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African American Studies

Unit 2

Unit 2 Slavery and the New Republic


Essential Standards Competency Goal 2: 2.01; 2.02; 2.03; 2.04; and 2.05
Competency Goal 3: 3.01; 3.02; 3.03; and 3.04

HISTORY

GEOGRAPHY &
ENVIRONMENTA
L LITERACY

CIVICS AND
GOVERNMENT

ECONOMICS &
FINANCIAL
LITERACY

CULTURE

Unit Overview
In this unit, students will study the regional differences between the northern and the
southern states and why these differences caused an ideological divide. The north will call
for an end to slavery. The south will seek to preserve their way of life. We will also see
African Americans contribute to the abolitionist movement and their place in the new
republic. The country will go to war over the issue of slavery and the United States will be
formed.

Generalizations
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Slavery was social, political as well as economic.


Slavery grew out of an economic necessity.
Resistance to slavery came from all walks of life.
There are many dimensions to freedom.
Ideological differences have often been the catalyst for change in society.

Essential Questions
1. Why did slavery take such a firm hold in the southern colonies and not the
northern colonies?
2. What was the link between the call for independence and the call to end
slavery?
3. How did African Americans contribute to the abolitionist movement?
4. How did the lives of free blacks in the North differ from those of free
blacks in the South?

Unit 2

Slavery and the New Republic

African American Studies

Unit 2
5. What effect did the slave revolts in the early 1800s have on slaves in the
south?
6. Why did some militant abolitionists inspire some and shock others?
7. How did African Americans contribute to the creation of a new republic?

Unit Vocabulary
Cotton king,
Antebellum south,
Conflict over spread
of slavery,
Westward expansion,
Culture,
Citizenship,
Free blacks,
Revolutionary war,
Industrial revolution,

Unit 2

Abolitionist
movement,
Resisting slavery.
Cotton gin,
Cotton belt,
Antebellum period,
Louisiana Purchase,
Amistad Mutiny,
Underground
Railroad,
Colonization,

Slavery and the New Republic

Navigation Acts,
French and Indian
War,
Boycott,
Boston Massacre,
Antislavery societies,
Emancipation,
Three-fifths
Compromise,
Creole,
Domestic slave trade

African American Studies

Unit 2

Key People
Crispus Attucks,
Nat Turner,
Benjamin Rush,

Unit 2

Anthony Benezet,
Richard Allen,
Paul Cuffe,

Slavery and the New Republic

Phillis Weatley,
Benjamin Banneker,
Harriet Tubman

Unit 2- Goals
What do students need to KNOW?

What do students need to be able to DO?

The geographical differences between the


northern states and southern states that
influenced the ideological differences of the two
regions.

Demonstrate the geographical differences


between the northern and southern states and
how that influenced each regions view of slavery
with evidence.

The ideological differences between the northern


states and the southern states.

Explain the justifications and ramifications of


slavery in 1619, then again in 1860 and explain
the difference of its transformation over time with
evidence.

Explain the justifications and ramifications of


slavery between 1619 and 1860.
Analyze the economic, social, religious and legal
justifications for the establishment and
continuation of slavery.
Discuss and evaluate the various ways Africans in
America resisted slavery.
Analyze the role of African Americans in the
development of the United States as a new nation.
Assess the role that slavery played in the
development of sectionalism and nationalism.
Trace the development of the abolitionist
movement and its impact on slavery and the
nation.
Compare and contrast African American urban and
rural communities in the north and in the south.
Discuss and analyze the black family in the
Antebellum America.

Analyze the economic, social, religious and legal


justifications for the establishment and
continuation of slavery.
Discuss and evaluate the various ways Africans in
America resisted slavery.
Analyze the role of African Americans in the
development of the United States as a new nation.
Assess the role that slavery played in the
development of sectionalism and nationalism.
Trace the development of the abolitionist
movement and its impact on slavery and the
nation.
Compare and contrast African American urban and
rural communities in the north and in the south.
Discuss and analyze the black family in the
Antebellum America.

Trace the development of African American


institutions such as religious, education and
benevolent organizations.

Trace the development of African American


institutions such as religious, education and
benevolent organizations.

Identify the contributions of African Americans in


science and the arts.

Identify the contributions of African Americans in


science and the arts.

Explain the workings of the plantation system.


The key arguments for and against slavery.
The key players in the abolitionist movement.
The role that religion and family played in the lives
of slaves.
The economic advantages/disadvantages of
slavery.

I Can Statements

I can compare and contrast the differences between the northern states and the southern

states.
I can describe the abolitionist movement for various perspectives.
I can identify key players in the abolitionist movement.
I can discuss the role that religion and family played as African Americans sought to cope

within the institution of slavery.


I can trace the history of the abolitionist movement from its beginnings to the Emancipation

Proclamation.
I can explain the social, religious and economic justification for the continuation of slavery.
I can explain the contributions that African Americans made toward the success of the

republic.
I can discuss and explain in detail how the lives of African Americans changed/remained the
same during the antebellum period.

Unit 2- Common Core Standards


READING

WRITING

CMS CCSS Power Standards:

CMS CCSS Power Standards:

R.9-10.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support


analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to
such features as the date and origin of the information.

W. 9-10.1 Write arguments focused on disciplinespecific content.

R. 9-10.10 Read and comprehend history/social studies


texts in the grade 9-10 text complexity band
independently and proficiently.

W. 9-10.2 Write informative/explanatory texts,


including the narration of historical events,
scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical
processes.

Additional Reading Standards:

Additional Writing Standards:

R. 9-10.2. Determine the central ideas or information of


a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate
summary of how key events or ideas develop over the
course of the text.

W. 9-10.3 not applicable as a separate requirement

R. 9-10.3. Analyze in detail a series of events described


in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later
ones or simply preceded them.
R. 9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and
phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary
describing political, social, or economic aspects of
history/social studies.
R. 9-10.5. Analyze how a text uses structure to
emphasize key points or advance an explanation or
analysis.
R. 9-10.6 Compare the point of view of two or more
authors for how they treat the same or similar topics,
including which details they include and emphasize in
their respective accounts.
R. 9-10.7 Integrate quantitative or technical analysis
(e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in
print or digital text.
R. 9-10.8 Assess the extent to which the reasoning and
evidence in a text support the authors claims.
R. 9-10.9 Compare and contrast treatments of the same
topic in several primary and secondary sources.

W. 9-10.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which


the development, organization, and style are appropriate
to task, purpose, and audience.
W. 9-10.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by
planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new
approach, focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and audience.
W. 9-10.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to
produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing
products, taking advantage of technologys capacity to
link to other information and to display information
flexibly and dynamically.
W. 9-10.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained
research projects to answer a question (including a selfgenerated question) or solve a problem; narrow or
broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize
multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating
understanding of the subject under investigation.
W. 9-10.8 Gather relevant information from multiple
authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced
searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each
source in answering the research question; integrate
information into the text selectively to maintain the flow
of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard
format for citation.
W. 9-10.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to
support analysis, reflection, and research.
W. 9-10.10 Write routinely over extended time frames
(time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames
(a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of disciplinespecific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Unit 2- Assessment Options:


W1- Literacy Common Core Power Standard: Writing Arguments

W2- Literacy Common Core Power Standard: Writing Informative Texts


Use research to find out more about the hidden clues and secrets of
the Underground Railroad. Then write a brief essay in which you
explain how these kinds of secrets aided slaves who sought their
freedom. Make sure you use specific examples to support your main
ideas.

R1/R10- Literacy Common Core Power Standard: Reading Closely Over Time
with a Variety of Texts
Create a visual to illustrate the rise of Cotton King in the south and
the subsequent expansion of cotton west in the Cotton belt. Sketch a
scene or symbol that represents each event, and be sure to include a
caption and date for each event.