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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 1

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 3
Community Service Guidelines 4, 5

COUNSELING SERVICES 6
Admission to Post-Secondary Schools 7
College Admissions Testing 7

GENERAL INFORMATION 8

STUDENT SENATE BILL OF RIGHTS 10

DISCIPLINARY CODE 10

COMPUTER NETWORK ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY 18

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 21
Awards 23
Unassigned Time 24

COURSE/DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTIONS 26
COMPUTER 26
ENGLISH 27
FINE, APPLIED and TECHNICAL ARTS 32
Applied Technology 32
Art 34
Media Arts 36
Music 37
Theater Arts 40
HISTORY & SOCIAL SCIENCES 41
WORLD LANGUAGES 45
MATHEMATICS 49
NON-DEPARTMENTAL ADDITIONAL
COURSES AND PROGRAMS 52
SCIENCE 54
WELLNESS 59
Alternate Activity Policy 62

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 63
CENTRAL 63
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 64
METCO PROGRAM 65

SPECIAL EDUCATION 66

ATHLETIC PROGRAM & STUDENT ACTIVITIES 67


Process for Concerns 70

SAMPLE SCHEDULE 71

BLANK SCHEDULE 72

SCHOOL CALENDAR Back Cover


Lincoln-Sudbury welcomes students and families from many different cultures and backgrounds. We
will make every effort to provide important notices in other languages, in addition to English. Interpreters are
always welcome at conferences and meetings. Families whose language background is other than English, and
who need translation services, are asked to contact the Office of Student Services.

Lincoln-Sudbury da la bienvenida a estudiantes y a familias de diversas culturas y nacionalidades.


Haremos todo lo posible para hacer anuncios importantes en otros idiomas. Siéntase con la libertad de asistir a
nuestras reuniones o conferencias acompañado de conocidos o familiares que le puedan servir de intérpretes. Por
favor contacte la Oficina de Servicios Estudiantiles si usted prefiere que la escuela le ofrezca los servicios de
traducción.

Lincoln-Sudbury dá as boas-vindas a estudantes e a famílias de diversas culturas e nacionalidades.


Faremos o possível para dar informações importantes em outras línguas. Se você quiser, venha as reuniões ou
conferencias acompanhado de amigos ou parentes que possam traduzir-lhe a informação. Embora, contate o
Escritório de Serviços Estudantis se prefere que a escola lhe forneça dos serviços de tradução..

Lincoln-Sudbury accoglie favorevolmente gli studenti e le famiglie da molte culture ed ambiente. Faremo
ogni sforzo fornire gli avvisi importanti in Italiano. E sempre benvenuto l'interprete ai congressi ed alle riunioni.
Le famiglie che hanno bisogno di servizi di traduzione sono chieste di mettersi in contatto con the Office of Student
Services.

Lincoln-Sudbury heißt Schüler und Familien unterschiedlicher kultureller Herkünfte herzlich


willkommen. Wir bemühen uns in jeder Hinsicht, wichtige Mitteilungen auf anderen Sprachen, wie auch auf
Englisch, zur Verfügung zu stellen. Dolmetscher sind jeder Zeit bei Elternsprechtagen und anderen
Veranstaltungen willkommen. Nicht Englisch sprechende Familien, die Übersetzungsmöglichkeiten benötigen
werden gebeten sich mit der Schulverwaltung in Verbindung zu setzen.

Lincoln-Sudbury makes every effort to comply with federal and state laws and regulations
regarding student and staff civil rights and individual entitlements. All members of the school
community should be aware of those administrators who are responsible for the enforcement of these
regulations.

Title VI Coordinator under the Civil Right's Act of 1964:


Superintendent/Principal, John Ritchie (Ext. 2373)

Title IX Coordinator regarding the Gender Equity Act:


Athletic Director, Nancy O'Neil (Ext. 3100)

IDEA/Special Education and Section 504 Coordinator for students


under the Americans with Disabilities Act:
Director of Student Services, Joanne Delaney (Ext. 2385)

Section 504 Coordinator for faculty and staff:


Personnel Manager, Kim Goodwin (Ext. 2382)

Anyone who has concerns in any of these areas is encouraged to contact these administrators by phone
(at the above extensions) or by mail.

No person shall be excluded from or discriminated against in admission to the


Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District, for admittance to state and federally
funded grant programs, or in obtaining the advantages, privileges, and courses of
study presented in this school, on account of race, color, gender, disability, sexual
orientation, religion, or national origin. This non-discrimination applies to all
persons, whether or not the individual is a member of a conventionally defined
“minority group.”
School Motto:

“Think for yourself but think of others.”

For more information - See the L-S Website: www.lsrhs.net

The L-S website is maintained by the L-S web team which consists of a
group of students and two faculty advisors. The categories include: About L-
S, Academics (which individual teachers maintain), Alumni, Community and
Student Life. Daily announcements are posted along with special
announcements such as exam schedules and an events calendar. The purpose
of the L-S website is two-fold: it is a communication vehicle for the L-S
community beyond the walls of the school building and it is an opportunity
for students to learn about web publishing and design.

Conventional e-mail address for teachers:

teacher first name_teacher last name@lsrhs.net


Example: john_ritchie@lsrhs.net

School Address:

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School


390 Lincoln Road
Sudbury, MA 01776-1409

School Phone:

(978) 443-9961
(781) 259-9527

School FAX:

(978) 443-8824
Superintendent-Principal:
Dr. John Ritchie (Extension 2373)

Housemasters

House: Housemaster: Extension:


Central Peter Fredrickson 4261
East Leslie Gray 3353
North Scott Carpenter 3253
South Eleanor Burke 2453
West Iain Ryrie 2353

Program Directors/Coordinators

Program: Director: Extension:


Athletics/Activities Nancy O’Neil 3100
Curriculum/Instruction Leslie Belcher 2337
METCO Nicole Stewart 2254
Student Services Joanne Delaney 2385

Department Coordinators

Department: Coordinator: Extension:


Computer Mark Sobkowicz 2431
Counseling John Flynn 3352
English Judy Plott 4352
Fine, Applied & Paul Sarapas 2204
Technical Arts
History Phillip James 4363
Language Jorge Allen 3474
Mathematics Virginia Blake 3406
Science Constance Patten 2404
Special Education Rebecca Reitz 2308
Technology Integration Nancy Errico 3337
Wellness 3150

Mediation/Anti-Violence Karen Thomsen 3480

Health Office/School Nurse 2390


LINCOLN - SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL - STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

Since its founding in 1954, Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School has viewed itself as “a different kind of place”
— a place that not only tolerates but truly values diversity in style and substance. This quality manifests itself in
the academic program and in the general atmosphere of the school, and may best be seen in the respectful and
warm relationships between students and adults, the high degree of autonomy for and participation by the faculty
in decisions, and a school culture marked by commitment to innovation and experimentation.

Through a challenging academic program and a wide variety of school activities, students are expected to make
choices and to have a degree of power over their own education. The ability to make good choices requires the
development of a sense of responsibility and an understanding of the ethical implications of their actions.
Formality and standardization have, in the life of the school, been less important than creativity, originality, and
critical thinking skills. The school culture also seeks to join academic skills to an active civic concern for the
Lincoln-Sudbury community, American society, and the world beyond.

The school’s Core Values — fostering of cooperative and caring relationships, respect for human differences, and
the development and maintenance of a purposeful and vigorous academic program — constitute the foundation of
the operation of Lincoln-Sudbury. In addition, in 1993, Lincoln-Sudbury defined five general areas of student
performance, which serve as the underpinnings of the longer list of student expectations which follows. These
areas are:

• A strong knowledge base in the various disciplines and program areas


• Proficiency in problem-solving and critical thinking skills
• The ability to express ideas — both simple and complex — in many modes
• A knowledge of, and an ability to participate in, the democratic process
• An ability to assess one’s own progress in learning

LINCOLN-SUDBURY STUDENT EXPECTATIONS

The Lincoln-Sudbury Student:

Learns to participate actively in, and make important choices about, his or her learning.

Understands, appreciates, participates in, and contributes to affairs of the community — be it the school, the
nation, or the world.

Reads carefully and critically, and has read both English/American and representative world literature.

Writes and speaks carefully, thoughtfully, and effectively.

Understands, and is able to use, a variety of mathematical methods to solve problems.

Is able to use technology appropriately to help create, investigate, and communicate.

Understands and applies the concepts of personal physical fitness, health, and nutrition.

Understands, and communicates in, at least one language in addition to English, with additional
understanding of different cultural characteristics.

Has studied the major events, themes, and scope of U. S. History, and has explored in some depth the history
of other parts of the globe.

Is familiar with basic scientific methodology and principles, and has a background in biological and
physical sciences.

Is encouraged to develop artistic and creative ability, and to explore how aesthetics can enlarge
understanding of all disciplines.

Is able to work cooperatively with others.

Behaves in a manner that, while it may be individualistic and perhaps non-conformist, is decorous, civil, and
attentive to the needs and feelings of others.

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LINCOLN-SUDBURY PERFORMANCE EXPECTATIONS

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School:

Focuses on teaching and learning as central and indisputable missions.

Promotes and maintains an atmosphere where students will learn to do their best work and make their best
effort.

Encourages and allows students to participate in decisions about their learning.

Presents a meaningful curriculum that builds on fundamental skills, but is creative and adaptable in its
delivery.

Finds ways to recognize and honor students for a variety of achievements.

Continues to celebrate the school’s history and mission, and nurture that which has made Lincoln-
Sudbury a special place for over forty years.

Insists on a non-violent school climate, and provides students with the skills to deal with conflict
effectively.

Fosters close relationships between students and staff members.

Provides a variety of counseling services for all students to help them cope with and overcome difficulties,
problems, and stresses that may impede their learning.

Provides a broad range of athletic and extracurricular opportunities for students.

Promotes an atmosphere within the school where civil and thoughtful debate, dissent, and disagreement are
not only permitted, but encouraged without fear of retribution or censure.

Finds ways to make the school experience a joyful as well as rigorous one.

Maintains facilities that are appropriate to the school’s many purposes.

Understands, values, and attends to the educational needs of a diverse and multicultural student
population.

Provides opportunities to explore and understand personal issues and relationships.

Fosters creative thought and expression.

Is committed to fostering a spirit of voluntary community service.

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

In order to graduate from Lincoln-Sudbury you must accumulate 89 credits which reflect a balanced program of
study. In order to earn credit, you must receive a passing grade of D- or better and meet the attendance
requirements. Full year courses grant 4 credits per course and semester courses grant 2 credits per course. Quarter
courses grant 1 credit per course. The required credits are:

Community Service - Each student is required to perform a minimum of fifteen hours of community service
between the date of entrance as a ninth grader and the first day of the senior year.

Computer Science/Computer Technology - For students graduating in 2009, 2010, 2011, and beyond, two (2)
credits must be earned in specific computer technology courses. See course descriptions for courses that qualify for
this requirement.

English - 16 credits to include:


a. British or American Literature 2 credits
b. World Literature 2 credits
c. Writing 2 credits (Ninth grade course will meet this requirement)

Please refer to the Program of Studies for courses which fulfill these requirements.

Fine, Applied & Technical Arts - Two (2) credits must be earned in specific arts courses. See course
descriptions for courses that qualify for this requirement.

History & Social Sciences - 12 credits to include:


United States history 4 credits

Please refer to the Program of Studies for courses which fulfill this requirement.

Language - 8 credits (two consecutive years) in the same language

Mathematics - 8 credits

Science - 8 credits to include:


a. Biological laboratory science 4 credits
b. Physical laboratory science 4 credits

Wellness - 12 credits to include CPR and Cardiovascular Fitness as well as:


a. Ninth grade year - 4 credits to include courses in both
Muscular Fitness 1 credit
Intro to Wellness 1 credit
b. Sophomore year - 4 credits to include
Outdoor Pursuits 1 credit
c. Junior year - 4 credits to include
Health 1 credit

Credits required in specific subjects 68


Additional credits required 21
Total credits required to graduate 89

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COMMUNITY SERVICE GUIDELINES
Revised Sept. 2006

Rationale
Our country, state, and community are all committed to providing young people with the
opportunity to receive an education which will enable them to be productive and responsible citizens.
One meaningful way students can learn about responsible citizenship is by serving their communities.
Many national leaders have expressed the belief that Americans, and particularly young people, need
to regain the sense of community that has long been a part of our country’s history and character. A sense
of community is so central to who we are as a people that many leaders have called upon young people to
make such American values as citizenship and a sense of obligation to others fashionable once again.
National polling data and articles also strongly suggest that young people want challenging
responsibilities through which they can shape their characters, their values, and their commitment to
society. Additionally, they seek a sense of purpose, of inspiration, and of fruitful connections, with family
and with the larger society.
Implemented in 1996, the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School Community Service requirement
has been designed to provide students with opportunities to involve themselves in a variety of enriching,
useful, and practical experiences that serve the school and community. Through an exposure to
community service, students can learn new skills, assume responsibilities, become aware of the needs of
others, and learn the importance of serving and giving. Meaningful Community Service links students to
the wider community and exposes them to people and situation s outside their previous experiences.
Each student at Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School is required to perform a minimum of fifteen
hours of community service between the date of entrance as a 9th grader and the third quarter of 12th
grade, senior year. The community service requirement may be satisfied by participation in any one or a
combination of approved activities. A listing of Community Service opportunities from which students
may select is available to students in house offices and in the Career Center. Students are also encouraged
to create and propose their own community service projects. A partial listing of placements appears later
in this section.
For more information on how students can become involved in a community service activity, and
how they can sign up to perform a community service, please refer to the Q&A section below.

Definition of Community Service

To fulfill the L-S graduation requirement, a recognized Community Service activity is one which:
 Is performed without remuneration to the service provider.
 Has some institutional or organizational affiliation, (or has been pre-approved by the student’s
housemaster,) and was not a required activity.
 Results in a service to at least some other person or group.
 Is not a service mandated by a court.

Guidelines for Fulfilling the Community Service Requirement

To fulfill the fifteen-hour L-S Community Service requirement the activity must:

 Meet the definition of Community Service.


 Be carried through to completion and documented (get papers in house office).
 Entail a minimum of two hours per project, not including transportation.
 Be supervised by someone other than a relative of the service provider.

Any exceptions to the above definition and guidelines can be made only with the prior approval of the
Housemasters and Director of Central House.

Frequently Asked Questions about the Community Service Requirement

When can I perform my Community Service hours?


A student should complete the minimum of 15 hours of service by midway through the senior year.
Many students choose to perform much more than the minimum requirement. Community service can be
performed during the school day, after school, evenings, weekends, and during the summer. It can be
done on a regular, on-going basis for some length of time, or as a project in which a lump sum of hours is
completed in a shorter time. A minimum of two hours total is required for any given service project,
unless waived by the housemaster.

What if I transferred in to LS after 9 th grade?


A 10th grade transfer should fulfill the 15-hour requirement by end of senior year.
An 11th grade transfer student should perform 10 hours of Community Service.
A 12th grade transfer student should perform 5 hours of service.

How do I find a community service placement?


First, a student should review the material covered in this document. Examples of Community
Service activities and a list of placements appear below. Additionally, the Career Center lists various

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opportunities that arise throughout the school year. Students who need help finding a placement can
speak to their Housemaster or Guidance Counselor.

How do I go about arranging to perform my service?


Students may begin by discussing their plans with their Counselor or Housemaster. If the placement
is located at LSRHS, the student should make an appointment to see the contact person. (For example, if
the service is to be performed in the library, the student would arrange to see the head Librarian.) If the
placement is outside LS, the student should call the contact person to arrange a meeting (and should leave
a message if the person is not immediately reached.) Counselors and Housemasters will help if the
student is having difficulty reaching a contact person.

What if I want to design my own Community Service project?


Students are encouraged to design their own Community Service placements or to create their
own projects. Participating in or organizing a project alone or with friends, or with a group such as a club,
team, or class, is welcomed. Students may employ their own talents, interests, and imaginations to create
individual service projects. They should check with their housemasters first, to get the plan approved,
before performing the service.

How do I document my Community Service hours?


When a student finishes a Community Service project, (s)he should fill out a PROJECT
COMPLETION form, which can be found in the House offices. It must be signed by the student and the
project supervisor, and should include the actual number of hours that were performed on the project.
(Transportation and pledge-soliciting time do NOT count toward service hours, unless pre-arranged by
discussing with the student’s Housemaster.) The student should submit the completed form to the House
Assistant.

Examples of Community Service Activities*


The following categories present some examples of community service. It is not intended to be all-
inclusive.

Education Recreation
Classroom teacher’s assistant** Team coach
Tutor Team manager
Library assistant Activity instructor
Office assistant Town recreation or Y volunteer

Environment Health & Social


Recycling projects Hospital aide
Conservation projects handicapped/disadvantaged helper
Habitat preservation Elder services activities
Maintenance and cleanup projects Nursing home assistant

Cultural and Historical Elections


Museum work Charitable fund raising or collection drives
Historical park guide Soup kitchen or homeless shelter
State House helper Food drive
Theatrical and Musical performances

*Any project performed for community service hours must meet the definition and guidelines stated
above, and if there is any question, must be approved by Housemaster prior to performing the service.

**When assisting a teacher, confidentiality of all material pertaining to students, exams, etc. must be
maintained. Students may not have access to these materials.

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Minimum Entry Requirements for Massachusetts State College/University System
English 4 years
Social Sciences 2 years (including 1 year of US History)
Foreign Language 2 years (in a single language)
Science 3 years (including 2 years with laboratory work)
Mathematics 3 years (Algebra I and II and Geometry or Trigonometry
or comparable coursework
Electives 2 years (from above subjects or Arts and Humanities or Computer Science)

The minimum required grade point average is a 3.0 for all college preparatory classes with accelerated,
honors, or advanced placement classes weighted higher by the Massachusetts college/university. If the applicant's
GPA falls below the minimum requirement, a sliding scale using SAT/ACT scores will be used. As of Fall 2000, no
applicant with a GPA below 2.0 may be admitted to a Massachusetts state college or university. While the state
colleges and universities (and most other colleges and universities) re-compute a student’s grade point average
according to their own formula, the following explanation of Lincoln-Sudbury’s formula regarding the GPA may
be helpful to you.

At Lincoln-Sudbury, a grade point average (G.P.A.) is computed for every student at the end of the junior year
(6 semesters). Grades used in computing averages are those from all courses in English, History, World Language,
Mathematics, Science, and Computer Science courses. The average is determined by assigning numerical
equivalents to letter grades as follows:
A+=4.0 B+=3.3 C+=2.3 D+=1.3
A=4.0 B=3.0 C=2.0 D=1.0 F=0
A-=3.7 B-=2.7 C-=1.7 D-=.7

At Lincoln-Sudbury, all courses are weighted equally.

The above are minimum requirements for the Massachusetts State College/University System only. Other
colleges and universities may have different requirements. Please review this information with your counselor.
Reminder: Meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee admission.

COUNSELING SERVICES
Each student is assigned a counselor who is available to discuss any concerns (personal, academic, planning
for the future, etc.). Students may see their counselor by making an appointment in the House Office. If the
situation is urgent, the House Assistant will arrange for an immediate conference. Parents may call the House
Office to schedule a conference with their son or daughter's counselor.

The Lincoln-Sudbury Counseling Department makes group counseling experiences available when possible.
Ninth grade students will have a "Ninth Grade Orientation Seminar" during the first semester at Lincoln-Sudbury.
The focus and activities for the groups include becoming acquainted with Lincoln-Sudbury, the transition to high
school, getting to know the student's counselor, future-planning, and decision-making issues.

Clinical counseling services are also available to students. Students may refer themselves, or parents or
counselors can also make referrals. We are currently running some social skills groups through the Special
Education Department, and some Dialectical Behavior Therapy groups through Special Education, the Academic
Support Center, and Central. There are topic-related groups which are short-term, and run from time to time as
needed. Clinicians are also available to parents for consultation. Each house has one or two clinicians assigned to
provide services for students and parents in that house.

The Career Center is a resource center with information about colleges, volunteer opportunities, part-time
employment, and careers for students, parents, and the community. Among the center’s resources are college
reference books, catalogs, brochures, CD’s, financial aid information, and up-to-date career information. The
Career center hosts representatives from colleges, summer programs, the military, and various other post-
secondary options. Working papers, a job board, applications for Work-Study and Executive Internships are also
available. Community members and students may register to vote, register for Selective Service, and learn about
adult education opportunities in the center. The Career Center is open from 9 a.m. every school day and no
appointments are necessary. Students are encouraged to drop in whenever they have a free block.

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ADMISSION TO POST-SECONDARY SCHOOLS
When planning a course of study for a student's four years at Lincoln-Sudbury, some thought should be given to
college admission requirements. This section has been included to give a brief overview of the college admission
process so that students and parents will be able to make informed decisions on course selections.

Colleges make admissions decisions by evaluating some or all of the following information about a student:
1. High School Transcript
a. Grades/Grade Point Average (G.P.A.)
b. Type of curriculum/courses
2. College Admissions Exams
a. SAT Reasoning Test or ACT
b. SAT Subject Tests
3. Recommendations
4. Extracurricular Activities
5. Special Talents
6. Your College Application and Essays

In general, students preparing for college, who wish to keep all of their options open, should plan their program to
include:
English 4 years
Social Studies 3 to 4 years
Languages 2 years plus (usually of the same language - 3 years or more is preferred)
Science 3 to 4 years (including 2 years of laboratory science)
Mathematics 3 to 4 years (through Algebra II or beyond, if possible)

Students considering specific careers or majors in college should consult with their counselor because some
careers/majors may have prerequisites.

College Admission Testing


The Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test (PSAT) is designed as a practice test for the SAT Reasoning Test and a
qualifying test for National Merit Scholarships (when taken in the junior year). This test is administered once each
year in October. Juniors are strongly encouraged to take this test.

The SAT Reasoning Test measures critical reading, math problem-solving, and writing skills developed over many
years, both in and out of school. These tests are generally taken in spring of the junior year and/or the fall of the
senior year.

SAT Subject Tests are designed to measure how much a student knows about a particular subject. The more
competitive colleges may require them. It is recommended that an SAT Subject Test is taken as soon as the student
has completed his/her most advanced study in an area. Students should check with colleges to learn about their
requirements for the Subject Tests. The tests are one hour exams and students may take up to three on a given test
date.

For more information please visit www.collegeboard.com

The ACT, administered by the American Colleges Testing Service, is another standardized test used for college
admissions. The ACT contains four 35 to 50 minute sections in English usage, mathematic reasoning, reading
comprehension, and science. The main difference between the ACT and the SAT is the ACT is a yardstick of both
reasoning ability and knowledge of specific subject matter covered in courses. The ACT Plus Writing includes a
30-minute Writing Test for an additional fee. This Writing Test lets you show your skill in planning and
composing a short essay. Most colleges will accept the ACT in lieu of the SAT Reasoning test, and some colleges
will accept the ACT in lieu of both SAT Reasoning tests and SAT Subject tests. Check directly with the colleges you
are considering for specific information about testing requirements.

For more information please visit www.act.org

Students with special needs who require accommodations for test-taking in classes may apply for eligibility for
special accommodations when taking the SAT or the ACT. Counselors and learning specialists have more detailed
information.

It is essential that the process of selecting appropriate colleges and/or making other post-graduate plans begin in
the junior year. During the second semester of the junior year, students begin meeting formally with counselors to
discuss their future plans.

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GENERAL INFORMATION
THE LINCOLN-SUDBURY HOUSE SYSTEM

The L-S House system helps make a large school feel smaller to students and families, by giving students
a home base where they find support for their academic and social wellbeing. Every student is placed in a House
(East, North, South or West) at the beginning of ninth grade, and siblings are placed in the same house for their
four years at LS. All houses have a cross section of 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th graders. Each house is staffed by a
Housemaster, Guidance Counselors, and an Administrative Assistant; students and parents can easily get to know
the three folks who work with them on school issues such as course choices, academic progress, behavioral issues,
college or post-graduate application processes, and all things school-related. Students have a mailbox in the house
office, where they can receive notices from staff, messages from home, etc. Parents call attendance information to
the administrative assistant, and may call the counselor or the housemaster with any questions and concerns.

ATTENDANCE

Students are expected to be in school except in cases of emergency or for reasons explained below. As per
Massachusetts General Law (Title XII, Ch 76), the following are the only legal excuses for absence from school:

1. Personal illness - Under certain circumstances, the school may require the certificate of a doctor.
2. Illness in the family - All schoolwork should be kept current.
3. Observance of a religious holiday - Any student of any religion shall be excused if his/her absence is for
the purpose of observing a religious holiday consistent with his/her creed or belief.
4. Suspension from school - students have the right to make up work missed.
5. Appearance at court; a note from a court officer may be required.
6. Housemasters, at their discretion, “may excuse cases of necessary absence for other causes, not exceeding seven
day sessions or fourteen half day sessions in any period of six months....” (Massachusetts General Law (Title XII,
Ch 76)

AN EXTENDED FAMILY VACATION OR BUSINESS TRIP IS NOT A LEGITIMATE REASON FOR MISSING
SCHOOL. TEACHERS ARE NOT REQUIRED TO HELP STUDENTS MAKE UP WORK MISSED DURING THIS
PERIOD.

Participation in co-curricular activities


1. In order to participate in co-curricular activities (e.g. athletics, drama, music etc.) students must attend
school on the day of the activity. If a student is absent on Friday, s/he may not participate in weekend school
activities, including athletics, drama, music, etc. Extenuating circumstances are handled on a case by case
basis, and must be brought to the attention of the athletic director.
2. All students who participate in interscholastic athletics are expected to attend practices and games during
school vacations. The Vacation Policy is further clarified in the Athletic section of this handbook.

Steps to follow when absent:


1. The parent or guardian should phone the school and inform the House office of the absence before 7:30 a.m.
on the day of the absence.
2. If the parent or guardian cannot call in, s/he should write an excuse giving student name, date, days of
absence and his/her signature.
3. Excuses must be presented to the Housemaster within 5 school days of the absence in order to be
considered.
4. Student should ask all teachers for make-up assignments. Assignments not made up will reflect in student’s
grade. (Each student is responsible for seeing that make-up work is completed.)

POLICY FOR PERMISSION TO LEAVE SCHOOL


OPEN CAMPUS POLICY
An important part of the philosophy at Lincoln-Sudbury is helping students learn to use their unassigned
time responsibly. Therefore, juniors and seniors, with a parent or guardian’s permission, and their own signature
which indicates that they understand the rules and obligations, may apply for an Open Campus Card (“max ed”
card) which allows them to leave campus during their unassigned time.
To receive the card, juniors or seniors bring a signed permission form to their House Office, pay a $5.00
fee for the picture identification, have their Housemaster sign the card, and have their picture taken. When a
parent or guardian signs this permission form, he/she is granting permission for the student to leave campus for
the remainder of his/her time at L-S. This privilege can be revoked at any time by the parent or school. Therefore,
we urge you to have a conversation with your son/daughter about the use of this privilege before you sign. If you
have any questions about the policy or use of the “max ed” card, please contact your son or daughter’s House
Office.

• Ninth and tenth graders are not allowed to have Open Campus Cards.

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Consequences for leaving the campus without permission are detailed in the Discipline Code. All students are
required to attend classes and be on campus between the hours of 7:50 a.m. and 2:39 p.m. on regularly scheduled
school days (7:50-12:36 on Wednesdays). Exceptions are allowed as follows:
1. Approved school field trips, accompanied by a staff member or members.
2. Approved athletic trips, accompanied by a member of the coaching staff.
3. Approved early dismissal, or absence requested by a parent or guardian and approved by the
Superintendent or Housemaster.
4. Approved off-campus classes and programs, including but not limited to Work Study, Executive Intern,
college courses, Alternate Activity and classes at other high schools.

NURSING SERVICES AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS


The Lincoln-Sudbury Regional Health Office is open from 7:50 a.m. to 2:40 p.m. for students with medical
problems and/or routine first aid. Students who feel too ill to go to class should go to the Health Office. Ill or
injured students will only be dismissed home with parental permission. If it becomes necessary for a student to
take any form of medication at school, a signed note from the parent, the prescribing doctor, and the original
container of medicine must be presented to the nurse in charge. All medication will be kept in and dispensed
through the Health Office.

State law requires that all 10th grade students have a physical examination by their private physician and
that the results be filed in their health record. In addition, all 9th grade students are screened for postural
problems; all 10th and 11th grade students undergo vision and hearing screening through the Health Office.

If a student is excused from Wellness, a signed and dated letter from the attending physician must be on
file in the Health Office. For students participating in the athletic program, a physical examination is required
before the tryouts. Students who have a medical excuse for Wellness may not participate in the athletic program.

Massachusetts State Law requires that all transfer students entering LSRHS have a physical examination
by their private physician. The law states that “No student (except those exempt for religious or medical reasons)
shall be admitted to school without a physicians certificate or a copy from a school in the Commonwealth of their
current immunizations.”

SUPERVISED STUDY
Supervised Study is a program for students whose grades indicate to their housemasters, counselors or
teachers that they could benefit from homework or study time under supervision. Tutors may be available to
students during their supervised study time.

LOCKERS
Lockers with combination locks are issued to students at the beginning of the year. Lockers should
be kept locked at all times. To safeguard their property, students are cautioned against telling their
combinations to one another. Any locker malfunction should be reported to the appropriate housemaster.
STUDENTS ARE CAUTIONED NOT TO KEEP MONEY OR OTHER VALUABLES IN THEIR LOCKERS. If
a student brings valuables to school, such as money, jewelry, or expensive clothing articles, s/he should
secure them with a school official.

LOST AND FOUND


Articles found in and around the school should be turned in to the Main Office. Items will be placed in a
Lost and Found Box, located in the Cafeteria.

SCHOOL INSURANCE
Optional school insurance is available to all students. A packet describing the program is available to
students in their house offices.

VOTER REGISTRATION
Voter registration for students and community members is available in the Career Center.

PARKING
Student parking is limited. Therefore, only juniors and seniors may apply (preference given to seniors) to the
supervising Housemaster to park in the student parking lot. A fee is charged.

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STUDENT SENATE BILL OF RIGHTS

The Senate shall support and defend the following rights of all members of the school community:

• To express freely and peaceably, in speech and in writing, opinions and ideas.
• To distribute printed materials on school grounds before school, during school, and after school
hours.
• To assemble freely and peaceably in any other matter, before school, during school, and after
school, so long as such gatherings do not disrupt the educational process.
• To dress as he or she shall consider proper so long as health and safety regulations are observed
and common decency is practiced.
• To defend against an accusation before any discipline, suspension, expulsion, termination, or other
major action may occur.
• To petition for redress of grievances.
• To be free from physical and verbal harassment.

LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL DISCIPLINE CODE

Lincoln-Sudbury prides itself on maintaining an atmosphere in which all members of the community are
treated with respect, and thoughtful, civil behavior is the norm. The purpose of this Discipline Code is to maintain
this atmosphere, and to promote self-discipline and an ability to behave and dress appropriately and responsibly
in school. Proper school and classroom conduct, in which considerate and caring behavior towards others is
expected and modeled, supports this discipline code in a positive way. Whether in school, or at a school sponsored
event, students are always expected and required to give their names when asked by a faculty or staff member.
School personnel are committed to ensure compliance with this code in a fair, consistent, and judicious manner.

The Lincoln-Sudbury community has articulated three Core Values which are at the heart of this learning
community. Adherence to these core values by all members of the community is expected, and a breach of the core
values will generate a strong corrective reaction.

The Lincoln-Sudbury Core Values are:

1. Promotion of caring and cooperative relationships among all members of the community.
2. Respect for human differences.
3. Satisfaction with excellence only, especially in academics.

There are certain concerns that we would like to highlight at the outset, even though they are covered in
more detail later in the Discipline Code. Student safety is the school’s highest priority. Students and parents
should be absolutely aware of the following:

IMPORTANT NOTE ON ISSUES OF SAFETY AND SECURITY

• Drugs are absolutely and completely forbidden at Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School. Under the terms of
the Education Reform Act, students in possession of controlled substances on school grounds can be expelled from
school.

• Weapons of any kind are prohibited, and students in possession of a weapon may be expelled.

• Theft-which has been a significant problem at L-S in the past- will not be tolerated, and those caught stealing will
be dealt with seriously. Any student involved in stealing will be suspended and the police may be notified.

• Physical violence of any kind is prohibited. Any student involved in violence will be suspended.

• Verbal or sexual harassment in any form will not be tolerated.

• Under no circumstances can anything be thrown in or around the light wells.

• Defacing School Property/Graffiti will not be tolerated.

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CONSEQUENCES FOR INFRACTIONS

L-S students have traditionally had the privilege of making many decisions. With this privilege goes the
responsibility for behaving thoughtfully, as well as for understanding school rules and the possible consequences
for violating them. The consequences for infractions of school rules include the following range of responses:
After School Detention
Loss of free time
Work Detail
Exclusion from areas in the school, e.g. cafeteria
Revocation of Max Ed card and/or parking privileges
Exclusion from athletic events and extra-curricular activities
Exclusion from the school bus
Loss of parking privileges
Suspension
Expulsion
Loss of the privilege of representing the school, in athletics, or other positions of leadership
Other, as appropriate

Under ordinary circumstances, punishment is progressive in nature. That is, second offenses are generally
treated more harshly than first offenses. If a student continually violates a school rule, the administration may take
more serious action than is specifically prescribed in this Code. Students have a right to expect that disciplinary
decisions will be treated with discretion.
The Discipline Code is not meant to describe all possible areas of misbehavior. If students behave in a way
that is inappropriate or irresponsible, they will receive a penalty that is in keeping with their actions. Even if not
specifically cited here, behavior which is disruptive to the school, malicious towards others, destructive to
property, or intentionally damaging to the reputation of fellow students or staff members will be considered
punishable. These rules apply at school, on school buses, and at school sponsored events.
Students with diagnosed disabilities are subject to current state and federal laws and regulations under the
Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA 2004). A copy of these laws is available in the Student Services Office.

MEDIATION
A Non-disciplinary procedure for resolving conflicts

L-S has a strong school mediation program which offers students and staff a non-punitive method of
resolving conflicts. Anyone who wants to mediate a dispute can contact the mediation coordinator to request a
mediation. Many disputes can be resolved at this level, allowing participants to come to agreements responsibly,
without feeling like they have to invoke disciplinary consequences.
Housemasters may refer students to mediation in addition to assigning consequences, if a dispute appears
to be unsettled and may result in further interruption of the educational process. Participation in mediation may be
strongly recommended in such situations, but it is voluntary on the part of all participants.

DUE PROCESS
Students accused of an infraction have the right to due process. This means they have the right to respond
to the charge and explain their actions and perceptions. Students have the right to appeal disciplinary decisions to
the Superintendent/Principal.

EXPULSION HEARINGS
For offenses involving drugs, assault on a staff member, the possession of weapons, or other very serious
offenses, there will be a hearing in front of a committee of at least three Administrators. These individuals will
function as Principal-designees at the hearing. The student shall be notified in writing about this hearing and has
the right to bring advocates to the hearing. If the committee of Administrators recommends expulsion, students
have the right to appeal a decision to the Superintendent/Principal within ten days. The student will remain
under suspension pending the appeal.
In cases of extremely serious violations of school rules other than those involving drugs, weapons, or
assault on a staff member, the Superintendent/Principal may recommend expulsion to the School Committee.
Students who pose a significant threat or danger to the community, or who commit particularly egregious offenses,
will be excluded from the community for an appropriate period of time.

SUSPENSIONS
For suspensions from school for fewer than ten days, administrators will state the nature of the offense,
and the consequences, to the student and parent. The student will be provided an opportunity to respond to the
charges. Appeals may be made to the Superintendent/Principal, and will be scheduled expeditiously. However,
the student will remain under suspension pending the appeal.
For suspensions of ten days or more, the charges against the student will be made in writing, along with
written notification of the right to appeal. Appeals must be made to the Superintendent/Principal within five days
after receiving written notification of the suspension. The Superintendent/Principal will hold a hearing within
three days of the request for an appeal. The student may present written or oral testimony on his/her behalf, and
shall have the right to counsel.
If a student has been issued a criminal complaint charging that student with a felony, the Principal or
Housemaster may suspend such student for a time deemed appropriate, if the student’s presence is determined to

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have a substantial detrimental affect on the general welfare of the school. If a student is convicted of a felony such
student may be expelled. Such students have all rights of due process outlined above.

DISCIPLINE OF SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS

All students are expected to meet the requirements for behavior as set forth in this handbook. Additional
provisions may be made for students who have been found by an evaluation TEAM to have special needs and
whose program is described in an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP). Any modifications will be described in
the student’s IEP.
If a special needs student is suspended, the Housemaster will notify the Student Services Office if that
suspension may exceed 10 days for a single offense or for several similar offenses. The student’s TEAM will
reconvene to determine whether the student’s misconduct was a direct manifestation of his/her disability. If such
a causal relationship is determined to exist, appropriate modifications to the student’s program will be made. A
copy of disability law requirements regarding discipline is available in the Student Services Office.

CATEGORIES OF INFRACTIONS
The Discipline Code divides unacceptable behavior into three categories. The first covers academic behavior,
the second covers offenses of a generally social or behavioral nature, and the third covers the most serious offenses,
which may involve legal as well as school consequences.

I. ACADEMIC BEHAVIOR

SCHOOL CORRIDORS: L-S is the kind of place that allows students to peacefully congregate during free time in
corridors and other public areas. However, behavior needs to be quiet, decorous, civil, and respectful of others
and of classroom activities at all times in all areas of the building. If behavior is not within those guidelines, an
area may be closed for a period of time.

CHEATING: Cheating is intolerable in an academic institution and will be dealt with seriously. Cheating involves
the intentional attempt to pass off the work of others as one’s own. Cheating includes (but is not limited to)
1. Illicitly sharing or learning of specific questions on an exercise before it is given.
2. Illicitly sharing or obtaining information during an exercise (this includes homework, accessing information
from a disk, etc.).
3. Plagiarism, i.e., submitting another’s work or ideas as one’s own. This includes copying from another
student’s work, from books, or from any electronic source including the Internet.
4. Stealing quizzes or tests.
5. Using electronic devices, such as text messaging, to receive information about tests or quizzes.

Consequences for cheating (which are cumulative from class to class and year to year):
First Cheating Offense:
A. The teacher will notify the Housemaster who will keep a record of the event.
B. The student will receive a failing grade on the exercise.
C. The parent(s)/guardian(s) will be notified.
Second Cheating Offense: (In addition to the above)
A. The student’s grade for the quarter will be lowered at least one full letter grade.
B. The student may be ineligible for awards.
C. A conference with the student, teachers, parent(s)/guardian(s), and Housemaster will be
held.
Third Cheating Offense: (In addition to the above):
A. The student will fail the course for the semester, potentially jeopardizing graduation and athletic
eligibility.
B. The student will be ineligible for awards.
C. A conference with the student, parent(s)/guardian(s), Housemaster, and Superintendent-
Principal will be held.

CLASS ATTENDANCE: Attendance in class is mandatory. Students who have three unexcused absences in a
class per semester will lose one credit in that course. In Wellness classes, two unexcused absences per quarter will
result in loss of one credit. Students with five unexcused absences per semester will lose both credits in that course.
Parents are notified in writing of unexcused absences (unless an 18 year old student has filed papers of majority
with the school.) When changing classes or levels during a semester, unexcused absences from the original class
will be carried forward to the new class.

For ninth grade students (during the first semester) for the first two unexcused absences, parents will be
notified and students will receive detentions; and for the third such absence students will lose a credit in the class.
For all other students, the housemaster will assign a detention for the second cut, as a warning that a third cut will
result in loss of credit.

All students need to be in school and to attend classes on the day of a contest or event, in order to
participate in athletics or other activities.

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II. SOCIAL BEHAVIOR

PUBLIC DISPLAYS OF AFFECTION: Lincoln-Sudbury prides itself on maintaining a friendly atmosphere, where
close relationships are fostered and encouraged, and students are permitted to live their lives without too much
intrusive adult intervention. However, it is also a public institution, where appropriate norms and boundaries of
interaction need to be maintained. In this regard, any sexual activity, including excessive public displays of
affection, are not permitted in the school, on the school bus, or on school grounds. Casual and friendly contact, of
course, is understandable. But physical intimacy is not appropriate in the corridors, classrooms, or grounds of
Lincoln-Sudbury.

PROPER ATTIRE/DRESS: While L-S does not have a formal dress code, it is expected that students will dress
appropriately in school, with consideration for public sensibility. Clothing containing images of drugs, alcohol, or
violence is unacceptable and students will be asked to change or cover unacceptable clothing.

BEHAVIOR AT SCHOOL, AT SCHOOL ACTIVITIES, AND ON SCHOOL BUSES: Students are expected to
behave appropriately. The penalties for misbehavior at school activities or on school buses are the same as the
penalties for misconduct during school hours. In addition, misbehavior at a school-sponsored activity or on a
school bus may result in privileges to participate being revoked.

INAPPROPRIATE CLASS/CORRIDOR BEHAVIOR: Students are expected to refrain from inappropriate behavior
such as yelling, disrupting a class, knocking on a door or window, littering, throwing objects, playing music,
pitching coins, writing on desks, etc. Language in hallways, open spaces, and classrooms should be civil. The first
time students are reported by a teacher for engaging in such behavior, they will receive a detention. If a student is
reported a second time, a more serious penalty will be imposed. Throwing anything in or around the light wells is
an offense which may result in suspension.

FAILURE/REFUSAL TO IDENTIFY YOURSELF: Students are required to give their full name when asked.
Students who refuse to give their name or who give a false name are subject to suspension.

CAFETERIA BEHAVIOR: Students are expected to behave appropriately in the cafeteria and to clean the table
after eating. If students violate these expectations, they may be suspended from spending time in the cafeteria for
up to one semester and/or given other appropriate consequences, such as clean-up duty in the cafeteria during
free time. Students are not permitted to eat in the halls under any circumstances; consequence is detention or
cafeteria clean-up duty.

GAMBLING, FIREWORKS, LITTERING, and SNOWBALL THROWING: These activities are not allowed and the
consequences for infractions will be determined by the administration.

RESPECT FOR SCHOOL PROPERTY: L-S is a community and we all need to work together to take care of our
school. Defacing school property/writing graffiti is expressly prohibited. Students who violate this expectation
will receive appropriate penalties.

PARKING AND SAFE DRIVING: Access to a parking space is a privilege which can be withdrawn at the
discretion of the administration. Students may be fined, their car booted or towed, and/or they may lose parking
privileges if they break rules such as parking outside student-designated areas, reckless driving during the school
day (on or off campus), or unauthorized use of permits. Unpaid fines will become senior obligations to be settled
before graduation.

ELECTRONIC DEVICES (e.g. cellular phones, radios, personal stereos): All electronic devices are expressly
prohibited from being used in classrooms, unless with the approval of the teacher. Students using these devices
while in class will have them confiscated. Students may use phones and listen to music in public spaces, as long as
they are not disruptive, and not disturbing others.

OPEN CAMPUS POLICY: Juniors and Seniors may leave campus with parental permission and a signed I.D. card
(“max-ed.” card). Ninth and tenth graders may not leave campus. The parking lot is considered off-limits for ninth
and tenth graders.
First offense: five detentions
Second offense: loss of free time for 3 weeks
Subsequent offenses: additional loss of free time, loss of max-ed. privileges and/or parking privileges for the
first quarter of junior year

If a student with a max-ed. card takes a student who does not have a card off campus, he/she will lose max-ed
privileges for one month. Subsequent offenses may lead to longer loss of privileges, loss of parking privileges
and/or loss of free time and/or suspension.

PRESENCE IN UNSUPERVISED AREAS: Students may not be in unsupervised areas such as laboratories, gyms,
the auditorium, the woods, the ropes course, the radio station, computer rooms, classrooms, or stairwells without
a teacher or a teacher’s explicit permission. Students may never go on the roof. Violations of these rules will result
in an appropriate penalty.

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BICYCLES, SKATEBOARDS, SCOOTERS, etc: Skateboards, stunt bikes, and rollerblades may NOT be used on
school property. Other bicycles must be used appropriately with regard to personal safety, the safety of others,
and with care to not damage property.

TOBACCO POLICY: Any minor and/or student who smokes in any non-smoking area or within 300 yards of public school
property shall be subject to a fine of one hundred dollars ($100.00) for a first offense; or shall complete the participation in a
tobacco education class only for the first offense; in either case the parent(s) and or legal guardian(s) shall be notified of the
minor's infraction; each subsequent offense will result in a one hundred dollar ($100.00) fine. (Sudbury Town By-Law)

In summary: No student may be in possession/use of a tobacco product on school property or within 300 yards of
school property within the Town of Sudbury.
1. First offense or second offense
A. Parents will be informed and
B. Students can choose between a tobacco education program or receive a ticket for $100 payable to
the Town of Sudbury
2. Subsequent Offenses
A. Parents will be informed and
B. $100 ticket payable to the Town of Sudbury
No school employee shall use tobacco products on school property within the Town of Sudbury.

III. ILLEGAL BEHAVIOR

If a student commits an act which violates a state or federal law, the school may report the offense to the
appropriate legal authorities. In criminal cases, the school is required to make such report. Lincoln-Sudbury has a
memorandum of understanding with the local police departments, which states the following as mandated
reportable incidents:
a) possession, use, or distribution of alcohol by a student
b) possession, use, or distribution of an inhalant or any controlled substance
c) any incident in which any individual is reasonably believed to be selling or distributing drugs or alcohol
d) any incident involving intentionally assaultive or negligent behavior that results in personal injury
e) possession of a weapon, as defined by G.L.c. Section 10(b) or in the school handbook
f) any incident involving domestic abuse, dating violence or a violation of M.G.L.c. Section 209A order
g) any incident involving the serious physical neglect or abuse of a child (in addition to a report filed with the
Dept. of Social Services pursuant to G.L.c.119 Section 51A)
h) any incident involving an actual or suspected hate crime or violation of civil rights
j) any incident resulting in significant damage to municipal or private property
k) any bomb threat, fire, threatened or attempted fire setting, threatened or attempted use of an explosive
device or hoax device
l) any creation or possession of a “hit list” of individuals targeted for violence or death
m) any incident of “hazing,” involving a threatened or actual risk of physical or emotional harm to a student
n) any sexual assault, rape or incident of gender-based harassment

Mandatory Reportable Incidents will be immediately reported to the Police Departments if such incidents:
(a) occurred on school property or within 1,000 foot radius of school property
(b) occurred at a school-sponsored function
(c) occurred in a school owned or contracted bus or other vehicle
(d) involve a student of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School

THEFT: As it is an affront to our core values, theft will be dealt with extremely seriously, to the fullest extent
allowable under this Discipline Code. Theft includes anything stolen from vehicles parked on school property.
Thefts of money or valuables worth over $250 will be reported to the local police by the school. Parents may report
any theft to the local police. In cases in which such theft takes place outside the boundaries of the Lincoln-Sudbury
campus, the school administration reserves the right to issue consequences as though they had occurred on
campus if, and only if, the school administrator(s) deems that the theft in question was connected to school. Such
consequences will be independent from any criminal charges brought against the student(s).

Consequences for theft include: a period of suspension, payment of restitution, and may include loss of in-school
free time. Subsequent offenses may result in exclusion from the L-S community or exclusion from specified areas
of the school.

PREVENTING THEFT IS THE BEST DEFENSE AGAINST IT!


Thefts hurt the whole community. Preventing theft and reporting it is everyone’s responsibility. Currently, many
of the thefts at L-S occur in the locker rooms. In order to ensure that possessions are safe on school property, the
following is recommended:
• Do not bring unnecessary cash or valuables to school.
• Either lock up your belongings, or carry them with you.
• Ask coaches to lock up valuables, for extra protection, if necessary.
• Make every effort to look out for one another. If you witness a theft, report it.
• Staff members are concerned about theft, and will continue to supervise areas as well as possible.
• Theft report forms are available in your house office.

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ARSON AND PULLING FIRE ALARMS: Pulling fire alarms and arson are violations of state laws. If students set
a fire or pull an alarm, the school will file a court complaint against them in addition to imposing a suspension of
up to ten days. If a second offense is committed, the school administration will recommend that the student be
expelled from school.

DRUGS AND WEAPONS/ASSAULT ON A STAFF MEMBER: Based on Chapter 71 of the General Laws of the
Commonwealth, any student who is found on school premises or at a school-sponsored or school-related event,
including athletic games, in possession of a dangerous weapon, including but not limited to, a gun or knife; in
possession of or under the influence of a controlled substance, as defined in Chapter 94 C, including but not
limited to marijuana, cocaine, and heroin; or who assaults a staff member may be subject to expulsion from the
school district. Students who are part of a group which is using or in possession of illegal substances may share in
the responsibility and may receive the same penalty as all members of the group. The expulsion hearing takes
place before a tribunal comprising three Housemasters, whose decision may range from suspension to expulsion.
In addition, depending on the nature of the offense, it may be determined by the administration that violators will
not be permitted to attend future social or athletic events at the school. This prohibition may be modified if the
student is willing to participate in a drug education or treatment program.

ALCOHOL: Use, possession, or being under the influence of alcohol are all strictly prohibited in school, on school
grounds, on school buses, or at any school events. Students who violate the prohibition against alcohol use will be
subject to an immediate three day suspension from school. In addition, depending on the nature of the offense, it
may be determined by the administration that violators will not be permitted to attend future social or athletic
events at the school. This prohibition may be modified if the student is willing to participate in an alcohol
education or treatment program.
Students should realize that being part of a group, in school or at school events, in which alcohol is being
used puts them in jeopardy, and that they are likely to receive the same punishment as all members of the group.

MIAA RULE ON TOBACCO, DRUGS, AND ALCOHOL


Students on athletic teams should note that use of tobacco, drugs, or alcohol at any time during a season is
prohibited, and will result in suspension from a team as delineated by the MIAA rules and regulations.

PHYSICAL, VERBAL OR SEXUAL HARASSMENT


Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School is committed to providing staff and students an environment
which allows them to pursue their careers and studies in physical and emotional safety. Therefore the school and
its offices must be free of any type of harassment or physical threat to well-being. Harassment refers to conduct,
behavior, or comments that are personally offensive, degrading, or threatening to others. The prohibition against
harassment applies to all interactions among students, staff, or any combination of these.

Physical harassment includes pushing, hitting, punching, or other unwanted contact. It also includes any
case of an individual or group not permitting another individual freedom of movement by blocking the way or
otherwise hampering passage.

Verbal harassment includes any threats or negative remarks based on another’s race, gender, physical
appearance, sexual orientation, role, religion or national origin, expressed directly or in written or pictorial form.
Electronic harassment, over e-mail or via the internet, will be considered a punishable offense. While name-calling
or taunting may not rise to the level of harassment, they are unacceptable forms of behavior at L-S, and will be
treated as violations of the Discipline Code. Any incident of harassment should be reported immediately to a
Housemaster.

Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination and is a violation of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act
and of the Massachusetts General Law. Sexual harassment is demeaning and degrading. It affects an individual’s
self-esteem, and can have a negative impact in performance at work or in class. It can make an individual feel
angry, powerless, and fearful.
Sexual harassment includes any unwanted sexual attention, physical or verbal, which interferes with an
individual’s ability to work, learn, or otherwise participate in the services and benefits of school activities and
programs. This attention may include spreading sexual gossip, unwanted sexual comments, pressure for sexual
activity and/or unwanted physical contact. It can also include publicly displaying sexually offensive signs,
clothing, or jokes. The fact that someone did not intend to sexually harass an individual is generally not considered
a defense to a complaint of sexual harassment. In most cases, it is the effect and characteristics of the behavior that
determine if the behavior constitutes sexual harassment. Retaliation against anyone reporting or thought to have
reported sexual harassment behaviors is prohibited. Knowingly filing false charges of sexual harassment will be
dealt with as a serious offense.

The consequences for physical, verbal or sexual harassment may include anything from a warning to
expulsion from school depending on the severity of the offense, and may include participation in an educational
group. Disciplinary actions will be progressive in nature. In cases in which such harassment takes place outside
the boundaries of the Lincoln-Sudbury campus, the school administration reserves the right to issue consequences
as though they had occurred on campus only if the administrator(s) deems that the harassment in question was
connected to school. Such consequence will be independent from any criminal charges brought against the
student(s).

15
Students who wish to report harassment are entitled to confidentiality and, if desired, anonymity. School
personnel will help the student resolve the issue, either through peer mediation or disciplinary action, and will
inform the student about support services available within the school. (School administrators and staff who fail to
report, investigate, or take appropriate action with regard to sexual harassment complaints may face disciplinary
action.)

A student who is filing a complaint of sexual harassment should follow the following procedure:

1. A student shall meet with his/her counselor or Housemaster to discuss the complaint. The counselor/
Housemaster will write up the complaint.
2. The complaint should contain as much information as possible about the alleged incident (names,
addresses, phone numbers, location, date and description of incident, print-out of electronic harassment).
3. The complaint will be investigated by two administrators (male and female). Together they will interview
all parties involved in the complaint and will respond within fifteen days of the interview.
4. If the administrator’s response does not satisfactorily resolve the issue, the complainant may request a
hearing before the Superintendent/Principal to be held within ten school days of receipt of the administrator’s
report. The student complainant is entitled to have his/her counselor present at every meeting.

FIGHTING: Fighting, or any form of violence, is expressly forbidden at Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School.
If students are involved in a fight, they will be removed from school immediately, suspended, and they will not be
eligible for school transportation. The punishment given will depend on the circumstances surrounding the fight.
In general, each party involved in a fight will be treated equally, because of the difficulty of determining whether
one student is more responsible than another. Students involved in fights may be referred to Peer Mediation. In
cases where fights take place off campus, the administration reserves the right to issue consequences as though the
infraction had occurred in school only if it is deemed that the fight was clearly connected to school, or could pose a
threat to the safety or welfare of students while in school.

HAZING AND INITIATION: Hazing and initiation of one student by another student or group will not be
tolerated. Any form of hazing or initiation will result in a student being suspended. The following is the Mass.
General Law regarding Hazing:

CH.269.S.17. Whoever is a principal organizer or participant in the crime of hazing, as defined herein, shall be
punished by a fine of not more than three thousand dollars or by imprisonment in a house of correction for not
more than one year, or both such fine and imprisonment.

The term “hazing” as used in this section and in sections eighteen and nineteen, shall mean any conduct or method of
initiation into any student organization, whether on public or private property, which willfully or recklessly endangers the
physical or mental health of any student or other person. Such conduct shall include whipping, beating, branding, forced
calisthenics, exposure to the weather, forced consumption of any food, liquor, beverage, drug or other substance, or any other
brutal treatment or forced physical activity which is likely to adversely affect the physical health or safety of any such student
or other person, or which subjects such student or other person to extreme mental stress, including extended deprivation of
sleep or rest, or extended isolation.

Notwithstanding any other provisions of this section to the contrary, consent shall not be available as a defense to any
prosecution under this action. Added by St.1985, c.536; amended by St.1987, c.665.

CH.269.S.18 Duty to Report Hazing


Whoever knows that another person is the victim of hazing as defined in section seventeen and is at the scene of such
crime shall, to the extent that such person can do without danger or peril to himself or others, report such crime to an
appropriate law enforcement official as soon as reasonably practicable. Whoever fails to report such crime shall be punished by
a fine of not more than one thousand dollars. Added by St.1985, c.536; amended by St.1987, c.665.

SEARCH POLICY: Students’ lockers are assigned to them for the period of the academic year. Lockers are
provided only for uses consistent with legitimate school or social purposes. The school retains the right to search
student lockers. Possession of contraband, drugs, and weapons is illegal and inconsistent with school policy.
Students, their bags, backpacks, lockers, personal computers, network accounts, email accounts, and vehicles may
also be searched. Following any search, parents/guardians will be notified. Students who refuse a search will be
suspended pending a meeting with their parent/guardian.

VANDALISM: If students vandalize school or personal property, they will be punished and expected to pay for
the damage. Writing on walls and defacing property are considered acts of vandalism. In cases in which such
vandalism takes place outside the boundaries of the Lincoln-Sudbury campus, the school administration reserves
the right to punish such instances as though they had occurred on campus if, and only if, the administrator(s)
deems that the vandalism in question was connected to school. Such consequences will be independent from any
criminal charges brought against the student(s).

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DEFINITIONS OF TERMS

DETENTION - Students assigned detention are expected to stay 30 minutes before or after school. Under
special circumstances, a student may lose free time during the school day for one full block (LOFT=loss of
free time) as a detention. Detention time will be doubled for those failing to report. The next step is
suspension.

SUSPENSION OUT-OF-SCHOOL - Students who are suspended for ten days or fewer will be informed by a
Housemaster of the charges against them, and provided an opportunity to respond. If a student is suspended,
she/he is ineligible for school bus transportation, may not appear on school grounds for any purpose during the
school day, and may not participate in or attend any extra-curricular activities during the period of suspension.
His/her parents/guardians will be notified. If a student appeals a suspension, the hearing with the
Superintendent/Principal will be held as quickly as possible, but the student must remain out of school until the
hearing is held.

SUSPENSION IN SCHOOL - Under certain circumstances, at the discretion of the Housemaster, students may
serve the period of suspension in school, under supervision.

EXPULSION - If a student is expelled from school, she/he loses his/her right to a public education. Expulsion is a
legal procedure which requires action by the Superintendent/Principal. The Superintendent/Principal, acting
alone, may expel students for drug violations, weapons possession, or assault on a staff member. In other cases, the
School Committee must decide upon expulsion, based upon the recommendation of the Superintendent/Principal.

EXCLUSION - Exclusion from the L-S community can be in the form of in-school or out of school suspension, or
expulsion. Exclusion may also include being excluded from certain areas or events.

APPEAL PROCEDURES - If a student believes a disciplinary action is unjust, she/he may appeal beginning with
the person imposing the original penalty, continuing through the Administration. In each situation, the student
may have the opportunity to present facts and may be accompanied by other people to assist or offer other
information. However, as noted above, students under suspension must remain out of school unless and until their
appeal is successful.

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LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT
L-S COMPUTER NETWORK- ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY
Revised 1/15/05

The Lincoln-Sudbury Computer Network consists of a First Class e-mail and bulletin board system
(Quantum), network access to file servers, and shared electronic resources, and Internet access via the network
through a T1 line.

PURPOSE
It is the policy of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District to provide access for employees and students
to the L-S Computer Network and to other external networks for educational and administrative purposes.
Educational purposes shall be defined as classroom activities, career and professional development activities, and
high-quality self-discovery activities of an educational nature.
The purpose of the L-S Computer Network is to assist teachers in preparing students for success in life and
work. This is accomplished by providing them with a network that allows them access to a wide range of
information and the ability to communicate with others.
The L-S Computer Network shall be used consistently with these educational purposes to increase
communication, enhance productivity, provide information to the community, and assist staff in upgrading
existing skills and acquiring new skills through a broader exchange of information.

AVAILABILITY
The Superintendent/Principal or his/her designee shall be responsible to implement, monitor, and evaluate
the L-S Computer Network for educational and administrative purposes.
Access to the L-S Computer Network, including external networks, shall be made available to employees and
students for educational and administrative purposes, in accordance with administrative regulations and
procedures to be developed by the Superintendent/Principal or his/her designee.
Access to the L-S Computer Network is subject to adherence with the District's Acceptable Use Policy and the
exercise of good judgment and common sense. ALL USERS shall be required to comply with all administrative
regulations and procedures governing use of the system. Copies of this policy may be found in the Program of
Studies and Policy Handbook for Students, the Staff Policy Manual and the Support Staff Handbook.
Noncompliance with applicable regulations and procedures, or inappropriate use of the L-S Computer Network or
external networks may result in suspension or termination of user privileges and other disciplinary actions
consistent with the policies of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District. Violations of law may result in
criminal prosecution as well as loss of user privileges and disciplinary action by the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional
School District.

In compliance with the Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA), L-S will utilize a filter to prohibit access to
Websites which contain inappropriate material (obscene, child pornography, or harmful to minors). The filtering
will not impede educationally relevant sites.

ACCEPTABLE USE
The Superintendent/Principal or his/her designee shall be responsible to develop and implement
administrative procedures, and student user agreements, consistent with the purposes and mission of the Lincoln-
Sudbury Regional School District, as well as with law and policy governing copyright and other applicable law.

PERSONAL COMPUTERS
Staff and students may bring personal computers to L-S. In an effort to protect the L-S information network,
the District reserves the right to investigate a personal computer and/or any peripheral device at any point, if there
is any reason to believe these are being used inappropriately, or in such a way as to threaten the network.

MONITORING USE
Electronic mail transmissions and other use of electronic resources by students and employees shall not be
considered confidential and may be monitored, accessed, retrieved, downloaded, printed, copied or examined at
any time by the network administrator, Superintendent/Principal or his/her designee to ensure appropriate use
for educational and administrative purposes, and may be disclosed to others, including law enforcement officials.

LIABILITY
The Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District shall not be liable for users' inappropriate use of electronic
resources or violations of copyright restrictions, users' mistakes or negligence, or costs incurred by users. The
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District shall not be responsible for ensuring the accuracy or usability of any
information found on external networks.

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LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT
L-S COMPUTER NETWORK- ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY

ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTATION


Policy Enforcement
• The District shall provide each user with copies of the Acceptable Use Policy and Procedures. Copies of this
policy may be found in the Program of Studies and Policy Handbook for Students, the Staff Policy Manual and
the Support Staff Handbook.
• Access shall be granted to employees.
• Access shall be granted to students.
• The Superintendent/Principal or his/her designee shall be responsible for disseminating and enforcing
policies and procedures.

Passwords
• User names shall be recorded on access agreements, where applicable, and kept on file.
• In applications where passwords are utilized, the initial passwords provided by the network administrator
should be set to expire on login.
• Passwords are confidential. All passwords shall be protected by the user and not shared nor displayed.
• Individual users shall, at all times, be responsible for the proper use of accounts issued in their name.
• System users shall not use another user's account.

Copyright
• Copyrighted software or data shall not be placed on the L-S Computer Network server without permission
from the holder of the copyright and the system administrator.
• System users must comply with copyright laws and respect copyrights. Copyrighted material may be copied
or redistributed only when the system user is authorized to do so in writing by the copyright holder or
designee, or is authorized to do so under the copyright law “fair use” doctrine. Any system user who has a
question about his/her right to use or redistribute copyrighted material should consult with the
Superintendent/Principal, or his/her designee or the System Administrator.
• System administrators may upload/download public domain programs to the system/network. System
administrators are responsible for determining if a program is in the public domain.

General Usage
• The Superintendent/Principal or his/her designee shall be authorized to monitor, access, retrieve, download,
print, copy or examine all system activities including electronic mail transmissions, as deemed appropriate to
ensure proper use of electronic resources, and to disclose such transmissions to others, including law
enforcement officials.

System Maintenance
• The network administrator or his/her designee shall be responsible for establishing appropriate retention and
backup schedules.
• The network administrator or his/her designee shall be responsible for establishing appropriate disk usage
limitations, if needed.
• System users should purge electronic information according to District retention guidelines.

Unacceptable Uses
The L-S Computer Network is to be used for educational and administrative purposes, in accordance with the
District's L-S Computer Network - Acceptable Use Policy. The following are some examples, but not an exhaustive
list, of uses which are inconsistent with that Policy:
• Using the L-S Computer Network for political or commercial purposes of any kind.
• Forgery or attempted forgery.
• Except in the case of an authorized network administrator, Superintendent/Principal or his/her designee,
attempting to monitor, read, delete, copy, or modify the electronic mail of other users or to interfere with the
ability of other users to send or receive electronic mail.
• Using the L-S Computer Network for illegal purposes, the support of illegal activities, or for any activity
prohibited by District policy.
• Attempting to harm or destroy equipment, materials, data or programs on the L-S Computer Network or on
the network of any other agency connected to the Internet.
• Using vulgarity, ethnic or racial slurs, harassment, slander, or other inflammatory language. Language should
always be appropriate to the context in which it is used.

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• Pretending to be someone else when sending/receiving messages.
• Transmitting or viewing any sexually explicit or pornographic materials or material not considered to be of
value in an educational setting.
• Revealing personal information (addresses, phone numbers, etc.) regarding oneself or another to an unknown
party.
• Attempting to impersonate or to gain unauthorized access as a system administrator or as any other user.
• Attempting to harm or destroy data of the L-S Computer Network, another user on the network, or any other
agency connected to the Internet.
• Encouraging or supporting the prohibited activities of others.
• Spamming [sending massive, inappropriate and unsolicited information] or flooding [transferring data
without intent of meaningful communication].

District Response to Infractions


• Deliberate attempts to degrade or disrupt system performance are violations of District policy and may be
criminal activity under applicable state and federal laws. This includes, but is not limited to, the uploading or
creating of computer viruses.
• Vandalism is a violation of District policy and may be criminal activity under applicable state and federal
laws. Vandalism shall result in the cancellation of system privileges and shall require restitution for costs
associated with hardware, software, and system restoration.
• The District shall cooperate fully with local, state, or federal officials in any investigation concerning or
relating to misuse of the District's network.

A user who violates District policy or administrative procedures or uses the L-S Computer Network
inappropriately shall be subject to suspension or termination of L-S Computer Network privileges and shall be
subject to appropriate District disciplinary action and/or prosecution.

STUDENT USER WEB CONSENT FORM

Dear Parent/Guardian:

If you do not consent to having your child photographed or videotaped during the school year for electronic
publications, please sign and return this form to the Lincoln-Sudbury Educational Technology Coordinator.

Student Name _____________________________________________________________

Year of Graduation __________________

Signature of Parent/Guardian: _____________________________


Date: ____________

Printed Parent/Guardian Name: ____________________________

Signature of Student (if 18 or over):_________________________


Date: ____________

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
THE SCHOOL YEAR
The school year at Lincoln-Sudbury is divided into two semesters. The first semester generally runs from
September through January and the second semester from February through June. Each semester is divided into
two quarters (or terms), each of which is approximately 10 weeks in length. Academic warnings are issued in the
middle of each quarter (term) and report cards are issued at the end of each quarter.

COURSES, CREDITS, GRADES


Ninth, tenth, and eleventh grade students are required to take seven (7) courses each semester. Twelfth
graders are required to take six (6) courses per semester. Students may earn two credits per semester for most
courses in which they earn a passing grade. For Wellness courses, students earn 1 credit per quarter (term) in
which they earn a passing grade. Students earn letter grades (A+ through F) in most subject areas. Certain courses
or subject areas may be graded Pass/Fail or A/Pass/Fail. The guidelines which teachers use in grading are as
follows:
A+ extraordinary work C+ 77-79
A 93 and above C 73-76
A- 90-92 C- 70-72
B+ 87-89 D+ 67-69
B 83-86 D 63-66
B- 80-82 D- 60-62
F 59 and below

REPORT CARDS AND WARNINGS


Report cards are issued four times a year. They are given to students in November, February, and April, and
sent by mail in July. Students who owe books, money, or other equipment for a particular course will receive the
letter grade "Z" on their report cards. In order to receive a grade and credit, all books/money must be returned to
the Student Services Office.
Warnings are sent to the parents of students after the first 5 weeks of each term. Please consult the school
calendar for the exact dates of warnings and report cards.

MID-YEAR AND FINAL EXAMINATIONS


At the end of each semester, two hour examinations are given in English, history, mathematics, language and
science. This occurs at the end of January and June for all students except seniors who take their final exams
during class periods in May. Certain classes may be excused from examinations. Details of the administration of
exams are provided well before each semester ends.
POSTPONEMENT OF FINAL EXAMS
When a student misses a final exam in June because of a pre-arranged absence, he/she will receive an
incomplete grade and must make up the exam prior to the opening day of school.
When a student misses a final exam because of an illness or injury, he/she will receive an incomplete grade
and the exam must be made up by the end of the second full week of school in September. A student may ask the
Superintendent/ Principal for an extension of this date.

INCOMPLETES
Students who receive an incomplete grade (INC) on their report card will have until the end of the next
quarter to make up the work necessary to receive a grade and credit. If the work is not made up, the grade the student
would have received at the end of the quarter when the INC was given will be recorded.

RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS
Students of many different religions attend Lincoln-Sudbury. Teachers handle homework assignments and
tests at the time of religious holidays with sensitivity and respect for the religious commitments of the individual
student. At a time of known religious holidays, teachers alter class assignments and tests appropriately. Individual
students are also encouraged to alert their teachers regarding any significant individual religious responsibilities in
order to make special arrangements when appropriate.

ADD/DROP POLICY
Schedule changes will be made by the Counseling Department only after parental permission and
department coordinator approval is secured.

ADDING A COURSE- Students may add a course during the first TWO weeks of a semester only.

DROPPING A COURSE
• During the first 25 school days of each semester, students may drop a course, with permission, and no
record of the course will be kept.
•After 25 school days that a course is in session, no drops will be permitted.
On the rare occasions that an exception is made and a student is allowed to drop a semester long or year
long course after the first 25 school days that the course is in session, a drop will be recorded as a
Withdrawn/Pass (W/P) or Withdrawn/Fail (W/F) on the transcript. If a student drops a yearlong course at
the semester break, a grade of “W” will be recorded for second semester. The grades will appear on the
permanent transcript.

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LEVEL CHANGES
Students taking courses (such as math) with designated levels, indicated by a numeral in parentheses
following the course title, may find that a particular level is too easy or too hard and that they need to move
up or down a level.
• Level changes must be completed during the first 25 days of the first or third quarter or within the first
two weeks of the second quarter.
• When a student makes a level change, the grades earned in the original course may be considered in the
determination of the grade given in the new course.
•When a student makes a level change, only the new course will appear on the student's transcript.

AUDITING A COURSE
1. Students may audit a class providing they have permission of the teacher,
the Department Coordinator, and the Counselor or Housemaster. Guidelines for attendance, course
work, tests, papers, etc. will be negotiated with the teacher.
2. Students may CHANGE from a credit status to an audit status during the
first 25 days of school with special permission.
3. Students may not change from Audit to Credit status once Audit status is
defined.
4. No student will be allowed to audit a class if there is a wait list.

In exceptional cases, the Housemaster may make appropriate modifications to the above.

REPEATING A COURSE
In the rare circumstance that a student is allowed to repeat and get 2 credits for a course at Lincoln-
Sudbury, the student must earn a semester grade which is two grades higher (e.g. D to B) than the semester grade
earned in the original course. A student may earn one credit when they achieve a semester grade which is one
grade higher (e.g. D to C). The student will receive no credit if the semester grade is less than one full grade
higher than the semester grade earned when the course was taken previously.

SUMMER SCHOOL

No high school credit may be earned for summer courses or programs until the summer after the ninth
grade year. The number of credits a student receives for a summer school course depends on:

1. The grade the student earns - must be a "C- " or better.

2. The number of hours - 25 - 50 hrs. = 1 credit


51 hrs. & above = 2 credits

3. The course(s) - if the course is a repeat of one taken at


Lincoln-Sudbury, the student must receive a letter grade:
a. 2 grades higher than the original (e.g. "D" to "B")
to receive 2 credits (at least 51 hours) or
b. 1 grade higher than the original (e.g. "D" to "C")
to receive 1 credit (at least 25 hours).

If a student receives a grade of "P" at a school which gives only Pass/Fail grades, credit will be awarded contingent
on the number of hours spent in class.

RETENTION POLICY

To move from: A student must And be:


have earned:
9th to 10th grade 20 credits Not deficient by more than
2 credits in required courses.
10th to 11th grade 44 credits Not deficient by more than
2 credits in required courses.
11th to 12th grade 68 credits Not deficient by more than
2 credits in required courses.

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Student Recognitions and Awards
Lincoln-Sudbury recognizes the accomplishments of the students in our school in a variety of areas, including
excellence in academics and the arts as well as effort and improvement in academics. Individual departments
recognize students’ accomplishments with special awards. Social Service is highly-valued and recognized as well.
The following are some of the awards available to our students:

•Lincoln-Sudbury Scholar - Students are designated Lincoln-Sudbury Scholars at the end of each semester if their
grades for the semester are all B- or higher.

•College Book Awards - These special awards for students at the end of the junior year are based on academic
achievement and co-curricular activities.

•National Merit - Students who earn very high scores on the PSATs in October of their junior year will be
considered for National Merit recognition by the National Merit Corporation.

•Cum Laude Society - Students who meet the personal and academic standards of the Society are inducted into the
Cum Laude Society at the end of their senior year. The standards are published annually and distributed to all
students.

•Faculty Plaque - Awarded to that member of the graduating class who best exemplifies the qualities of
scholarship, character and service that are representative of the standards of the Regional High School.

•Frank Heys Award- Given to the graduating student who exemplifies the personal and academic qualities most
cherished by Frank Heys.

•DeNormandie Award - Given to the Junior student who best exemplifies the qualities of courtesy, cooperation,
and educational growth that are characteristic of the useful citizen.

•LSPO Communications - Presented to six students, one junior and one senior in each of three categories: Written
Word, Spoken Word, Artistic Expression.

•The Performing and Visual Arts Departments present awards to students who have demonstrated exceptional
achievement in and devotion to the art, music, and drama programs. In addition, at awards ceremonies, students
who have successfully competed in various festivals and programs are recognized.

•Service Award - Given to a boy and a girl in each grade. These students will have exhibited extraordinary service
to the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School community through their volunteer efforts.

•Citizenship Award - Given to a boy and a girl in grades 9, 10 and 11. These students will have exhibited
extraordinary service to the larger community through their volunteer efforts.

•Other departments and groups (clubs, co-curricular organizations etc.) which offer additional special recognitions
include - Art, Athletics, Drama, English, History, Math, Music, Newspaper, Science, Wellness, World Language,
Yearbook, and more.

Each year, students are honored at special awards ceremonies. Students and parents of seniors are invited to
the Senior Awards Ceremony on graduation day. All other students and their parents are recognized at a separate
ceremony. While the ceremonies and recognitions are wonderful and meaningful, the most valuable aspect is the
students joy in their own achievements and in all that they learned through their extra efforts in whatever arena. If
you would like more information about any of the ninth, tenth or eleventh grade awards, please contact Student
Services. For information about the senior awards, please contact the Superintendent-Principal’s Office.

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UNASSIGNED TIME

Most Lincoln-Sudbury students have some time during the week in which they are not in class. Since using
that time to good advantage is one of the skills that we want students to learn here, Lincoln-Sudbury provides a
variety of ways and places for students to spend unassigned time, both during and after school.

LIBRARY - The library is the primary place in the school for doing research, in both print and electronic formats,
with priority on the computers given to those working on school assignments. While it is also a comfortable place
where students may study or read whenever they are not in class, it is not meant to be a lounge or area for
socializing. Students must obtain a Lincoln-Sudbury picture ID in order to check out library materials. The library
is open from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. daily except Wednesday, when the hours are 7:30-1:20 because of professional
development meetings, and Friday, when it closes at 3:00P.M. Residents of Lincoln and Sudbury are welcome to
use the resources of the library.

CAFETERIA - The cafeteria is open for breakfast from 7:30 a.m.- 9:15 a.m. and for lunch from 10:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
The snack bar is open from 10:45 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

CAREER CENTER - The Career Center provides information about colleges and careers for students, parents, and
the community. Among the center's resources are college reference books, catalogs, applications, videos, financial
aid information, and up-to-date career information.
The Career Center hosts representatives from colleges, summer programs, the military, and various other
post-secondary options. Career exploration programs allow students the opportunity to meet or to intern with
professionals from various career fields. There is also a job bulletin board which lists current part-time job
openings in the area. The Career Center is open from 9A.M. every school day.

COMMUNICATIONS/MEDIA DEPARTMENT - CHANNEL 9 TV - WYAJ 97.7 FM - THE DYAD YEARBOOK -


DYAD-ON DISC DVD & THE FORUM NEWSPAPER
The Communications Dept. includes all aspects of Educational broadcasting, on both radio and tv. From
production, on-air talent, engineering, and non-linear digital editing. Electronic publishing includes the yearbook
and newspaper, both produced entirely digitally using the latest generation of desktop publishing tools and digital
photography and imaging. Instructional materials are available to all students, staff and parents on many different
software programs, from keyboarding skills and image manipulation, to telecommunications. Students interested
in any of these areas should visit the Communications department as early in the year as possible.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTER - The Academic Support Center (ASC) serves as a tutoring resource for students
who may need assistance in their math, science, English, or History courses and/or MCAS preparation. In
addition, the ASC can help students with study and organizational skills as well as support students with
developing effective coping strategies for stress. There are three types of tutors available to provide assistance:
professional tutors, faculty tutors, and peer tutors. Students should discuss his/her need for tutoring with the
appropriate teacher and guidance counselor to complete the referral form. In addition, a student may also stop by
the ASC to get help any time a tutor is free. Students will be matched with a tutor (professional, faculty, or peer)
on a one to one or small group basis, depending on availability.

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DEPARTMENT FACILITIES - All teachers encourage students to arrange
for individual conferences or extra help during a time when both the student and teacher are free.

ART - Students who are experienced with art equipment useage and have teacher approval may use the
art facilities. Novices may use the facilities, with teacher approval, when more experienced students are
available to assist. Art studios are open when teachers are available.

COMPUTER - The computer lab is available to all students both before and after school, and many times
during the day. More experienced students can provide assistance in using the computers. E-mail
accounts are available for students, assuming they abide by rules governing the appropriate use of the
system.

ENGLISH/HISTORY - Teachers are available to help students in the department office or their classrooms
and offices. The Humanities Computer Lab is available for classwork in English and history.

LANGUAGE - During school hours the language office is open for students to speak with teachers and
receive help. Students may use the Technology Learning Center (TLC) to build their language skills. The
TLC is open to students when a Language teacher is available for supervision and when classes are not in
session in the TLC.

MATHEMATICS - Teachers are available to help students in the math office upon request. Students may
work in the math office and the math computer lab with teacher supervision.

MEDIA LABS - Students may work on video editing and media projects with teacher supervision or
permission when classes are not in session.

MUSIC - Vocal and instrumental groups practice in the choral and instrumental rooms throughout the
day. Students may arrange a time for individual practice by contacting a music teacher.

WELLNESS - OPEN GYM LABS - Students may use the Wellness facilities and Fitness Center during
unassigned time to do strength training or play basketball, badminton, volleyball, and make up classes
during open gym labs. Labs are available when the facility is not being used for classes. Schedules are
posted every marking period. All students will be trained in the proper use of the Fitness Center and may
use the center after school when it is open and supervised. A picture ID card, which costs $5.00, will be
issued to students who complete the appropriate training.

SCIENCE - Students may use most laboratory areas and the science computer lab when the rooms are not
scheduled for a class. Teacher approval and supervision is necessary.

TECHNOLOGY - Students may use hand or power tools in the applied tech area when a teacher is
available for supervision and classes are not in session.

25
Course & Department Descriptions
COMPUTER SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Lincoln-Sudbury’s computer department serves two functions in the school. It maintains and services the
computer facilities used by the school’s administration, student organizations, publications, academic departments,
and individual students and teachers. The department also teaches courses leading to an understanding of basic
and more advanced concepts in computer programming and computer applications (e.g. word processing,
spreadsheets, databases).
One of the expectations for students at Lincoln-Sudbury is the ability to use computer technology
appropriately to help create, investigate, and communicate. Beginning with the Class of 2009, all students are
required to earn two credits in a course that incorporates those expectations into the curriculum and instruction.

COURSES OPEN TO NINTH GRADERS & UPPERCLASS STUDENTS

(770) ROBOTICS PROGRAMMING Semester course - 2 credits


Students will learn programming concepts by programming “Lego” robots. The course will include elements
of engineering and programming, though programming will be the main focus. The course may include puzzles to
solve (such as a maze-doing robot), contests (such as a soccer robot), and student designed challenges. Students
will use a java-like language to program the robots that will prepare them for further courses in programming.
(This course meets the computer technology requirement.)

(772) WEB PUBLISHING Semester course - 2 credits


This will be a hands on course which introduces students to web publishing. At the end of the course, all
students should be able to use a web page editor to make web pages with text, images, tables, and links. Students
will be able to create simple pages using HTML, and will be able to modify more complicated pages. Students will
learn principles of layout and design using tables, and will be able to optimize images for the web using
Photoshop. Some possible advanced topics which will be covered if time allows include frames, Javascript,
Quicktime sounds and movies, Director, and Filemaker Pro. Students will spend a fraction of the course creating a
final project, many of which will be part of the school web pages. (This course meets the computer technology
requirement.)

(777) CREATIVE COMPUTING Semester course- 2 credits


This course explores the use of computers to create, investigate and communicate. Students will create
multimedia projects including slideshows, movies and web pages. Project work in different academic disciplines
will incorporate research on the Internet, electronic databases, advanced word processing skills and the use of
spreadsheets. Students will become comfortable experimenting with new software and will acquire the ability to
transfer computer skills learned in the course to other learning environments. (This course meets the computer
technology requirement.)

(774) INTRO TO PROGRAMMING Semester course - 2 credits


An introductory course which explores elementary programming concepts including variables, loops,
conditional statements, functions, and objects. The course is designed to allow students access to many of the
computers features, and to make small but working window based applications throughout the course. Students
will complete a more complex independent programming project at the end of the course. (This course meets the
computer technology requirement.)

(776) INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 10-12
Prerequisite: INTRO TO PROGRAMMING or permission of instructor
This course will build upon the work completed in INTRO TO PROGRAMMING. Students will learn how to
design, code, debug and document programs, focusing on JAVA language syntax, variables, functions, control
structures, program structure, and formatted input/output. Other topics to be covered include data structures,
recursion, and object-oriented programming. Students will be expected to complete an independent programming
project of their own choosing. (This course meets the computer technology requirement.)

(778) ADVANCED PROGRAMMING Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 11-12
Prerequisite: INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING
For students who have completed INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING (or who have demonstrated
outstanding independent work with JAVA ), this course will build upon earlier work and will focus on: advanced
features of the JAVA language; object-oriented programming, including classes, encapsulation, and inheritance;
algorithm analysis; searching and sorting algorithms and their implementation; good programming style; program
design and debugging. The course will begin to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam in Computer
Science held in May. (This course meets the computer technology requirement..)

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ENGLISH
Four years of English at Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School provide an integrated and diverse study of
language and literature. The program is designed to teach the student to read effectively, to write well, and to
speak persuasively. In accordance with our belief that writing is best taught in conjunction with literature study,
there is a strong emphasis on writing in all literature courses. Students are expected to write a minimum of four to
six papers per semester as well as to complete frequent informal pieces. These papers will include both analytical
and creative writing. Assessment of writing may include teacher comments and corrections, conferencing, draft
revision and peer-editing.

Course placement in English classes is based upon student interest and need, teacher recommendation, parent
approval and scheduling availability. To assist in the selection of appropriate classes, courses are ranked in
difficulty from 1 to 5, with 1 being the most challenging. This designation is placed at the end of each course
description. All courses are open to grades 10-12 unless otherwise noted. Not all courses are offered every year.

WRITING AND SKILLS COURSES

(001) NINTH GRADE COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE Full year course - 4 credits
Open to: 9 only

Ninth grade English consists of the first semester focused on writing and the second semester focused on literature.
In the writing semester, students are introduced to a variety of informal, formal, and creative writing experiences
through weekly assignments.

Informal assignments may include personal narrative, journals and informal essays. Formal essays include brief
analytical papers or persuasive essays. Short stories, poems, novels or films may be the basis for these
assignments. Creative writing assignments include dialogues, poems, or short stories. Classes focused on writing
will practice skills such as: peer editing, writing from models, and the revision process from first draft to final
composition. During conference time, teachers provide individual attention to specific writing problems.

The second semester concentrates on the intensive reading of literary texts organized around a specific theme, such
as justice and vengeance, choice and responsibility, prejudice, family relations, etc. Literary study will emphasize
the analysis of the various aspects of a work, such as style, structure, and setting. Students will respond to the
literature with various kinds of writing studied in the first semester. There will be a minimum of four to six major
writing assignments per semester to which the teacher will respond seriously and critically.

Both semesters emphasize critical thinking and analytical skills in reading and writing. Reading skills are a central
aspect of English study at L-S; it is essential that students develop reading skills in order to be successful in further
course work and in order to understand requirements in other courses.

(022) MEMOIR & PERSONAL WRITING Semester course - 2 credits

This is a course designed for those interested in reading modern-day memoirs and exploring the art and craft of
writing about one’s life. A critical study of works such as the following - some in their entirety, some extracted -
will drive the course: Tuesdays With Morrie, by Mitch Albom, All Souls, by Michael Patrick MacDonald, The Liars’
Club, by Mary Karr, Holidays on Ice, by David Sedaris, and Makes Me Wanna Holler, by Nathan McCall. Students are
expected to write up to eight original essays (based on their life experiences) and to present them to the class
throughout the semester. If time allows, the class will put together an anthology drawn from pieces written
throughout the semester. The final exam will be based on the reading and writing techniques studied. (1-4)

(072) EXPOSITORY WRITING Semester course - 2 credits

Students in this course make a serious effort to master more sophisticated forms of the personal essay, analytical
essay and comparison-contrast essays. They are expected to demonstrate initiative and work independently to
develop a personal voice. They should be prepared to work in groups and share their writing. Rewriting and
critiquing are integral to this course. (1-3)

(073) CREATIVE WRITING Semester course - 2 credits

In a workshop format students explore several creative genres such as poetry, drama and the short story. They
should be prepared to present their work to the class for discussion and constructive criticism. Appropriate
readings may be assigned on an individual or class basis. Students should demonstrate initiative and self-
discipline. (1-4)

(076) ENGLISH WORKSHOP Semester or full year course - 2 credits per semester

This class is for those students who want to become more confident learners by improving their skills. It may be
recommended by your English teacher or guidance counselor. Using short stories, novels, plays, research
materials, and movies, students learn and practice 5 paragraph essays, note-taking and outlining, vocabulary in

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context, and analytical and critical thinking skills. The first semester will give credit for World Literature. The
second semester will give credit for American/British Literature. (3-5)

LITERATURE COURSES
The Department believes it is vital for students to know about the literature and ideas of their own culture and
tradition and also to be aware of these aspects of other cultures. The Lincoln-Sudbury graduation requirements
mandate that students earn two credits from the literature categories: American/British and World. Therefore,
courses in literature are designated below, indicating the category to which each belongs. (see graduation
requirements on page 3)

American/British World
Semester Semester
(020) Short Fiction/Poetry (026) Adolescents in Literature
(025) Analysis in Context (030) Heroes in Literature
(033) The Making and Remaking of Race (035) Ideas in Drama
(037) Drama in Production (039) Bible & Classical Literature
(042) Shakespeare I (040) The Novel
(045) American Voices (031) Irish Literature
(048) Early British Literature Full year
(049) Modern British Literature (041) Three Worlds Literature
() American Idol I (056) Russian Literature
() American Idol II (059) Continental Literature
Full year (064) Intro to Western Civilization Literature
(051) American Literature

AMERICAN/BRITISH LITERATURE COURSES

(020) SHORT FICTION & POETRY Semester course - 2 credits

In this course, students will read short fiction, focusing on poetry and short stories. Such literature raises some of
the following questions: how do authors convey plot, emotions, themes and other literary elements in such a short
medium. How do authors create unique characters and develop their personalities? What kinds of diverse tones,
moods and styles do poets use?

Students will read and respond to each of the texts and each term they will select an author to present to the class;
the presentations will be both on poets and on short story authors. Students will be evaluated on participation in
discussion, frequent in-class writing, reading quizzes, presentations, and formal analytical essays as well as a mid-
term and final exam.

Some of the works to be used may include: Best American Short Stories, Best American Poetry, Perrine’s Story and
Structure (ed. Arp and Johnson), Junot’s Diaz’s Drown, The Story and Its Writer (ed. Charters), Yusef
Komunyakaa’s Neon Vernacular, Billy Collins’s Sailing Alone Around the Room, Rita Dove’s Thomas and Beulah,
Philip Levine’s What Work Is. (1-4)

(025) ANALYSIS IN CONTEXT Semester course - 2 credits

May be requested in addition to another English course


without going through the double enrollment process.

This course will deal with themes, subject matter, style, and characterization in a variety of forms, including
literature and film. Students will read from a range of literary genre—novels, plays, stories—and discuss authors’
themes and techniques; there will also be some study of how some of these ideas have been transferred to film and
interpreted by filmmakers.

Students will write essays of critical analysis on each unit studied. There will also be projects in which students
demonstrate their critical understanding of the topics; projects may involve presentations, essays, screenplays or
even some film making. (1-4)

(033) THE MAKING & REMAKING OF RACE Semester course - 2 credits

THE MAKING and REMAKING OF RACE, subtitled “There is only one race, the human race,” is a semester
course which examines the construction of the idea of racial prejudice against African Americans, Native
Americans, Asian Americans, and Hispanic Americans in the United States as reflected in its literature. The
literature will come from such writers as Hawthorne, Stowe, Melville, Faulkner, Hughes, Baraki, Walker, Angelou,
Ellison, et al. One history text, The Shaping of Black America by Lerone Bennett will be used. Students will be
expected to work to the best of their ability in reading, writing and discussing. (1-4)

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(042) SHAKESPEARE I Semester course - 2 credits
This course focuses on Shakespeare’s plays as drama through close reading and discussion of the plays.
Shakespeare’s England and the nature of the Elizabethan Theater are considered; however, central to the course is
an examination of personality, power, and social history in the selected dramas. Works may include Macbeth,
Hamlet, Othello, Twelfth Night, Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Merchant of Venice. There are writing
assignments on each play. (Students who have taken Shakespeare I may not enroll in Shakespeare and Production
and students who have taken Shakespeare in Production may not enroll in Shakespeare I.) (1-3)

(037) DRAMA IN PRODUCTION Semester course - 2 credits


Drama in Production is a one-semester elective in which students read several plays with particular emphasis
on the problems involved in staging those plays. Students can act in, work backstage, or work on the business side
of the production; however, they must be involved in some way with the production. Students will read plays
chosen from a wide range of styles and periods from Shakespeare to the contemporary theater. In addition to play
reading and study of basic dramatic techniques, students will have reading, quizzes and papers on the plays
studied in the class.
Please note: Part of each student's final exam grade, one third of the semester grade, will be determined by the
student's participation in the production. (1-4)

(045) AMERICAN VOICES Semester course - 2 credits


Students will examine the question of what “American” means by considering the diverse range of cultures
represented here in school, in the United States and in the other Americas. The course includes all genres—novel,
poetry, short story, drama, non-fiction, and film—and will emphasize United States literature by minority authors
and by women.
Works of prose include: Sula, Bright Lights, Big City, Dharma Bums, A View From the Bridge, Rule of the
Bone, To Kill A Mocking Bird, Maus I and II, and The Women of Brewster Place. Poetry selections include: Turtle
Island, The Book of Questions, and The Book of Light. Anthologies include: Eye of the Heart, Krik? Krak!, Black
Voices, New Worlds of Literature, and Imagining America. Additional readings may be chosen from works of
other North American or from works of other South American countries. This course will emphasize frequent,
short writing assignments. (2-4)

(048) EARLY BRITISH LITERATURE Semester course - 2 credits


Legends and stories from Beowulf to King Arthur and his knights to The Canterbury Tales are an important
part of early British literature. In addition to such works, the course will involve the study of a play from the
Elizabethan era, readings from Milton’s Paradise Lost and examples of satire of the eighteenth century. We will
conclude the semester with a selection by Jane Austen. As we study these works, we will look at the world that
produced them and the ideas that shaped them.
Possible readings include: Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Paradise Lost,
The Tempest, Henry V, The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus, Moll Flanders, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, the poetry
of John Donne, Edmund Spenser, Alexander Pope, and others. Students will do individual reading and study on
writers they choose and share some of their knowledge with the class. Writing assignments will include analytical
and creative pieces for each unit. There will be oral presentations. (1-3)

(049) MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE Semester course - 2 credits


What are the dangers and pitfalls of modern society? What kinds of behavior are admired and criticized? In
MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE, we will explore the world since the nineteenth century, beginning with the
romantic poets. We will explore the Romantic Era’s sinister cousin, Gothic literature, then move through the
Victorian era and finally look at the modern age.
As we study these works, we will look at how the rapidly changing world influenced these writers. Possible
readings include the poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, Frankenstein, Wuthering
Heights, Jane Eyre, the poetry of Tennyson, Robert and Elizabeth Browning, and other Victorian poets, Hard
Times, The Mayor of Casterbridge, Heart of Darkness, The Importance of Being Ernest, 1984, writings by Virginia
Woolf, poets of the early twentieth century, and others. Students will focus on individual reading and study
writers they choose, then share some of their knowledge with the class. Writing assignments will be both
expository and creative for each unit. There will be oral presentations as well. (1-3)

(051) AMERICAN LITERATURE Full year course - 4 credits


This course studies American Literature primarily from the 19th and 20th centuries. Artistic, social, and
historical contexts may be considered and common “American” themes across the literary periods may be
explored. Possible authors include Hawthorne, Whitman, Twain, Dickinson, Chopin, Fitzgerald, Faulkner,
Hurston, Ellison, O’Connor, Kesey, Walker and Morrison. Much reading and discussion are required. There will
be frequent writing assignments. (1-3)

(046) AMERICAN IDOLS I: LITERATURE AND ART IN AMERICA, 1700-1900 Semester course - 2 credits
This course traces the evolution of identity in American literature and art through two centuries. Students will
learn to examine both literature and artistic creations (such as fine art and architecture, clothing, toys, vehicles,
other consumer goods and objects of everyday life): what do these representations of American life reveal about
the beliefs and values of their creators? How can we gain a better understanding of contemporary American
culture through these works? In this semester, students will examine a broad range of written and visual material
organized thematically; among these, matters of class, gender, race, religious movements and immigration will be
of special interest. Students will examine a range of texts, both visual and written; on any given day, students

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might be asked to examine and critique a poem by Anne Bradstreet, a painting by Gilbert Stuart, an essay by
W.E.B. DuBois, a quilt from the Mississippi Delta or the plans for Monticello. Readings in Franklin’s
Autobiography, Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Edith Wharton’s House of Mirth and Edward
Bellamy’s Looking Backward will be supplemented by a range of other material, including historical speeches,
essays, letters and poems. Students may take one or both semesters of this course.
Recommended for grades11,12 (1-4)

(047)AMERICAN IDOLS II: LITERATURE AND ART IN AMERICA, 1900-2000 Semester course - 2 credits
This course traces the evolution of identity in American literature and art through the twentieth century.
Students will learn to examine both literature and the objects we create: what do these representations of
American life reveal about the beliefs and values of their creators? How can we gain a better understanding of
contemporary American culture through these works? As in semester one, students will continue to read a broad
range of written and visual material organized thematically. Students will be asked to consider and critique both
everyday objects and fine art (such as a Romare Bearden collage, a box of Wheaties, Susan B. Anthony dollar coins,
plans for the Chrysler Building or photographs by Diane Arbus--in conjunction with written texts. Readings will
include works such as“Paul’s Case” by Willa Cather, Passing, by Nella Larsen, The Interpreter of Maladies, by
Jhumpa Lahiri, Nickel and Dimed, by Barbara Ehrenreich and Middlesex, by Jeffrey Eugenides as well as a variety
of other works, including stories, essays, articles and poems. Students may take one or both semesters of this
course. Recommended for grades 11,12 (1-4)

WORLD LITERATURE

(026) ADOLESCENTS IN LITERATURE Semester course - 2 credits


Readings in this course focus on conflicts young people face as they mature in a complex, bewildering society.
They emphasize the choices facing young people in America and other cultures, and the consequences of their
choices. Films, television programs, speakers, and other activities are used to clarify and deepen students’
understanding of the pressures they experience during these crucial years. Writing is designed to encourage
students to reflect on the issues and their own experience. (2-4)

(030) HEROES IN LITERATURE Second Semester course - 2 credits


In this course students examine the idea of the hero and heroine, and there is frequent reference to the
definition of the hero and heroine in the modern world. Students work on some of the reading and writing in class
to enable them to sharpen their skills and to develop their ability to write essays and papers about their reading.
There are nightly reading assignments, regular writing assignments, and a project. Readings may include: The
Power of One, The Dwarf, Siddhartha, The Moon is Down, The Stranger, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch, Death of a
Salesman, Oedipus Rex, Mother Night, and Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha. (2-4)

(031) IRISH LITERATURE Semester course - 2 credits


This course covers Irish literature from the Celtic past through the twentieth century. Since the literature of
Ireland reflects its troubled past and rich culture, students will study the history and culture to understand the
myth and tragic reality of a torn nation. One of the core questions students will pursue is: “What is Ireland?”
Novels may include: Barry’s The Whereabouts of Eneas McNulty, Doyle’s A Star Called Henry and The Snapper,
Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, MacLaverty’s Cal, McGahern’s Amongst Women, and Trevor’s
Felicia’s Journey. Plays may include: Friel’s Translations and Dancing at Lughnasa, Lady Gregory’s Spreading the
News, McDonagh’s The Cripple of Inishmaan, O’Casey’s Plough and the Stars, Synge’s Playboy of the Western World and
Riders to the Sea, and Yeats’ and Lady Gregory’s Cathleen ni Houlihan. Poets include: Boland, Delanty, Heaney,
Kavanaugh, Longley, Mahon, Meehan, and Yeats. There will also be non fiction reading, short stories, and films.
Students taking the course must be capable readers, able to handle nightly reading and frequent writing
assignments. There will be one or more independent projects. (1-3)

(035) IDEAS IN DRAMA Semester course - 2 credits


This course includes the reading and discussion of plays from various times and places from the classical to
the modern. The plays will focus on a theme or a style of drama. In addition to studying plays as literature,
students may produce and perform scenes. Some course readings will be chosen to correspond to plays being
performed in the area and at school—at the American Repertory Theater and the Huntington Theater, for
example—so that students can see drama in performance as well as in literature.
Readings will be chosen from among the following authors: Shakespeare, Brecht, Ibsen, Strindberg, Williams,
O’Casey, Friel, Stoppard, Kopit, Durrenmatt, Fugard, Ionesco, Beckett, Anouilh, Wilson, Hellman, Pirandello and
selections from traditional Chinese and Japanese drama. There will be analytical and creative writing assignments.
(2-4)

(039) BIBLICAL & CLASSICAL LITERATURE Semester course - 2 credits


In this course one quarter is spent studying the Bible; in the other quarter, some major works of classical
literature are considered. The content of the course is designed to help students acquire a knowledge of some of
the fundamental myths which are the very basis of Western culture and to develop a deeper understanding and
appreciation of the fact that so much of the world’s literature repeatedly alludes to and is based on Biblical and
ancient sources. Some of the books of the Bible studied are: Genesis, the David narratives, Psalms, and a Gospel of
the New Testament. In Greek literature, works are selected from Homer’s epics and the tragedies of Aeschylus,
Sophocles and Euripides. There will be analytical and creative writing assignments. (1-3)

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(032) THE NOVEL Semester course - 2 credits
Open to: Recommended for 11 – 12
May be requested in addition to another English course without going through the double enrollment process.
This course requires intensive reading of several novels which are approached historically and analytically.
Study is concentrated on the genre itself, and each novel is explored in depth to determine its uniqueness and
relationship to the form and development of the genre. Students should be good readers. Possible novelists
include Dostoyevsky, Joyce, Boll, Grass, Mafouz, Marquez, Alain-Fournier, and Mehta. There will be papers on
each novel. (1-3)

(041) THREE WORLDS LITERATURE Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: Recommended for 11 – 12
Students in this course read contemporary literature from the Third World, Eastern Europe and the Western
democracies in order to understand the people’s everyday lives. Readings are chosen from all genres; novel,
poetry, drama, memoir, short story, essay. Authors and film directors may include Argueta, Naipaul, Ramirez,
Puenza, Toer, Paz, Sildo, Nowakowski, Herbert, Milosz, Havel, Chen Jo-Hsi, Hwang Chun-Ming, Spark.
Students are strongly encouraged to write in all three basic modes of expression: formal, informal, and creative.
In-class essay tests are given on many of the works we read or see. Students are asked to keep a journal. In
addition students are assigned a long-term project which may be either a research paper or some form of creative
project. (1-3)

(056) RUSSIAN LITERATURE Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: Recommended for 11 – 12
Since the literature of Russia reflects intimately the times during which it was written, this course focuses on
novels, poems, plays and short stories as contemporary cultural expressions. Thus, in the nineteenth century, the
rise of the revolutionary intelligentsia occupies the attention of writers like Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. In
the twentieth century, the readings focus on the revolution and the consequences of the revolution. Readings
include Tales of Pushkin, The Brothers Karamazov, Fathers and Sons, and The Master and Margarita, poems of
Mandelstam, Blok, Mayakovsky, Essenin, Akhmatova. The student who wishes to study Russian literature must
be a capable reader, able to handle nightly assignments requiring thoughtful responses. There will be analytical
essays. (1-3)

(059) CONTINENTAL LITERATURE Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: Recommended for 11 – 12
Nineteenth Century European literature is the focus of the first semester. Titles include Madame Bovary,
Crime and Punishment, Germinal, The Death of Ivan Illych, A Doll’s House, Miss Julie, Faust, and poems of
Verlaine and Baudelaire. The second semester examines the 20th Century through works such as The Plague,
Bread and Wine, Three-Penny Opera, The Clown, The Trial, Waiting for Godot, When Things of the Spirit Come
First, A Swell Season, selected poetry and short stories. The student who wishes to study CONTINENTAL
LITERATURE must be a capable reader able to handle nightly assignments requiring thoughtful responses.
Students are encouraged to write in all three basic modes of expression; formal, informal and creative. (1-3)

(064) INTRO TO WESTERN CIVILIZATION LITERATURE Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: Recommended for 11 – 12
This course touches on the major periods of the Western literary tradition and includes the following authors
and works: Plato, Sophocles, Aristotle, selections from The Bible, St. Augustine, The Romance of Tristan and
Iseult, selections from The Women Troubadours, Christine de Pisan, Dante’s Inferno, The Lais of Marie de France,
Boccaccio, Petrarch, Machiavelli, Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptameron, Shakespeare (some sonnets and a play),
Donne, Marvell, Behn, Sor Juana, Pascal, Candide, The Social Contract, “The Declaration of Independence”, The
Sorrows of Young Werther, selections from Romantic poetry, Ourika, Pere Goriot, Marx, Hedda Gabler, Freud,
Yeats, Eliot, Sartre, deBeauvoir, The Stranger, Fanon, selections from A History of Their Own, Caryl Phillips’ The
Nature of Blood. Students will have frequent essay quizzes, group work, and papers on units studied. (Students
who sign up for Western Civ/Literature NEED NOT sign up for Western Civ/History; students may take the
Western Civ English course WITHOUT taking the History course.) (1-3)

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FINE, APPLIED, and TECHNICAL ARTS
(Applied Technology, Art, Media Arts, Music, Theater Arts)

The Arts Graduation Requirement:


Students ar e encouraged to develop their own artistic and creative problem solving ability and to study the
functions of Art in different cultures and time periods. Classes that meet the Arts Requirement include an
examination of theory and practica l application through research and project or performance based work.

Classes that meet the Arts Requirement have a hands-on component, requiring students to creatively solve
problems in a way that demonstrates understanding of key concepts, mastery of technical skills, and the
applica tion of safe work habits.

Students also learn:


-- to work coopera tively in a communal studio, lab, or ensemble
-- to assess and reflect on their own progress
-- to respectfully participate in larger group critiques

Several courses in each of the FATA sub disciplines of Applied Technology, Art, Media Arts, Music, and Theater
Arts meet the Arts Requirement and are noted as such.

APPLIED TECHNOLOGY
The Applied Technology program at Lincoln-Sudbury is a blend of traditional “hands-on” project based
Industrial Arts courses, “system” based Technology Education courses and high-tech Engineering courses. All
courses are part of a comprehensive action based program that is designed to meet a wide range of students and
grade levels.

SPECIAL NOTE: Students who are considering taking the “Technology and Engineering Test” for the Science MCAS
should take both Exploring Engineering (semester 1) and Engineering Design (semester 2). These two courses will
cover the learning standards established in the Massachusetts Science and Technology and Engineering Framework.

(902 ) E2 – EXPLORING ENGINEERING Semester course – 2 credits


This course will explore the many facets of engineering and how it affects our daily lives, as well as
providing an opportunity to gain insight into engineering as a car eer. A wide variety of tools and machinery will be
used during the many hands-on activities in this course. Students can expect to study solar energy, learn to use
CNC machinery, explore virtual bridge building, design and build a prototype vehicle along with other topics in
the ar eas of manufacturing, construction, communication, and thermal systems.

(909) ENGINEERING DESIGN PROCESS Semester course - 2 credits


Students electing this course will design, create, test, evaluate, and redesign projects to meet or exceed certain
specifications. Students will be presented with “real world” problems or needs which they must solve by applying
the engineering design process. Working in teams of 2 to 6 people, students will have to research the problem or
need, develop a plan or product to resolve it, produce a prototype, test it to see if it works, collect and analyze the
data, redesign, rebuild and retest as needed, and present their findings to the class. Students will maintain a journal
to document their individual input to each activity. Part of this course will include instruction in 3D modeling
software.

(927) WOODWORKING Semester course - 2 credits


This introductory level course is designed to provide a “hands-on” opportunity in the area of woodworking.
The individual experience will depend on the skills and interest of the student. Some students may choose a more
traditional project production approach, while others may follow a direction of exploration, curiosity, and creativity.
(This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(929) ADVANCED WOODWORKING Semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: grade of C or better in WOODWORKING
In this course students are expected to incorporate previous experiences in the area of woodworking. All
students have the freedom to select larger and more difficult projects. More advanced instruction in techniques of
construction, joinery, and finishing are offered. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(907 ) WOMEN AND WHEELS Semester course – 2 credits


This course is a gender specific beginning level automotive course for women only that will deal with the
ownership and maintenance of an automobile. Women in this cla ss will learn how to perform routine maintenance
tasks such as rotating tires, changing engine oil, replacing an air filter and wiper blades. Topics and research covered
in the class will include buying a new or used car, financing a car, long-term costs versus short-term costs, leasing or
buying, insurance, recalls and lemon laws. We will also look at the social, environmental, economic and histor ical
impact of the automobile.

(906) YOU AND YOUR CAR Semester course - 2 credits


This introductory level course in automobile ownership and routine maintenance is designed to give
students a “hands on” experience. Students are exposed to the rich history of the automobile and its impact by
researching the names that laid the foundation for the industry. Benz, Daimler, Selden, Ford, Buick, Olds, Sloan are

32
just a few of the players that become familiar. Students will also experience many of the routine services that can be
performed at home with minimal investment in tools and materials. Oil changes, basic tune-ups, tire rotation, brake
pad replacement, belts and hoses replacement are just a few of the “hands on” experiences that are offered to
students. Other topics covered will include buying and selling a used car, insurance, registration, financing and the
“fix it – dump it” decision.

(903) AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY Semester course - 2 credits


Students taking this course will be involved in the theoretical and technical aspects of automobile
maintenance and repair. Fewer topics are covered in Auto Tech than in You and Your Car, but more theory and
technical information is covered. Students can expect to work on tires and related machines, replacing exhaust
systems, minor tune up work, suspension and steering linkage diagnosis and replacement, shock absorber and
McPherson strut replacement, hydraulic brake service, and starting and charging systems. Students will be required
to gather information from selected websites for use in classroom activities.

(904) ADV. AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY Semester course – 2 credits


Prerequisite – grade of C or better in AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
This advanced level course is designed to build on the experiences gained in Automotive Technology as
well as focus on the following topics: Four stroke engine theory of operation, ignition system fundamentals, fuel
injection systems, emission controls, and engine computer operations. All students will be introduced to On Board
Diagnostics (OBD I and OBD II) in relation to computerized engine diagnosis. Students will be required to gather
information from selected websites for use in classroom activities.

(911) TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Semester course - 2 credits


This is an introductory level course that involves the study of the four areas of transportation (land, water, air
and space). Students will work individually and in teams on projects and activities within each area that will allow
them to design, construct, test, and evaluate model and prototype vehicles. Activities may include crash-testing
vehicles, land speed vehicles, radio controlled vehicles, hovercrafts, hot air balloons, model rockets, submarines, and
vehicles powered by alternative energy sources.

(915) ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN Semester course - 2 credits


After initially using sketching techniques to come up with ideas for a family home, students in
Architectural Design will refine their ideas by applying a “design and build” approach to learn how to use a
computer program to “draw” various architectural plans with the end result being a set of plans for a home.
Students will then use the plans to build a scale model of the home that started out as an idea and a sketch.
Students may elect to work in teams of two for their projects. There may be an opportunity to enter student work
in local and national competitions through a local architectural firm and through the Boston Society of Civil
Engineers. (This course meets EITHER the Arts requirement OR the Computer Technology requirement.)

(916) ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN Semester course- 2 credits


Prerequisite – grade of C or better in ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN
This course is a continuation of Architectural Design. Students will continue developing their skills in
working with the expansive “ArchiCAD” software and explore career opportunities in the field of architecture. A
second software package called “Building Homes of Our Own” will also be introduced. This software allows
student teams to go through the process of designing a house, finding a house lot, obtaining building permits,
arranging financing, conducting a site survey, purchasing building materials, building the house, landscaping the
property, setting a fair market value, market the house, and finally selecting a qualified buyer. (This course meets
EITHER the Arts requirement OR the Computer Technology requirement.)

(918) MACHINE CAD and 3-D MODELING Semester course – 2 credits


This course will allow students to apply the design process experience by developing a set of dra wings on
different planes that can be “assembled” into a 3-D model on a computer screen. These models can then be
animated on the screen or they can be downloaded into a progra m that will allow actual par ts to be manufactured
on the CNC milling machine, CNC lathe or CNC router. This whole process will provide students with a real life
experience in the process of design and manufacturing. (This course meets the Arts requirement OR the Computer
Technology requirement)

(910) ROBOTIC ENGINEERING Full year course – 4 credits


This fast paced high tech course involves the design and fabrication of radio controlled robots for use in
the competitive robot arena. Most of the first semester will involve instruction in design process, electricity and
electronics, structural testing, pneumatics, and CNC machines. During the second semester students will work on
3D modeling, welding and materials fabrication. They will also work in teams of 6-8 to design, build and program
table top robots that will compete against each other in a series of events that may involve a task orientation, sumo
orientation, and combat orientation. Students may be working in conjunction with members of the LS Robotics
Team and will have the option of joining the team for the US FIRST vex and Battlebot IQ competitions.

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ART
Courses in art help you develop your visual awareness. You will learn to use the elements of design; line, shape,
color and texture to create two or three dimensional works of art. All art courses listed are “studio” courses
providing active participation and personal involvement with different media. Achievement in art courses is
determined by regular attendance, completion of projects, quality of craftsmanship, effort, and the teacher’s
assessment of performance in light of a student’s ability. All art courses are open to grades 9-12 unless otherwise
noted.

NOTE: The program and courses offered by the Art Department will be dependent upon the availability of staff.

Policy Regarding Repeating Art Courses


Courses which may not be repeated
Exploring Art Media Cartooning I FLASH: Web Anim
Drawing Photography Intro Animation
Painting Digital Photo Art & Tech of Film
Pottery Digital Imaging Broadcast Journalism

Courses which may be repeated:


Jewelry Adv Drawing & Painting Adv Filmmaking
Portfolio Prep Adv Pottery Documentary Video
Adv Photo

(709) EXPLORING ART MEDIA Semester course - 2 credits


Whether you think of yourself as "artistic" or someone who can't draw a straight line with a ruler, you'll learn
some of the tricks and exercises that artists use to capture their ideas in a variety of art media. Students have the
opportunity to experiment with lots of different art materials. Areas of exploration include drawing, painting and
printmaking, collage, and 3 dimensional projects, depending upon class interest. You'll discover which materials
you enjoy working with while uncovering hidden talents in areas that you may choose to develop later in more
advanced courses. Field trips to museums may also be included as a resource in understanding and appreciating
art. (This course meets The Arts Requirement)

(712 ) COLLAGE AND ASSEMBLAGE Semester course - 2 credits


For the student who is afra id to dra w and wishes to learn the concepts of visual art, or for the advanced artist,
this course provides a framework for learning art by using a variety of media in one piece of artwork. Tra ditional
and experimental media including, paint, colored pencil, magaz ine cutouts, unusual paper stock, canvas, or
photographic emulsion will be used to create compositions that reflect each artist's individual voice. Projects will
address the elements of ar t, composition, and design and color theory. Projects include a re-interpretation of a
master work from art history and an experimental self portrait. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(702) DRAWING Semester course - 2 credits


Learn to draw or fine-tune your drawing abilities by sharpening your perceptual skills. Learn to 'see' and then
draw line, shape, shadows and space, drawing from both observation and imagination. Starting with traditional
black and white media such as pencil and charcoal, you will go on to use everything from pastel to paint as you
create imaginative and expressive drawings. (This course meets The Arts Requirement)

(703) PAINTING Semester course - 2 credits


This is a studio course suitable for beginners or more advanced students, which will deal with color and the
illusion of space on a two dimensional surface. Projects begin with drawing in pencil and charcoal, and progress
through color and design with collage and paint. Art history and the art of many cultures will be explored as
students work on individual solutions to class assignments designed to increase technical skills and personal
expressions. Drawing as a prerequisite recommended but not required. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(704) ADVANCED DRAWING and PAINTING Semester course - 2 credits


Open to: 10-12
Prerequisite: DRAWING or permission of the instructor

This course is for students who have already taken drawing or painting and would like to continue at an
advanced level of commitment and competence. Emphasis will be on drawing and painting but mixed media and
three dimensional work will also be included. Most projects will be theme based in an effort to develop creative
solutions and personal styles. Long-term projects may necessitate working outside of class time. (This course
meets the Arts requirement.)

(705) JEWELRY & METALSMITHING Semester course - 2 credits


This course introduces students to the basic techniques of jewelry and metalsmithing including: sawing, filing,
soldering, texturing, forming and finishing. Students may choose to make jewelry (pins, pendants, bracelets, belt
buckles, rings or earrings) or small objects (letter openers, money clips, spoons or tea strainers) in silver, bra ss or
copper. Students will be required to pay for any silver or stones they use. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

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(706) ADVANCED JEWELRY/METALSMITHING Semester course - 2 credits
Open to: 10-12
Prerequisites: JEWELRY or permission of the instructor

This course gives students, with a basic understanding of metals, an opportunity to work in depth with the
skills they have and to acquire new, advanced techniques including: stone setting, hollow construction, forging,
weaving and various types of casting. Emphasis will be placed on design as well as craftsmanship. Students will
be required to pay for any silver or stones they use. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(701) PORTFOLIO PREPARATION First semester course - 2 credits


Open to: 11-12
Prerequisites: 3 arts courses (one at the advanced level) and B or higher average in the art courses or permission of
the instructor.

Whether you plan to apply to an art school or just submit a portfolio as part of your liberal arts application,
this class is designed to aid students in preparing a body of artwork. Students will have a choice of medium(s) and
focus and will have assistance in developing a personal plan to enhance their portfolio. Students will also learn
how to prepare art work for presentation, create slides, and edit thoughtfully, as well as prepare written statements
which express their thoughts behind their artwork and their philosophy about art.

(707) DIGITAL IMAGING Semester course - 2 credits


Students will learn to create and manipulate digital images using Adobe Photoshop: a software application for
graphic design, web publishing, print production, photo retouching and compositing. Through a series of creative
projects, students will be producing original images from scratch, retouching photographs, manipulating images,
and combining text and images to create unique works of art and design. Some computer experience is useful but
not necessary. (This course meets the Arts requirement and, for the Class of 2009 and beyond, it meets EITHER the
Arts requirement OR the Computer Technology Requirement.)

(730) FLASH: WEB ANIMATION Semester course - 2 credits


Macromedia Flash is by far, the leading internet technology for creating and viewing “multimedia rich”
content on the web. Over 95% of Internet users use a Flash capable web browser - including the workstations in the
LS computer labs. In this project based course, students will explore Flash’s drawing, animation and audio
capabilities and build interactive content that can be shared over the internet. Students will learn how to create
interesting motion graphics. They will learn about the aesthetics of design, motion and sound. By constructing user
interactive projects, students will be challenged to think in a non-linear way. Students will learn to use a
combination of logical reasoning (basic programming), critical thinking and artistic creativity. (This course meets
the Arts requirement and, for the Class of 2009 and beyond, it meets EITHER the Arts requirement OR the
Computer Technology Requirement.)

(708) POTTERY Semester course - 2 credits


Students will make a variety of functional and sculptural objects while acquiring hand building skills such a
building with coils, using paper patterns and slabs. Basic wheel working techniques will be briefly introduced.
Students may work with different types of clay and explore several different glazing and surface decoration
techniques. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(728) ADVANCED POTTERY Semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: successful completion of one semester of POTTERY
Students taking this course will learn advanced hand building techniques and learn basic wheel working
techniques. Theories and issues related to working with clay and creating three dimensional work will also be
explored. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(714) WHEELWORKING Semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: POTTERY or permission of instructor
In this class, students will learn to use the pottery wheel as a tool to make functional pottery as well as parts
for ceramic sculptures. Initial work will focus on the basics, making cylinders and bowls and trimming pots. Each
subsequent lesson will be on learning to make different components, such as lids, spouts, handles and knobs, as
well as more complicated forms.

(710) PHOTOGRAPHY Semester course - 2 credits


Open to: 10-12
Students will learn the fundamentals of black and white photography: using a 35mm camera to properly
expose film, processing negatives, and printing images in the darkroom. Assigned readings and projects will
increase technical skills, help students develop their own unique, image making styles, and introduce different
ideas about the roles photography plays in society. A limited number of cameras will be available for use during
class time. However, it is recommended that students have their own manual 35mm cameras. (This course meets
the Arts requirement.)

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(711) DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY Semester course - 2 credits
Using digital still cameras and computers, students learn how to capture and compose images which reflect
the unique way they see the world around them. The elements of composition and design are introduced through
a variety of exercises and assignments. Students learn to manage and manipulate images with iPhoto and Adobe
Photoshop, powerful programs which enable the enhancement photos with color correction, reducing redeye,
cropping, burning, or dodging. These tools allow you to experiment with arranging and combining images,
making it possible to produce work including photo montages, collages, and posters that combine photographs
with text. Critiques and image analyses help students to develop ideas and gain a deeper understanding of the
media and artistic expression. (This course meets the Arts requirement)

(715) ADVANCED DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY Semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: Digita l Photography or Photogra phy
The emphasis in this class will be on developing a personal style. Assignments and exercises will challenge
students to visually explore the world ar ound them in a way that is uniquely theirs, and help them build the skills
they need to make images that look as good as the ideas behind them. Students will learn to use a professional
quality digital SLR (Single Lens Reflex) camera . They will learn technical skills that will help them frame and
capture shots that look more accurately reflect their way of seeing. Images will be further developed using
Photoshop as our 'Digital Darkroom'. Critiques, ima ge analyses and short writing assignments will help students
develop ideas and gain a further understanding of the media. (This course meets the Arts requirement).

(723 ) DRAWING & CARTOONING (CARTOONING I) Semester Course- 2 credits


This course is for the aspiring cartoonist who needs to understand the fundamentals of dra wing in order to
execute effective cartoons and caricature. Students start working with geometric sketches and still life dra wing to
gain an understanding of the elements and principles of design and how they relate to cartoon illustration. Once
these basic skills are mastered, students move on to the more advanced concepts of exaggeration and caricature. .
(This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(724) CARTOONING/SEQUENTIAL ART Semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: Drawing, Explor ing Art Media, or Drawing & Cartooning
In this course, students will learn the history, techniques, and methods used in creating sequential art and
caricature. Through films, hands-on instruction, and readings, students will prepare a variety of art projects.
These projects include comic strips and three-dimensional sculpting of the figure for possible animation projects.
Student sequential art will be created for exhibition and possible display in the school newspaper. (This course
meets the Arts requirement.)

(716) INTRODUCTION TO ANIMATION Semester course - 2 credits


Animation includes a wide range of materials and techniques that go far beyond the concept of cartoons.
These include “claymation” and other 3-D objects, cutouts and collage, and many other experimental methods.
While drawing skills are helpful, it is not necessary in creating animated productions. This is a hands-on project-
based class in which students will learn about production planning, storyboarding, timing, animation physics,
spatial concepts, character design, composition, and narrative storytelling. Working in groups, students will
produce a series of exercises and experiments and possibly collaborate on one or two larger projects. This class
will be team taught with students rotating between instructors. (This class meets the Arts requirement)

MEDIA ARTS
(790) THE ART AND CRAFT OF VIDEO PRODUCTION Semester course - 2 credits
Students are given training in the use of video equipment and production technique. Instruction includes
the fundamentals of video production, including camera angle and composition, use of camera movement, an
understanding of editing technique, and the creation of storyboards used as a visual shooting script. Working in
groups, students produce several exercises and projects, including a silent film, a short narrative, and an
experimental/montage video. (This course meets The Arts Requirement).

(792) ADVANCED FILMMAKING Semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: ART & TECHNIQUE OF FILM and/or BROADCAST JOURNALISM
ADVANCED FILMMAKING is a course designed for those students who are interested in learning more
about Documentary and Feature films and who would like to further develop their video production skills.
Selected examples of excellent filmmaking techniques will be screened throughout the course so that students can
have some examples of various approaches, styles, and methods of telling a film story. The students will be
expected to apply the knowledge they gain from this exposure to creating their own video work. By the end of the
course, the students will be expected to produce two broadcast-quality video shorts (one fiction and one non-
fiction piece). (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(79Q1,Q2,Q3,Q4) RADIO PRODUCTION/BROADCAST JOURNALISM Semester course - 2 credits


NOTE: students may take this class as 2 distinct quar ters (terms) for 1 credit per quarter (term)
Radio Production: Students will learn the fundamentals of radio production including the use of voice,
diction, interview technique, public service announcements, news reporting, musical programming, and audio
recording. Working in groups, students will use audio production software to create and edit programming, create
an audition recording, and produce a fifteen minute LIVE broadcast using the school’s FM ra dio facility WYAJ-FM.

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Broa dcast Journalism: Although many people in the United States cite television as their main source of
information, few really understand how news shows are produced. In this course students will learn how to
analyze news covera ge, plan and produce video news segments, and operate Lincoln-Sudbury's TV studio.
Selected finished work is edited into a twice monthly news show entitled "Lincoln-Sudbury Today" and is
broadcast via cable TV to homes in Lincoln and Sudbury. (This course meets the Arts requirement when both
quarters are completed.)

(798) MEDIA LITERACY IN THE AGE OF MTV Semester course - 2 credits


Do you know who owns and controls the major media production and distribution industries and how they
use production and marketing to create and manipulate their audience? Are you an informed consumer of media?
In this class, students look at how media is made, what goes into the creation of advertising, and how films, TV,
radio, and advertising can create stereotypes or offer a narrow focus on complex issues. Through class activities
that include improvisational skits, the creation of art work, or by watching and listening to many types of film and
electronic media, students gain an awareness about what choices they have in being informed consumers of media.
Video, Photographic, and audio equipment are used by students working in teams to create their own critical
analyses of today’s media. The projects include short films, art mural projects, radio and television spots, flip book
animations, and photo collages. The internet is used as a place to both get and share information with selected
student work posted on our own website. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(799) MEDIA LITERACY II Semester course - 2 credits


Students may repeat MEDIA LITERACY IN THE AGE OF MTV once as an advanced course, MEDIA LITERACY
II.

(787) DOCUMENTARY VIDEO PRODUCTION Semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: One of the following- Art & Technique of Film, Broadcast Journalism, Media Literacy, Journalism,
Photography, or permission of instructor
Documentary Video, or non-fiction film, is an area that offers a wide range of topics and creative approaches.
The class will examine an overview of styles and genres, including propaganda, film making for social change,
instructional videos, historical documentary, and films for the humanities. Films or excerpts by such artists as Leni
Riefenstahl, Ken Burns, Michael Moore, and others will be screened as an example of the various approaches to
communicating ideas and information. The approaches of PBS programs such as Frontline and recent
developments in the cable arena such as the Discovery or History channels will also be explored. Students will
learn proper interview technique, how to research and develop an idea, and will work in teams to produce several
group projects each quarter.

(793) ACTING & DIRECTING FOR FILM PRODUCTION Semester course - 2 credits
This class offers students of drama and students of film the opportunity to collaborate on narrative film
projects. It will be scheduled during a common block with an Advanced Film section giving students in either class
the opportunity to “crossover” between classes in drama and classes in film. With two teachers, students will have
the opportunity to work in large and small groups on several productions each quarter.
The overarching goal of the course is for students of acting and drama to collaborate successfully with
students of film in the production of several short film narrative projects. Students will have the opportunity to
working in groups, of take risks, and to improve their skills of storytelling, acting, improvisation, and performance
in the visual medium of film. (This class meets the arts requirement)

MUSIC

The music department plays an integral role in the life of Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School, involving
20 0+ students in its ensembles and courses. With the presentation of severa l evening concerts that are open to the
community throughout the year, this depar tment is among the most visible at L-S. The music depar tment is a place
where L-S students can develop lasting friendships and learn skills that will enrich their lives for years to come.

With the goal of developing lifelong musicians, the music faculty is dedicated to providing diverse and
rewar ding musical experiences for all L-S students, offering a wide range of courses for both beginners and more
advanced students. For more information, you can find us online at www.lsrhs.net/departments/fata/music. If
you have any questions about the courses described below, please email the choral director (Ruth_Hartt@lsrhs.net)
or the instrumental director (Thomas_Gra ndprey@lsrhs.net).

Course Selection Process


Our curriculum includes many ensemble and academic opportunities for string and wind players,
percussionists, and singers. Participation in a major ensemble (Concert Band, Mixed Chorus, &/or String
Orchestra) is a prerequisite for participation in a select ensemble. Auditions for select ensembles and courses
generally take place during the first few weeks of school.
When filling out your Course Selection Sheet, please indicate your interest in any of the music courses
mentioned here. Every effort will be made to schedule you into any and all music courses listed on your Course
Selection Sheet.
We encourage active participation in private lessons. We also encourage students to audition for special
extracurricular ensemble opportunities such as Junior and Senior District Festivals. Auditioning for Massachusetts
Music Educators Association Honor Ensembles, such as those just listed, requires the student to be a member in
good standing in any of our Major Ensembles.

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MAJOR MUSIC ENSEMBLES
Participation in a performing group is an essential and rewarding opportunity to use your talents and
develop your musical skills.

(737) MIXED CHORUS Full year course - 4 credits


Mixed Chorus is the largest chora l ensemble at L-S and meets as an elective during the school day (block 4
or 7). Chorus is open to all students. There is no audition; a ‘good voice’ and music-reading skills are not required.
This group of 60+ singers (male and female) performs a variety of music including classical, multicultural,
Broadway, and jaz z. Joining chorus is a great wa y to make lasting friendships, improve your singing voice, and
develop your musical skills. For more information, go to: www.lsrhs.net/departments/fata/music/choral. (This
course meets the Arts requirement.)

(739) CONCERT BAND Full year course - 4 credits


The Lincoln-Sudbury Concert Band provides 9-12th grade students the opportunity to develop their
musicianship in an environment that promotes strong musical skills and an active performance schedule. If you
play a band instrument, or if you would like to learn, then you will want to sign up for this course with its several
unique opportunities. A wide range of enjoyable and challenging music will be presented with growth in
technique and musicianship emphasized.
The band performs several concerts per year as well as traveling to participate in festivals and exchange
programs. Members have the opportunity to audition for District and Regional Festivals including Junior and
Senior Districts and All State Music Festivals. Seating is arranged by audition, which takes place during the first
semester of the course. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(741) STRING ORCHESTRA Full year course - 4 credits


(Select ensemble for wind and percussion students.)
The Lincoln-Sudbury String Orchestra provides 9-12th grade students the opportunity to develop their
musicianship in an environment that promotes strong musical skills and an active performance schedule. The
music presented will feature a wide variety of classical to contemporary musical genres. Coursework will not only
emphasize improving technique, but will promote an understanding of the inner workings of the theoretical
aspects of the repertoire as well as the importance of teamwork integral in a group performance. Periodically
throughout the year members from the concert band will join the orchestra in presenting a full orchestra
composition. Members have the opportunity to audition for District and Regional Festivals including Junior and
Senior Districts and the All State Music Festival. Seating is arranged by audition which takes place during the first
semester of the course. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

SUPPLEMENTAL COURSES and SELECT ENSEMBLES

(758) SONGWRITING IN POPULAR MUSIC Semester course - 2 credits


No prerequisite
Through listening and analyzing popular music, musicians and non-musicians alike will be able to write their
own songs and lyrics. An emphasis on learning the language of music theory and utilizing software programs
such as ‘garage band’ to record and compose will be presented. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(734) VOCAL EXPLORATION Full year course - 1 credit


Requires enrollment in band or orchestra
For band or orchestra students interested in singing, the Vocal Explora tion course allow s students to ‘cross
over’ from band to choir or from orchestra to choir every Monday. Students who have another elective during block 4 or
7 may be able to attend Concert Choir during their free blocks (Must be approved by the Choral director and the Scheduling
Office.)

(735) CHAMBER SINGERS Full year course - 2 credits


Requires enrollment in a major music ensemble
Chamber Singers is a vocal ensemble of 8-12 students (selected by audition) which performs complex SATB
music from the classical genre. Students in any major music ensemble are eligible to audition. This group rehearses
after school on Tuesdays until 4pm. Auditions take place during the first full week of school in September.

(736) VOCAL JAZZ ENSEMBLE Full year course - 2 credits


Requires enrollment in a major music ensemble
Vocal Jazz is a vocal ensemble of 8-12 students (selected by audition) which performs a variety of complex
SATB music from the jazz, Broadway, and popular repertoires. Students in any major ensemble are eligible to
audition. Vocal Jazz rehearses Mondays after school from 3-4 pm.

(740) SMALL ENSEMBLES Full year course - 2 credits


Requires enrollment in a major music ensemble
These ensembles can be any combination of three or more instruments and/or voices and are organized by
the students involved. Most of the decisions regarding repertoire and interpretation are also made by the students,
providing a more “hands-on” experience in learning and music-making. These ensembles are designed to give
playing experience in a Chamber-music situation. String players, wind players and percussionists, as well as
pianists and singers, may participate. Groups are scheduled individually by arrangement.

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(747) JAZZ ENSEMBLE Full year course - 2 credits
Requires enrollment in a major music ensemble
The jazz band plays a wide variety of jazz styles through traditional and contemporary arrangements.
Instrumentation includes an expanded big band format, all students registered for concert band will have the
opportunity to participate in this group. Learning the language of jazz through written parts and improvisation
techniques will be emphasized. The jazz band meets on an alternating basis with concert band during block 7.
Students will perform in several concerts throughout the year as well as participate in area jazz festivals including
the Berklee College of Music High School Jazz Festival. Workshops on improvisation will be included. (This
course meets the Arts requirement.)

(744) SELECT JAZZ COMBO Full year course - 2 credits


Requires enrollment in a major music ensemble and the Jazz Band
By audition only. This select group of musicians performs challenging jazz repertoire. Students will focus on
expanding their harmonic and theoretical knowledge and instrumental technique for improvisation. Students will
be one-on-a-part, strengthening their need to play and think independently addition to focusing on ensemble
blending and balance. The group will perform in several concerts and gig opportunities throughout the year.
Auditions for jazz combos are held in the fall.

(747) JAZZ IMPROVISATION Fall semester - 2 credits


Requires enrollment in a major music ensemble or approval of director.
Bird, Dizzy, Miles, Duke... “Your Name Here” Designed for students enrolled in any major music ensemble
who desire to learn the art and craft of jazz improvisation. This course will help the student identify their
individual strengths in improvisation and will foster the development of systematic approaches to advancing their
instrumental and improvisational technique as well as developing individual expression.

(749) JAZZ/SMALL COMBOS Full year course - 2 credits


Requires enrollment in a major music ensemble
Auditions for jazz combos are held in the fall, and all students regardless of jazz experience are encouraged to
participate in a combo setting to learn and strengthen their individual improvisation and group communication
skills. Students will have an opportunity to participate in a small group jazz setting. Students will learn to
improvise as well as learn the basics of Jazz Theory, styles and techniques. (This course meets the Arts
requirement.)

GUITAR/PIANO Semester course - 2 credits


No prerequisite
Have you alwa ys wa nted to learn how to play guita r and piano? This course is for you! During this fall
semester course you will spend one quar ter on each instrument, learning the basics of technique and music theory.
At the end of the semester you'll be on your way to proficiency in guitar and piano.

(731) FLUTE CHOIR Full year course - 2 credits


Requires enrollment in a major music ensemble.
Flute students will rehearse and perform flute ensemble repertoire. They will learn stronger intonation skills,
technique, blending and balance, rhythm and pitch reading. Students will also have an opportunity to learn
arranging and composition skills for the flute. Students will culminate their learning in concert performances
throughout the year.

(738) CIVIC ORCHESTRA Full year course - 2 credits


Lincoln-Sudbury Civic Orchestra meets on Tuesday nights from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. and prepares two concert
programs each year. Repertoire is drawn from orchestral works by composers such as Beethoven, Tchaikovsky
and Copland. Wind and percussion players must be approved by the conductor before signing up. It is strongly
recommended that all freshman players who sign up for the Civic Orchestra also participate in either String
Orchestra or Concert Band. Members are eligible to audition for District and Regional Festivals including Junior
and Senior Districts. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(745) MUSIC THEORY I Semester course - 1 credit


Music Theory is designed to develop musicianship through basic theory, sight-singing, ear training, and
piano skills. Students are encouraged to participate in an L-S musical ensemble for practical application of concepts
covered in this course. Concepts covered include: note reading, intervals, key signatures and scales, chords,
musical structure/form, musical analysis, symbols and terms, sight-reading, transcription, rhythmic and melodic
dictation. This course is highly recommended to seniors who plan to study music in college.

(747) MUSIC APPRECIATION Semester course- 2 credits


This course helps students discover the origins of today’s music. Designed as an introduction to musical
elements, forms, and styles, this course culminates in a study of American popular music. Students study the
history of Western music from the medieval times to the present. Students also explore the music of other cultures,
such as Africa, and discover the connections between these cultures and American popular music. This course is
open to all students; there are no prerequisites. This is a fall semester course which meets during block 5.

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NON-CREDITED ENSEMBLES/CLUBS

MEN’S CHORUS Not for credit


Men’s Chorus is an all-male group which performs mostly pop music and is alwa ys a favorite with
audiences. There is no audition or prerequisite for this singing club. Men’s Chorus provides vocal training and
performa nce opportunities to male students who are not able to enroll in Chorus due to scheduling constraints,
and for choral students who desire additional singing opportunities. This group rehearses during Activity Block
(Wednesdays from 12:36-1:21) in the Small Ensemble room.

WOMEN’S CHORUS Not for credit


Women’s Chorus is an all-female group which performs pop, jazz, Broadway, and classical music. There is
no audition or prerequisite for this singing club. Women’s Chorus provides vocal training and performance
opportunities to female students who are not able to enroll in Chorus due to scheduling constraints, and for choral
students who desire additional singing opportunities. This group rehearses during Activity Block (Wednesdays
from 12:36-1:21) in the Lecture Hall.

GOSPEL CHOIR Not for credit


Gospel Choir is a group of 20+ singers (male and female) who perform contemporary gospel music. There is
no audition or prerequisite for this singing club. Ruth Hartt (Choral Director), Nicole Stewart (METCO), and Leslie
Gray (East House) serve as advisors. Gospel Choir rehearses during the Wednesday Activity Block.

THEATER ARTS

(750) DRAMA I Semester course - 2 credits


This course is designed to give students experience in and a working knowledge of the various areas involved
with staging a dramatic work. Students will be introduced to theatrical design, including costumes, sets, lights,
makeup, and props. In addition, students will be introduced to the different “roles” required in a theatrical
production--the producer, director, playwright, designers, stage manager, box office manager, house manager, and
the actors. Course work will also include a beginning approach to acting, including stage directions, stage
conventions, the beginning “mechanics” of acting, and a strong physical training. Students will also be urged to
attend, critique, and be involved in LSB Players productions in any and all areas. (This course meets the Arts
requirement.)

(751) DRAMA II Semester course - 2 credits


Drama II is designed for students with some previous experience and interest in acting. In Drama II, students
will begin the exploration of various acting techniques and styles, with particular emphasis on voice, movement,
and character development. Students will read and discuss monologues and scenes and with the aid of the
instructor prepare in-class performances. Through improvisational activities and various acting exercises, students
will gain knowledge and experience in working with a director and the thrill of live performance. Students will
have opportunities for formal and informal performances as well as being encouraged to take part in LSB (Lincoln,
Sudbury, Boston) productions. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

(752) DRAMA III: Scene Study/Playwrighting Semester course - 2 credits


This course is for the advanced drama student who wishes to seriously pursue the study of theatre and what
makes a play great. Students will be reading scenes from classic and contemporary plays, breaking them down for
interpretation and figuring out how and why each scene works. Students will also be exploring the components of
playwrighting as a genre and attempt to answer the big question - how do we write a play? Students will be asked
to research playwrights, do independent reading, explore the Boston theatre world, and ultimately create their
own theatrical pieces.

(760) IMPROVISATION & PERFORMANCE Semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: One class in the Drama Department or permission of instructors
This course is designed for students interested in developing their performance skills. It will focus specifically
on the uses of Improvisation as a tool for dramatic exploration and performance. During the course, students will
develop an original production which will be performed. The emphasis is on group work in the process of
exploration, development and performance of material related to particular themes. (This course meets the Arts
requirement.)

(753) ACTING and DIRECTING Second semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: Successful completion of ACTING, or successful participation in a school play, or permission of
instructor
ACTING and DIRECTING is an elective course for advanced theater students in their sophomore, junior or
senior year. The class will teach advanced acting technique, focused on speech, movement, character
development, and scene-work on short scenes excerpted from longer plays, one-act plays, or student-written
scripts. There will also be instruction in directing technique, including script selection and preparation, casting,
blocking, costume and design. Each student will act and direct during the course; all students in the course will be
involved either in directing or acting in a piece to be presented as part of COLLAGE in the spring. (This course
meets the Arts requirement.)

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(754) STAGECRAFT Semester course - 2 credits
STAGECRAFT will introduce students to the technical facilities and skills involved in stage productions.
Students will study the use and design of the technical elements of plays: scenery, painting, props, lighting,
costumes, makeup, sound and special effects. Students in STAGECRAFT will read and discuss plays, especially
those being produced by the LSB Players; there will also be work on the technical crews of current LSB Players
productions. (This course meets the Arts requirement.)

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES


The goal of the History Department is to teach students the skills necessary to analyze the past, and thus gain
perspectives on the present. The curriculum includes courses which provide an awareness of our own history, an
appreciation of the many cultures which enrich the human experience, and an understanding of the political,
social, and economic issues which confront us as citizens.
In order to graduate, students must earn 12 credits in History and the Social Sciences, including 4 credits in the
category of American History. Students are encouraged to fulfill this requirement in their sophomore year.
Courses which meet this requirement are listed below under AMERICAN HISTORY. (Note that POST WAR
AMERICA, IMMIGRATION/ ETHNIC AMERICAN HISTORY, and HISTORY OF RACE do not satisfy the
requirement.) Qualified Seniors may enroll in a program leading to graduation with Honors in History.
Applicants prepare ambitious projects and papers which are reviewed by committees of history teachers. To assist
in the selection of appropriate classes, courses are graded in a range of 1 to 5, based on the quantity and difficulty
of the work expected. One is the most challenging. The designation appears at the end of each course description.
In planning a program in history each student is strongly encouraged to take a course in three of the following
four categories, and must confer with a department member about selecting an appropriate sequence of courses.
IT SHOULD BE NOTED THAT SOME HISTORY ELECTIVES MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE IN A PARTICULAR
YEAR.
AMERICAN HISTORY
(104) MODERN AMERICA 1865-PRESENT
(105) ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY
(107) 20th CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY
(108) TRENDS IN 20th CENT AMER HISTORY
(110) GREAT TRIALS IN U.S. HISTORY
(103) EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY (does not satisfy US History requirement)
(106) HISTORY OF RACE & MEMBERSHIP IN 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES
(does not satisfy US History requirement)
EUROPEAN STUDIES
(112) MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY
(115) PHILOSOPHY & HISTORY IN WESTERN EUROPE
(116) WESTERN CIVILIZATION - THE ARTS AND HISTORY
(117) DICTATORS
(127) MEDIEVAL EUROPEAN HISTORY

AREA STUDIES
(101) NINTH GRADE HISTORY LAB
(120) MODERN WORLD HISTORY
(132) WORLD CRISES IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
(144) GLOBAL ISSUES
(135) ASIAN STUDIES
(136) A HISTORY OF AFRICA AND ITS PEOPLE

SOCIAL SCIENCES
(140) PSYCHOLOGY
(146) ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS
(142) LAW AND AMERICAN SOCIETY *
*Students may choose to enroll in this course in addition to a full year history course without going through the
normal double enrollment process.
There are no prerequisites for any history courses except where noted. All courses are open to grades 10 through
12, except where noted.

AMERICAN HISTORY
Since they cover the same material, students may take ONLY one of the following for U.S. History credit:
MODERN AMERICA, 1865-1985
TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY
TRENDS IN TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY
GREAT TRIALS IN UNITED STATES HISTORY

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(104) MODERN AMERICA 1865-1985 Full year course - 4 credits
After a review of the Constitution this course focuses on Reconstruction and then explores the economic,
political, and social developments of the late nineteenth century that facilitated the country’s rise to power in the
twentieth century. Among these topics are: expansion, industrialization, urbanization, and immigration. In the
twentieth century the course explores the Progressive Era, the “Great War,” the affluence and anxieties of the
1920’s, the Depression, World War II, post war growth and social change, Cold War America, the turbulence of the
1960’s and the movements for social change, Vietnam, the post-Watergate era, and the revival of conservatism.
Students are expected to use a textbook, to read from additional sources, and to be positive, active participants
in the classroom. A variety of assignments will be given, with particular attention paid to essay writing. Increased
emphasis will be placed on critical analysis and varying interpretations of the past. (1-4)

(105) ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY Full year course - 4 credits
ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY is designed for students who wish to prepare for the
Advanced Placement Examination in United States History. The course will acquaint students with the writings of
major American historians as well as important schools of American historiography. Students will be required to
do extensive reading. Important historical works as well as significant journal articles will supplement a college
level American history textbook, Davidson’s Nations of Nations The textbook will be issued during the preceding
June. Students will be required to independently master the first four chapters and write one essay during the
summer break. In preparation for the Advanced Placement Examination, students will also be expected to learn a
great deal of factual material. Only students who are seriously considering taking the Advanced Placement
Examination should take this course. (1-3)

(107) TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY Full year course - 4 credits


TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY is a detailed survey course which proceeds by decades, and
examines the relationships of major events during each period of modern American history. While conventional
political topics are discussed, social history, and important cultural events are also emphasized. Students are
encouraged to consider different interpretations of the same event. Students will be required to do an extensive
amount of reading from a college level text, Nash’s The American People, and also from supplementary sources.
Classes will mix lecture with discussion. There will be regular homework assignments, and at least two major
research papers. This course requires excellent organizational skills. (1-3)

(108) TRENDS IN TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY Full year course - 4 credits
TRENDS IN TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY is a full year course based on TWENTIETH
CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY (107), and appropriately scaled for students who need skills work. The course
will emphasize both skills development and historical content. (4-5)

(103) EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY— Full year course - 4 credits


EXPLORING THE UNITED STATES AND LOCAL HISTORY BEFORE THE CIVIL WAR
This course uses local history and material history as a prism through which to see the cultural and historical
development of America from the late 15th century to the Civil War. By mixing history with cultural expressions
such as song, art, and religious thought and by paying greater attention to the experiences of racial minorities,
women, and immigrants a wider understanding of the nation as it developed will be addressed. Readings will
include biographies, environmental history, literature, newspapers, and other secondary and primary source
material. There will be a “hands on” component that will provide opportunities for students to engage in any
number of activities including making or using period tools, creating a garden, or exploring culinary history.
Field trips will be central to the course and may include Lexington Green, area cemeteries, the Freedom Trails of
Boston, Deerfield, Newport, and Mystic Seaport. Students will select a topic for personal research which may
develop into a paper, an edited collection of primary sources or an exhibition. (1-3)
Note: This course does not satisfy the United States history requirement.

(110) GREAT TRIALS AND ISSUES IN UNITED STATES HISTORY Full year course - 4 credits
This course surveys the American historical experience by focusing on critical political and social issues as
well as on some of the great trials that reflect US society in transition and at moments of crisis. After a thorough
exploration of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution as the basis of the country’s social values and
political structure, students will examine how much of United States history relates to the full realization of the
ideas and principles of these documents. Topics students will explore are the reform movements of the 1830’s, the
centrality of race during the Civil War, the rise of industrialization and the Haymarket Trial, immigration, the
Progressive Movement, civil liberties during World War I, US involvement during World War II, Japanese
American Internment, the Civil Rights movements, and the tragedy of Vietnam. Basic skills such as organization,
note taking, writing essays, vocabulary development, and oral expression are emphasized. (3-5)

(106) HISTORY OF RACE IN 20TH CENTURYUNITED STATES Full year course - 4 credits
May be requested in addition to another history course without going through the double enrollment process.
This course will examine the history and legacy of racism, prejudice and discrimination in 20th century United
States. Using materials from Facing History and Ourselves, as well as relying on the use of primary sources,
popular films, newspaper articles and biographies, this course will ask students to think honestly and reflect on the
challenges and benefits of living in our democratic society. We will study eugenics, a “scientific” practice whose
goal was to eliminate “undesirable” human traits and included questionable experiments on living human
subjects. In addition, we will analyze how different “racial” and social groups are portrayed in popular American
culture, and how accepting those who are “different” has changed over time. Students will be expected to

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participate in classroom debates, mock trials, field trips and film analysis. At the end of the course, students will
be asked to design an in-depth “Choosing to Participate” proposal where they will exhibit how they plan to
participate or continue participating in our democratic society. (2-4)
Note: This course does not satisfy the United States history requirement.

EUROPEAN STUDIES

(112) MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 9 only
Focusing on Europe since 1600, this course presents a chronological survey of the following topics: the English,
French, Russian, and industrial revolutions; the rise of colonialism and nationalism; World Wars I and II; the rise of
the dictatorships; the cold war and contemporary Europe. Reading and other materials are selected from a variety
of sources as a supplement to the textbook. Student work is designed to teach historical, social, and geographic
content as well as to develop verbal and analytical skills. (1-4)

(115) PHILOSOPHY AND HISTORY IN WESTERN EUROPE Full year course - 4 credits
This course is an introduction to the major philosophers of the west and their ideas, with an emphasis on
ethics and political philosophy. Philosophical ideas will be presented in their historical contexts. The course will
start with the beginnings of western philosophy in ancient Greece, and continue through the twentieth century.
Students will examine moral and political ideas and see how they apply to the contemporary world and their own
lives. Readings will be drawn from actual philosophical works and commentary on them. Some fictional sources
will also be used. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and activities, read materials
closely, and write analytical essays. (1-3)

(116) WESTERN CIVILIZATION - THE ARTS AND HISTORY Full year course - 4 credits
WESTERN CIVILIZATION — THE ARTS AND HISTORY traces the evolution of the western world through a
survey of the visual arts and music presented in their historical contexts. In addition, science, technology, and the
evolution of ideas will be considered. The first semester starts with ancient Egypt and continues through the
fourteenth century. The second semester covers the last six hundred years. This course seeks to develop a sense of
the continuity of western civilization, and a heightened appreciation of the arts, both for themselves and as a
mirror of history. The central text will be Kenneth Clark’s Civilization. Students will spend the majority of class
time critically examining and discussing various works. They will be expected to read in various sources, write
analytical essays, and work independently on projects. By special arrangement students may prepare to take the
Advanced Placement examination in the History of Art. (1-3)

(117) DICTATORS Full year course - 4 credits


The history of the world in the twentieth century is marked by the rise of dictators who were able to gather a
great deal of power and use it ruthlessly for their own ends. Under these dictators, more than one hundred million
people lost their lives as these dictators tried to establish total control over their people. DICTATORS will focus on
Hitler’s rule in Nazi Germany, Stalin’s rule in the Soviet Union, and Pol Pot’s role in Cambodia.
We will analyze how these men came to power, what their totalitarian governments looked like, and what the
tragic results were in the countries where they ruled. Throughout the course, we will also look at current events
happening in the world in order to understand what dictatorships look like today. Ultimately this course is
designed not just to teach the content of the periods and places studied, but is meant to help students to identify
and oppose oppression both locally and globally.
Students will be expected to read from a number of different sources—textbooks, magazine articles, fiction
and non-fiction books, and primary sources. In addition, students will be expected to write a research paper for
this class as well as a number of shorter papers. Students will also have the opportunity to do original research
with survivors of the Stalinist purges. (2-4)

(127) MEDIEVAL EUROPEAN HISTORY Full year course - 4 credits


This course is a survey of Medieval European History from the collapse of the Western Roman Empire and the
rise of Christianity to the Black Death and the Renaissance (circa 300-1500 C.E.). A wide variety of political,
economic, religious, social, cultural, intellectual and military trends will be examined. Readings will be taken from
a textbook and from primary source documents. (1-3)

AREA STUDIES

(101) NINTH GRADE HISTORY LAB Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 9 only
This smaller class is designed for students who have had significant difficulty with the reading, writing, and
conceptual skills demanded in history courses. Individualized instruction helps students to begin to master various
history skills involving chronology, cause and effect, bias, geography, data, research, and film. Reading and
writing skills will be the primary focus throughout the course. (4-5)

(120) MODERN WORLD HISTORY: ASIA, Full year course - 4 credits


THE MIDDLE EAST, AFRICA, AND LATIN AMERICA
Open to: 9 only
This course is a comprehensive examination of three or four selected countries or regions such as China, South
Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. The foundation of each unit is a thorough study of the history and

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politics of the region, as well as relevant social and religious traditions. Examples of units and topics of study are
apartheid in South Africa, the Chinese communist revolution and the Arab-Israeli conflict. The origins of
influential social and religious institutions are also incorporated into the curriculum. Readings and other materials
are selected from a variety of primary and secondary sources as a supplement to the textbook. Student work is
designed to teach historical, social, and geographic content and to emphasize the development of strong written
and analytical skills. (1-4)

(132) WORLD CRISES IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE Full year course - 4 credits


This course is designed to introduce students selected pressing political issues across the globe. Though the
units studied will change with current events, recent topics have included: 9/11 and the U.S. War on terror,
Afghanistan, Iraq, nuclear proliferation, Iran, North Korea, Israel-Palestine, and Colombia/the U.S. war on drugs.
The historical basis of each controversy will be presented so that students can make connections between past and
present, and thus gain understandings which go beyond newspaper headlines. The complexities of each situation
will be examined, taking into account different perspectives. Through readings, documentaries, debate, research,
and rigorous analysis, students will be expected to come to their own informed opinions about the topics studied.
The course requires that students stay abreast of world news, and emphasis is placed on introducing students to
various sources of information about world affairs. (1-3)

(144) GLOBAL ISSUES Full year course - 4 credits


Global Issues is a course for students who want to know more about what is happening in the world. The
course examines terrorism, including the U.S. government’s response to 9/11 and the war against Iraq. In addition
to terrorism, units of study include: drug trafficking, the global impact of AIDS and other infectious diseases,
human rights, the environment, and the work of international organizations, such as the United Nations. While the
course will provide some historical background, the emphasis is on current conditions. Consequently, students are
required to follow the news, and discussion of current events is a daily class routine. Readings, documentaries,
group projects, role plays, lectures, analytical essays and a research paper will help students become informed
citizens and give them information with which they can formulate their opinions. In addition to the course
material, there is a strong emphasis on the development of academic skills in reading, note-taking, analytical essay-
writing, and organization. Writing is an important course component. (2-4)

(135) ASIAN STUDIES: TRADITION AND Full year course - 4 credits


CHANGE IN CONTEMPORARY ASIA
This course will focus on the history, traditions, and beliefs of some of Asia’s peoples. Special attention will be
paid to the areas of India, China, and Japan. Students will do long-term research on other Asian nations of their
choosing. Course materials will be drawn from diverse sources including primary texts, novels, diaries, art, music,
ritual, and film. Central to the course will be questions concerning the relationships between tradition and change
in Asia. What are some of the most significant Asian traditions? How are they changing? What are their impacts in
Asia today? (1-3)

(136) A HISTORY OF AFRICA AND ITS PEOPLE Full year course - 4 credits
This course examines sub-Saharan Africa's history and the relationship of its past to its present and future. 
Students learn not only about African history, but also about the continent’s people and cultures.  Africa is too
diverse and our time too short to survey all of its history.  Instead, the course is divided into two halves with
different emphases.  In the first semester, we explore some critical periods in African history (including the eras of
the trans-Atlantic slave trade, colonialism, nationalism and independence, and modern Africa).  In the second
semester, we focus on the study of specific African countries of particular importance to contemporary Africa
(including Rwanda, Darfur and South Africa).  Through primary and secondary sources, novels written by
Africans, and an ongoing African film series, students learn about the diversity of historical perspectives that have
shaped the telling of African history.  The course also features creative assignments, which have included an
African mask project, a curriculum project in which students teach other classes about the Darfur crisis, and a
computer related research project on a famous person from West Africa today.  Lectures, graded debates, and
small and whole group class discussions are designed to reinforce out of class readings and assignments.  Students
are expected to complete all assignments, including analytical essays and a third quarter research paper, and
participate actively in class.   (1-3)

SOCIAL SCIENCES

(140) PSYCHOLOGY Full year course - 4 credits


This course covers core concepts in psychology beginning with the use of the scientific method in research and
the physiological basis for behavior. Topics covered first semester include perception, learning, memory, and states
of consciousness. During the second semester the focus is on human growth and development, personality, stress
and adjustment, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy, and social psychology.
Class time is divided between lecture, films, discussions, experiments, and demonstrations. During the first
semester, students take frequent unit tests, write a paper on a movie selected by the instructor, and write a five
page research paper. Second semester, students take frequent unit tests, read two books on which papers are
assigned, construct a personal time line, and write a seven page research paper. By special arrangement, students
may prepare to take the Advanced Placement examination in Psychology. (2-4)

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(142) LAW AND AMERICAN SOCIETY Full year course - 4 credits
May be requested in addition to another history course without going through the double enrollment process.

This course explores some of the ways that the American legal system enters the lives of citizens and attempts
to address pressing social problems. Topics include freedom of speech, criminal justice and the correctional
system, race and Affirmative Action and locker searches in public schools. Students will learn about the balance
between the desire of Americans to enjoy personal and societal freedoms, and the need for order, safety, and
fairness. In addition, the class will consider some aspects of civil law, such as contracts or torts, and what it is really
like to be an attorney or judge in America.
Class time will be divided between discussion, lecture, films, oral or visual presentations, writing exercises,
and the use of the school’s computer laboratories. Occasional field trips, such as a tour of the Billerica House of
Correction and a mock trial are planned to enrich the curriculum . Students should expect to complete regular
homework assignments, take tests and quizzes, and write essays of various lengths. This course features a strong
emphasis on the development of skills in reading, writing, organization, and note-taking. (2-4)

(146) ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS Full year course - 4 credits


The goal of this course is to give students an understanding of the economic issues they face as voters and
participants in the economy. Economic theory will be studied and then used to analyze economic and political
issues. Emphasis will be placed upon linking students’ buying and working experience with economic concepts.
Economic concepts and possible applications include: supply and demand, the war on drugs, production cost and
the rise of sweatshops, money and banking, credit cards, fiscal policy, balancing the Federal budget, investments,
and managing a hypothetical $100,000, as well as taxation and the gap between rich and poor. Students should
expect a mixture of analytical essays, oral reports, long term group projects, tests, quantitative and qualitative
homework. (2-4)

WORLD LANGUAGE
Knowledge of another language develops your sensitivity to, and your understanding of other peoples and
their cultures. On a more practical level, it also enhances your career options. Whether you enter social services,
work for the U. S. government, global industry or become a literary scholar or artist, foreign language skills will
advance you in your profession and create new opportunities for you.
Your willingness to keep an open mind in selecting a language to study enables Lincoln-Sudbury to offer
a wide selection of languages. We offer four world languages, representing some significant new options for most
students. In order to encourage students to consider studying a language which may not have been available to
them prior to coming to Lincoln-Sudbury, the World Language Department will, by petition, allow students to
fulfill the World Language graduation requirement by successfully completing a total of two years in two different
languages. This must be done by successfully completing the first year of a less commonly taught language
(German), with the balance done in another language (French, Latin or Spanish). It is important to note, however,
that the minimum entry requirement for Massachusetts state colleges and universities is 8 credits in one language.
To communicate effectively in a foreign language, you must study beyond the beginning level. Instruction at
the beginning level and beyond is offered in all languages. The Language Department recommends that a student
achieve a second semester grade of C- or better in order to continue on to the next year’s sequenced study of that
language. Language courses are yearlong unless otherwise specified. Moreover, there are trips and exchanges
available for students of all four languages offered.

GERMAN
(216) BEGINNING GERMAN Full year course - 4 credits
This course is appropriate for students of all skill levels. The goal of Beginning German is to acquire the
communicative skills necessary to function in German on a very basic level. Students will learn to greet others,
and talk about themselves, their families, homes, likes/dislikes and basic activities. The course emphasizes
listening and speaking skills. Through immersion in the German language and culture, students become
increasingly comfortable with communication solely in German while in class, drawing on the many similarities
between English and German (both Germanic languages). Students complete culture projects each term.

(217) GERMAN 2 Full year course - 4 credits


German 2 is open to students who have successfully completed German 1 or have some prior background in
German. Here students continue to develop their speaking and listening skills, with added emphasis this year on
reading and writing. Immersion continues and students learn more about the structure of the German language.
Cultural components of this course include the geography of Germany, Austria and Switzerland, the German
school system, Grimms’ fairy tales and Berlin, Germany’s capitol city. In addition, students will begin to read
simple authentic German texts.

(219) GERMAN 3 Full year course - 4 credits


German 3 is open to students who have successfully completed German 2 or have significant prior background in
German. Based on skills acquired in German 1 and 2, students at this level are able to communicate in class solely
in German. More advanced structural topics are covered, and students learn to write essay-length compositions in
German. Students read and discuss full-length authentic German texts. Using resources such as online news
broadcasts, newspapers and magazines, students present weekly news synopses about current happenings in

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German-speaking countries. Cultural topics at this level include modern Germany and its political structure, the
GDR and the fall of the Berlin Wall, contemporary German pop culture and the historical development of Berlin.

(220) GERMAN 4 Full year course - 4 credits


German 4 is the usual culmination of the German program at LS and prepares students for further study at the
college level. This highly interactive course is conducted entirely in German, and students quickly learn to be very
conversant in the language. Students work to fine-tune advanced structural skills and refine their writing skills
with response journals and frequent compositions. Most fourth-year students prepare for and take the Advanced
Placement German Exam. Cultural topics include German immigration to America, press and the media in
German-speaking countries and German theater. Most years, students in this class prepare a piece for presentation
at the Mount Holyoke German Theater Festival. Since 1986, the German program at LS has provided students with an
opportunity to apply their skills in an authentic setting through participation in our exchange program with the Friedrich
Harkort School in Herdecke, Germany. Students in German 2, 3, 4 and the German Seminar (and 11 th or 12th grade students
in Beginning German) are eligible to participate in this three-week long program that includes a 2 week home-stay, attendance
at our partner school and a 4-day excursion to Berlin.

LATIN

(238) BEGINNING LATIN Full year course - 4 credits


This course offers students an introduction to basic Latin grammar and vocabulary. Students will begin to
examine the relationship between Latin, English and the Romance languages. Through the use of the textbook Ecce
Romani, students read Latin stories that portray the daily lives of an upper class Roman family. Cultural topics
integrated in the stories include Roman dress, housing, slavery, travel, and architecture. These form the basis for
second semester projects, which students present to the class.

(239) LATIN 2 Full year course - 4 credits


Latin 2 is open to students who have successfully completed Beginning Latin or have significant prior
background in Latin. Students learn an increasing amount of Latin forms and grammar, and they continue to
build their Latin vocabulary base. Longer, more challenging Latin readings in Ecce Romani continue the story of
the Roman family introduced in Beginning Latin, and provide students with the opportunity to hone their
translating skills. Students begin to learn the basics of Roman history, specifically the trends, people, and events
leading up to the civil wars of the 1st century BC. These topics and characters form the basis for second semester
projects, which students present to the class.

(240) LATIN 3 Full year course - 4 credits


Latin 3 is open to students who have successfully completed Latin 2. In the first semester students, finish the
Ecce Romani series introduced in the beginning years of Latin. Through the textbook readings, students continue
learning and increasing their vocabulary while studying the forms and uses of the subjunctive mood. The readings
gradually become more challenging in an effort to prepare the student for reading authentic Latin. During the
second semester students read, in Latin, the Roman authors Caesar, Cicero, and Suetonius while studying the
events surrounding the end of the Late Republic. These readings prepare students for the culture and literature of
the fourth year. Latin composition helps students reinforce their knowledge of advanced Latin grammar. In the
spring, students will research a topic introduced in the literature and present it to the class.

(241) LATIN 4 Full year course - 4 credits


Latin 4 is the usual culmination of the Latin program at LS and prepares students for further study at the
college level. Students read selections from Cicero's Catilinarian and Philippic orations, studying both the literary
style and the historical context of those speeches. Practice with Latin prose composition provides the opportunity
to review complex Latin grammar and syntax. During second semester, students read selections from Catullus'
poems, Vergil's Aeneid, and Ovid's Metamorphoses with a view to these poets' influences on the development of
Western literature. The class visits the Classical Art galleries at the MFA Boston to examine the artistic
representations of the literary themes studied in the course. In the spring, each student chooses a cultural or
historical topic from the Roman period to research and present to the class.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES
The following chart indicates the sequence and articulation of the Lincoln, Sudbury and LS French and Spanish
Language program.

6-7th Grade 8th Grade 9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade

Higher Proficiency⇒ 2 (1) 3(1) 4(1) 5th Year


Adv
Beginning Beginner⇒ 2(2) 3(2) 4(2) 5th Year

. Using Spanish 2 (1) as an example, the number 2 indicates second year Spanish and the number 1, in parentheses,
indicates the level. The absence of a number in parentheses indicates heterogeneous grouping.

46
Level-1 courses are enriched courses, designed for students who enjoy examining language topics in more depth.
Completion of this sequence provides students with the foundation to take standardized language exams, read
basic authentic literary texts and/or engage in social and community projects that require a certain level of mastery
of the language. The ability to work independently is important to succeed in this level.

Level-2 courses are designed for students who require repetition and considerable guidance from the teacher to
learn new grammar concepts. Still, students are expected to acquire new language structures, demonstrate
increasing competence with previous topics and skills as they continue to be practiced in class and on homework,
and to learn well from periods of direct instruction in combination with in-class guided practice.

FRENCH

(2PLF) PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS IN LANGUAGE (PAL) I FRENCH


Full Year course/Two Year Cycle 4 credits per year
Prerequisite: Recommendation by Language teacher and departmental approval

PAL French I provides a beginning year of language study for students who find learning a foreign language
difficult. This course is designed primarily as an oral approach with minimum attention to written language.
Instructors engage the students’ strengths by employing a wide range of modalities. Above all, an active
willingness to risk, to engage, to try, to “get up and do” will be the keys to success.

(202) BEGINNING FRENCH Full year course - 4 credits


This course is appropriate for students of all skill levels. Beginning French is presented using a proficiency-
based immersion method, placing greatest emphasis on listening and speaking skills. All material is introduced
orally and is then reinforced through a variety of listening, speaking, reading and writing activities that are directly
relevant to daily communication in the French language. The student of Beginning French is immersed into the
French language and culture and is expected to develop a willingness to communicate solely in French while in
class. Language skills are reinforced in the Technology Language Center with CD-ROMs and websites connected
to the curriculum. The course uses the Discovering French Bleu system.

(205) ADVANCED BEGINNER FRENCH Full year course - 4 credits


This course is appropriated for students who have been exposed to French in middle school but who need to
develop speaking and listening skills before advancing to the second year. Advanced Beginner French is presented
using a proficiency-based immersion method, placing greatest emphasis on listening and speaking skills. All
material is introduced orally and is then reinforced through a variety of listening, speaking, reading and writing
activities that are directly relevant to daily communication in the French language. The student of Advanced
Beginner French is immersed into the French language and culture and is expected to develop a willingness to
communicate solely in French while in class. Language skills are reinforced in the Technology Language Center
with CD-ROMs and websites connected to the curriculum. The course uses the Discovering French Bleu system.
(Teacher recommendation required.)

(204) FRENCH 2 (1) Full year course - 4 credits

This is an intensive second year course, using a second year text, in which there is significant emphasis on
command of the spoken and written word, on aural skills, and on vocabulary development. This course is
appropriate for students from L-S or the middle schools who demonstrate mastery of first year skills, who are self-
motivated and who have excellent study skills and a willingness to work. Simple literature is introduced at this
level, and short compositions are an integral part of the course. There is, as well, a major research project on Paris
and its monuments. (Teacher recommendation required.)

(203) FRENCH 2 (2) Full year course - 4 credits


This standard level second year course is the sequel to Advanced Beginner, and is appropriate for students
from the middle schools who have mastered the standard first year curriculum but are not ready for the intensity
of the 2(1) course. It uses the second year book, Discovering French Blanc. and presumes competence in all first
year material. There is a research project on Paris and its monuments. (Teacher recommendation required.)

(207) FRENCH 3 (1) Full year course - 4 credits


This is an intensive course with emphasis on reading short stories, excerpts from Les Misérables, and some
poetry. Significant progress is made in the study of grammar, and short papers or essay exams are begun at this
level. The culture and geography of France are studied, and projects on French provinces are required. (Teacher
recommendation required.)

(208) FRENCH 3 (2) Full year course - 4 credits


This course uses Discovering French Rouge, as well as its audio and video tapes and workbook. The CD-ROM
is an integral part of the course. Short readings are continued at this level. The culture and geography of France
are studied, and a research project on French provinces is required.

(210) FRENCH 4 (1) Full year course - 4 credits


Through literature, film, and guest speakers students will discover the francophone world. The Antilles,
Africa, and Belgium are the focus. Rêves Amers, L’Enfant Noir and Astérix chez les Belges are among the works

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studied. Students are expected to read, discuss and write in the target language. Continued emphasis is placed on
oral proficiency and topics in advanced grammar. (Teacher recommendation required.)

(211) FRENCH 4 (2) Full year course - 4 credits


This course is opened to students who have successfully completed French 3-2. The course covers selected
units of Discovering French Rouge. Each semester a film and newspaper articles highlight current social and cultural
themes. In addition, an intergenerational e-mail exchange with native French speakers is punctuated by a get
together at the French Library

(212) FRENCH 5 (1) Full year course - 4 credits


Prerequisite: French 4(1) or permission of the instructor
Advanced French is a pre-college level course, which combines the study of literature and culture with the
improvement of language skills. An advanced level of communication is reinforced. Students will be provided
with varied opportunities to practice and improve their communicative competency. Fluency and accuracy are
stressed. Oral skills are reinforced by regular guided conversations and debates, as well as through literary
discussion and oral presentations on current events and socio-cultural topics. Essential grammar is reviewed and
expanded. Several genres of literature of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries are studied, as well as works of major
French cinematographers. A number of authentic media sources (French movies, songs, TV, news programs,
Internet/World Wide Web) offer the students the opportunity to increase both their level of proficiency and
accuracy. Students will continue to develop skills, which are typically tested in the Advanced Placement exam.

(215) FRENCH 5: FRENCH CINEMA, HISTORY, AND ART Full year course - 4 credits
This movie analysis course will also teach history by viewing films that show each major period in French
history. There will be projects that are very hands on. The literature is based on short stories, short essays or
picture poems. The literature will illustrate themes of the movies and discussion will flow from both movies and
literature. The goals are to give the students new fields of content and to develop discussion skills through the
projects.

SPANISH

(224) BEGINNING SPANISH Full year course - 4 credits


Prerequisite: Departmental approval is required for enrollment.
High school Beginning Spanish aims at the same skills and it covers the equivalent material taught at the
Lincoln and Sudbury 6th and 7th grade Spanish courses. This course introduces students to basic grammar and
vocabulary, and the use of basic conversational patterns of Spanish speech. The course uses the En español system.

(227) ADVANCED BEGINNER SPANISH Full year course - 4 credits


This course is appropriate for students who need to reinforce 8 th grade skills before starting the high school
sequence. The course uses the En español system.

(226) SPANISH 2 (1) Full year course - 4 credits


Prerequisite: Language teacher recommendation and satisfactory performance on the proficiency assessment
This is an intensive second year course, using a second year text, in which there is significant emphasis on
command of the spoken and written word, on aural skills, and on vocabulary development. This course is
appropriate for students from L-S or the middle schools who demonstrate mastery of first year skills, who are self-
motivated and who have excellent study skills and a willingness to work. The course uses En Español II, with
ancillaries, as its major text, and includes a short novel and a video series. Teacher recommendation required.

(225) SPANISH 2 (2) Full year course - 4 credits


This course is the sequel to ADVANCED BEGINNER SPANISH and is appropriate for students from the
middle schools who are competent in all first year skills, but who are not ready for the intensity of the SPANISH 2
(1) curriculum. The course uses En E spañol II as its major text, as well as its software and ancillary materials.

(229) SPANISH 3 (1) Full year course - 4 credits


This intensive third year course is the sequel to SPANISH 2(1). The emphasis is on a multi-skill approach
whereby the mastery of grammar and vocabulary, the development of reading and linguistic skills, and the ability
to communicate successfully in basic survival situations are of equal importance. Student performance will be
assessed based on listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Teacher recommendation required.

(230) SPANISH 3 (2) Full year course - 4 credits


This course presumes mastery of basic second year skills. Students will receive more in-depth instruction in
grammar, verb tenses and vocabulary. Class participation, in the four language skills, is essential for successful
completion of this course.

(232) SPANISH 4 (1) Full year course - 4 credits


Spanish 4 (1) explores the Hispanic world. This course is designed for those students who want to become
more proficient in all four skills (aural, oral, writing, reading) in Spanish. Conversation is encouraged through
discussion of a variety of topics in Spanish literature, culture, civilization, and film. Students are expected to
participate ACTIVELY in all discussions and give oral and written reports on the different subjects covered.
Teacher recommendation required.

48
(233) SPANISH 4 (2) Full year course - 4 credits
The core program of SPANISH 4 (2) presumes knowledge of basic third year concepts, and works on student
proficiency in all four skills. Students are expected to speak actively and frequently in Spanish with attention to
correct grammar and an expanding vocabulary. Teacher recommendation required.

(235) SPANISH 5 (1): ADVANCED SPANISH Full year course - 4 credits


This course places emphasis on literature, grammar and class discussions. Students are expected to be
proficient in all four skills (aural, oral, writing and speaking) in Spanish. Students interested in taking the Spanish
language AP exam will be able to prepare for it through this course. Teacher recommendation required.

(237) SPANISH 5 (1) EXPLORACION CULTURAL Full year course - 4 credits


This course offers advanced students in Spanish the opportunity to increase their fluency through personal
and continued contacts with native speakers, learn the intercultural communication skills necessary to live in a
multicultural society, and study about the contemporary situation of many Latinos in a historical/cultural
framework. The course combines a service and classroom component. The classroom component will focus on the
history, literature, culture and present day political and social situations of some of the diverse groups of Latinos in
the United States, as well as issues relating to the Latino community in Framingham. Grammar will be covered in
conjunction with the readings. Teacher recommendation required.

The following course is open to students from both Spanish 41 and 42:

(234) SPANISH 5: LATIN AMERICA THROUGH FILM Full year course - 4 credits
The goal of this fifth year course is to gain a better understanding of the Hispanic world through analysis of
the social, political, and economical issues presented in Latin American film. In addition to the films themselves,
the course will contain literary, historical, and cultural readings pertinent to the themes of the film. Students will
be evaluated on their class participation as well as on their written work.

(236)SPANISH 5: LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES Full year course – 4 credits


An introduction to the civilization and culture of the Latin American republics, the course provides an
opportunity to raise awareness about and honor the diversity of the world's cultures. In addition, it would
enhance the cultural skills required by the Commonwealth's World Languages Frameworks. For this purpose this
course will focus on the history, culture, present day political situation, and literature of selected Latin American
countries. Students will be given the opportunity to study in greater depth many of the topics that they have
already been introduced to in their previous language classes.

MATHEMATICS
The Mathematics Department offers a variety of courses including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Advanced
Math, Calculus (both full year and semester courses) and Statistics (both full year and semester courses). These
courses are offered in levels varying in difficulty. The level designations of these courses are the numbers 1, 2, or 3
in parentheses, or the word “Intensive” in the course title.

•Intensive Level one courses are designed for students who enjoy examining topics in
mathematics more deeply and exploring non-routine, abstract and challenging math
problems. Students are expected to analyze complex, multi-step problems with minimal
repetition, readily apply concepts to new problems (even in testing situations) and
consistently demonstrate mastery of previous topics and skills without re-teaching.

•Level one courses are enriched courses, designed for students who are able to learn new
concepts and analyze complex multi-step problems with limited repetition and guidance.
Students are expected to apply concepts to new problems with some guidance from the
teacher and consistently demonstrate proficiency with previous topics and skills with
minimal review.

•Level two courses are college preparatory courses, designed for students who are able to
learn new concepts and reach an understanding of fundamental mathematical problems
and relationships with repetition and guidance. Students are expected to learn new ideas
and skills with guidance from the teacher and to demonstrate increasing competence with
previous topics and skills as they continue to be practiced in class and on homework.

•Level three courses are general courses designed for students who are able to learn new
concepts with repetition and guidance from the teacher. Students are expected to apply
concepts to new problems with considerable guidance from the teacher, to demonstrate
increasing competence with previous topics and skills as they continue to be practiced in
class and on homework, and to learn well from periods of direct instruction in
combination with in-class guided practice.

49
Ninth graders are placed in mathematics courses by eighth-grade mathematics teachers based on their Algebra
competence, study habits, level of motivation and their interest in mathematical challenge. Students who are not
yet ready for Algebra I are placed in Topics in Math or Introduction to Algebra; those who are ready to begin
algebra are placed in Algebra I (2) or Algebra I (3); those who have successfully completed a full year of Algebra
are placed in Intensive Geometry (1), Geometry (1), or Geometry (2).

Although only two years of mathematics are required for graduation, most students take math for three or
four years. It is important that students and their parents consider goals. Most students who plan to continue their
academic education beyond high school take at least two years of algebra and one year of geometry. These three
courses are required by all Massachusetts state colleges.

In order to continue in sequence at the same level, a student must receive a C- or above in each semester of the
prerequisite course as well as the recommendation of the current teacher.

SEQUENCE OF MATHEMATICS COURSES


Entering Entering Entering Entering
Geometry Algebra Intro to Algebra Topics in Math
Grade 9 Geometry Algebra I Intro to Algebra Topics in Math
Grade 10 Algebra II Geometry Algebra I Intro to Algebra
Grade 11 Advanced Math Algebra II Geometry Algebra I
Grade 12 AP Calculus AB Advanced Math Algebra II Geometry
AP Calculus BC
Calculus
Pre Calculus/Calculus
Statistics
AP Statistics
Computational Math
Discrete Math
Problem-Solving through
Puzzles and Games

(301) TOPICS IN MATH Full year course - 4 credits


This course includes topics from measurement, practical mathematics, computer use, geometry and algebra.

(302) INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA Full year course - 4 credits


A preparation for and an introduction to algebra.

(303) or (304) ALGEBRA I (2) or (3) Full year course - 4 credits


This course covers all the topics traditionally associated with elementary algebra.

(309-312) INTENSIVE GEOMETRY (1), GEOMETRY (1), (2), (3) Full year course - 4 credits
Prerequisite: a grade of C- or above in ALGEBRA I and teacher recommendation
This course covers plane Euclidean geometry together with topics in analytic and solid geometry. Because
Algebra is integrated throughout the course, a solid understanding of Algebra I concepts and strong Algebra skills
are expected.

(316-318) INTENSIVE ALGEBRA II (1), ALGEBRA II (1), or (2) Full year course - 4 credits
Prerequisite: a grade of C- or above in GEOMETRY and teacher recommendation
This course covers intermediate algebra incorporating the use of the graphing calculator.

(320) TOPICS IN ALGEBRA II Full year course - 4 credits


Prerequisite: a grade of C- or above in Geometry and teacher recommendation
This course will cover many of the topics of Algebra II. Emphasis will be placed on applications and use of the
computer and graphing calculator.

(325-327)INTENSIVE ADVANCED MATH (1), ADVANCED MATH (1) or (2) Full year course - 4 credits
Prerequisite: a grade of C- or above in GEOMETRY and ALGEBRA II and teacher recommendation
This course includes trigonometry, vectors, parametric equations, limit theory, and other topics in advanced
algebra and advanced geometry. Emphasis will be placed on the use of the graphing calculator.

(328) TOPICS IN ADVANCED MATH Full year course - 4 credits


Prerequisite: a grade of C- or above in ALGEBRA II and teacher recommendation.
This course will cover many of the topics of Advanced Math. Emphasis will be placed on applications and the
use of the computer and graphing calculator.

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(331) PRE CALCULUS/CALCULUS Semester course - 2 credits
Prerequisite: a grade of C- or above in ADVANCED MATH and teacher recommendation
This course covers introductory calculus topics and applications, incorporating focused review of the concepts
from precalculus necessary to study calculus.

(330) CALCULUS Semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: A grade of C- or above in ADVANCED MATH and teacher recommendation
This course covers introductory calculus topics and applications, including both differential and integral
calculus.

(336) STATISTICS Semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation
This course will cover a study of introductory statistics topics, including distributions, sampling, central limit
theorem, hypothesis testing, survey design, and linear regression.

(341) DISCRETE MATH Semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation
Topics covered in discrete math may include: voting methods, fair division, matrices, critical path analysis
(PERT), Steiner points, graph coloring, and network or graph science.

(333)MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM SOLVING THROUGH PUZZLES & GAMES Semester course - 2 credits
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation
This course approaches mathematics through solving puzzles and playing games. The topics to be covered
may include: geometric ideas such as tiling, dissection, symmetry and proof, and algebraic ideas such as notation,
equation solving and modeling, combinatorics and logic.

(334-335) ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB or BC Full year course - 4 credits


Prerequisite: INTENSIVE ADVANCED MATH (1) or ADVANCED MATH (1) and teacher recommendation
Both courses include topics from differential and integral calculus, with attention both to theory and to
practical applications. Both courses are intended to be equally rigorous but CALCULUS BC covers more topics
than CALCULUS AB. The courses follow the College Board Advanced Placement Calculus syllabi. Enrollment in
AP Calculus will be limited to students who have demonstrated a high level of achievement and interest in
mathematics.

(337) ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS Full year course - 4 credits


Prerequisite: INTENSIVE ADVANCED MATH (1) or ADVANCED MATH (1) taken previously or concurrently
and teacher recommendation
Topics studied in this course include: summarization and graphing of data, use of the normal distribution and
other probability distributions to model data, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing,
regression and correlation calculations, and mathematical models. The course follows the College Board Advanced
Placement Statistics syllabus. Enrollment in AP Statistics will be limited to students who have demonstrated a high
level of achievement and interest in mathematics.

(343) COMPUTATIONAL MATHEMATICS Semester course - 2 credits


Prerequisite: ADVANCED MATH taken previously or concurrently and teacher recommendation
This is an elective math course that fulfills the Computer Technology Requirement. The focus of
Computational Math will be topics that benefit from being explored through graphing calculators, computer
applications such as spreadsheets or statistical packages, or basic programming techniques. Example topics
include matrices, fractals, curve fitting, and geometric transformations and 3-D projections.

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NON-DEPARTMENTAL
ADDITIONAL COURSE OFFERINGS & PROGRAMS
All courses are open to grades 9-12 unless otherwise noted.

WHITE HOUSE PRE-SCHOOL - CHILD DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM


The White House Pre-School, nestled in the corner of our high school campus, was established in 1971 by the
Massachusetts Department of Education. Three groups of pre-school aged children attend this school, where
qualified teachers work with high school students in a program of teaching assistance.
(852) CHILD DEVELOPMENT EXPLORATION Semester course - variable credit
This course offers practical experience working with children in a pre-school setting. Students assist teachers
in the classroom, make teaching aids, and help with planning while observing and interacting with 3, 4, and 5 year
old children. Students interested in Education and/or Human Services careers will find this program most
beneficial.

(762) MEET MR. THOREAU Semester course - 2 credits


Open to: 10-12
This elective is designed to acquaint the student with the life and the mind of Henry David Thoreau, one of the
most extraordinary individuals ever born in this area. Because Thoreau was a naturalist, an inventor, an
abolitionist, and a writer, the course will go in a number of directions. Students will be expected to do some
reading and to keep journals. The emphasis will be on discussion and on participating in Thoreauvian experiences
like camping, boat rides on local rivers, opportunities for solitude, walking, hiking, meditation, and nature
observation. Students can also expect to meet a number of guest speakers. The class may also adopt an
environmental project in the Thoreau spirit.

(764) JOURNALISM Semester course - 2 credits


This course will focus on the fundamentals of the profession of journalism. Students will learn the different
styles of journalistic writing (news, editorial, feature, sports), will gain experience in editing the work of others,
and will have their stories published in the school paper. The art and computer technique of page layout will also
be emphasized.

(980) THE PEER HELPER PROGRAM Full year course - 1 credit


Peer Helper is a yearlong course that meets once a week as a small group of (4-10) students.
Group discussions cover topics and issues that are directly relevant to teenagers. Topics include, but not limited
to, the following: stress, relationships, time management, effective communication skills, self-awareness and
prevention of destructive behaviors. Each group is led by a trained faculty member. Peer Helpers receive one
academic credit that is based on attendance and participation. This course is open to all students. Students who
successfully complete the peer helper program are eligible to become part of the Peer Leader Program.

(981) PEER LEADER PROGRAM Full year course - 1 credit


Prerequisite: Application process
The PEER HELPER LEADERSHIP PROGRAM is a way for students who have had Peer Helper Training to
give back to the community. Students will devote at least one hour per week to their internship which will take
place over the course of a semester. The internship will count as a one-credit course. In the past, students have
done their internships at local elementary schools, or here at L-S (in the English Language Learners program,
REACH program, or co-teaching a Peer Helper class).

(978) PEER TUTORING Semester course - 1 credit


This course focuses on providing peer tutors for students. Peer tutors are required to go to the Academic
Support Center for half a lunch block and/or a free block. During this time peer tutors will meet with scheduled
students, be available for unscheduled drop-ins, or discuss tutoring strategies with the ASC staff. While requests
for tutoring are received in all subjects, the greatest demand has been in the areas of math, language and earth
science.

(766) PUBLIC SPEAKING Semester course - 2 credits


The goal of this course is to foster excellence in public speaking through a variety of activities, including
debate, poetry, and oratory. Students will study and recite famous speeches, write and present their own material,
and consider what is necessary to make an effective presentation alone or in group situations.

(984) CAREER EXPLORATION PROGRAM Semester course - variable credit


Exploration internships may be considered for students at all grade levels. This part-time program is flexible,
to encourage students to test a potential career, to practice work skills, to learn how business organizations
function, or to make a contribution to their community. Individual proposals will be evaluated by the Internship
Coordinator or other school personnel, and credit will be based on hours of participation.

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(985) EXECUTIVE INTERNSHIP Second semester course - 12 credits
Open to: 12 only

This challenging internship program provides a unique opportunity for a select group of students to explore career
choices outside the classroom. A full semester is spent working or volunteering as an assistant to a professional in
the student’s field of interest. The internship involves both observation of the executive in his/her role, and
participation in meaningful work. Students may choose to remain in some classes and be part-time interns.
Achievement in the course is determined by successful evaluations by the sponsoring professional, a weekly
journal reflecting the work experience, and by participation in the regular seminars held for interns at the high
school. A full-time internship grants 12 credits, and fulfills a 2 credit English requirement.

(986) WORK STUDY Semester course - 2 credits


Open to: 11-12

WORK STUDY is a program for juniors and seniors over 16 years of age who wish to earn credit by gaining
practical work experience in an after school job. Participants must work at least 15 hours a week in a paid position
for a full semester. Upon completion of a satisfactory evaluation by their employers they will earn 2 credits. A
maximum of 8 work study credits may be earned toward graduation.

(988) OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION Semester course - up to 13 credits


Open to: 11-12

OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION is a work experience program designed to meet the needs of students who work
full time while they are completing their academic requirements. The students are released from classes for a full
semester to work at an approved work site. The program coordinator periodically evaluates their progress in
conjunction with the employer. Students are responsible for completing any necessary courses needed for
graduation requirements. Upon completion of a satisfactory work experience students are awarded up to 13
general credits.

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Students who want credit for any course, program, tutoring, or alternative experience which does not fall under a
regularly scheduled class must complete an application for Independent Study in their House office. Independent
study credit is granted when no appropriate course is available based on either the school schedule or the content
of specific courses. Ordinarily a letter grade is assigned for the work done. All independent study credit activities
must be supervised by certified instructors and must be approved by the Housemaster.

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SCIENCE

The core science curriculum within the Science Department is a four-year sequence of earth science, biology,
chemistry, and physics. In an age of ever-increasing emphasis on the sciences, a well-rounded background in these
disciplines provides a foundation for more sophisticated thinking, and the knowledge base necessary to make
educated personal and societal decisions. For these reasons, it is strongly recommended that all students take the
full four years of study covering all the disciplines. All 9th graders are required to take a course in Earth Science,
and all 10th graders are required to take a course in Biology.

EARTH SCIENCE Full year course - 4 credits

Earth Science is a physical science that looks at the underlying unity and interrelationships of the sciences
through study of the earth and its systems. The subject matter, planet Earth, provides a framework for observing
and experimenting, making connections to other sciences, and addressing current and topical issues. Areas of
study include geology, oceanography, meteorology, astronomy, and hydrology. Current environmental topics are
studied in the context of the earth systems they impact. The course emphasizes the development of study, problem
solving and laboratory skills. Laboratory investigations and activities are important components of the course.
Teachers may assign long-term projects on related topics. Computers are used in some areas for simulation and
data analysis.

(401) ACCELERATED EARTH SCIENCE (1) classes are fast-paced and require learners to function independently
at a high level of comprehension, analysis, application, and synthesis. Homework, projects, laboratories, and tests
require abstract thinking that goes beyond a concrete learning style. Successful students in this course hold
themselves to high standards of achievement, are self-motivated to explore and question material on their own
initiative, and take responsibility for their own learning. They are timely in completing assignments and labs,
work well in groups, and are able to focus in class during lectures. The course employs a college level text;
therefore, students must have strong reading comprehension skills. Students are expected to demonstrate their
comprehension through clear and well-structured writing. Excellent mathematical skills are required for
homework, laboratories, and tests.

The major factors which the Lincoln-Sudbury Science Department considers in determining placement of eighth
graders in ACCELERATED EARTH SCIENCE include:
• an application, including a student essay
• an acceptable score on the skills-based placement test administered to all
applicants
• middle school performance
• successful completion of Algebra I.

(402) EARTH SCIENCE (1) is the core, college-preparatory Earth Science course. Approximately three-quarters of
current ninth graders are placed in Earth Science (1). Expectations for this course include strong math and
graphing skills, reading at or above grade level, ability to express oneself in writing, working in groups, and
prompt and complete submission of assignments. The course emphasizes critical thinking skills, connections to
other disciplines, and the application of course content to the student’s own experiences and to unfamiliar
situations. It is recommended, but not required, that students have successfully completed Algebra I before taking Earth
Science (1).

(403) EARTH SCIENCE (2) covers the same material as Earth Science (1) but is modified to meet students’ skill
levels. Smaller classes, hands-on activities, and group work enable students to receive frequent teacher assistance.
Basic math, graphing, and reading skills are addressed. The course is aimed toward concrete learning styles and
an understanding of broad scientific concepts.

BIOLOGY
All biology full-year courses are introductory survey courses that cover a wide range of topics including Cellular
Biology, Biochemistry, Evolution, Genetics, Molecular Biology, Ecology, and Human Anatomy and Physiology.
All biology courses include a unit on Fetal Pig Dissection. An emphasis is placed on the process of science and the
importance of experimentation and evidence in constructing a framework of knowledge. All Biology courses
strive to foster a curiosity about the living world and the interconnectedness of its many varied systems, both on a
microscopic as well as macroscopic level. Students are encouraged to explore the social and cultural issues
surrounding these topics.

(406) ACCELERATED BIOLOGY (1) Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 10-12 Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher
ACCELERATED BIOLOGY (1) is an in-depth introductory survey course intended to prepare students for
further study in the biological sciences at the college level. The science of biology is approached from a cellular
and biochemical point of view. Students are expected to be active and independent learners who read above grade
level and are computer literate. They are expected to have the ability to readily develop a sophisticated conceptual
understanding of the material and to have an ability to apply the material to new situations.
Course work includes rigorous scientific reading, laboratory assignments, exams and quizzes, homework, and
projects/presentations. Exams and quizzes typically assume the student’s ability for factual recall and focus
primarily on conceptual understanding, application, and data analysis.

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With some independent study, students in ACCELERATED BIOLOGY (1) can successfully complete one of the
SAT subject tests in Biology (E or M version).

(407) BIOLOGY (1) Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 10-12 Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher
BIOLOGY (1) is a college preparatory survey course intended to prepare students for further study in science
at the college level. Students are expected to take responsibility for missing work and to complete assignments and
lab work in a timely manner. The high performance expectations for this course include reading at or above grade
level, ability to express oneself in writing, and the ability to analyze data and graphical information as it pertains to
a biological system. Course work includes difficult scientific readings, laboratory assignments, exams and quizzes,
homework, and projects/presentations. Quizzes and exams involve substantial recall and require the student to
demonstrate an understanding of abstract ideas from the synthesis of concrete concepts.
With significant independent study, motivated students in Biology (1) can successfully complete one of the SAT
subject tests in Biology (E or M version).

(409) BIOLOGY (2) Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 10-12 Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher
In BIOLOGY (2) the emphasis in study is on topics which can be demonstrated through hands-on
manipulation. Smaller classes enable more frequent teacher check-ins and active monitoring of the completion of
homework and laboratory assignments. Course work includes laboratory assignments, exams and quizzes,
homework, and projects/presentations.
Quizzes and exams involve substantial recall and require the student to demonstrate an understanding of concrete
concepts as they apply to a biological system. Course content and instructional methods are optimized for a wide
range of learning styles and students are expected to develop an understanding of biological concepts as they
apply to their lives and future decision making.

(410) APPLIED BIOLOGY Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 10-12 Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher
In APPLIED BIOLOGY the science of biology is approached from an ecological point of view with an
emphasis on laboratory investigations and classwork. The reading is of a less abstract and more practical nature.
This course seeks to present the main themes from the standard biology curriculum for students who have had
previous difficulty in science courses. Units covered are plant study, ecology, microbiology (including the diseases
of man), human social problems, cell biology, fetal pig dissection, human anatomy and physiology, genetics,
animal classification and the study of different ecosystems.

(411) ACCELERATED CHEMISTRY Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 11-12
Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher and completion of ALGEBRA II
ACCELERATED CHEMISTRY is an intensive course covering the basic topics in chemistry at an advanced
placement level. An introductory college textbook is used in the course. There is a stress on the theoretical and
quantitative aspects of chemistry along with a significant laboratory component. Students electing this course
should be extremely facile in the use of algebra and arithmetic since the class and lab work will develop in-depth
problem solving skills. Topics covered include measurement, nomenclature, stoichiometry, types of reactions,
thermochemistry, gas laws, atomic theory, periodicity, equilibria, and acid-base theories. Students will be required
to keep a laboratory journal and do 4-5 hours of homework per week.

(412) CHEMISTRY (1) Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 11-12
Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher and completion of ALGEBRA II
CHEMISTRY 1 stresses the theoretical and quantitative aspects of chemistry as well as the methods of
questioning and reasoning used by scientists, and is designed to prepare students for further study in science at the
college level. Students electing this course should feel comfortable in the use of algebra and arithmetic as these are
the basic tools in both class and lab work. Topics covered include measurement, scientific method, gas laws, mole
concept, heat effects in chemical reactions, atomic and molecular structure, properties of the elements and
compounds, equilibrium, acid-base, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. About three to four hours per week
of outside work, including completing homework assignments, writing lab reports and reading in the text, will be
necessary for most students to achieve well.

(413) CHEMISTRY (2) Full year course - 4 credits


Open to:  11-12
Prerequisite:  Completion of Algebra I
Chemistry 2 is designed to teach students basic chemical principles, as well as the methods of questioning and
reasoning used by scientists. The emphasis of study is on principles that can be demonstrated by “hands on”
experiments. For this reason portions of each period are spent “discovering” and applying these principles through
hands on activities and computer models. This course is more lab oriented and less reliant on mathematical
calculation than Chemistry (1). Topics covered will include physical and chemical properties, atomic and
molecular structure, acids and bases, chemical reactions, measurement, gasses, solutions, and stoichiometry. Other
topics may include nuclear reactions, organic chemistry, and redox. About three to four hours per week of outside
work, including completing homework assignments, writing lab reports and reading , will be necessary for most
students to do well. Achievement in the course is based on units tests, quiz scores, laboratory reports, homework,
major projects, and a final examination.

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In the descriptions below, the “instructor” is the current instructor of the course being described.

(414) ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 11-12
Prerequisite: Completion of BIOLOGY with a grade of C or better and CHEMISTRY with a grade of C or better or
concurrent enrollment in CHEMISTRY 1. Instructor approval necessary if grade requirement not met.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY is a one year course offered to students who intend to pursue studies in
biology and/or medical fields beyond high school. It is a study of the interrelations of structure and function. An
in depth dissection of the rabbit forms the basis of the anatomical work in the course. After an early unit in cellular
biochemistry and physiology, human systems such as the skeletal, muscular, circulatory and nervous are studied.
Students are required to write lab reports on the above, as well as one paper of considerable depth each semester.
Reading of current medical literature is also emphasized. This course also requires a great deal of memorization.
Student achievement is assessed through lab reports, unit tests, laboratory work, and a final exam. Students will
frequently need to use extra periods to complete laboratory work and do assigned readings in the library.

(417) ACCELERATED PHYSICS (1) Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 11-12
Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher and ADVANCED MATH taken concurrently

ACCELERATED PHYSICS is a fast-paced introductory physics course. Curriculum coverage is similar to that
in CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS, but with a greater emphasis on electricity and magnetism. Students are expected to
be active and independent learners who read successfully for information from a high-level high school text.
ACCELERATED PHYSICS differs from AP PHYSICS in two ways. The coverage of curriculum in ACCELERATED
PHYSICS is much broader, and calculus is not used.
ACCELERATED PHYSICS differs from CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS in that students are expected to take
increased responsibility for their own learning and be capable of understanding material quickly and with minimal
help. Problem assignments and tests, while not requiring calculus, are more challenging and require the ability to
analyze and synthesize complex information.

(415) CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 11-12
Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher, completion of CHEMISTRY or BIOLOGY with a grade of
C and ALGEBRA II taken concurrently or completed. Instructor/department approval necessary if grade
requirement is not met.

This course approaches physics with a greater emphasis on understanding and explaining concepts than on
mathematical applications, although basic algebraic problem-solving using laws of physics is included. Topics
covered in the course include classical mechanics, wave phenomena, electricity and magnetism, and optics.
Hands-on and computer-based laboratory work is done. Students read from Hewitt’s text Conceptual Physics, and
are evaluated through homework, quizzes, tests (including short essays), and laboratory reports.

(416) PRACTICAL PHYSICAL SCIENCE Semester or full year course – 2 credits per semester
Open to 11-12 Two semesters, covering different material, are offered.

This course approaches science thematically, relating physics and physical science to everyday experiences.
Students who prefer hands-on learning to lecture-based learning will find the material more accessible. Students
will complete daily activities that provide them with the knowledge and skills to complete an end-of-unit project.
Students learn about such topics as electricity, energy transfer, magnetism, waves, light, and the physics of motion.
Maintaining an organized notebook of all classwork is required. Students are evaluated through homework,
quizzes, projects, notebooks, and science portfolios. Students may take the course for one or both semesters.

(418) ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 11-12
Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher and completion, with grade B or better, of BIOLOGY and
CHEMISTRY at level 1 or higher.
Although PHYSICS is not a prerequisite, if space in the class is limited, priority will be given to those students
who have taken or are concurrently taking a Physics course.

AP Biology is designed to be the equivalent of a college level introductory biology course. The text is the same
as that used by college biology majors and labs are equivalent to those done by college students. The main goals of
the class are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and to help them gain an
appreciation of science as a process. The topics covered are, Molecules and Cells (25%), Heredity and Evolution
(25%), and Organisms and Populations (50%). Students are encouraged, but not required, to take the AP Exam in
April.

(420) ADVANCED CHEMISTRY (1) Full year course - 4 credits


Open to: 11-12
Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher and completion of CHEMISTRY 1 with a grade of B, and
PHYSICS taken concurrently. Instructor approval necessary if grade requirement not met.

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Advanced Chemistry is a 2nd year course in chemistry that addresses more advanced topics in chemistry. The
intent of this course is to offer the student a college level course in terms of both depth of material covered as well
as the level of responsibility expected. A college chemistry textbook is used and requires a high level of problem
solving skills. The course will include a significant amount of laboratory work and projects. Topics covered
include stoichiometry, quantum mechanics, molecular geometry, colligative properties, kinetics, solution
equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, coordination compounds, and organic chemistry.
Students that are successful in this course will be prepared to take the AP Chemistry exam.

(422) ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS Full year course - 4 credits


Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher and full year Calculus taken concurrently with this
course or permission of department coordinator.

This course is designed to be the equivalent of a calculus-based first semester college physics course. The text
is the same as that used at several local universities. The course is a rigorous introduction to mechanics, including
Newton’s laws, conservation principles and rotational dynamics. Additional topics will be covered in the spring as
time allows. Considerable instructional time is devoted to building problem solving skills, and frequent problem
sets are assigned. Students will be required to do some laboratory work, and will be graded on tests, laboratory
write-ups, and homework.

(424) AQUATIC BIOLOGY Semester course - 2 credits


Open to: 10-12
Prerequisite: One year of biology or the approval of the Science Department Coordinator
AQUATIC BIOLOGY examines the organisms found in fresh and salt water ecosystems, with particular
emphasis placed upon fish and marine mammals. Projects are a major part of the course, the most important of
these being the design, upkeep and study of the workings of a freshwater aquarium. AQUATIC BIOLOGY is
offered to the general science student wanting to take a science elective beyond the two year requirement for
graduation.

(426) ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Semester course – 2 credits


Open to: 11-12
Prerequisite: Two years of science or the approval of the Science Department Coordinator
Environmental Science explores the science behind current environmental issues and concerns and offers
students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the complex interactions between humans and the
environment. Activities include lectures, labs, discussions, student research and presentations, field trips, and/or
guest speakers. Topics covered are, in part, determined by current local and global issues and by the interests of
students enrolled in the course. Recent topics have included: world population growth, water resource
management, water pollution, global climate change, air pollution issues, resource depletion, alternative energy
sources, and habitat loss and biodiversity.

(428) ASTRONOMY Semester course - 2 credits


Open to: 10-12
This course is offered to all students interested in exploring humankind’s current knowledge of the universe.
Topics will range from local phenomena such as seasons, eclipses, and tides, to the most grand and mysterious
objects known to us, including black holes and supernovae. In addition to the usual classroom activities and
nightly assignments, students will explore astronomy through computer simulations, small research projects and
papers. Regular observing nights (optional) with state-of-the-art telescopes are planned for those who want to
explore the night sky firsthand. Astronomy is offered to the student wanting a non-mathematical yet intellectually
challenging science course.

(433) DOING ASTRONOMY Semester course - 2 credits


Open to 10-12
Prerequisite: Completion of Earth Science and Astronomy, or permission of instructor.
Did you know that LS has four telescopes and a heliostat? Did you know that there are countless
opportunities for high school students to participate in professional astronomical research? This course will
explore the latest advances in our understanding of stars, galaxies, and the universe through discussions, readings,
guest speakers, and software explorations of real data from ground- and space-based telescopes. It will culminate
with students DOING ASTRONOMY—an extended research project of the student’s choosing. Possible projects
could include contributions to professional investigations; long-term observations of an astronomical object; in-
depth presentations; and web sites, power-point presentations, or other educational tools that could be used to
teach future courses. Students wanting the opportunity to explore fully and independently astronomy topics of
their choosing will be successful in this course.

(430) BUILDING NEW ENGLAND Semester course - 2 credits


Open to: 10-12
Prerequisite: 1 year of Earth Science or approval of Science Department Coordinator
“Building New England” will investigate the processes that created the New England landscape and then
relate those features to settlement of the area by human beings. The course will focus on aspects of Earth Science
not emphasized in the introductory course taken by freshmen such as glaciers, historical geology, and topographic
maps to develop an understanding of the evolution of New England. This understanding of the physical
characteristics will be applied to investigating the influence of the landscape on human settlement and land use

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(for example: why was Sudbury one of the first inland settlements, why was Maynard a textile powerhouse but
Sudbury mainly farmland, why did Quincy supply so much granite for the building of Boston, etc.). Time
permitting the course will also examine how the landscape is continuing to evolve through natural and man-made
processes. The class will include hands-on investigations. One day-long field trip to do on-site geologic
investigations will be included.

(436) INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCE Semester course - 2 credits


PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of one year of biological science.
This is a lab-based course that introduces the student to techniques used in crime scene investigations. These
techniques will involve the integration and understanding of different aspects of biology, chemistry, anthropology,
physics and law. The focus of this course will be on crime scene processing and evidence analysis. Topics include
analysis of materials such as DNA, hair, bone, organic tissue, fibers, paint, latent fingerprints and unknown
compounds using microscopy, spectroscopy, chromatography, gel electrophoresis, and other techniques.

(432) STUDY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES- IS IT CATCHING? Semester course - 2 credits


Open to: 11-12
Prerequisite: Recommendation of current science teacher and completion of BIOLOGY
In IS IT CATCHING? students will learn about immunology, epidemiology and biotechnology by studying
diseases which are infectious. Issues which will be considered include: Why are some diseases “catching” and
others aren’t? Why do some diseases affect lots of people quickly (epidemics) and others do not? How does my
body fight off invaders? Why do third world countries experience more diseases than developed countries? Study
of epidemics (epidemiology) will be studied by investigating specific cases such as AIDS and influenza.
Treatments for infectious diseases will be studied and the role of biotechnology companies in using genetic
engineering to create new treatments and drugs will be discussed. The class will involve current lab techniques,
reading of current literature and research projects.

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WELLNESS
The Wellness program is designed to provide students with a comprehensive health/fitness education through
both required and elective course offerings. Each course reflects a commitment to help students seek a balance
between the expression of individuality, a responsible concern for the needs of others, and the opportunity to
examine and monitor personal wellness toward the pursuit of a healthy lifestyle. Students are scheduled into
Wellness by class period; however, official enrollment in Wellness courses occurs during an “arena” scheduling
process at the beginning of each semester.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENT: 12 credits to be distributed as follows:
4 credits in ninth grade year
1 credit in Intro to Wellness
1 credit in Muscular Fitness
2 credits from the elective choices
4 credits in the sophomore year
1 credit in Outdoor Pursuits
1 credit in Basic CPR/First Aid
2 credits from the elective choices
4 credits in the junior year
1 credit in Health Issues
1 credit in Cardiovascular Fitness
2 credits from the elective choices
Students may earn the six elective credits by choosing any of the following courses: Badminton, Conflict
Resolution, Cross Training, Fencing, Fitness Games, Game Dynamics, Golf, Group Exercise, High Adventure,
Nutrition, Personal Fitness, Rock Climbing, Self-Defense, So You Think You Can Dance, Tennis, Territorial Games,
Volleyball, or Yoga. All required courses should be completed by the end of the Junior year.
GRADING:
A - Surpasses course requirements
P - Pass - Meets course requirements
F - Fail - No credit given - course requirements not met
INC. - Incomplete; to be made up during the next quarter
MED - Excused for medical reasons; credit requirement waived

**Required Courses - Medical excuses do not waive required courses.


Students must attend 80% of the classes or make up the credit.

HEALTH FITNESS ASSESSMENT PROGRAM - This program has been designed to:
a) Emphasize the importance of the health-related components of fitness.
b) Identify students whose test scores fall below satisfactory levels and recommend programs to
help them improve
c) Motivate students to maintain good health fitness levels.
d) Allow students to monitor their fitness levels over a three year period.

Once a year each student is required to be tested in the following areas:


a) Muscular strength
b) Muscular endurance
c) Flexibility
d) Cardiovascular

LOCKERS: Students will be assigned a locker for their personal use. Students are responsible for all personal items
and are strongly encouraged to secure valuables or bring them to class.

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WELLNESS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

GROUP EXERCISE 1 credit


This course will focus on cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength and endurance by offering challenging
aerobic workouts. A variety of classes are offered including circuit training, group activities/games, step aerobics,
abdominal strengthening, and stretching/relaxation.

BADMINTON 1 credit
This course will teach students the games of singles and doubles. Skill emphasis will be placed on the offensive
and defensive overhead clears, the smash, the drive, the drop shot and two types of serves. Various strategies will
be taught for both singles and doubles. Intra-class tournaments will be held during the last few weeks of the class.

CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) 1 credit


This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary in an emergency to help keep someone
alive, to reduce pain, and to minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until professional medical help
arrives. Successful completion of the course will result in a Red Cross Certification Card. (Required for
graduation)

CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS 1 credit


This course provides the fundamental principles needed to reduce the risk of heart disease. Students will learn
basic anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system. Using individualized heart rate monitors, students
will also assess their progress and learn how to make proper adjustments to their personal workouts. An
introduction to the proper use of the cardiovascular equipment in the Fitness Center will help students become
educated health/fitness consumers. (Required for graduation)

CONFLICT RESOLUTION AND MEDIATION 1 credit


This course gives students the opportunity to learn how to resolve their differences peacefully and develop
effective ways of working and communicating together. It recognizes that conflict is a normal and natural part of
everyone’s life and effective conflict resolution skills are essential to success. Students will learn how to solve
problems constructively and creatively in ways that can be integrated into their everyday experience. Students
will be trained in the Lincoln-Sudbury peer mediation model through role plays, videos and demonstrations. As
part of this training, issues on bias and diversity will also be addressed. This course is a prerequisite to becoming a
Lincoln-Sudbury peer mediator.

CROSS TRAINING 1 credit


This course will provide students with a safe, effective and challenging workout along with basic knowledge to
develop a personal cross training routine. Special emphasis will be spent addressing the importance of functional
training. Functional training concepts will focus on increasing balance, reaction time, acceleration, agility and
deceleration. Instruction will include the effective use of hand weights, resistance bands, medicine balls, stability
balls, and other progressive resistance modes to attain or enhance one’s levels of muscle fitness.

FENCING 1 credit
This course provides instruction and practice in the fundamentals of foil fencing. Emphasis is placed on basic arm
and footwork of the ready and guard positions, advance and retreat, extend, lunge and recovery movements.
Fencers will learn offensive and defensive strategies using simple and compound attacks, parries and ripostes.
Intra-class tournaments will be held during the final classes.

GOLF 1 credit
GOLF is designed for beginning students with an emphasis on the development of a proper golf swing and the
fundamental uses of the various clubs. Instruction will be given for the middle irons and the putter.

HEALTH ISSUES 1 credit


This class is designed to foster mature decision making as it covers current information available on pertinent
health issues facing young adults in today’s society. Topics covered are stress, substance use and abuse, human
sexuality, relationships, violence, and understanding loss. (Required for graduation)

INTRODUCTION TO MUSCULAR FITNESS 1 credit


This course is designed to introduce students to the benefits, methods and safety precautions relative to
musculoskeletal growth and development. Basic anatomy and physiology of muscles and their response to
training will be covered. Students will learn to assess, achieve, and maintain an appropriate level of muscular
fitness. Using properly applied progressive resistance training students will learn the correct form and technique
when training with selectorized machines and free weights. (Certification for use of the LS Fitness Center is also
offered in this course.) (Required for graduation)

INTRODUCTION TO WELLNESS 1 credit


The intent of this course is to give students a basic understanding of wellness concepts, to assess personal life-
styles, understand human needs, and develop goals for growth. Students will learn the importance of self
acceptance and self responsibility in the wellness process as well as understanding the risk-taking and
compulsive/addictive life patterns. The course will show the impact each component (intellectual, physical,
environmental, social/emotional/leisure, spiritual) has on the others, emphasizing the need for balance. Using

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self-evaluation and cooperative group work, students will practice skills in goal setting and behavior change.
(Required for graduation)

PERSONAL FITNESS 1 credit


This course builds on the Intro to Muscular Fitness course content. Continued emphasis will be placed on properly
applied progressive resistance exercise using selectorized machines and free weights. Students will also become
familiar with more advanced methods of strength and cardiovascular conditioning exercises. Each student will
design his or her own personal fitness program appropriate to their individual goals and needs. Students will self
assess their levels of physical fitness and work to improve those levels each day in class.

NUTRITION 1 credit
This course will introduce students to the essential components of a healthful diet. Topics to be addressed will
include basic anatomy and physiology of the digestive system, essential nutrients, nutrition for active individuals,
eating choices, food culture and consumer skills. Students will participate in cooking labs and experience food
culture through various field trips.

OUTDOOR PURSUITS 1 credit


This course is required for all sophomores. It encourages students to work together in a cooperative manner in
order to accomplish a common goal. It is designed to increase self-confidence, develop communication skills,
increase mutual support for each other, gain better appreciation for individual differences, learn to trust oneself
and others and learn how to better cooperate in a group. (Required for graduation)

ROCK-CLIMBING 1 credit
This course presents an introduction to basic rock-climbing. Students become familiar with the equipment and
safety system through activities on the indoor climbing walls and the high ropes course. Students will learn the
basics of belaying, rappelling, various knots and climbing calls. They will then have an opportunity to experience
techniques on the rock climbing field trip.

HIGH ADVENTURE 1 credit


A group adventure experience, this course is designed for students who would like to challenge themselves in the
adventure realm without the technical and movement components of rock climbing. Students will have an
opportunity to explore social and physical risk taking while using high and selected low elements as metaphors for
risks that students take in their own lives.

SELF-DEFENSE (females only) 1 credit


Students will learn the basic strategies of street safety. Non-physical strategies of personal safety such as
assertiveness skills, the use of voice, and safety awareness strategies will be taught. The physical skills will focus on
techniques that are most effective when a male assailant attacks a woman. Students will learn to use the strength
in their lower body to counter an engulfing attack. Students will then be presented with real-life situations in
which they will practice their non-physical strategies as well as physical skills, full-force, on a “male mugger”.
Related topics to be discussed in class will be physical and emotional abuse, sexual harassment, and date rape.

SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE? 1 credit


This course will explore several different dance genres (hip hop, step, Irish Step, square-folk-social, improvisation).
Students will be encouraged to step outside their comfort zones socially, emotionally, physically, and culturally.

FITNESS GAMES 1 credit


This course provides students with an opportunity to experience a cardiovascular workout through game play.
Basic team strategies and skills will be covered in low to high organizational games. Heart rate monitor
technology will be utilized to provide feedback to students about their workout intensity and the resulting
physiological effects. In a continued effort to encourage students to pursue an active lifestyle, this course
encourages each participant to be creative in the design of their health/fitness workouts as well as experience the
benefits of “play” in their recreational and leisure pursuits.

GAME DYNAMICS 1 credit


This course, a progression from the Fitness Games course, will provide students with new game experiences as
well as enhance students understanding of game concepts. Students will recognize strategies which are common
among four categories of games: target, striking, net/wall, territorial. The focus of this course includes game roles,
game creation, international games, modifying games for groups of various ages and abilities, and teaching games
to others. This course is to be enjoyed by anyone who likes to play and discuss games and will assist students who
will be working at camps/playgrounds or coaching.

TERRITORIAL GAMES 1 credit


This course provides students with an opportunity to incorporate physical activity and leisure experience into their
lifestyle through game play and practice. Focus units include flag football, rugby, ultimate frisbee and basketball.
Skills and common concepts of each territorial game will be presented and developed through practice and game
play. Students of all skill and experience levels are encouraged to enroll in this course provided that they are
willing to take a social risk as they participate in this fun-filled wellness course.

SPORT PSYCHOLOGY 1 credit

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This course will examine the impact of sports, games, and play on society and the individual. In a culture that
values athleticism at all levels, we need a deeper understanding of myths, traps, and influences that sports can
create. A focus on the positive and negative consequences of being a participant, spectator, coach, and bystander
in the world of sport will be examined.

VOLLEYBALL 1 credit
People of all levels of experience are encouraged to enjoy this leisure/recreational activity. This course will
acquaint students with the fundamentals of volleyball. Setting, bumping, serving, spiking and basic team
strategies will be taught. Students will be proficient in the rules of the game. Tournaments will be held at the end
of the quarter.

TENNIS 1 credit
This course is designed to acquaint students with the proper techniques for the forehand, backhand, serve, and
volley. Game rules and basic strategy for singles and doubles will be covered.

YOGA 1 credit
This course will cover the basic knowledge, attitudes and concentration necessary to benefit from yoga exercises.
Flexibility, balance and body alignment will be part of each exercise session. Students will practice the skills of
proper breathing/relaxation techniques as a form of stress management.

WELLNESS DEPARTMENT ALTERNATE ACTIVITY POLICY


Alternate Activity will be available to Sophomores and Juniors only. In order to be eligible for Alternate Activity,
students will be required to attain minimum standards in the Health/Fitness assessment. These tests are given
every year during the second semester. Students whose test scores fall below satisfactory level will be able to
repeat the tests any time up until exam week in June.

ALTERNATE ACTIVITY FOR MEMBERS OF ATHLETIC TEAMS


Students who participate on athletic teams may receive one credit for one season of a fall, winter, or spring sport.
A maximum of two credits may be earned in one year for two seasons of participation. See procedures below.

ALTERNATE ACTIVITY FOR OUT-OF SCHOOL INSTRUCTION


Students may receive one alternate credit for 30 hours of pre-approved out-of-school physical instruction activity.
A maximum of two alternate activity credits may be earned in one year.

Participation on an athletic team or instruction in an out-of-school physical instruction activity must occur during
the quarter in which the student would normally be enrolled in a wellness class.

Fall sport 1st quarter alternate activity only


Winter sport 2nd or 3rd quarter alternate activity only
Spring sport 4th quarter alternate activity only

The limit is two credits in sophomore year and two credits in junior year for a maximum of four credits.

THERE WILL BE NO RETROACTIVE CREDIT FOR ALTERNATE ACTIVITIES GIVEN, NOR CAN A STUDENT
“BANK” CREDIT FOR FUTURE USE.

THE REQUEST FOR ALTERNATE ACTIVITY IS NOT A GUARANTEE THAT IT WILL BE GRANTED. IF YOU
ARE SCHEDULED FOR A REQUIRED COURSE IN THE QUARTER IN WHICH YOU APPLIED FOR
ALTERNATE ACTIVITY, THE REQUIRED COURSE TAKES PRECEDENCE.

PROCEDURE FOR AWARDING CREDIT FOR ALTERNATE ACTIVITIES:


During spring scheduling, students must complete the Alternate Activity section under Additional Information on
their Course Selection Sheet, and indicate the sport or out-of-school physical activity s/he plans to do in the
following year.

The Health/Fitness level eligibility of the applicants will be determined by the Wellness Department.
At the end of each season, the Athletic Director’s Office will verify completion of participation on the team and
credit will be awarded.

For out-of-school physical activity, students must submit an application prior to the beginning of the activity, to
the Wellness Department Coordinator indicating the instructional activity and other pertinent information. If the
application is approved, a faculty member will be assigned to monitor the student’s progress. At the end of the
out-of-school physical activity students must submit verification of the completion of the instruction and credit
will be awarded.

Students who do not fulfill the above criteria will receive a NC (no credit) on their report card and transcript..

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SPECIAL PROGRAMS
L-S CENTRAL PROGRAM
CENTRAL is an in-house alternative high school program for students who have had difficulty in finding success
despite good academic ability. The program is a structured combination of academic classes and on-going
personal support and monitoring. Central students may have from one to five classes taught within the CENTRAL
program. (See below for Central course descriptions.) In addition, students participate in mainstream classes,
sports, extra-curricular activities and school events. Teachers from CENTRAL also support and/or teach classes
other than Central classes. Students are referred to the CENTRAL program by housemasters, counselors, or the
Director of Student Services. Students do not need an IEP to be referred to CENTRAL.

Students entering CENTRAL make a commitment to work toward improving the direction of their school
experience. They agree to accept close supervision and follow-up along with specific academic and behavioral
expectations set forth in the CENTRAL regulations.

CENTRAL CLASSES
(Every course is not offered every year.)
ENGLISH
(096) WRITING Full year course - 4 credits

(097) LITERATURE & WRITTEN EXPRESSION Full year course - 4 credits

(098) 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE Full year course - 4 credits

(095) WOMEN’S LITERATURE Full year course - 4 credits


This class is reserved for young women. Through reading various literature, we study and analyze social issues
that effect the lives of young women in today’s society. In this course female novelists, poets and important
women in society are read. Societal issues that are discussed include, but are not limited to, feminism, abusive
relationships, drug use, pregnancy, and sexuality. Often, discussion will follow the interests and needs of the
young women in the class. This class will regularly visit an elementary school to read and share with third
graders. Requirements include presentations, research projects and class participation.

HISTORY
(157) LAW Full year course - 4 credits
This course studies how the law works and sometimes doesn’t work. Through analysis of cases, mock trials, and
field visits to court and prison, students examine the system of law upon which American society is based. Topics
include the court system, search and seizure laws, prison, death penalty, serial killers and juvenile justice.
Requirements include research projects, presentations and active class participation.

(158) HISTORY OF RACISM/US Full year course- 4 credits

(159) CURRENT WORLD ISSUES Full year course- 4 credits

(160) TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY Full year course - 4 credits


This course studies the motivation behind human behavior. First semester we cover fundamentals of psychology,
perception, waking consciousness and cognitive development. Second semester we study human development
from pregnancy through adolescence, stress and end with the study of abnormal psychology. Requirements
include research projects, presentations and active class participation.

ENGLISH/HISTORY
(818) INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES Full year course - 4 credits
Interdisciplinary Studies explores current issues and high interest topics from an academic perspective. Classes
emphasize experimental and problem solving approaches. One component of the class will be to participate in
community service projects. The class will regularly visit an elementary school and a facility for the aging.

GENERAL
(815) STUDY SKILLS Full year course - 4 credits

(816) VALUES CLARIFICATION Full year course - 4 credits

(819) INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY Full year course - 4 credits

63
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
For students who speak English as a second language, L-S may provide English language support in a variety
of forms, depending on their level of English language mastery. English language courses are offered for students
who require a significant level of instruction. In addition, students who no longer need formal ESL instruction
continue to be monitored for progress and to receive additional services as necessary.

COURSES

(805) ESL 1 Credit Varies

Students with limited English will receive basic instruction in reading, writing, listening and speaking.

(805) ESL 2 Credit Varies

Students with some English ability will continue to work on reading, writing, listening and speaking as they
learn the vocabulary and skills they need to prepare for the MCAS exam.

(805) ESL 3 Credit Varies

Intermediate students will work on developing an understanding of academic language, English grammar,
main idea, comparison, author’s intent, and creating and supporting an academic argument.

(805) ESL 4 Credit Varies

Students who are transitioning out of the ESL program will analyze, research, discuss, and write/edit in a small
group setting.

64
METCO PROGRAM
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School participates in the Metropolitan Council For Educational Opportunity
(METCO), a voluntary school integration program. Through the METCO program, students from various racial
and ethnic backgrounds who live in the city of Boston, attend Lincoln-Sudbury. Because the Lincoln and Sudbury
school systems also support the METCO program, many Lincoln-Sudbury RHS METCO students have also
attended the Lincoln or Sudbury elementary schools.

(806) METCO CULTURAL IDENTITY GROUP SEMINAR Full year course - 4 credits

This course is designed to introduce METCO ninth grade students to many of the “isms” that pervade our society
today: sexism, classism, anti-semitism, with a deep exploration of racism. The issues of race and racism are
consistent themes in all of our lives and have a profound impact on student development. Young people, although
directly affected, are rarely given an opportunity to discuss such matters openly with others, particularly as it
affects individual achievement and esteem.

The Cultural Identity Group Seminar (CIGS) will provide Boston based students with an opportunity to study
pervading worldly “isms” and to explore issues of race and racial, personal, and cultural identity in a “safe” and
constructive environment. This class meets for the full year (two semesters) during all regularly scheduled block
meeting times. All METCO ninth grade students are expected to take this course during their freshman year and
are automatically scheduled for the METCO Cultural Identity Group Seminar (CIGS) as part of their regular
schedule.

(803) INDEPENDENT ACADEMIC STUDY Full year course - variable credits

All METCO ninth grade students and some tenth, eleventh, and first semester twelfth grade METCO students are
assigned to Independent Academic Study (IAS). This class provides academic support and structure in all subject
areas. IAS meets during open class meeting blocks. Some students choose to take Independent Academic Study as
an elective to help support their academic needs and workload.

AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM

In addition to the courses and services provided to METCO students during the regular school day, the
METCO program offers an After School Program, during part of the school year, to provide additional academic
support and structure for students after regular school hours. Students who receive a C- or below in two or more
major subjects are assigned to attend the After School Program (ASP). This program meets on Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 3 to 5pm at the end of quarters one, two, and three following the distribution of report cards.

The After School Program is designed to benefit students and most students, when assigned to “ASP,”
participate actively in order to improve their achievement in classes. The few students who are unwilling
participants need to know that an unexcused absence from an assigned After School Program is similar to an
unexcused absence from a class. Consequences for missing “ASP” are progressive in nature and include:

one unexcused absence- 2 hour detention/parent or guardian notification


second unexcused absence- 4 hours detention/parent or guardian notification
third unexcused absence- Parent/Guardian meeting and suspension

65
SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES

If a student has a suspected disability that interferes with the ability to make effective progress in school,
and various classroom interventions and modifications have not been successful, an evaluation for special
education services may be in order. Under federal and state law, students are entitled to a free, appropriate, public
education, or FAPE, in the least restrictive educational environment. Students are eligible for special education
services if all three of the following are true:

1. The student has one or more disabilities


2. The student is not making effective progress in school as a result of the disability, and
3. The student requires specialized instruction or a related service in order to make effective progress

It is important to realize that special education is not designed solely as a support service for any student
who is struggling in school. Special education services are designed for students who have disabilities that affect
their ability to make progress in education and require such services in order to make progress in the general
curriculum. These services may include specially designed instruction or related services necessary for access to
the general curriculum.

Parents or other adults working with a student may make a referral for an evaluation. Such referrals can
be made at any time. Parents should make a referral whenever they have a concern about their child’s school
performance and believe that it may be associated with a disability. The first step is to contact the student’s
guidance counselor and present the specific concerns. Often it may be an issue of course or level placement that
can be adjusted from the House office. If a disability is suspected, the student’s Guidance Counselor will set up a
meeting with the Lincoln-Sudbury Student Support Team. This team makes recommendations regarding possible
strategies or interventions to address the concerns and/or recommends an evaluation to further explore the
suspected disability. An evaluation of the referred student is carried out by a team consisting of the student’s
teachers, Housemaster, Counselor, a Learning Specialist, and when appropriate, the School Psychologist and the
Speech and Language Pathologist. An evaluation includes information-gathering steps and, if necessary, formal
assessments in the area of suspected disability. If a student is found eligible for special education, the Team
prepares an Individualized Educational Plan, or IEP, for the student and services commence upon receipt of signed
permission by the parent/guardian.

A variety of programs are available to students who have an IEP. Teachers in the Learning Center, for
example, present learning strategies in areas such as study skills, reading, writing, and mathematics by using the
student’s class assignments or other learning materials that are applicable to the individual student’s goals.
Students receive one to two credits per semester depending on the amount of time scheduled for a particular
program.

DISCIPLINE OF STUDENTS WITH IEPS AND 504 PLANS

All students are expected to abide by the same rules as non-disabled students. There are different procedures
for the discipline of students on IEPs and 504 plans under the federal IDEA and Massachusetts law.
Parents/guardians will be provided with copies of these procedures. A copy of these laws is also available in the
Student Services Office. Additional provisions may be made for students who have been found by an evaluation
TEAM to have special needs and whose program is described in an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP). Any
modifications will be described in the student’s IEP.

If a special needs student is suspended, the Housemaster will notify the Student Services Office if that
suspension may exceed 10 days for a single offense or for several similar offenses. The student’s TEAM will
reconvene to determine whether the student’s misconduct was a direct manifestation of his/her disability. If
such a causal relationship is determined to exist, appropriate modifications to the student’s program will be
made. A copy of disability law requirements regarding discipline is available in the Student Services Office.

66
ATHLETIC PROGRAM AND STUDENT ACTIVITIES

The primary purpose of the Interscholastic Athletic and Extra-curricular


Activities program at Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School is to promote the physical, mental, social, and
emotional well-being of the participants. Therefore, it seems self-evident that athletics and activities are an
integral and fundamental part of education. We encourage all students, regardless of skill level and individual
differences, to participate in extra-curricular activities.
Extra-curricular activities other than athletics will begin when school opens in September. An Activity
Orientation will be held at the beginning of the year to acquaint new students with the variety of activities
available at Lincoln-Sudbury. Clubs and activities usually meet after school, or during Activity Block.

ATHLETIC TRY-OUTS: First formal try-out date for most Fall sports will be Monday, August 27, 2007; for Winter
sports, Monday, November 26; and for Spring sports, Monday, March 17, 2008.

PHYSICAL EXAMINATION POLICY: Any student wishing to participate in the Lincoln-Sudbury athletic
program must have a physical exam certificate dated within 13 months of the scheduled ending date of the sport
season. This certificate must be on file with the school nurse prior to the above try-out dates. Students who are
medically excused from wellness classes may not participate in the athletic program for the duration of the excuse.

NO CANDIDATE MAY PARTICIPATE WITHOUT THE PROPER PHYSICAL


EXAMINATION CERTIFICATE ON FILE.

ATHLETIC USER FEE: A $165 fee per sport (amount subject to change) must be paid before a student can be a
member of a team. The fee must be paid in the Athletic Office. Checks should be made out to LSRHS. Scholarship
assistance is available.

ACADEMIC ELIGIBILITY: Any student who is planning to participate on an athletic team MUST be enrolled in a
minimum of 4 major subjects or the equivalent. A student must also have secured a passing grade in at least 4
major subjects, or equivalent, during the marking period preceding the athletic contest.

TEAM STRUCTURE: The head coach of the varsity team is responsible for the entire program; i.e., the head coach
of varsity football organizes the try-out schedule for the junior varsity and ninth grade program. This is true of all
sports.

VACATION POLICY: All LSRHS athletes who have contests scheduled over school vacations will be expected to
attend all scheduled practices and contests during that week. Those students who do make a team, and then
choose to go away during the vacation will have to adhere to the following policies:
• Varsity students-athletes who are absent during the entire vacation week will not compete in any contests
during the week that follows. However, they will be expected to practice and attend all contests. This policy
will be more flexible with sub-varsity student-athletes.
• Varsity student-athletes who are absent for part of a vacation will not compete in contests for part of the
following week. This will be determined by the coach.
• In general, students who choose to go away, and miss part of their season, will lose playing privileges to
students who are at practices and games throughout the vacation.

APRIL VACATION POLICY: The Dual County League policy regarding April vacation allows students flexibility.
During this time, no contests are scheduled, and practices are optional. The specific dates for this flexible time
period are established sometime in the Fall. Although practices are optional during this time, they will be
conducted. Students who are best prepared will, therefore, receive more playing time during the games that
follow this time period. Please note that there are no 9th grade teams with obligations during the vacation.
However, if a 9th grader makes a junior varsity or varsity team, there will be vacation obligations.

PROCESS FOR CONCERNS: See page 70

SIGN-UP FOR FALL SPORTS: Sign-up sheets at both Curtis & Brooks will be available to incoming ninth
graders. Most coaches will also send information during the summer to prospective team members. Please feel
free to contact the appropriate coach listed below for any concerns you may have.

FALL SEASON HEAD COACHES (Varsity):

Varsity Football Tom Lopez (978) 443-3917


Varsity Field Hockey Vicky Caburian (978)897-5056
Varsity Boys Soccer David Hosford (978) 318-0475
Varsity Girls Soccer Alicia Carrillo (978) 443-0005
Varsity Cross Country Pat McMahon (978) 897-5055
Varsity Volleyball Judy Katalina (508) 877-0310
Varsity Golf Ken DiMaggio (978) 440-9135
Varsity Girls Cross Country Chris Tarello (609) 304-1678

67
DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS/STUDENT ACTIVITIES: For any additional information, parents or students may
call the Athletic Director, Nancy O'Neil, at the school: (978) 443-9961, Ext. 3100.

FALL SPORTS
Begin Monday, August 27, 2007

Varsity Football - Boys Varsity Soccer - Boys


J. V. Football - Boys J. V. Soccer - Boys
9th Football - Boys 9th Soccer - Boys
Varsity Field Hockey - Girls Varsity Soccer - Girls
J. V. Field Hockey - Girls J.V. Soccer - Girls
9th Field Hockey - Girls 9th Soccer - Girls
Football Cheerleading Cross Country - Girls
Varsity Volleyball - Girls Cross Country - Boys
J.V. Volleyball - Girls Golf - Coed Varsity
9th Volleyball - Girls

WINTER SPORTS
Begin Monday, November 26, 2007

Varsity Basketball - Boys Winter Track - Boys


J. V. Basketball - Boys Winter Track - Girls
9th Basketball - Boys Varsity Wrestling - Boys
Varsity Basketball - Girls Varsity Ice Hockey - Boys
J. V. Basketball - Girls J.V. Ice Hockey - Boys
9th Basketball - Girls Varsity Ice Hockey - Girls
Basketball Cheerleading Swimming - Boys
Nordic Ski (x-c) - Boys & Girls teams Swimming - Girls
Alpine Ski (downhill) - Boys & Girls teams Varsity Gymnastics - Boys
Varsity Gymnastics - Girls

SPRING SPORTS
Begins Monday, March 17, 2008

Varsity Lacrosse - Boys Varsity Softball - Girls


J. V. Lacrosse - Boys J.V. Softball - Girls
9th Lacrosse - Boys 9th Softball - Girls
Varsity Lacrosse - Girls Spring Track - Boys
J. V. Lacrosse - Girls Spring Track - Girls
9th Lacrosse - Girls Varsity Tennis - Boys
Varsity Baseball - Boys J.V. Tennis - Boys
J. V. Baseball - Boys Varsity Tennis - Girls
9th Baseball - Boys J.V. Tennis - Girls
Sailing - Coed Varsity Volleyball - Boys
J.V. Volleyball - Boys

INTRAMURALS
Depending upon funding and student interest, various intramural programs may be offered throughout the
year. Those listed below have been recently offered.
FALL Winter SPRING
Sailing Fencing Volleyball
Basketball Snowboarding Basketball
Tennis Frisbee
Cycling Cycling
Rugby

Full Year Programs: Seven A.M. Club (before school fitness center), Fitness Center (afternoon fitness center)

No person shall be excluded from or discriminated against in admission to the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional
School District, for admittance to state and federally funded grant programs, or in obtaining the advantages,
privileges, and courses of study presented in this school, on account of race, color, gender, disability, sexual
orientation, religion, or national origin. This non-discrimination applies to all persons, whether or not the
individual is a member of a conventionally defined “minority group.”

68
STUDENT ACTIVITIES

An Activity Orientation, to introduce students to the various extra-curricular activities is planned for the
opening of school in September.

CLUBS & ACTIVITIES

Advanced Peer Helper L-S Film Society


Africa Action L-S Nutrition Council
Amnesty International Marine Life Committee
Asian Cultures Club Math Team
Astronomy Club Mens Chorus
Autocross Club METCO Fundraising
B-B-Q Club MLK Action Project
Beatles Club Model U.N.
Best Buddies Music Groups
Billiards Club Outdoor Club
Breaking Barriers Paintball Club
Chess Club Ping Pong Club
Colors Prodigy
Compassion Into Action Recycling Club
Culinary Club Robotics
Dead Language Society Rocketry Club
Deaf Culture Club SADD
Destination Imagination Science Club
Diabetes Team Group Science Olympiad
Drama Groups South Asian Cultures
Economics Club Speech & Debate Club
Equestrian Club Step Squad
Environmental Club Stocks, Bonds, & Business
F.A.C.T. (Fighting Against Cancer Together) Strategy Game Club
Fantasy Adventures Student Senate
Games Club Students for a Free Tibet
Gay/Straight Alliance Urban Outgoers
Golf Club Womens Chorus
Gospel Choir Young Democrats Club
History Debate Club Young Investors Club
International Connections Young Republicans Club
Key Club Young Women's Leadership Club
LASA (Latin American Social Awareness Club) Youth United
L-S Dance Troupe & Many More!

ACADEMIC HONOR SOCIETY LANGUAGE CLUBS

The Cum Laude Society French Club


German Club
Japanese Club
Spanish Club

PUBLICATIONS CLASS STEERING COMMITTEES


DYAD (Yearbook)
THE FORUM (School Newspaper) Ninth Grade
FOUNTAIN (Literary Journal) Sophomores
WYAJ (Radio Station) Juniors
L-S Website Seniors

69
LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
ATHLETIC PROGRAM

PROCESS FOR CONCERNS

Athletic involvement, while fun and exciting, can be very emotional and time consuming. Because of this,
conflicts and issues between a student and his/her coach may arise. It is imperative that any conflict and/or issue
be addressed immediately, and as directly as possible, so that it can be resolved promptly. Students and parents
should use the following process as a guideline when seeking resolution to conflicts and/or issues between a coach
and an athlete.

FIRST STEP: PERSONAL STUDENT-COACH CONTACT

The conflict/issue should be presented as soon as possible to the coach by the athlete. If personal contact is
not practical, a student may ask his/her team captain to approach the coach. If contact by the captain is not
practical either, then contact may be made by the athlete's parent at an appropriate time. In order for this
conversation to be as productive as possible, times to be avoided are:

- either immediately prior to or right after a contest


- during an active practice session
- during a time when other students are present or when discussion is readily
visible to others
- when it is apparent that there is not sufficient time to allow for a complete
discussion

The best solution is to set up an appointment with the coach. A parent or student may leave a note for a coach
in the athletic office, or speak to him/her in person, or by phone.

SECOND STEP: STUDENT-ATHLETIC DIRECTOR CONTACT

If a satisfactory resolution is not reached through direct contact with the coach, the student and/or parent
should contact the athletic director. The coach should be informed that this contact is going to be made. If this
discussion does not result in a satisfactory conclusion a meeting will be scheduled involving all concerned parties
in an attempt to reach a satisfactory resolution. As this process can be time consuming, and, since athletic seasons
are relatively short, there should be no time delay in airing concerns. It is important that students and their
parents trust that any comments, concerns, or issues raised to the athletic director will be addressed. Parents and
students may also expect to hear from the athletic director regarding the outcome of their concerns. Issues
concerning coaching personnel may not be publicly communicated. While there is no guarantee that all parties
will agree with all resolutions or findings, a thorough, respectful airing of different perceptions and experiences
can lead to more productive relationships and clearer understandings in the future.

THIRD STEP: STUDENT-SUPERINTENDENT/PRINCIPAL CONTACT


If a satisfactory resolution has not yet been reached, the student or parent should contact the high school
superintendent/principal. The athletic director should be informed that this contact is going to be made.

"RETRIBUTION"

On occasion, there is a perception by members of the Lincoln-Sudbury community that voicing an opinion or
concern about a coach, or about the athletic department, carries with it the risk of "retribution" towards the athlete
either by the coach or by other staff members within the department. The athletic director and coaches are
committed to insuring that there be no "retribution" in any form, within the athletic department at Lincoln-
Sudbury Regional High School, for raising an issue or concern. (Of course, students who violate team, department
or school rules will continue to face consequences.)
Using the aforementioned process to voice a concern is strongly encouraged. If at any time, a student or
his/her parents suspect that some form of "retribution" is surfacing as a result of voicing a concern, the athletic
director should be immediately informed.

70
BLUE WHITE
Mon Tues Wed Thr Fri Mon Tues Wed Thr Fri
7:50 7:50

1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1
8:55 8:55
9:00 9:00

4 1 2 3 1 4 2 3 1 2
9:53 9:53
9:58 9:58

3 4 5 4 5 2 4 5 4 5

85
11:03 11:03
11:08 11:08
Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch

2 3 6 5 4 1 3 7 5 4
12:31 12:31
12:36 12:36

activity activity
6 7 6 7 7 6 7 6
1:41 1:21 1:41 1:21

1:46 Professional 1:46 Professional

7 5 Development 7 6 6 5 Development 6 7
2:39 2:39
Chinese simplified
林肯Sudbury 欢迎学生和家庭从许多不同的文化和背景。
我们将做每一努力提供重要通知在其它语言, 除英语之外。
口译员总是受欢迎的在会议和会议上。 语言背景是除英语之外的家庭,
并且谁需要翻译服务, 请求与学生服务办公室联系。

Portuguese
Lincoln-Sudbury-Sudbury dá boas-vindas a estudantes e a famílias de
muitos culturas e fundos diferentes. Nós faremos cada esforço fornecer
observações importantes em outras línguas, além ao inglês. Os
intérpretes são sempre bem-vindos em conferências e em reuniões. As
famílias cujo o fundo da língua é à excepção do inglês, e que necessitam
serviços de tradução, são pedidas para contatar o escritório de serviços do
estudante.

Italian
Lincoln-Sudbury accoglie favorevolmente gli allievi e le famiglie da molti
colture ed ambiti di provenienza differenti. Faremo ogni sforzo fornire gli
avvisi importanti in altre lingue, oltre che l'inglese. Gli interpretatori sono
sempre benvenuti ai congressi ed alle riunioni. Le famiglie di cui la priorità
bassa di lingua è tranne l'inglese e che hanno bisogno dei servizi di
traduzione, sono chieste di mettersi in contatto con l'ufficio dei servizi
dell'allievo.

Korean
링컨sudbury은 많은 다른 문화 및 배경에서
학생 그리고 가족을 환영한다. 우리는 다른 언어안에 중요 고지사항을
제공하는. 갖은 노력을 만들l 것이다, 영어에 더하여. 해석자는 항상
회의와 회의에 환영받다. 그의 언어 배경이 영어이외에 이는 가족, 그리고
누구 필요 번역 업무 까, 학생 서비스의 사무실을 접촉하라고
요청받는다.

Japanese
リンカーンSudbury
は多くの異なった文化および背景からの学生そして家族を歓迎する。
私達は他の言語の重要な通知を提供するための全力を作る
英語に加えて。 通訳は会議及び会合で常に歓迎されている。
言語背景が英語以外ある家族、 そしてだれ必要性の翻訳サービスか、
学生サービスのオフィスに連絡するように頼まれる。
Chinese Traditional
林肯Sudbury 歡迎學生和家庭從許多不同的文化和背景。
我們將做每一努力提供重要通知在其它語言, 除英語之外。
口譯員總是受歡迎的在會議和會議上。 語言背景是除英語之外的家庭,
並且誰需要翻譯服務, 請求與學生服務辦公室聯繫。

Lincoln-Sudbury begrüßt Kursteilnehmer und Familien von vielen


unterschiedlichen Kulturen und von Hintergründen. Wir bemühen,
wichtige Nachrichten in anderen Sprachen zur Verfügung zu stellen,
zusätzlich zu Englisch. Interpreten sind immer bei den
Konferenzen und bei den Sitzungenwillkommen. Familien deren
Sprachenhintergrund anders als Englisch ist, und wer Notwendigkeit
Übersetzungsdienste, werden gebeten, mit dem Büro der
Kursteilnehmer-Dienstleistungen in Verbindung zu treten.

Lincoln-Sudbury accueille des étudiants et des familles de


beaucoupde différents cultures et milieux. Nous ferons tout effort
de fournir les notifications importantes dansd'autres langues, en
plus de l'anglais. Les interprètes sont toujours bienvenus lors des
conférences et desréunions. Familles dont le fond de langue est
autre que l'anglais, et qui services de traduction du besoin, sont
invités à entrer en contact avec le bureau des services
d'étudiant.

Russian
Lincoln-Sudbury приветствует студентов и
семей от многопо-разному культур и
предпосылок. Мы сделаем каждое
усилие обеспечить важные извещения
в других языках, в дополнение к
английской языку. Переводчики
всегда радушны на конференциях и
встречах. Семьи предпосылка языка за
исключением английской языка, и
услуги по переводу потребности,
спросите, что контактировать офис
обслуживаний студента.

Lincoln-Sudbury da la bienvenida a estudiantes y a las familias de


muchas diversos culturas y fondos. Haremos cada esfuerzo de
proporcionar avisos importantes en otras idiomas, además de
inglés. Los intérpretes son siempre agradables en las conferencias
y lasreuniones. Familias que fondo de la lengua está con excepción
de inglés, y quién servicios de traducción de la necesidad, se piden
entrar en contacto con la oficina de los servicios del estudiante.