) N
6,1
2,a
2 ,a
6,2
1,b
1 ,b
A A
A A
1 2
1 2
" , "B , "lB
6,3
3,6
6,6
6,7
B
B
MA #lA ( ' ) N , "!
MlA #A ( ' ) N
"!
2,a
2
,a
7,2
1,b
1 ,b
7,1
A A
A A
1 2
1 2

1
l
"!B
#
, "lB ,
7,3
7,6
R
R
1
2

"B
7,7

B (1!l)
B (1!l)
"!
MA ( ' ) !A N , "!
MA ( ' ) !A N
8,1
1
,b
1,b
8,2
2 ,a
2,a
2A A
2A A
1 2
1 2
D
D
" , "! ,
9,4 B 6,1
9,5
B 6,2
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

"D,
"l D
9,9
9,10
Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

D
D

" ,
" ,
10,4 B 7,1
10,5 B 7,2

1945

"lD,
"D
10,9
10,10

D
D (1!l)
D
"! ,
"!

"! ,
8,1
11,5
8,2
11,11
11,4
B
2
B

5B(1!l) 1
5B(1!l) 1

"
,
"!
(')
12,1
12,3
,a
R
A
12
12
1
1
B (1!l)
5B (1!l)

"
,
"
12,4
12,12
3
12

5B (1!l) 1
5B (1!l) 1

"
,
"
(') ,
13,2
13,3
,b
R
A
12
12
2
2
y "u, y "v,
1
2
N!lP
,
y "
7 B (1!l2)

5B (1!l)

"
13,13
12

P!lN
y ") , y "
,
5
2
6 B (1!l2)

y "w, y ") ,
3
4
1

2
K!lM
M!lK
y "
, y "
, y "
,
8 B (1!l)
9 D (1!l2)
10 D (1!l2)

12S
12Q
2
, y "
, y "
y "
12 5B(1!l)
13 5B(1!l)
11 D(1!l)
f "!q ,
1
1

f "!q , f "!q
2
2
3
n

(31)

Having obtained the "eld equations one needs a method to obtain the functional. We believe that
the Ga( teaux di!erential method is suitable for this aim. Since this method was extensively used
and explained in other studies [38], for the sake of simplicity, the basic steps and de"nitions will
be summarized brie#y. The Ga( teaux derivative of an operator is de"ned as
LQ(y#qy6 )
dQ (y, y6 )"
Lq

(32)

q"0

where q is a scalar. A necessary and su$cient condition that Q is potential is [47]


SdQ (y, y6 ), y*T"SdQ (y, y*), y6 T

(33)

where parentheses indicate the inner products. It can be veri"ed by some calculations that the
operator Q in (30) satis"es (33) if the boundary conditions are de"ned as
[R, u]"[A , u] #[A P, u] #[A , v] #[A N, v] #[A S, w] #[A Q, w]
1
b
2
a
2
a
1
b
2
a
1
b
[M, )]"[A K, ) ] #[A , ) ] #[A , ) ] #[A M, ) ] #[A S, w] #[A Q, w]
2
1 a
1
1 b
2
2 a
1
2 b
2
a
1
b
(34)
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1946

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

where parentheses indicate the inner product which is de"ned on the boundary. Indices show that
inner product is valid where the unit normal coincides with the corresponding co-ordinates. The
boundary conditions are very meaningful in the mechanical viewpoint. All of the terms de"ne the
work done by the boundary forces. If the operator Q is potential, then the functional which
corresponds to the "eld equations is given by [47]
1

P0 [Q (sy, y) y] ds

I(y)"

(35)

where s is a scalar quantity. Explicit form of the functional corresponding to the "eld equation is
I (y)"![A u , P]![u , A ]![A2,a u, N]#[A1,b , u]!SS, ) T
2 ,a
,b 1
1
u
![S, A w ]# S,
![A , v ]#[A2,a , v]
2 ,a
2
,a
R
1
v
![A N, v ]![PA1,b , v]!SQ, ) T![Q, A w ]# Q,
2
1 ,b
1
,b
R
2
P
N
!
,w !
, w #Sq , uT#Sq , vT#Sq , wT
1
2
n
R
R
1
2
![A K, ) ]#[A1,b ) , ]![A , ) ]![MA2, a , ) ]
2
1,a
1
1
1,b
2
![A ) , ]![A ) , M]#[A2,a , ) ]![KA1,b , ) ]
2 2,a
1 2,b
2
2
1
1
1
1
#
SP, PT!lSP, NT# SN, NT #
S, T
B (1!l2) 2
2
B(1!l)

T U

T U

T U T U
G
G

1
1
1
SK, KT!lSK, MT# SM, MT
#
2
D(1!l2) 2

1
6
#
S, T#
MSS, ST#SQ, QTN
D (1!l)
5B(1!l)
#[R, (u!uL )]e#[M, ()!)) )]e#[RK , u] #[M
K , )]
p
p

(36)

where parantheses indicate the inner products and are de"ned as

PPA fgA1 A2 da db
[ f, g]" fg da db
PA

S f, gT"

(37)

and the parentheses with e, p subscripts indicate the geometric and dynamic boundary conditions, respectively. This functional serves in forming the "nite element matrix for the shells, which
has arbitrary geometry.
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

1947

6. FEM FORMULATION FOR THE PARABOLIC CYLINDER


The theory developed will be applied "rst to the parabolic cylindrical shell since the parabolic
geometry "nds a wide area of use in engineering applications.
The parabolic cylinder is de"ned by Figure 2:

4
z"f 1! y2
l2

(38)

The curvature of the shell can be obtained as


1
z@@
2af
R "R and s" "
"!
1
R
(1#z@2)3@2
(1#A2y2)3@2
2

(39)

where
4
a" ,
l2

8f
A"!
l2

(40)

The arc length of the two neighbouring points is


dS2"A2 dx2#A2 dy2
2
1

(41)

A "1, A "J1#A2y2
1
2

(42)

where

The functional for parabolic shells is obtained by substituting (42) into (36) as follows:
I (y)"![A u , P]![u , ]!SS, ) T![S, A w ]![A , v ]![N, v ]
2 ,x
,y
1
2 ,x
2
,x
,y
N
v
!
, w #Sq , uT#Sq , vT#Sq , wT
!SQ, ) T![Q, w ]# Q,
1
2
n
2
,y
R
R
2
2
![A K, ) ]![, ) ]![A ) , ]![) , M]
2
1,x
1,y
2 2,x
2,y
1
1
1
1
SP, PT!l SP, NT# SN, NT #
S, T
#
2
B (1!l)
B(1!l2) 2

T U T U

G
G

1
1
1
#
SK, KT!lSK, MT# SM, MT
D(1!l2) 2
2
1
6
#
S, T#
MSS, ST#SQ, QTN
D (1!l)
5B(1!l)
K , )]
#[R, (u!uL )]e#[M, ()!)) )]e#[RK , u] #[M
p
p
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

(43)

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1948

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Figure 2. The parabolic shell geometry and


reference frame.

Figure 3. Global and local reference frame.

To obtain the element matrix, bilinear interpolation function t is de"ned as


i
t "1 (1#mm ) (1#gg ) m "$1, g "$1, i"1, . . . , 4
i 4
i
i i
i

(44)

The geometry of the element is depicted in Figure 3.


Employing Equation (42), and de"nition of g as
y!y
G
g"
b

(45)

A "J1#4a2f 2(gb#y )2
2
G

(46)

A is obtained inside the element


2

The displacements u, v, w rotations ) , ) , internal forces P, N, , K, M, , S, Q are chosen as


1 2
nodal variables and they are expressed by shape function t in the element. For example
i
u"+ u t . To give an explicit form of the element matrix for a parabolic shell the following
i i
submatrices are de"ned

PA ti tjj A2 dA, [k2]"PA ti tj,a A2 dA


1
[k ]" t t dA, [k ]" t t A
3
PA i j,b 4 PA i j 2 R dA

[k ]"
1

(47)

where i"1, . . . , 4 and j"1, . . . , 4. The explicit expressions of submatrices are given in
Appendix A. In order to take into account the variable cross-section of the shell, the rigidities
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

1949

B and D are represented by interpolation functions


1
"+ B t ,
m m
B

1
"+ D t , m"1, . . . , 4
m m
D

(48)

where
1
1
B " , D " , m"1, . . . , 4
m h
m h3
m
m

(49)

denote the thickness of shell elements at the nodal points. For the shell with variable thickness the
following submatrix is de"ned:

PA titj A2tmBm dA ,

[k ]"
d1

PA ti tj A2tmDm dA

[k ]"
d2

(50)

The "nite element matrix of parabolic shells


[k ]"
P
F K F M F

u Fv Fw F) F) F P
F
N F
F S
F Q
- - - - - - - - - - -1- - - -2- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -F 0 F 0 F
0
0 F0 F0 F 0 F 0 F![k ]T F
0
F![k ]T F 0
F 0
2
3
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
0
F0 F0 F 0 F 0 F 0
F![k ]T F![k ]T F 0
F [k ] F 0 F 0 F
4
3
2
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
0
F F0 F 0 F 0 F 0
F![k ] F 0
F![k ]T F![k ]T F 0 F 0 F
3
4
2 ))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F [k ] F 0 F [k ]
F F F0 F0 F 0
F
0
F 0
F![k ] F 0
2
3
1 ))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F
F0 F 0
F
0
F 0
F 0
F![k ] F 0 F [k ] F [k ]
1
3
2
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 0 F 0 F
0
F F F
F
F c[k ] F!a[k ]F 0
F 0
F 0
d1
d1
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 0 F 0 F
0
F F F
F
F
F c[k ]F 0
F 0
F 0
d1
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 0 F 0 F
0
F F F
F
F
F
F k[k ] F 0
F 0
d1
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 0 F 0 F
0
F F F
F
F
F
F
F u[k ] F 0
d1 ))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
0
F F F symmetrical F
F
F
F u[k ] F 0 F 0 F
d1
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
Fd[k ] F 0 F
0
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F
d2
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
Fd[k ] F!b[k ]
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F
d2
d2
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F
F j[k ]
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F
d2

(51)
where
2(1#l)
k"
,
E

1
c" ,
E

a"lc,

b"ld,

24(1#l)
j"
,
E

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

12
d"
E

12(1#l)
u"
5*E

(52)

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1950

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

To include the boundary conditions into the element matrix we use Equation (34). The explicit
boundary condition terms in functional are
I "[ , (u!uL )]b#[A P, (u!uL )]ae #[A , (v!vL )]ae #[N, (v!vL )]be
e
2
BC
2
#[A S, (w!wL )]ae #[Q, (w!wL )]be #[K , u]b#[A PK , u]a
p
p
2
2
#[A K , v]a #[NK , v]b#[A SK , w]a #[KK , w]b
p
p
p
2
p
2
#[A E, () !)K )]ae #[, () !)K )]be #[A , () !)K )]ae
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
K , ) ]b
#[M, () !)K )]be #[A EK , ) ]a #[K , ) ]b#[K , ) ]a #[M
2 p
2 p
1 p
2
2
2
1 p

(53)

The terms with p, e subindices are valid on the boundary points where dynamic and geometric
boundary conditions are given. The variables with hat are given on the boundary points. The
terms with a subindices are valid on the boundary points where the normal of the boundary
coincides with the "rst co-ordinate axes. For example, [, (u!uL )]be is valid on the boundaries
1}3, 2}4 and [A P, (u!uL )]ae valid on the boundaries 1}2, 3}4. The following element matrix gives
2
the contribution of boundary terms:

u Fv Fw F) F) F P F N F F S F Q F K F M F
- - - - - - - - - - 1- - - - -2- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -0 F0 F0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F [S ] F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
1
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F [S ]F [S ]T F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
1
3
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F [S ]TF [S ] F 0 F 0 F 0
1
3 )))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F [S ]T F 0 F [S ]
3
1
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F [S ] F [S ]T
1
3
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
0
F
0
F
0
F
0
F
F
F
F
F
0
F
0
F
0
F
0
F
[k ] " ))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
P BC
F F F
F
F
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F
F
F
F
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F
F
F
F
F
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 0 F 0 F 0
F
symmetrical
F
F
F
F
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F 0 F 0
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F
F 0
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F

(54)

The explicit forms of the boundary terms are given as submatrices [S ], [S ] in Appendix C.
1
3
The total parabolic shell "nite element matrix for variable thickness is
[k]"[k] #[k]
1
BC
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

(55)

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

1951

It is obvious that this matrix is also valid for the shells with uniform thickness. Therefore, the
separate element matrix is not given.

7. CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS


The developed theory will be applied to cylindrical shells since it has practical importance.
Cylindrical shells are studied extensively and there exist numerous reference about such works
[39]. If we substitute
A "A "1,
1
2

R "R,
1

R "R
2

(56)

into (36) we will obtain the functional for cylindrical shells:


I(y)"![u , P]![u , ] !SS, ) T![S, w ]![, v ]![N, v ]
,x
,s
1
,x
,x
,s
N
v
!SQ, ) T![Q, w ]# Q,
!
, w #Sq , uT#Sq , vT#Sq , wT
2
,s
1
2
n
R
R

T U T U

![K, ) ]![, ) ]![) , ]![) , M]


1,x
1,s
2,x
2,s
1
1
1
1
SP, PT!l SP, NT# SN, NT #
S, T
#
2
B(1!l)
B(1!l2) 2

G
G

1
1
1
SK, KT!l SK, MT# SM, MT
#
2
D(1!l2) 2

1
6
#
S, T#
MSS, ST#SQ, QTN
D(1!l)
5B (1!l)
#[R, (u!uL )]e#[M, ()!)K )]e#[RK , u] #[M
K , )]
p
p

(57)

Omurtag and AkoK z [40] obtained a similar functional for a circular cylinder assuming constant
shear distribution through the thickness. In this study, parabolic shear distribution is assumed.
Therefore ) , ) have di!erent meanings here than the ones mentioned in Reference [40].
1 2
The displacements u, v, w, rotations ) , ) , internal forces P, N, , S, Q, K, M, are chosen as
1 2
nodal variables and they are expressed by the shape functions t as in the previous section. The
i
same shape function is chosen as is given by Equation (44). The master element is depicted in
Figure 4.
The submatrices are de"ned below for the shells of variable thickness:

PA ti tj dA, [kM 2]"PA ti,atj dA, [kM 3]"PA ti,btj dA


[kM ]" t t D t dA
[kM ]" t t B t dA,
c2
c1
PA i j m m
PA i j m m
[kM ]"
1

(58)

The explicit expressions of submatrices are given in the Appendix C.


Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1952

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Figure 4. The master element.

Figure 5. The parabolic geometry.

The "nite element matrix is obtained as follows:


[k ]"
C
F K F M
F

u Fv Fw F) F) F P
F
N F
F S
F Q
1
2
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 0 F 0
F
0
0 F0 F0 F 0 F 0 F![kM ] F
0
F![kM N F 0
F 0
2
3
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 1 M
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F F F
0
![kM ] ![kM ]
0
0
0
0
0
0 0 0
[k ]
2 F
3 F
F R 1 F
F
F
F
F
F
F F F
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F
F
F
F 1
F
F
F
F
F
F
0 0
0
0
! [k ]
0
0
0
0
![kM ] ![kM ]
3
4
2
R
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F [kM ]T F 0
F [kM ]T
F F F0 F0 F 0
F
0
F 0
F![kM ] F 0
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -1- - - - - - - - - - - - - -2- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -3- -F F F
F0 F 0
F
0
F 0
F 0
F![kM ] F 0 F [kM ]T F![k ]T
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -1- - - - - - - - - - - - -3- - - - - - - - - -2- -F 0 F 0
F
0
F F F
F
F c[kM ] F!a[kM ]F 0
F 0
F 0
c1
c1
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 0 F 0
F
0
F F F
F
F
F c[kM ] F 0
F 0
F 0
c1
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 0 F 0
F
0
F F F
F
F
F
F k[kM ] F 0
F 0
c1
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 0 F 0
F
0
F F F
F
F
F
F
F u[kM ] F 0
c1 ))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
0
F F F symmetrical F
F
F
F u[kM ] F 0 F 0
c1
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
Fd[kM ] F!b[kM ]F
0
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F
c2
c2
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F d[kM ] F
0
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F
c2
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F
F j[kM ]
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F
c2

(59)
where
2(1#l)
k"
,
E

1
c" ,
E

a"lc,

b"ld,

24(1#l)
j"
,
E

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

12
d"
E

12(1#l)
u"
5*E

(60)

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

1953

If we insert A "1 into Equation (53) we can get the boundary condition terms. Then using
2
a procedure similar to that in previous section the contribution of boundaries term are given by
the following element matrices:
u Fv Fw F) F) F P F N F F S F Q F K F M F
- - - - - - - - - - 1- - - - -2- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -0 F0 F0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F [S ] F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
1
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F [S ]F [S ] F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
1
2
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F [S ] F [S ] F 0 F 0 F 0
1
2 )))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F [S ] F 0 F [S ]
2
1
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F [S ] F [S ]
1
2
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F
F
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
[k ] " )))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
C BC
F F F
F
F
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F
F
F
F
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F
F
F
F
F
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F 0 F 0 F 0 F 0
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F 0 F 0 F 0
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F 0 F 0
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F
F 0
F F F
F
F
F
F
F
F

(61)

The explicit forms of the boundary terms are given Appendix C.

8. NUMERICAL EXAMPLE
The parabolic PRSH52 element is a versatile element to solve a broad range of problems.
Let us de"ne #atness of the parabola (m) as the ratio of sag ( f ) to span (l) (see Figure 5).
As the #atness m decreases the parabolic shell will become a plate and parabolic beam will
become a straight beam. In order to check the performance of the present new theory, various
problems are solved and our "ndings are compared with the existing studies in the literature.
8.1. Clamped-end beam
First we consider the accuracy and convergence of PRSH52 element. To this end a simple
clamped ended beam is subjected to a uniform vertical load q"10 kN/m as shown in Figure 6.
Material properties and dimensions are: E"2]107 kN/m2, l"0.3, l"10 m, f"0.01 m,
h"0.50 m, b"0.2 m,
The element meshes are depicted in Figure 7. Moment and de#ection of mid-point versus the
number of elements are given in Figures 8 and 9. As seen from this "gure the result converges to
the correct value from above and below depending on even or odd numbers of elements. The
error in the energy norm can be shown to satisfy inequality [8], EeE)clk where c is a constant
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1954

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Figure 6. Clamped ended beam and the


external loads.

Figure 7. The element meshes.

Figure 8. The convergency test of displacement for


"xed-end beam.

Figure 9. The convergency test of bending


moment for "xed-end beam.

and l is the characteristic length of element. k is called the rate of convergence. k depends on the
derivative of w in the functional and the degree of polynomials k used to approximate w. The error
can be reduced by reducing the size of the element. This reduction is called the l convergence.
In order to provide the means to quantitatively estimate the error in FEM solution, the numerical
result is plotted in axes log (l) versus log (e) in Figure 10 and log (l) versus log (e) in Figure 11.
w
M
The inspection shows that the data are well interpolated well since we have a straight-line log}log
plot. The plots of shear force, moment and de#ection along the axis of beam are shown in
Figures 12(a)}12(c).
8.2. The simply supported plate
The solution of a simply supported plate, using PRSH52, for the following dimensions and
material properties (see Figure 13): 2a"2b"10 m, f"0.01, q"1 kN/m2, h"0.1 m, l"0.3,
E"2]107 kN/m2 is shown in Figures 14 and 15. Moment and de#ection of the centre point
versus the number of elements are plotted in Figures 14 and 15. As seen from Figure 15, moment
converges to the correct value from above and below for even or odd number of elements. To get
some idea of the quantitative estimate of the error in FEM solution the numerical result is plotted
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

Figure 10. Plots of the logarithm of the error


w versus the logarithm (l).

1955

Figure 11. Plots of the logarithm of the error


M versus the logarithm (l).

Figure 12. (a) Shear force diagram of "xed-end beam; (b) internal moment diagram of "xed-end beam; (c) the
elastic curve of "xed-end beam.

in axes log (l) versus log (e) in Figure 16 and log (l) versus log (e) in Figure 17. Inspection shows
w
M
that the data are well interpolated since we have a straight-line log}log plot.
8.3. Clamped-end parabolic beam
To check the performance of PRSH52 element, a parabolic beam is analysed for which theoretical solution is available. Figure 18 illustrates the geometry and loading, the material
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1956

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Figure 13. Simply supported rectangular plate.

Figure 14. The convergency test of displacement for simply supported plate.

Figure 15. The convergency test of moment for simply supported plate.

properties, dimensions and load being: E"2]107 kN/m2, l"0.3, l"10 m, f"5 m,
h"0.50 m, b"0.2 m, q"10 kN/m. The de#ection, and internal forces of apex versus number of
elements are plotted in Figures 19}21. As seen from Figures 19}21, de#ection and normal forces
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

Figure 16. Plots of the logarithm of the error


w versus the logarithm (l).

1957

Figure 17. Plots of the logaritm of the error


M versus the logarithm (l).

Figure 18. Clamped-end parabolic beam.

converge to theoretical results from above and below depending on even and odd number of
elements.
Also numerical convergence test is performed for w, M. Results are shown in Figures 22 and 23.
Inspection shows that data is well interpolated since we have a straight-line log}log plot. The
variation of N, M, Q along the beam axes is given in Figures 24(a)}24(c).
8.4. The circular cylinder
Although S13 and CRSH52 have almost equivalent FEM formulation, they are based on
completely di!erent kinematic assumptions. The performance of CRSH52 is tested by the very
popular shell roof problem. Figure 25 illustrates the geometry of this example. A uniform
cylindrical shell with diaphragm end supports is subjected to a gravity load of q"4.393 kN/m2.
The material properties and dimensions are E"2]107 kN/m2, l"0.3, h"403, "15.64 m,
x
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1958

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Figure 19. The convergency test of lateral displacement of apex.

Figure 20. The convergency test of moment of apex.

h"0.0762 m, R"7.62 m. Due to the symmetry only one-quarter of the shell is analysed.
Comparative results for v, w, P, K, M are presented in Figures 26(a)}26(e).
8.5. The ewect of yattness of shell on the internal forces
To assess the e!ect of #atness of the parabolic shell on the internal force distribution, the shell
subjected to uniform load is analysed. The shell geometry and load distribution are depicted in
Figures 25 and 27, respectively. The material properties and dimensions are l"0.3,
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

1959

Figure 21. The convergency test of normal force.

Figure 22. Plots of the logaritm of the error w


versus the logarithm (l).

Figure 23. Plots of the logaritm of the error


M versus the logarithm (l).

E"2.]107 kN/m2, "15.64 m, h"0.0762 m, y"4.898 m, f "1.782 m, f "3.733 m,


x
1
2
f "4.898 m. Due to the symmetry only one quarter of the shell is analysed. For the three
3
di!erent sags, the variation of v, w, M, K, P, N, Q along CD is presented in Figures 28(a)}28(g).
Inspection shows that the internal forces increase conversely with f. Therefore we conclude that
#at shell is not favourable.
8.6. The comparison of parabolic and circular cylindrical shells
To compare the e!ect of geometry on the internal stress distribution, the shells illustrated in
Figure 25, subjected to uniform load in Figure 27, are solved for circular and parabolic cylindrical
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1960

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Figure 24. Internal force variation along beam axes (a) N, (b) M, (c) Q.

shells so that both the shells have the same span and the same sag. Comparative results of v, w, M,
K, P, N are shown in Figures 29(a)}29(g), 30(a)}30(f ), and 31(a)}31(f ) for (h"403, f "1.783 m),
1
(h"603, f "2.83 m), (h"74.623, f "3.732 m), respectively. The inspection shows that the
2
3
internal forces and the deformation of circular shell are smaller than corresponding internal
forces and deformation of parabolic shell.
8.7. Parabolic shells with variable thickness
To test the e!ect of height variation on the internal force distribution, the shell shown in
Figure 25, subjected to a uniform normal pressure, is analysed for di!erent thickness. A 10]10 mesh
is used in solution. Displacement and internal forces v, w, M, K, P, N, Q are shown in
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

1961

Figure 25. Circular cylindrical shell roof example.

Figures 32(a)}32(g). Inspection of these "gures shows that displacements and moments reduce for
h /h "2.
" 0
9. CONCLUSIONS
A higher-order shell theory is proposed for arbitrary shell geometries which allows the crosssection to rotate with respect to the middle surface and to warp into a non-planar surface. This
theory is "rst applied to the shells of revolution by Bhimaraddi et al. [33]. Based on this new
theory, "eld equations are derived for arbitrary shell geometries. Using "eld equations a new
functional has been obtained for arbitrary shell geometries based on Ga( teaux di!erential
approach. This theory takes into account transverse shear deformations. Through the variational
process, boundary conditions are constructed in a systematic way and introduced into the
functional. Two di!erent "nite element formulations PRSH52 and CRSH52 are derived which
have four nodes and 52 degrees of freedom for parabolic and cylindrical shells respectively.
PRSH52 is a versatile element to obtain the solution for a broad range of problems. If the #atness
of parabola is taken to be a small value, this element can be used to solve plates and straight beam
problem as well. CRSH52 is identical to the S13 element, which is proposed by Omurtag and
AkoK z [40]. Although the element equations are similar the kinematic assumptions and the
meaning of rotations ) are di!erent. The proposed elements are used to analyse various
i
problems and convergency test is performed. These tests indicate that elements provide accurate
and stable solutions and avoid shear locking.
The properties of formulation brie#y are:
(a) A higher-order shell theory is proposed for general shell geometries.
(b) Ga( teaux di!erential method has been used.
(c) Ga( teaux di!erential method provides the following advantages:
(i) the consistency of the "eld equations
(ii) boundary condition terms are constructed and introduced to the functional in a
systematic way.
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Figure 26. The variation of displacement and internal forces distribution along CD.

1962

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

1963

Figure 27. The vertical load distribution for shells.

(d) The closed form of element equations PRSH52 and CRSH52 are obtained which eliminate
the time-consuming numerical inversion of the element matrix.
(e) The variable cross-section can be handled by this formulation.
(f ) The previous works have shown that this approach avoids shear locking [38, 44].
(g) This formulation is also suitable for the dynamic problems, which are under study.

APPENDIX A
The de"nition of some parameters valid for all submatrices is
Sqr1"J1#(bf1)2 X Log 1"LOG (1#4fa (b2!2byg#yg2))
Sqr2"J1#(bf2)2 X Log 2"LOG (1#4fa (b2#2byg#yg2))
ArcSh1"LOG (bf1#J(bf1)2#1) Arct1"ATAN (2f (!b#yg) a)
ArcSh2"LOG (bf2#J(bf2)2#1) Arct2"ATAN (2f (b#yg) a)
f b1"a3b2f 3 ,

fa"f 2a2 ,

f b2"a2b2f 2 ,

fg"fyga ,

f b3"a3b3f 3 ,

fg2"f 2yg2a2,

f b4"a4b3f 4 ,

fg3"f 3yg3a3 ,

bf"bfa
bf1"2fa (b!yg)
bf2"2fa (b#yg)

4
a"
2
The submatrix of the parabolic cylindrical shell
2*c1F2*c2 F c1 F c2
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
2*c2 F2*c3 F c2 F c3
[k ]" ))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
c1 F c2 F2*c1 F2*c2
1
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
c2 F c3 F2*c2 F2*c3
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Figure 28. The variation of displacement an internal force distribution along CD for three di!erent sags.

1964

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1965

Figure 28. Continued.

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

Figure 29. The comparative results of displacement and internal force distribution for circular and parabolic
cylindrical shells, f"1.783 m, h"403.

1966
A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1967

Figure 29. Continued.

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

Figure 30. The comparative results of displacement and internal force distribution for circular and parabolic
cylindrical shells, f"2.828 m, h"603.

1968
A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1969

Figure 30. Continued.

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

Figure 31. The comparative results of displacement and internal force distribution for circular and parabolic
cylindrical shells, f"3.732 m, h"74.623.

1970
A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1971

Figure 31. Continued.

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

Figure 32. The comparative results of displacement and internal force distribution for di!erent thickness variations.

1972

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1973

Figure 32. Continued.

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1974

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

where
c1"A MSqr1(38bf#26fg#272f b3!176f b2fg!80bf fg2!16fg3)
!Sqr2(26bf#26fg!16f b3!48f b2fg!48bf fg2!16fg3)
!(ArcSh1#ArcSh2) (3!48f b2!96bf fg!48fg2)N/(2304f b1)
c2"A MSqr1(!6bf!26fg#48f b3!80f b2 fg#16bf fg2#16fg3)
!Sqr2(6bf!26fg!48f b3!80f b2 fg!16bf fg2#16fg3)
#(ArcSh1#ArcSh2) (3#48f b2!48fg2)N/(2304f b1)
c3"A MSqr1 (!26bf#26fg#16f b3!48f b2fg#48bf fg2!16fg3)
#Sqr2 (38bf!26fg#272f b3#176f b2 fg!80bf fg2#16fg3)
!(ArcSh1#ArcSh2) (3!48f b2#96bf fg!48fg2)N/(2304fb1)
!d1F!d2 F d1 F d2
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
!d2F!d3 F d2 F d3
[k ]" )))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
!d1F!d2 F d1 F d2
2
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
!d2F!d3 F d2 F d3
d1"MSqr1(38bf#272f b3#26fg!176f b2 fg!80b!g2!16fg3)
!Sqr2(26bf!16f b3#26fg!48f b2 fg!48bf fg2!16fg3)
!(ArcSh1#ArcSh2) (3!48 f b2!96 bf fg !48 fg2)N/(1536f b1)
d2"MSqr1 (!6bf#48f b3!26fg!80f b2 fg#16bf fg2#16fg3)
!Sqr2 (6bf!48f b3!26fg!80f b2 fg!16bf fg2#16fg3)
#(ArcSh1#ArcSh2) (3#48f b2!48fg2)N/(1536f b1)
d3"MSqr1 (!26bf#16f b3#26fg!48f b2 fg#48bf fg2!16fg3)
#Sqr2 (38bf#272f b3!26fg#176f b2 fg!80bf fg2#16fg3)
!(ArcSh1#ArcSh2) (3!48f b2#96bf fg!48fg2)N/(1536fb1)
!2F 2 F!1 F 1
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
a !2 F 2 F!1 F 1 ,
[k ]"
[k ]" )))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
4
3
6 !1 F 1 F!2 F 2
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
!1 F 1 F!2 F 2
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

2*e1F2*e2 F e1 F e2
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
2*e2F2*e3 F e2 F e3
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
e1 F e2 F2*e1 F2*e2
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
e2 F e3 F2*e2 F2*e3
Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

1975

where
e1"AM!4bf!(Arct1!Arct2) (1!4f b2!8bf fg!4fg2)
!2(XLog1!XLog2) (bf#fg)N/(48f b2)
e2"AM4bf#(Arct1!Arct2) (1#4f b2!4fg2)
#2(XLog1!XLog2) (fg)N/(48f b2)
e3"A M!4bf!(Arct1!Arct2) (1!4f b2#8bf fg!4fg2)
#2 (XLog1!XLog2) (bf!fg)N/(48f b2)
B11FB12 F B13 F B14
)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
FB22 F B23 F B24
[kd1]" ))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F B33 F B34
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F
F B44

D11FD12 F D13 F D14


))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
FD22 F D23 F D24
[kd2]" )))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F D33 F D34
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F
F D44

B11"[3 * cc1 * B1#3 * cc2 * B2#cc1 * B3#cc2 * B4]


B12"[3 * cc2 * B1#3 * cc3 * B2#cc2 * B3#cc3 * B4]
B13"[cc1 * B1#cc2 * B2#cc1 * B3#cc2 * B4]
B14"[cc2 * B1#cc3 * B2#cc2 * B3#cc3 * B4]
B22"[3 * cc3 * B1#3 * cc4 * B2#cc3 * B3#cc4 * B4]
B23"[cc2 * B1#cc3 * B2#cc2 * B3#cc3 * B4]
B24"[cc3 * B1#cc4 * B2#cc3 * B3#cc4 * B4]
B33"[cc1 * B1#cc2 * B2#cc1 * B3# cc2 * B4]
B34"[cc2 * B1#cc3 * B2#3 * cc2 * B3#3 * cc3 * B4]
B44"[cc3 * B1#cc4 * B2#3 * cc3 * B3#3 * cc4 * B4]
D11"[3 * cc1 * D1#3 * cc2 * D2#cc1 * D3#cc2 * D4]
D12"[3 * cc2 * D1#3 * cc3 * D2#cc2 * D3 #cc3 * D4]
D13"[cc1 * D1#cc2 * D2#cc1 * D3#cc2 * D4]
D14"[cc2 * D1#cc3 * D2#cc2 * D3#cc3 * D4]
D22"[3 * cc3 * D1#3 * cc4 * D2#cc3 * D3#cc4 * D4]
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1976

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

D23"[cc2 * D1# cc3 * D2#cc2 * D3#cc3 * D4]


D24"[cc3 * D1#cc4 * D2#cc3 * D3#cc4 * D4]
D33"[cc1 * D1#cc2 * D2#cc1 * D3#cc2 * D4]
D34"[cc2 * D1#cc3 * D2#3 * cc2 * D3#3 * cc3 * D4]
D44"[cc3 * D1#cc4 * D2 #3 * cc3 * D3#3 * cc4 *D4]
where
cc1"A MSqr1(!8#346f b2#448bf fg#166fg2#2352 (f b2)2!1248f b 3fg
!768f b2 fg2!288bf fg fg2!48 (fg2)2)#Sqr2 (8!166f b2!332bf fg
!166fg2#48 (f b2)2#192f b3 fg#288f b2 fg2#192bf fg fg2#48 (fg2)2)
!(ArcSh1#ArcSh2) (45bf#45fg!240f b3!720f b2 fg
!720 fg2 bf!240fg3)N/(46080fb4)
cc2"A MSqr1(8#34f b2!188bf fg!166fg2#368 (f b2)2!512f b3 fg
!32f b2 fg2#128bf fg fg2#48 (fg2)2)#Sqr2 (8#94f b2!72bf fg
!166fg2!112 (f b2)2!288f b3 fg!192 f b2 fg2#32 bf fg fg2#48 (fg2)2)
#(ArcSh1#ArcSh2) (15bf#45fg#240f b3#240f b2 fg
!240fg2 bf!240 fg3)N/(46080f b4)
cc3"A MSqr1 (!8!94f b2!72bf fg#166fg2#112 (f b2)2!288f b3 fg
#192f b2 fg2#32bf fg fg2!48 (fg2)2)#Sqr2 (8#34f b2#188bf fg
!166fg2#368 (f b2)2#512f b3 fg!32f b2 fg2!128 bf fg fg2#48 (fg2)2)
#(ArcSh1#ArcSh2) (15bf!45fg#240f b3!240f b2 fg
!240 fg2 bf#240 fg3)N/(46080fb4)
cc4"A MSqr1 (8!166f b2#332bf fg!166fg2#48 (f b2)2!192f b 3fg
#288f b2 fg2!192bf fg fg2#48 (fg2)2)#Sqr2 (!8#346f b2!448bf fg
#166fg2#2352 (f b2)2#1248f b 3fg!768f b2 fg2#288bf fg fg2
!48 (fg2)2)!(ArcSh1#ArcSh2) (45bf!45fg!240f b3#720f b2 fg
!720fg 2bf#240fg3)N/(46080fb4)
Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1977

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

APPENDIX B
The submatrices of the circular cylindrical shell are given as follows:
4ab/9

4ab/18 4ab/18 4ab/36

4ab/18 4sb/9 4ab/36 4ab/18


[kM ]"
1
4ab/18 4ab/36 4ab/9 4ab/18
4ab/36 4ab/18 4ab/18

!b/3 !b/6 !b/3 !b/6


, [kM ]"
2

4ab/9

!b/6 !b/3 !b/6 !b/3


b/3

b/6

b/3

b/6

b/6

b/3

b/6

b/3

!a/3 !a/3 !a/6 !a/6


a/3
a/3
a/6
a/6
[kM ]"
3
!a/6 !a/6 !a/3 !a/3
a/6

a/6

a/3

b/3

BM 11FBM 12 F BM 13 F BM 14
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
FBM 22 F BM 23 F BM 24
[kc ]" ))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F BM 33 F BM 34
1
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F
F BM 44

where

C
C
C
C
C
C
C

D
D
D
D
D
D
D

BM 11"

ab
ab
ab
ab
B1# * B2# * B3# * B4
4 *
12
12
36

BM 12"

ab
ab
ab
ab
B1# * B2# * B3# * B4
*
12
12
36
36

BM 13"

ab
ab
ab
ab
B1# * B2# * B3# * B4
12 *
36
12
36

BM 14"

ab
ab
ab
ab
B1# * B2# * B3# * B4
36 *
36
36
36

BM 22"

ab
ab
ab
ab
B1# * B2# * B3# * B4
*
12
4
36
12

BM 23"

ab
ab
ab
ab
B1# * B2# * B3# * B4
36 *
36
36
36

BM 24"

ab
ab
ab
ab
B1# * B2# * B3# * B4
*
36
12
36
12

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1978

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

C
C
C

D
D
D

BM 33"

ab
ab
ab
ab
B1# * B2# * B3# * B4
*
12
36
4
12

BM 34"

ab
ab
ab
ab
B1# * B2# * B3# * B4
36 *
36
12
12

BM 44"

ab
ab
ab
ab
B1# * B2# * B3# * B4
36 *
12
12
4

DM 11FDM 12 F DM 13 F DM 14
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
FDM 22 F DM 23 F DM 24
[kc ]" ))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F DM 33 F DM 34
2
))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
F
F
F DM 44
where

C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C

D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D

DM 11"

ab
ab
ab
ab
D1# * D2# * D3# * D4
4 *
12
12
36

DM 12"

ab
ab
ab
ab
D1# * D2# * D3# * D4
*
12
12
36
36

DM 13"

ab
ab
ab
ab
D1# * D2# * D3# * D4
12 *
36
12
36

DM 14"

ab
ab
ab
ab
D1# * D2# * D3# * D4
*
36
36
36
36

DM 22"

ab
ab
ab
ab
D1# * D2# * D3# * D4
12 *
4
36
12

DM 23"

ab
ab
ab
ab
D1# * D2# * D3# * D4
*
36
36
36
36

DM 24"

ab
ab
ab
ab
D1# * D2# * D3# * D4
36 *
12
36
12

DM 33"

ab
ab
ab
ab
D1# * D2# * D3# * D4
*
12
36
4
12

DM 34"

ab
ab
ab
ab
D1# * D2# * D3# * D4
36 *
36
12
12

DM 44"

ab
ab
ab
ab
D1# * D2# * D3# * D4
*
36
12
12
4

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1979

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

APPENDIX C
The submatrices of BC are valid for both parabolic and circular cylindrical shells:
0

!a/3

2a/3

a/3

!2a/3

a/3

2a/3

s1 s2

s3 s3
[S ] "
3 a
0 0

!2a/3
0
[S ] "
1 b
!a/3

!2b/3

!b/3

!b/3

!2b/3

2b/3

b/3

b/3

2b/3

, [S ] "
2 a

!s1 !s2
!s2 !s3

where
s1"M2faSqr1 (19b#13yg#136bf b2!88f b2yg!40bfg2!8ygfg2)
#(!3#48f b2#96fg bf#48fg2) ArcSh1
#2f (b#yg)a (!13#8f b2#16bf fg#8fg2) Sqr2
#(!3#48f b2#96fg bf#48fg2) ArcSh2N/(768f b3)
s2"M2faSqr1 (13yg!24bf b2#40f b2yg!8yg fg2#3b!8b fg2)
#(!3#48f b2#48fg2) ArcSh1#2faSqr2 (!13yg#24b f b2#40yg f b2
!8yg fg2!3b#8b fg2)#(3#48f b2!48fg2) ArcSh2N/(768f b3)
s3"M2fa(b!yg)Sqr1(!13#8f b2!16fg bf#8fg2)
#(3!48f b2#96fgbf!48fg2)ArcSh1
#2faSqr2 (19b!13yg#136b f b2#88ygf b2!40b fg2#8ygfg2)
#(!3#48f b2!96fg bf#48fg2) ArcSh2N/(768f b3)

APPENDIX D: NOTATION
p, e
n
E, l
h
I(y)

stress and strain tensor, respectively


unit normal vector of a surface
Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, respectively
thickness of shell
functional

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

1980
Q
S , T, [ , ]
u, v, w
),)
a b
P, N,
S, Q
K, M,
B, D
q,q,q
a b z
t
i
a, b
m, g
L
f
y
[k ]
P
[k ]
C
I
BC

A. Y. AKOG Z AND A. OG ZUG TOK

operator
inner product
tangential and normal displacements
cross-sectional rotation of shells about x and y axes, respectively
stress resultant, in-plane shear force
transverse shear force components
internal moment components
tensile, #exural rigidities
distributed load acting along x, s, z
shape functions, I"1, . . . , 4
half length of the side of a rectangular element
non-dimensional co-ordinates of a master element
coe$cient matrix
load vector
unknown vectors
submatrix for parabolic shell
submatrix for cylindrical shell
functional for boundary conditions

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This work was partially supported by Technical Universty of Istanbul Research Fund.

REFERENCES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

Goldenveizer AL. heory of Elastic hin Shells. Pergamon Press: New York, 1961.
Novozhilov VV. hin Shell heory. P. Noordho!: Groningen, 1964.
Rekach VG. Static heory of hin =alled Space Structures. Mir Publishers: Moscow, 1978.
Kraus H. hin Elastic Shells. Wiley: New York, 1967.
Hughes T. he Finite Element Method. Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cli!s, NJ, 1987.
Zienkiewicz OC. he Finite Elements. McGraw-Hill: London, 1977.
Bathe KJ. Finite Element Procedures in Engineering Analysis. Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cli!s, NJ, 1982.
Reddy JN. An Introduction to he Finite Element Method. McGraw-Hill, International Editions: New York, 1985.
Gallagher RH. Finite Element Analysis Fundamentals. Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cli!s, NJ, 1975.
Zienkiewicz OC, Cheung YK. he Finite Element Method in Structural and Continuum Mechanics. McGraw-Hill
Publishing Co: London, 1967.
Przemienecki JS, Bader RM, Bozich WF, Johnson JR, Mykytow WJ (eds). Matrix method in structural mechanics.
Proceedings of the Conference on Matrix Methods in Structural Mechanics, =rite Patterson Air Force Base, October
1965, Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory TR-66-80, Dayton Ohio, December 1965.
De Veubeke BF (ed.). Matrix Methods of Structural Analysis. Pergamon Press: New York, 1964.
Zienkiewicz OC, Holister GS (eds). Stress Analysis. Wiley: London, 1965.
Argyris JH. Matrix Displacement analysis of plates and shells. Ingenieur-Archiv 1966; XXXV: 102}142.
Clough RW, Tocher JL. Finite element sti!ness matrices for analysis of plate bending. In Matrix Methods in
Structural Mechanics, Przemieniecki JS et al. (eds). Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory, TR-66-80, Dayton, OH,
December 1965; 515}546.
Jones RE, Strome DR. In A Survey of Analysis of Shells by he Displacement Method. Przemieniecki JS et al. (eds). Air
Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory TR-66-80, Dayton, OH, December 1965; 205}229.
Reissner E. The e!ect of transverse shear deformation on the bending of elastic plates. Journal of Applied Mechanics
1945; 12:69}76.
Mindlin RD. In#uence of rotary inertia and shear in #exural rotations of isotropic elastic plates. Journal of Applied
Mechanics 1951; 18:1031}1036.

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981

PARABOLIC AND CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL SHELLS

1981

19. Ahmad S, Irons BM, Zienkiewicz OC. Analysis of thick and thin shell structures by curved "nite elements.
International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering 1970; 2:419}451.
20. Zienkiewicz OC, Too J, Taylor RC. Reduced Integration techniques in general analysis of plates and shells.
International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering 1971; 3:275}290.
21. Zienkiewicz OC, Bauer J. Morgan K, Onate E. A simple and e$cient element for axisymmetric shells. International
Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering 1977; 11:1545}1558.
22. Hughes TJR, Taylor RL, KanoknukulchayH W. A Simple and e$cient "nite element for plate bending. International
Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering 1977; 11:1529}1543.
23. Pawsey SF, Clough RL. Improved numerical integration of thick shell elements. International Journal for Numerical
Methods in Engineering 1971; 3:575}586.
24. Parish HA. A critical survey of the 9-node degenerated shell element with special emphasis on thin shell application
and reduced integration. Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering 1979; 20: 323}350.
25. Hughes TJR, Cohen M. Heterosis "nite element for plate bending. Computers and Structures 1978; 9:445}450.
26. Pugh EDL, Hinton E, Zienkiewicz OC. A study of quadrilateral plate bending elements with &Reduced' integration.
International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering 1978; 12:1059}1079.
27. Belytschko T, Tsay CS, Liu WK. A stabilization matrix for the bilinear Mindlin plate element. Computer Methods in
Applied Mechanics and Engineering 1981; 29:313}327.
28. Batoz JL, Lardeur P. A discrete triangular nine d.o.f. element for the analysis of thick to very thin plate. International
Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering 1989; 28:533}560.
29. Katili I. A new discrete Kirchho!-Mindlin element based on Mindlin}Reissner plate theory and assumed shear strain
"elds*part I: an extended DKT element for thick-plate bending analysis. International Journal for Numerical
Methods in Engineering 1993; 36:1859}1883.
30. Saetta AV, Vitaliani RV. A "nite element formulation for shells of arbitrary geometry. Computers and Structures 1990;
37(5):781}793.
31. Rhiu JJ. Lee SW. A new e$cient mixed formulation for thin shell "nite element models. International Journal for
Numerical Methods in Engineering 1987; 24:581}604.
32. Saleeb AF, Chang TY, Graf W. A quadrilateral shell element using a mixed formulation. Computers and Structures
1987; 26:787}803.
33. Bhimaraddi A, Carr AJ, Moss PJ. A shear deformable "nite element for the analysis of general shells of revolution.
Computers and Structures 1989; 31(3):299}308.
34. Koziey BL, Mirza FA. Consistent thick shell element. Computers and Structures 1997; 65(4):531}549.
35. Bergman VL, Mukherjee S. A Hybrid strain "nite element for plates and shells. International Journal for Numerical
Methods in Engineering 1990; 30:233}257.
36. Tabarrok B, Sodhi DS. Complementary energy formulation for thin elastic shells. Bulletin of the echnical ;niversity,
Istanbul 1994; 47:187}211.
37. AkoK z AY. A new functional for and its applications. I<th National Mechanics Meeting. Gebze-Turkey 1985; 100}112.
(in Turkish).
38. AkoK z AY, Omurtag MH, Dog\ ruog\ lu AN. The mixed "nite element formulation for three dimensional bars.
International Journal of Solids and Structures in Engineering 1991; 28:225}234.
39. Omurtag MH, AkoK z AY. Mixed "nite element formulation of eccentrically sti!ened cylindrical shells. Computers and
Structures 1992; 42:751}768.
40. Omurtag MH, AkoK z AY. A compatible cylindrical shell element for sti!ened cylindrical shells in a mixed "nite
element formulation. Computers and Structures 1993; 49:363}370.
41. Omurtag MH, AkoK z AY. Hyperbolic paraboloid shell analysis via mixed "nite element formulation. International
Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering 1994; 37:3037}3056.
42. AkoK z AY. Functional for KaH rmaH n plates and its application. <Ith National Applied Mechanics Meeting, Kirazliyayla-Turkey 1989; 74}85. (in Turkish).
43. AkoK z AY, Kadioglu F. The mixed "nite element solution of circular beam on elastic foundation. Computers and
Structures 1996; 60:643}651.
44. Eratli N, AkoK z AY. The mixed "nite element formulation for the thick plates on elastic foundations. Computers and
Structures 1997; 65:515}529.
45. Morris AJ. De"ciency in current "nite elements for thin shell applications. International Journal of Solids and
Structures 1973; 9:331}346.
46. Sokolniko! IS. Mathematical heory of Elasticity (2nd edn), McGraw-Hill: New York, 1956; 177}184.
47. Oden JT, Reddy JN. <ariational Method in heoritical Mechanics. Springer: Berlin, 1976.
48. Altman W, Iguti F. A thin cylindrical shell "nite element based on a mixed formulation. Computers and Structures
1976; 6:149}155.
49. Laursen ME, Neilsen MP, Gellert M. Application of a new stress "nite element to analysis of shell structures.
Computers and Structures 1997; 7:751}757.

Copyright ( 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 2000; 47:1933}1981