Você está na página 1de 148

(Reprocessed with Scan Tailor by jparra, 2012-12-11)

The Sicilian
with
1

e4 c5

...

1trb6

lbf3 lbc6

d4 cxd4 4 lbxd4 iVb6

&
1

e4 c5

lbf3 e6

d4 cxd4 4 l2Jxd4 b6

Zoran S. Ilic

B.

T.

Batsford Ltd.,

London

First published 1998


Zoran S. Ilic 1 998

ISBN 0 7 1 34 8238 9

British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data.


A catalogue record for this book is
available from the British Library.
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be
reproduced, by any means, without prior permission
of the publisher.
Edited by Tim Harding and typeset by
Chess Mail Ltd., Dublin
Printed in Great Britain by
Redwood Books, Trowbridge, Wilts
for the publishers,
B. T. Batsford Ltd.
583 Fulham Road,
London SW6 5BY

Dedication
This book is dedicated to the memory ofmy mother, Ruza !lie

A BATSFORD CHESS BOOK


General Manager: David Cummings
Advisors: Mark Dvoretsky, Raymond Keene OBE,
Daniel King, Jon Speelman, Chris Ward

Contents
Bibliography

Symbols

Introduction

Main System:
1 e4 c5 2 ttlf3 ttlc6 3 d4 cxd4 4ttlxd4 ftb6
Part One:
White Reinforces the Centre by 7 Ad3
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

General Remarks and 9 a4


Classical Line with 9 Ae3 (without g4)
Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4
White plays Ad2
White Plays .i.gs
7 ... Ab4 Variation

10
17
30

44

53
60

Part Two:
White Reinforces The Centre By 7 Ae3
7. White Plays 8 f4
8. White Plays 8 a3
9. White Castles Queenside

65
71
75

Part Three:
Early Deviations in the 2 10c6, 4 ... lrb6 Line
..

10. White's Alternatives at Move 7


11. Deviations on White's Sixth Move
12. Deviations on White's Fifth Move

90
l OO
103

Contents/Bibliography

Kveinys Variation
Part Four:
1 e4 cS 2 lOO e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 l0xd4 1tb6
13.
14.
15.
16.

Kveinys Variation: Introduction and S l0c3


White Plays S l0b3
Enhanced Kveinys Variation
Various Deviations on White's Fifth Move

108
117
124
1 30

Guide to Transpositions, ECO and NIC Codes

135

Suggested Repertoire For Black

139

Index of Variations

1 42

Bibliography
The following were the sources most frequently consulted:
Informator 1-71
New in Chess Yearbooks 1-46
Encyclopedia of Chess Openings- ECO (l", 2"d and 3n1 editions)
Beating The Sicilian by John Nunn & Joe Gallagher (3nl ed.) - BTSJ
Various Chess Databases
Various Chess Magazines:
e Inside Chess
e New in Chess
e Europe Echecs
e Chess in the USSR
e Shakhmatny Byulleten
e Shakhmaty Riga
e Jaque

Symbols
+
++
#

!!
;t
:j:

+
+-+
00

?
??
!?
?!
1-0
0-1
Yz-Yz

Ch
OL
z

IZ
Ct
Wch
Cht
Echt
Wcht
Mem.
s/f
Jr

worn
rpd
corr.
sim
(n)
(D)

Check
Double Check
Mate
Good move
Excellent move
Slight advantage to White
Slight advantage to Black
Clear advantage to White
Clear advantage to Black
Winning advantage to White
Winning advantage to Black
Unclear position
Bad move
Blunder
Interesting move
Dubious move
White wins
Black wins
Draw
Championship
Olympiad
Zonal
lnterzonal
Candidates event
World championship
Team championship
European team championship
World team championship
Memorial tournament
Semifinal
Junior event
Women's event
Rapid game
Correspondence game
Simultaneous display game
nth match game
Diagram follows

Introduction

A number of systems in the Sicil


ian Defence involve the idea whereby
Black lowers the tension in the cen
tre by playing ...'it'b6. The main ob
jective of the queen's early outing is
to decentralise White's knight from
d4 and in that way to reduce the pres
sure on the e6 square. In practice this
idea is most frequently found in the
Sozin Variation after the moves I e4
c5 2 o!Df3 o!Dc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 o!Dxd4
.!Df6 5 o!Dc3 d6 6 c4 "Wb6, and the
Scheveningen after I e4 c5 2 o!Df3 d6
3 d4 cxd4 4 o!Dxd4 o!Df6 5 o!Dc3 a6 6
f4 e6 7 "Wn "Wb6.
However, the most direct way to
apply this idea is the line in which
Black plays ...'it'b6 as early as the
4th move, after the introductory
moves 1 e4 cS 2 lOO c6 3 d4 cxd4
4 xd4 Wb6 (D). In this way he
immediately achieves his goal - the
decentralisation of the d4-knight.
Of course, this is not done with
out a price. It costs a tempo because
later in the opening Black will be
obliged to retreat the exposed queen
and make way for his b-pawn.
This system forms the central part
of the book that is in front of you,
and is the fruit of several years of

both practical experience and theo


retical research. Although this is an
opening book and not a middlegame
text, I have tried to make it accessi
ble to players of all ranks. The book
gives a lot of complete games in or
der to break the inevitable monotony
of pure theory, that is, the dry refer
ence style more or less common in
the analytical overview of this kind.
As to the history of the system. I
am not sure who is the inventor of
the whole idea. In the Seventies GM
Eduard Gufeld and many Yugoslav
players played it rather often. The
variation later drew the interest of a
few Armenian grandmasters. Among
the present-day adherents we should
single out GM Vladimir Akopian. A
lot of games from his practice pro-

Introduction 7

vide the best example of the vitality


of Black's fourth move.
The final part ofthe book deals with
a variation that, basically, has that
same idea - the decentralisation of
the d4-knight, but carried out by Black
in a less direct way: 1 e4 cS 2 f3 e6
3 d4 cxd4 4 xd4 'ffh6 (D).

this system are still in the initial phase


of research.
In the year 1988, I decided to play
a big open tournament in Saint John
(Canada). Being engaged with some
other matters at that time, I didn't
have enough time for serious theo
retical preparation and I faced the
problem of how to react to 1 e4.
I had to solve the problem within
the Sicilian Defence because my
whole repertoire up to then had been
based exclusively on the sharp
Najdorfand Scheveningen variations.
Since at that moment I was not too
familiar with the state-of-the-art
trends in those two popular systems
of the Sicilian, I looked for something
relatively unknown and less investi
gated. So, I was attracted by the
4 . .'ii'b6 system.
My first experience being positive,
I continued to play this system regu
larly. In many of my games, my op
ponents were surprised by the early
4 . . .'tWb6, with the consequence that I
always managed to achieve a time
advantage in the opening.
A few words about the organisa
tion of the whole material are re
quired. The author is not familiar with
any existing opening monograph on
this system. All encyclopaedic edi
tions are, as far as this theme is con
cerned, more or less useless, as the
Guide To Transpositions demon
strates. That Guide shows how vari
ous introductory move orders, with
their wide range of ECOIN!Ccodes,
relate to the different schemes of de.

B lack makes no commitments


with his queen's knight and leaves
open the possibility of the develop
ment ... ft:Jd7. This variation has been
played for years by the Lithuanian
GM Aloyzas Kveinys, so in the lit
erature it can be found under the name
of "The Kveinys Variation". Of
course there are numerous transposi
tional options between this and the
2 . . ft:Jc6 system if Black decides to
play . . . ft:Jc6 sooner or later. But, in
practice, in most cases he prefers the
flexible method of playing with the
development ... ft:Jd7. The idea 2... e6,
4 . . .'iVb6 did not attract the attention
of leading players for many years, but
lately it has not been infrequent even
in the top circles. Many variations of
.

8 Introduction

velopment that Black and White may


adopt in the 4 ... 'i!t'b6 systems.
The complete structure of these
systems has been given for the first
time in this book, and in the author's
opinion, is the best way to present all
the available material to the reader.
It hasn't been an easy task to sys
tematise the numerous possibilities of
transposition characteristic of this
type of Sicilian Defence. I consider
this classification of the 4 . . 'ii'b6 sys
tems one of the indisputable merits
of the book.
Wherever it was possible, I have
given a comparative survey of simi
lar positions arising either from the
Sozin or Scheveningen!Paulsen. This
particularly applies to the first part
of the book. This means that the book
offers a lot of interesting material that
has wi der relevance than to the
4 . . .'ib6 system alone.
Although this book is thematically
highly specialised, and despite its
relatively small size, it gives complete
systems for Black in the Open Sicil
ian both with 2 . lt:Jc6 and 2 . . e6.
Having both these lines in your rep
ertoire will certainly make direct
preparations more difficult for your
opponent.
Here I should like to make a short
general statement about my personal
opinion of the main 4 .. . 'il'b6 system.
Black's first objective - the decen
tralisation of the d4-knight - has
positive sides, although it does not
mean anything special. Many things
in chess theory are relative and a
.

matter of taste. Let us remember that


there are many systems in the Sicil
ian Defence that have a solid reputa
tion for White where he, even without
being forced by ... 'il'b6, returns the
knight to b3.
For a player with a general knowl
edge of the Sicilian (e.g. the Schev
eningen, Paulsen, Rauzer or Sozin
variations) it will be easier to grasp
both the basic ideas and the neces
sary finesses. The practically unlim
ited possibilities of transposition offer
an experienced adherent of this vari
ation the chance to transpose from
one system to another and thus di
rect your opponent into terrain less
familiar to him. This is a practical
virtue of the 4 .. . 'ifb6 system, which
by no means should be underesti
mated in modem chess.
The system 2 ...GtJc6, 4 ... '*Vb6 is
divided into three parts. The first,
most extensive, part consists of six
chapters, five of which deal with the
classical position arising after the
following moves: 1 e4 c5 2 lt:Jf3 lt:Jc6
3 d4 cxd4 4GtJxd4 'iVb6 5 lt:Jb3 lt:Jf6
6 lt:Jc3 e6 7 ..td3 a6 8 0-0 ..te7 (D).

Introduction 9

The first Chapter examines the


variation where White plays 9 a4,
while the systematisation criterion for
the next Chapters is the various pos
sibilities of developing the white
dark-squared bishop: 9 e3, d2
and 9 g5 are given in Chapters
Twoffhree, Four and Five, respec
tively. (The division of material be
tween Chapters Two and Three
depends on White's avoidance or em
ployment, respectively, of the thrust
g2-g4 after kingside castling.) Chap
ter Six deals with the less explored
variation 7 . b4.
Part Two, entitled "White Rein
forces the Centre by 7 e3", is di
vided into three chapters. Chapters
Seven and Eight deal with various
lines where White does not play the
move d3 or postpones it, while
Chapter Nine is devoted to the im
portant topic of the variations where
White castles queenside.
Not surprisingly, the most unpleas
ant lines for Black are the sharpest
variations: "White Attacks with g2g4" (in Part One) and "White Cas
tles Queenside" (in Part Two ) .
Finding adequate defensive resources
and possibilities for counterplay in
these variations is the key to the as
sessment of the vitality of the entire
system. In other variations Black rela
tively easily achieves a solid game.
Part Three is devoted to various
early alternatives to the main line.
..

Separate sections deal with possible


deviations from the main variation,
which White can make at the 7'\ 6'\
and 5 tb moves in turn.
As for the Kveinys Line, the mate
rial on which is less extensive, the
material is systematised in four chap
ters. Chapters 1 3-15 deal with the clas
sic continuations 5 '2Jc3 and 5 '2Jb3.
Other less investigated options for
White can be found in Chapter 16.
There will inevitably be a number
of controversial assessments in a
book such as this (due to many un
clear positions). The reader shouldn't
take them a priori. He is advised to
check and make his own judgments.
I am sure the book has left many
issues open, which is understandable
having in mind the complexity of the
systems examined and the changeable
nature of chess theory. But, in any
case, the author will be pleased if the
book becomes a useful guide to the
adherents of this line that will help
them play this system more confi
dently and successfully.
I am especially thankful to two
people who have helped me in my
work on this book. To my wife
Biljana for understanding and sup
port, and to Grandmaster Marjanovic
whose enormous Sicilan experience
was very valuable in making assess
ment of some critical positions.
Zoran Ilic
Nis, June 1998

Ge neral Remarks
a nd 9 a4

c5
1
e4
c6
2
f3
cxd4
3 d4
1'fb6
4 xd4
f6
5
b3
e6
6 c3
a6 (D)
7 Ad3
This is the obligatory move in the
line - Black must play .. . a6 sooner
or later. Otherwise:
a) Some players, such as the great
advocate of this line, the grandmas
ter Vladimir Akopian, prefer 7...Ae7,
avoiding any weakening of the b6
square in the early stages of the game.
Perhaps this is a more precise move
order, but it is not inadvisable to avoid
or postpone .. . a6 for a long time. In
that case White can eventually uti
lise the unprotected b5 square. One
example which illustrates this is the
game Wedberg-Cabrilo, Kladovo
1 980: 7 . . . d6 8 0-0 e7 9 a4 0-0 1 0
e3 f!ic7 1 1 f4 b6 1 2 g4 lUd7 1 3 g5
g6 14 f5 .l:e8 15 b5 lUde5 1 6 lU d4
d7 1 7 fxe6 fxe6 1 8 .i.xc6 .:Uxc6
19 lUdb5 and White had the edge.
b) Another idea, to react immedi
ately in the centre, is premature. Af
ter 7. . . d5 8 exdS exd5 9 0-0 1i.e7 I 0
.i.g5 .i.e6 1 1 a4, White h a s a

positional advantage which, though


not big, is long-lasting.
c) However, the possibility of
playing an early ... d5 after 8 f4 is
valuable. If Black commits himself
with 7 ... d6 (a move order frequently
played in tournament practice) in
stead of 7 . . . a6, then he is deprived
of that option. The game G.Garcia
Grivas, Manila OL 1 992, had the
following course: 7 ... d6 8 f4 a6 9
'iff3 i.e7 1 0 a4 'if c7 1 1 0-0 0-0 12
a5 lUb4 1 3 e3 d7 14 b6 'li'b8
1 5 hi e5 1 6 .:Ud2 exf4 1 7 'ti'xf4
.i.e6 ;;too.
d) The continuation 7... Ab4 is
seldom played; it is dealt with sepa
rately in Chapter Six.
8 0-0
This is the correct move order.

General Remarks and 9 a4 11

In the case of 8 f4, Black can re


act with 8 ... d5 ! (D).
The efficacy of the timely reac
tion 8 . . . d5 ! was convincingly con
firmed in three games. After the
unavoidable 9 e5 (9 exd5 is weak
since White already played f2-f4)
9 . . . CtJd7, the games deviated:
a) 10 ffg4 a5 ! I I a4? 'it'b4! I 2
0-0 CZJcxe5 1 3 'ii'e2 tLlxd3 I 4 'ii'x d3
CUc5 I5 'ii' g3 CUxb3 I 6 cxb3 .i.c5 +
M.Wahls-J.Polgar, Munich I 99 1 .
b) 1 0 ffn lLlc5 ! I I .i.d2 ( I 1 e3
CUxd3+ I 2 cxd3 d4 I 3 f2 'ii'b4-+)
1 l . . .CUxd3+ I2 cxd3 CUb4 1 3 'ifi>e2
CUxa2 1 4 CUxa2 'it'xb3 1 5 CUc3 .i.d7
1 6 f5 l:.c8 0- I Vehi Bach-Bellon,
Platja d'Aro I 994.
c) 10 a3 .i.e7 I I 'Wh5 g6 I2 'tlt'h6
.i.ffl I 3 'tWh3 g7 I4 e3 'tlt'c7 I 5
tt:le2 b6 I 6 0-0 .i.b7 I 7 hi CUe7
18 CZJbd4 tLlc5 I9 _tg I h5 20 'ife3
h4 2I l:f3 CUe4 22 l:h3 g5 ! 23 fxg5
'iYxe5 + M.Jovcic-Z.Ilic, Tivat I 995.
8
Jle7
Another move order worthy of
consideration is 8 ffc7!? (D).
This is not a loss of tempo because
sooner or later Black will have to relo..

cate the queen. With it, he avoids the


annoying a4-a5 manoeuvre.
The game I .Gurevich-J. Polgar,
Hastings 1 992 continued 9 a4 b6
(9 ... d6 see Larsen-Polgar, three para
graphs below) 1 0 f4 d6 I I .i.e3 (1 1
'Wf3 .i.b7 1 2 'Wh3 .i.e7 I 3 .i.d2
CUb4 I4 l:ae1 0-0 transposes to the 9
a4 line below, while 14 a5? ! d5 I 5
axb6 1Wxb6+ I 6 .i.e3 1Wc7 I 7 e5
CUe4 I8 f5 exf5 19 'it'xf5 0-0 + was
Velimirovic-Barlov, Vrsac I 987)
I I ....i.b7 (Black's idea is to prevent
the very unpleasant plan suggested by
A.Mikhalchishin: 'ti'e2, CUd2-c4 cre
ating strong positional pressure on the
queenside) I 2 'it'e2 .i.e7 I 3 CUd2 d5
I 4 e5 tLld7 1 5 CUf3 g6 1 6 'iff2 CUc5
I7 l:fd1 o-o-o I 8 liJd4 lLlb4 with
mutual chances.
We can see that with the move
order 8 .. .'tWc7 Black can avoid the
line a4-a5 . White, on the other hand,
doesn't now have to play .i.e3 or
hurry with 'iti>h 1 in order to move his
f-pawn. He has the active 9 JlgS con
tinuation at his disposal, which will
be discussed separately in Chapter
Five. Here I would only mention that

12 General Remarks and 9 a4

with this move order, Black has the


interesting 9 Jtd6 (instead of the
usual 9 ... e7), with which Black,
nevertheless, did not achieve equal
play in the game Kaminski-Kveinys,
Rewal 1 992, which continued 1 0 f4
h6 1 1 xf6 gxf6 1 2 \'fg4 fl! 1 3
'tli'h4! e7 1 4 'irh5.
In comparison with 8 ... e7 and
8 . . . 'tlfc7, it seems that the continua
tion 8 d6 is less precise. In the game
A.Mikhalchishin-Liicke, Dortmund
1 992, White achieved a clear advan
tage after 9 a4 c7 10 a5 b6 1 1 axb6
'lr'xb6 1 2 e3 fie? 1 3 'l!fe2 'Llb8
(Or 1 3 ... 'Llb4 1 4 b5+ 'Lld7 1 5 l:!a4
a5 1 6l:tfa1 with decisive advantage)
14 .td4 ( 1 4 'Llb5 !) 1 4.. . e5 1 5 ..i.e3
ii.e7 16 b5+ .
It is better to refrain from the logi
cal reaction 1 0 . .. b6 and to continue
10 Ae7 1 1 e3 0-0 which trans
poses into Ziatdinov-Akopian below,
or 10 ltid7 1 1 .tf4 .te7 12 \'fd2
0-0 1 3 l:.fd1 b5 14 axb6 'lr'xb6 1 5
e2 and now instead o f 1 5 .. . 'Llc5 1 6
'Llxc5 dxc5 1 7 'Lla4 (Larsen-J.
Polgar, Buenos Aires 1 992), Black
could have played the superior 1 5 . . .
'Lice5.
Now we return to the principal
move 8 Ae7 (D).
The diagram shows the basic po
sition of the whole 2 ... 'Lic6, 4 .. . VWb6
system. At this moment White faces
the choice of several fundamentally
different plans that have been treated
separately. The rest of this chapter
deals with the variations where White
plays 9 a4. The most often played
...

...

...

...

...

continuation, 9 e3, leads to the so


called Classical Variation after the
moves 9 .. . 'fic7 1 0 f4 d6 11 fif3 0-0;
this will be discussed in Chapters
Two and Three. The continuations
with which White ignores the posi
tion of the black queen on the b6 and
develops his dark-squared bishop on
d2 and g5 are given respectively in
Chapters Four and Five.
9 a4
As with the system where White
quickly plays .te3, this is another
direct attempt to utilise the exposed
position of Black's queen. The idea
behind White ' s a2-a4 is to limit
Black's activity on the queenside. In
this line Black has to be cautious in
choosing the right move order. A su
perficial treatment can easily bring
troubles, as can be seen from several
examples below.
9
11Vc7 (D)
With this move order, Black tries
to avoid the fixing of his queenside
after a4-a5 and e3, which would
prevent his b-pawn advancing. This
looks like an unpleasant possibility,
although in a couple of games

General Remarks and 9 a4 13

Akopian obtained more or less suc


cessful play by consciously allowing
the cramping of his queenside.

For instance: 9. ..0-0 I 0 .i.e3 'iVc7:


a) The immediate 11 aS allows
Black the ambitious ll...dS!? - see
the game Scholz-Chuchelov, given
below in note 'c2' to White's 1 0U'move.
Also possible is the more modest
ll...d6 1 2 b6 'iYb8 13 it:ld2 tt:lb4 14
'i!t'e2 d5 1 5 exd5 tt:lbxd5 1 6 it:lxd5
tt::lxd5 1 7 tt:lc4 ..td7 1 8 tt:le5 e8 with
a playable position for both sides,
Ziatdinov-Akopian, Niksic 199 1 .
b ) 1 1 f4 ( A more precise move
order) 1 1 ... d6 1 2 a5 tt:lb4 and now:
b 1 ) 13 \'We1 e5 14 l:!.a4 ( 1 4 f5 d5)
1 4 . . . tt::lxd3 15 cxd3 e6 16 tt::ld2 exf4
with an equal game, Frolov-Akopian,
Jurmala 1 989.
b2) The manoeuvre tt:la4-b6 seems
to be more promising. The example
Khait-Nadanian, Czestochowa 1 992,
supports this statement. There fol
lowed 13 a4 d7 14 tt::lb6 l:!.ab8
15 d4 h8 16 e5 tt:le8 1 7 f5 tt::lxd3
18 xd3 b5 1 9 c4 dxe5 20 cxb5

exd4 2 1 .l:Z.ac 1 with a dangerous ini


tiative for White.
1 0 f4
This is the most precise move or
der if White wants to enter the main
line. If he plays 10 Ae3 first, Black
has the option 1 0 ...d5 !? (IO . . . b6 1 1
f4 d6 transposes into the main line)
when 1 1 exd5 exd5 1 2 .i.e2 e6 1 3
a5 0-0 1 4 b6 "id7 1 5 l:. e 1 is only
slightly, if at all, better for White,
Polugaevsky-Averkin, Moscow 1 970.
If instead 10 aS!?, then:
a) The direct and committing re
action 10 ...b6 is inadvisable in this
particular position. After 1 1 axb6
'i!Vxb6 1 2 .i.e3 "ilc7 1 3 f4 d6 14 "iWe2
tt::lb4 White obtained a strong pos
itional pressure by playing 1 5 ..tb5+
in Bjarnason-Nkousen, Lyngby 1990.
b) Also rather risky is the idea of
utilising the fact that his dark-squared
bishop is still not closed in and play
ing 10 ... Ab4?! aiming to gain the aS
pawn. That this cannot be done
without considerable concessions is
shown by the following line: 1 1 d2
xa5 (Even more dubious is 1 1 . . .
tt::l xa5? ! 1 2 lt:lb5 ) 1 2 tt::l xa5 lt:lxa5
1 3 lt:ld5 ( 1 3 lt:lxb5 axb5 14 b4 b6 1 5
'ti' e 1 b7 looks satisfactory for
Black) 1 3 . . .tt::lx d5 ( 1 3 . . . exd5 1 4
xa5 b6 1 5 e5! ) 1 4 xa5 b6 1 5
exd5 bxa5 1 6 'ti'g4 with the idea
1 6 ... 0-0 1 7 d6! 'ixd6? 1 8 'ife4 and
White wins.
c) It is best for Black to treat the
position after 10 a5 "a la Akopian"
... d6, ... 0-0, ... lt:lb4 ignoring White's
idea .i.e3-b6 (see the examples above).

14 General Remarks and 9 a4

Another option is to try to make use of 'Wh3CUb4!? 1 4 .te3 eS ( 1 4... 0-0) 1S


the fact that White has postponed the aS! bS (1S...bxaS 16 fxeS dxeS 17
move f2-f4 and attack in the centre with lUaS .tc8 18 'ifg3 0-0 19 CUc4)
16 fxeS dxeS 1 7 .tb6 'ii'b8 ( 17...
...d5. This idea was carried out by Black
'ifd7? 18 'ifg3) 1 8 .tcS 'ifc7 and
in two games:
Black managed to maintain the bal
c l ) 10 ...i0b4 1 1 .te3 d5 12 .tb6
ance, Novoselski-Barlov, Kragujevac
1Wb8 1 3CUcS 0-0 14 l%el .td6 1 S h3
198S.
.tc7 16 l:a4;!; Rohde-Kuijf, Beer
c) 11 fin 0-0 12 a5 (12 .te3 b6
Sheva 1987, and
c2) 10 0-0 1 1 .te3 dS 12 .tb6 transposes into the main line) 12 ...bS
1Wf4 13 exdS exdS 14 l:ta4 CUb4 IS (Possible is 12...CUd7 13 .te3 bS 14
l:te1 .td6 16 g3 'Wg4 1 7 .te2 'Wg6
Wxb6CUxb6 Egger-Garias, Vina del
1 8 .tcS .txcS 19 lUxcS CUc6 20
Mar 1997) 13 axb6 'ifxb6+ 14 .te3
CUxdS lUxd5 2 1 'WxdS l:.e8 22 l:.d1
Wb7 (More logical is 14 .. .'ilt'c7 1S .:a4
.tfS with compensation, Scholz
l:tb8 with the idea ...CUb4) 1S eS?! (Pre
Chuchelov, Berlin 199S.
mature. White didn't calculate properly
d6 (D)
the subsequent tactical complications)
10
1 S... dxeS 16 CUc5 "f#c7 17 CUbS axb5
18l:Xa8 exf4 19CUe4 (19 1Wxf4 xf4
20
l:.xf4 CUd5 or 1 9 .tt2 lUeS also
w
loses) 19 ...fxe3 20 CUxf6 + .txf6 21
1We4 l:td8 22 Wxh7+ 'itffl 23 l:!.xf6
gxf6 24 'Wh6 + 'ite7 0-1 Cigan-Z.IIic,
Brezovica 1988.
..

11

b6

The most logical. Less advisable


is 1 1 10b4 12 a5 e5 13 CUa4 .te6
14 CUb6 l:b8 and now, instead of
playing 1S f5 , in the game Am.
Rodriguez-Kouatly, Toluca 1 982,
White attempted to increase his spa
tial advantage by playing the incor
rect 1S c4?. That led to catastrophe
after 1S . . .CUg4 16 .tc1 exf4 17 .txf4
gS! 1 8 .te2 hS 19 .td2 dS 20 .txg4
hxg4 2 1 exd5 'i!Vxh2 + 22 f2 l:!.h3
23 .txb4 .txb4 24 'i!Vd4 l:txb3 0-1.
...

11

.i.e3

There are several examples in


which White deviated from this
move:
a) 11 aS bS 12 axb6 1Wxb6 + 1 3
'iPh llUb4 ( 13 ... 0-0 14 'iVe2lUb4 IS
CUaS lUxd3 16 cxd3 ;I;; Topalov
Kocovski, Star 199 1 ) 14 lUaS d5! ?
IS eS CUd7 16 .:n CUxd3 17 exd3;!;
Smirin-Marasin, USSR 1988.
b) 11 Wh1 b6 12 Wn .tb7 1 3

12

en

The direct 12 g4 is discussed early


in Chapter 3 (Kolker-Nadanian).

General Remarks and 9 a4 15

0-0 (D)
12
The alternative 1 2 b7 has
mainly a transpositional character.
Two examples in which the main line
was avoided are presented below:
a) 13 l:tael CDb4 I 4 ctJd4 ( 1 4
'ifh3 transposes into the main line)
I 4 . . . 0-0 I S hi ctJd7! I 6 \Wg3 .i.f6
I 7 CDdi .l:.ae8 1 8 t2J f2 'ti'd8! and
Black' s position is slightly prefer
able, Vogt-Lukov, Cienfuegos 1 983.
The manoeuvre ... tl:ld7, ... f6 and
. . . .l:.ae8 employed in this game is
worthy remembering. This is a use
ful plan in many positions from the
4 . . . 'i!Yb6 system.
b) 13 tlg3 h5?! ( 1 3 .. . 0-0 is more
reliable) 1 4 .l:.ae i ctJg4 1 5 .i.c1 "il'd8
1 6 l:te2 t2Ja5 1 7 h3 t2Jxb3 I 8 cxb3
ctJf6 1 9 e5 h4 20 1Vg7 .l:.g8 21 exf6
Morales-J.Armas, Sagua la Grande
1989.
13 l:tae1
The attempt to immediately exploit
the absence of Black's bishop from the
a8-h I diagonal is impatient and wrong,
as these alternatives demonstrate:
a) 13 e5? dxe5 1 4 fxe5 t2Jxe5 ! 1 5
'ifxa8 .i.b7 1 6 'ii' a7 t2Jeg4! 1 7 .i.f4
...

'ifc6 is winning for Black.


b) 13 aS?! bxa5 1 4 e5? ! dxe5 1 5
fxe5 t2Jd7 (Or 1 5 . . . t2Jxe5 1 6 \Wxa8
tl:leg4 1 7 l:.f4 t2Jxe3 1 8 'it'f3 ctJf5
w i th compensati o n , C ampora
Wirthensohn, Biel 1 983) 16 'Wh3
g6 17 ..th6 t2Jcxe5 1 8 .i.xf8 ..txf8
19 t2Je4? f5 20 t2Ja5 l:tb8 2I ctJg5
lLlf6 22 b3 tl:lfg4 23 'irg3 (2 3 c;t> h 1 )
2 3 . . . ..td6 2 4 h 3 t2Jxd3 2 5 'it'xd3
.i.c5+ 0- I Santa Roman-Benjamin,
Cannes I 992.
The possibility that White, in a
practical game, might go astray with
a premature e4-e5 is one of the rea
sons why Black usually prefers the
main line continuation I 2 . . . 0-0 to
I 2 ... .i.b7. Compared with the idea of
the central breakthrough, the sharp
plan characterised by the advance of
the g-pawn (g2-g4-g5) is more rea
sonable:
c) 13 g4 ctJd7 ( 1 3 ... tl:lb4 1 4 g5
tl:ld7 1 5 'it'h5 g6 I 6 'ilh6 f5? { 1 6.0
.!:[e8} 1 7 exf5 exf5 I 8 t2Jd4 Hohn
Illner, Dortmund 1992) 1 4 g5 .l:.e8
( 1 4 .. . ..tb7 15 'ih5 t2Jb4 16 l:.f3) 1 5
h4 .i.b7 1 6 h5 t2Jb4 1 7 g6 f5 !? (White
would have had compensation after
1 7 . .. fxg6 1 8 hxg6 hxg6 1 9 tl:l d4 t2J f8
20 'ifh3 ..tf6 2 I l:tf2) 1 8 gxh7+ Wh8
19 h6! g6 20 'ilig3 .i.f6 with chances
for both sides, Dervishi-V.Georgiev,
Ankara 1 993.
13
.i.b7
/llb4 (D)
14 'ffh 3
This is the standard move in this
variation, with which Black controls
two important strategic elements:
White' s light-squared bishop and the
0

16 General Remarks and 9 a4

d5-point. In the game Savereide


Chiburdani dze, Thessaloniki OL
1 984, Black played superficially, and
after 14 .. l1ad8?! 1 5 f5 exf5 1 6 'Lld5
ll:lxd5 1 7 exd5 lLle5 1 8 ._,xf5 g6 1 9
'it' t2 she faced problems.

l:tg8! 22 .:&.cl l:ad8 23 'lfi>h l ll:lxd3


24 l\Yxd3 ll:lc5 25 'ih3 Wi'd7 ! :;:
Urday-Panno, Mar del Plata 1 988.
c2) Or 16 Ae3 l:tad8 1 7 'Lld2 d5 !
1 8 fxe5 and now in Mnatsakanian
Akopian, USSR 1 987, Black could
have obtained the advantage by
1 8 .. . ll:le4! 19 e6 f6 20 i&.xe4 dxe4 + .
Black also stands better, if, instead
of 1 8 fxe5, White continues either 1 8
exd5 ll:lxd3 1 9 cxd3 ll:lxd5 +, or 1 8
ll:lxd5 'Llfxd5 1 9 exd5 ll:lxd3 +
Akopian.
d) 15 'Lld4 l:t ad8 (Possible is
15 ... .l:lfe8 16 h 1 i&.t& 1 7 ll:lO e5
1 8 fxe5 dxe5 1 9 'Llh4 i..c 8 20 ll:lf5
'iii>h 8 21 h4 Moiseev-Schliiter, Vi
enna 1 99 1 ) 16 Wh1 ( 1 6 ll:lf3 e5 1 7
ll:lg5? h 6 1 8 ll:lf3 exf4 1 9 xf4 i.. c 8
20 g4 ll:lxg4-+ Casa-Z. IIic, Nica
1 988) and now:
dl ) 16 ... d5 (I am not sure that
Black has created all the conditions
for carrying out this central break suc
cessfully) 1 7 e5 ll:le4 1 8 .i.g 1 i.. c5
1 91:1f3 l:1 fe8 20 li'h4 ll:lxd3 21 cxd3
e7 22 'iYg4 ll:lxc3 23 .l:l:.cl f5 24
'ifh5 i&.c5 with a complicated posi
tion where White's chances are bet
ter, Wang Zili-Gufeld, Beijing 1 996.
d2) I prefer the waiting policy. For
example in the game Grujic-Z.Ilic,
Novi Becej 1 994, after 16...1:lfe8 1 7
f2 'Lld7 1 8 'it'g4 ..tf6 Black had at
least equal play. White's moves 1 7
i.. t2 and 1 8 'iVg4 are certainly not
the best possible but even if White
commits himself with f5, Black
would, after ... e5 and a possible ... d5,
achieve active play in the centre.
-

This is the key position for the line


in which White plays a2-a4. Both
sides have completed their develop
ment in the best manner and a com
plex Sicilian battle is ahead. I n
practice several continuations have
been tried.
a) The most direct, 15 e5?!, is
again questionable: 1 5 . . .dxe5 1 6 fxe5
xe5 1 7 il. b6 ( 1 7 1:1xf6 1:1xd3)
1 7 ... 'il'h5 18 'Wxh5 ll:lxh5 1 9 .i.c5
ll:lxd3 20 cxd3 !tfe8! 2 11i.xe71:1xe7
22 ll:lc5 a5 ! :;: Brodsky-Akopian,
USSR 1 987.
b) 15 'Lld2 :fe8 16 l:lf3 g6 1 7 .l:lg3
.:ladS 1 8 f2 .i.t& 19 'iW114 e7 20
'ifb3 .it& 21 '1Wh4 i..g7 22GtJc4 Yz-Yz
Chandler-Benjarnin, Cannes 1 992.
c) 15 Ad4 e5 when:
c l ) 16 fxe5 dxe5 1 7 'iVg3 'Lld7 1 8
i.. e 3 h 8 1 9 'Lld4 g 6 ! 20 ll:l f3
(20 . . . i&.h6 2 1 i..c 5-+) 20 ... f6 21 'Llh4

Classical Line with 9 Jle3


(without g4)

This i s the first of two chapters


dealing with the important variation
(l e4 c5 2 'Lln 'Llc6 3 d4 cxd4 4
!Oxd4 tlb6 5 lllb3 'Llf6 6 'Llc3 e6 7
Ad3)
a6
7
Ae7
8 0-0
in which White reinforces the cen
tre with both bishops, playing
9 e3
Lines where the bishop is devel
oped at d2 (usually in conjunction
with h 1 ) are covered in chapter 4
and when it goes to g5 instead, we
have Chapter 5.
The main divergence point for the
e3 line is seen in the diagram,
which normally arises after the fur
ther moves.
9
'flc7
10 f4
d6 (D)
ffn
11
The most consistent and stand
ard, but not unavoidable, move. 1 1
a4 transposes to the main line of
Chapter 1 .
1 1 'Lla4 is an interesting option if
White wants to avoid classical posi
tions. Black can then choose between
l l...b5 12 lbb6 .l:tb8 1 3 lbxc8 'iYxc8
and ll. . 'Lld7 1 2 c4 b6 1 3 lbd4 f6
.

14 lbxc6 'ir'xc6 1 5 cl b7 16 b4
0-0 1 7 !tf2 with a spatial advantage
for White, Pupo-Urday, Havana
1 992.
0-0 (D)
11
It used to be considered that in this
type of position one should not hurry
to castle because White achieves the
initiative with the aggressive g2-g4
etc., but more recent games confirm
that Black's position is very tough
and full of defensive potential. In fact,
in this particular position Black
doesn't have much choice but to cas
tle. Unlike the Sozin line (1 e4 c5 2
lbf3 lLlc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 lbxd4 lbf6 5
lbc3 d6 6 c4 'iYb6 7 lLlb3 e6 8 0-0
a6 9 .te3 'ir'c7 10 f4 e7 1 1 d3
b5 12 'iVf3 0-0), here Black is a tempo
down because the move ... b5 hasn't

18 Classical L;ne with 9 eJ (withoutg4)

been played yet. This means that


. .. Ab7, which would have been a
very convenient option, can't be
played.
In our actual main line, it is im
possible to start action on the
queenside:
a) In the case of l l ... b5? there
would follow 1 2 e5! and, if 1 2 ... tZ:ld7,
then after 1 3 exd6 J..xd6 White has
1 4 J..xb5, as was played in the game
Kofidis-Anastasian, Athens 1 993.
We see that l l .. .b5 doesn't work,
but Black has two other options to
avoid the main continuation 1 1 .. .0-0.
b) The old alternative l l .ad7
was played in several games. In that
case, probably the most unpleasant
plan for Black is if White immedi
ately plays 12 g4. The idea of using
the b6 square with 12 l0a4 is tempt
ing but not effective: after 1 2 .. . 0-0
1 3 tZ:lb6 l:ad8 14 c3 J..e 8 1 5 a4 d5 !
16 exd5 exd5 1 7 aS d4! 1 8 tZ:lxd4
tZ:lxd4 1 9 J..xd4 i.cS Black achieved
good play in Kostro-Gufeld, Tbilisi
1 970.
c) Another quite reasonable idea,
ll ...l0d7, was tested in two games:
12 l:lael b5 1 3 a3 (Or 1 3 tZ:ld4 J..b7
14 tZ:lxc6 J..x c6 1 5 i.d4 J.. f6 1 6
Axf6 tZ:lxf6 1 7 'ti'g3 0-0 with a
roughly equal position, Mortensen
Larsen, Espoo 1989) 1 3 0-0 1 4 'ifb3
( 1 4 g4!?) 1 4 ... l:te8 1 5 eS tZ:lfB! with
solid play for Black, Dedes-Grivas,
Greece 1 987.
d) It is imprecise to go ll...l0b4?!
before .J:be 1 has been played. In that
case White has 12 .l:ac l , with which
...

he gains a tempo after the unavoid


able opening of the c-file. The game
Minasian-Kurajica, Erevan OL 1 996,
took the following course: 1 2 ... 0-0 1 3
a3 tZ:lxd3 1 4 cxd3 1Wd8 1 5 e5 (An
energetic way to make use of his ad
vantage in development: White de
liberately compromises his pawn
structure with the idea of obtaining a
kingside attack) 1 5 . . . dxe5 1 6 fxeS
tZ:ld7 1 7 d4 tZ:lb6 (Black has problems
developing his queenside) 1 8 'ifhS
tZ:lc4 1 9 i.f4 bS (If 1 9 ... tZ:lxb2? 20
l:lf3 White would quickly obtain an
attack) 20 f3 g6 21 :gJ l:!.a7 (Too
slow; better 2 l . ..b7) 22 tZ:le4 ..tb7
23 tZ:lf6+ ..txf6 24 exf6 'ti'xf6 25 :n
'flle7 26 ..th6 tZ:lxb2 27 'ti'eS f5 28
i.xf8 'ifxf8 29 d5 and White soon
won the game.
Now we return to the main line
after 1 1 . . .0-0 (D).

...

As usual in such a position, White


has many options. The continuation
1 2 a4 transposes into 9 a4 that was
already discussed in Chapter I.
For the sake of clarity, the varia
tions 12 g4 and 1 2 Uael b5 13 g4,

Classical Line with 9 eJ (without g4) 19

where sooner or later White makes


thi s aggressive advanc e on the
kingside, are given separately in
Chapter 3.
In the rest of this chapter, we ex
amine variations where White re
frains from the g2-g4 attack:
A: 1 2 ltJd4
B: 1 2 'ito>h 1
C: 1 2 l:tae1
12 a3 is not dangerous to Black
and rarely has an independent char
acter after 12 ... b5 when:
a) The central breakthrough 13 eS?
is bad in this particular position, as
can be seen from the game Aguera
Danailov, Candas 1 992, where after
1 3 . . . dxe5 1 4 fxe5 ltJxe5 1 5 'ifxa8
ltJ eg4 1 6 l:4 ltJxe3 Black was
clearly better.
b) 13 /l)d4 (The plan of recen
tralising the knight doesn't promise
a lot.) 13 . . . ltJxd4 14 xd4 e5 1 5 e3
b7 1 6 l:tae1 l:tac8 with equal play,
Krajina-Grivas, Vinkovci 1 989.
c) 13 g4 (inadvisable): Chapter 3.
d) 13 Wh1 see line B below.
e) 13 ,J;laet see line C32 below.
Lines with a2-a3 often arise in
practice via Chapter 8 (7 -'.e3 'ikc7
8 a3).
A:

12
/l)d4
The white knight usually comes
back to the centre only after Black
has played . . . ltJb4. When Black' s
knight is still on c6 Black has the
opportunity to simplify matters.
12
/l)xd4

It is best to play this well-known


freeing manoeuvre. Less promising
is 12 ... d7 1 3 h 1 b5 14 a3 l:tab8
1 5 ltJxc6! ..t.xc6 1 6 'i!Vh3 g6? ( 1 6 ...
e5 ! 1 7 fxe5 dxe5 18 'it'g3 ltJh5 ! 1 9
'iff3 g 6 i s unclear according to
Anand) 17 f5 ! b4 ( 1 7 ... exf5 1 8 exf5
b4 1 9 lLle2 ) 1 8 axb4 exf5 19 b5 !
cxb5 20 exf5 b4 2 1 lLle2 l'la8 22
l:txa8 xa8 23 .i.d4 'tid8 24 ltJf4
.i.c6 25 'flh6 Was 2 6 c4 1 -0
Anand-Epishin, Belgrade 1 988.
eS
13
xd4
14 fxeS
dxeS
15
1'lg3 (D)

Now Black has two possibilities:


a) 15 ...e6 1 6 hl ( 1 6 Axe5?
is bad because of 1 6 . . . 'ft'c5+ 1 7 '1tih1
ltJh5 while also in case of 1 6 '4i'xe5
d6 1 7 '4i'g5 xh2+ 1 8 'ito>h 1 h6!
Black has good play.) 16 ... ltJd7 1 7
e3 'ito>h8 ( 1 7. . . l:t fe8 is better) 1 8
ltJd5 'i!Vd8 (After 1 8 ... .i.xd5 1 9 exd5
White threatens 3 and Black can
not play 1 9 ... g6? because of20 ..th6)
1 9 l'ladl l'lc8 20 c4 and in Kosanovic
-V. Damjanovic, Tivat 1 995, White

.20 Classical Line with 9 eJ (without g4)

achieved a significant advantage in


the centre.
b) 15 ....1\c5 1 6 Axc5 'tWxc5+ 1 7
h1 'ti'e7 (Passive is 1 7 .. . ll:le8?! 1 8
il:ld5 f6 1 9 b4 'tWd6 2 0 c4 h8
2 1 .l:ad1 I.Marinkovic-Colovic,
Cacak 1 99 1 ) 1 8 c4 b5 1 9 il:ld5
ll:lxd5 20 xd5 l:tb8 21 l:tad1 l:.b6
and Black succeeded in holding the
balance, Marinkovic-B.Knezevic,
Subotica 1 992.
B:

b5
12 Wh1
As already observed in a similar
position, it is unwise to play the
move 12 ... '0b4 before White has
played l:ae l . However, Kreiman
Yermolinsky, USA eh 1 994, con
cluded 1 3 l:tacl d7 1 4 a3 il:lxd3
1 5 cxd3 'ii'd 8 I 6il:ld4 c6 1 7 'ii'g3
h8 1 8 l:tc2 Y2-Y2.
13 a3
Of course, this move is not com
pulsory, but it sets a hidden trap for
Black.
It is inadvisable to play 13 1Vh3
before Black has played ... b7, as
was shown by the game Britton-Con
quest, Guernsey 1 99 1 , where after
1 3 ... b4 14ll:le2 e5 1 5 f5 d5 1 6il:ld2
l:td8 1 7ll:lg3il:ld4 1 8 xd4 dxe4 1 9
.i.xe4 ll:lxe4 2 0 lUdxe4 .!:lxd4 Black
stood better.
b4
13
Introducing a risky adventure
which Black can avoid by playing
13 ... l:tb8 or 1 3 .. . .tb7. For example:
a) 13 ... I:Ib8!7 14 ifh3 l:td8 1 5
il:ld4? ll:lxd4 1 6 e5 (1 6 xd4 e5-+)

1 6 . . . dxe5 1 7 fxe5 il:lf5 1 8 exf6


Axf6 + Kiriazis-Anastasian, Aegina
1 993, and
b) 13 ... Ab7 14 'ii'h 3 l:tad8 1 5
l:ae1 l: fe8 1 6 l:tf3 b4 Farago-Illner,
Budapest 1 995.
14 axb4
'Oxb4
15 e5
il.b7
Black stands worse after 1 5 ...
'Ofd5 1 6 il:lxd5 exd5.
16 1fh3
dxe5
17 fxe5
1Wxe5
18 l::ta 5! (D)
The point of White's strategy. His
rook enters the battle in the best pos
sible manner and this manoeuvre is
worth remembering. This motif can
appear in various forms. For exam
ple, the same position appeared after
a different move order in the game
Sharif-Z.Ilic, Cannes 1 989, with the
important difference that the bishop
was there placed on d2 instead of e3.
This possibility is discussed in Chap
ter Four.

This position has been the subject


of many discussions and analyses. It

Classical Line with 9 eJ (without g4) 21

is clear that 18 ...l0bd5? and 18 ...


f!lc7? lose by force after 19 l:txf6
and 1 9 i.xh7+ l2Jxh7 20 l:th5, res
pectively.
Furthermore, 18 ... Ad5? is unsat
isfactory, as is shown by the follow
ing analysis: 1 9 lL\xd5 exd5 ( 1 9 . ..
lL\bxd5 2 0 l:txf6 ! +-) 2 0 Ad4 'ih5
(20 ...'ii'e6 2 1 Af5 'ti'e2 22 l:Iaa1 with
many threats) 2 1 xf6 'ti'xh3 22
il.xe7 'ii'g4 23 h3! and Black loses
the knight on b4. IfWhite's bishop is
on d.2, then White has an even sim
pler win: 1 8 ... d5 19 lL\xd5 exd5 20
xb4 ..txb4 2 1 .l:.xf6.
Two continuations for which it is
still difficult to give a definite assess
ment are:
B 1: 1 8 . . . lL\xd3 and
B2: 1 8 . .. 'i'Vd6
While in the case of the former,
the assessment that White has the ad
vantage is justified, in the latter vari
ation, matters are not clear.
B1 :
18
l0xd3 ! ?
l0xe5
19 l:txe5
20 Acs (DJ
The same position appeared in the
game Mortensen-Gufeld, Hastings
1992, with the difference that White
had not played the move Wh 1 . There
it arose from the Sozin move order:
I e4 c5 2 tLlf3 tLlc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 tLlxd4
tLlf6 5 tLlc3 d6 6 .i..c4 'iVb6 7 't:lb3
e6 8 0-0 ll.e7 9 .i.e3 'f!lc7 10 il.d3
a6 1 1 f4 b5 1 2 a3 .i.. b7 1 3 'i'Vf3 0-0
14 'i!Vh3 b4 1 5 axb4 tLlxb4 1 6 e5 dxe5
17 fxe5 Wxe5 1 8 .l:.a5 lL\xd3 1 9

l:txe5 lLlxe5 2 0 .i.. c 5. The position


of the king on the g 1 square has both
its advantages and drawbacks. There
followed 20 ... i.xc5+ 2 1 lLlxc5 .i..c6
22 'i!Vg3 lt:lg6 23 .l:. d 1 (23 b4 ! ?)
23 ... a5 ! 24 .l:.d6 l:tac8 25 'Lld3 ttJe4!
26 lt:lxe4 ..txe4 27 'iWe3 .i..d5 28
'ii'd2 a4 and Black had at least an
equal game. This is a nice example
from Black's point of view, but White
failed to play the stronger 22 lt:lxe6 ! .

20
l0g6
Not 20 ... Axc5 2 1 lLlxc5 .i..c6 be
cause of 22 lt:lxe6, winning a pawn.
However, 20 ... 1:tfe8 is better than the
text.
21
Axe7
l0xe7
22
tOes
The alternative is 22 l0a5 l:rab8
23 lt:lxb7 l:xb7 24 b3 .
22
Ac6
23 l:txf6!
With this exchange sacrifice,
White revives the attack: 23 ... gxf6 24
ttJ 5e4 Axe4 2 5 lt:lxe4 l:t fd8 26
l2Jxf6+ Wg7 27 lLlh5+ Wf8 28 'ifg4
with a superior position for White,

22 Classical Line with 9 eJ (without g4)

Timman-Kurajica, Reggio Emilia


1 984/85. An interesting alternative
here was 24 Wg7 25 1lt'h4 l?Jg8 26
l?Jxf6 l?Jxf6 27 'i!Vg5+ h8 28
-..xf6+ g8 29 h4 when it seems that
Black is defenceless against the fur
ther advance of the white h-pawn. But
Black c an put up a fight after
29 .. .l:tfd8 30 h5 Wf8 - Huhner.
..

B2:

18

.d6! ? (D)

b) 19 .axh7+ l?Jxh7 20 l:lh5 e5


(20 ... xg2+ 2 1 'Ot>xg2 e5 22 'Ot>h l
'ifg6 23 l:tgl 'ifxc2 24 l:tg2 'ifd3 25
l?Jcl ! fl + 26 gl +-) 2 1 c5 (It
is noteworthy is that, if White's
bishop is placed on d2 instead of on
e3, then he lacks this possibility; of
course not 2 1 lhh7 xg2+! 22
Wxg2 Wg6+. ) 2 l . . .'ifg6 22 xe7
l?Jxc2 (22 ... xg2+ 23 xg2 'ifxh5
24 b4 is according to Timman)
23 .i.xf8 l?Je3 24 l:tgl l?Jxg2! (24 ...
llJg4? 25 .i.c5+-) 25 l:txg2 .l:xf8 26
l:lxe5 'ifc2 27 l?Je2! l:ld8.
I think this is the critical position
for the assessment of the continua
tion 1 8 .. .... d6.
C:

Unfortunately this move has not


been tested in practice. The analyses
given below show that White has no
clear way to achieve the advantage
(if there is any way at all).
a) 19 J\cS ._,d8! ( 1 9... c7? 20
xb4 ..i.xb4 21 l:f.xf6+-) 20 xe7
(Black wins after 20 .txb4 xb4 2 1
.l:.xf6 g6) 20 . . . 'i!Vxe7 2 1 xh7+
l?Jxh7 22l:f.h5 f5 23 l:f.xh7 'i!Vg5 and
Black has good counterplay. For ex
ample, 24 l:lgl tLld5 25 l?Jxd5 Axd5
26l?Jc5 l:f.fc8 ! 27 .l:h5 'i!Vd2 28 liJd3
l:f.xc2 and White have to struggle for
a draw.

1 2 l:lael
After this, the most frequently
played continuation, Black is at the
crossroads:
C l : 1 2 . .. l:tb8
C2: 1 2 . ..l?Jb4
C3: 1 2 . .. b5
The main and most consistent con
tinuation, played in many games, is
1 2 ...b5 (C3). Since some new games
and analyses favour White after his
most direct approach with 1 3 e5 ! ,
Black has to pay more attention to
the alternatives Cl and C2 which pre
vent it.
Another possible way to avoid
White's e4-e5 advance is the continu
ation 1 2 /0d7. After 1 3 Wg3 (For
1 3 g4 see Chapter 3, line B) Black
played superficially in the game Solo
mon-Davidovi6, Sydney 1 990, where
...

Classical Line with 9 eJ (without g4) 23

after 13 Af6? (This often-useful


move doesn't work in this particular
position.) 1 4 e5! dxe5 1 5 f5 ! exf5
( 1 5 ... .:Ub6 1 6 .:Ue4!) 1 6 .i.xf5 'iVd8
1 7 l:d1 ! White was clearly better.
Correct is 13 11b8, transposing into
line C l .
...

Cl:

12
Black avoids the threat e4-e5, by
removing the rook from the a8-h 1
diagonal. Still, this is in a way a waste
of time. The rook move has more
sense if White has already played a3,
which is not the case here. Now I
think the most promising continua
tion is 13 g4 (compare Chapter 3,
page 39). In practice 1 3 g3 was
played in two games.
13
1tg3
d7! (D)

Gurevich, Hastings 1 993/94 went on:


14 ... dxe5 1 5 fxe5 .:Uh5 ( 1 5 ... .:Uxe5?
16 .i.f4) 1 6 fin g6 1 7 .i.h6 .i.b7
(Black also loses material in case of
1 7 ... .:Ug7 1 8 .:Ue4 .:Uxe5 19 .:Uf6+
'it>h8 20 'ii'g3 Ad6 2 1 'ii'h 3 with the
idea 22 Axg7+ 'it>xg7 23 'iWh7+) 1 8
.i.xffl .:Uxe5 1 9 'ii' e 3 .:Uxd3 20 Axe7
.:Uxe1 2 1 'ii'c5 'ii'x c5 22 .:Uxc5 (Now
it's clear that White has calculated
better. In the case of 22... .:Uxg2 or
22 . .. .:Uxc2, then 23 .i.d6 is winning)
22 ... b4 23 .:U3a4 .:Uxg2 24 .i.d6 l:c8
25 .:Uxb7 .:Ue3 26 l:lc 1 and White
realised her material advantage with
out many problems.
The correct 13 d7 was played
in the game Repkova-Svidler, Gron
ingen 1 993 . White superficially
mixed several plans and after 14 'tWh3
( 1 4 f5 !?) 1 4 ... .:Ub4 1 5 a3 (A waste of
time. 1 5 .:Ud4 is better) 1 5 ... .:Uxd3 1 6
cxd3 \'t'd8! 1 7 l:f3 'it>h8 1 8 g4l:!.e8
19 .:Ud4 Af6 20 l:tefl Wg8 21 .:Ude2
g6 22 e5 :Ji.g7 23 exd6 b5 24 .:Ue4
f5 ! Black soon obtained decisive
counterplay.
...

C2:

Black should not underestimate the


e4-e5 threat. For example 13 b5 is
dubious because of 1 4 e5 ! . With the
rook on b8, the pinning motif along
the h2-b8 diagonal is a factor. After
1 4 e 5 ! the game Arakhamia-1.
..

12
b4 (D)
This is a quite playable continua
tion and a reasonable alternative if
Black wants to avoid 1 2 ... b5 1 3 e5 ! .
The drawback i s that i t allows the
quick recentralisation of the b3knight. However, in practice White
has not played convincing examples
either after this or other alternatives,
so after 12 b4 it is difficult to
determine the main line.
...

24 Classical Line with 9 eJ (without g4)

The following practical examples


demonstrate the vitality of Black's
position:
a) 13 lt:1d4 nes 14 g4 b5 1 5 g5
l2Jd7 16 ti'h3 f8 1 7 ll:Jf3 ll:Jxd3 1 8
cxd3 b4 1 9 llle 2 'Wc2 ! :;: Gavric
Kurajica, Banjaluka 1 983.
b) 13 Whl b5 14 't!t'g3 b7 15 e5
illh5 16 't!t'g4 ll:Jxd3 17 cxd3 g6 1 8
llld2 b4 1 9 lLlce4 dxe5 2 0 .l:lc1 b8
2 1 c5 xc5 22 lll x c5 illx f4 +
Wittmann-Gostisa, Aosta 1 988.
c) 13 '8h3 ltJxd3 1 4 cxd3 b5 1 5
l:.c1 'i!Vd8 1 6lLld4 b7 1 7 g4 l:c8
1 8 :tcd1 l:!e8 19 l:d2 ll:Jd7 20 g5 b4
2 1 ltJd1 lLlc5 oo Westerinen-Kosten,
London I 988.
d) 13 1t'g3 e5 1 4 f5 ..t>h8 1 51Yf3
b5 1 6 g4 d5 1 7 g5 d4 1 8 gxf6 xf6
I 9 lLJxd4 exd4 20 .ll f4 'it'b6 2 1 lLJe2
b7 with good play for Black,
Schiifer-B.Knezevic, Sofia 1 994.
e) 13 a3 (This continuation does
not promise any advantage.) 1 3 . . .
lLJxd3 1 4 cxd3 d7 (Or 1 4...b5 I 5
l:tci 'fi'b8 1 6 lLJa5 .i.d7 1 7 lLla2 d8
1 8 lLlc6 Axc6 19 lhc6 a5 20 f51Vb7
21 .l:cc l b4 and White had problems
with his knight, Moldovan-Kiselev,

Bucharest 1 997) I 5 l:c1 't!t'd8 ( 1 5 ...


'ft'b8 1 6 lLJa5 d8 1 7 b4 b6 18 lLJb3
e7 I9 lLJb1 a5 20 lLJd4 axb4 2 1
axb4 'it'b7= Keres-Smyslov, Bled
1 959) 16 h 1 .l:c8 17 lLJd4 lL!e8 1 8
f5 f6 1 9 l:.c2 lLJc7 20 l:cf2 ti'e7
21 fxe6 fxe6 22 'ifd1 ..ixd4 23 .i.xd4
lLJb5= Lutz-Martinovic, Groningen
1 995.
f) 13 g4 (Probably the best.)
1 3 ... lLJd7 14 g5 .l:e8 (14 ... b5) 15 'fih.5
( 1 5 d4 lllc6 1 6 .i.e3 ..tf8 Y2-Y2
Kuporosov-Vokac, Lazne Bohdanec
1 994) 1 5 . . . ..tf8 ( 1 5 ... g6 is more pre
cise.) 16 .l:f3 g6 1 7 't!!Vh4 .i.g7 (This
type of position will be examined in
detail in the next chapter on the g2g4 attack) 1 8 f5 b5 19 .l:h3 h6 20
gxh6 ..tf6 oo Asrian-An astasi an,
Yerevan 1 995.
C3:

12

b5 (D)

Before we consider the position


after 1 2 . .. b5 in detail, it is necessary
to mention that it can arise with dif
ferent move orders as well, charac-

Classical Line with 9 eJ (without g4) 25

teristic of the Paulsen or Sozin. The


typical move orders are:
1 e4 c5 2 ltJf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4
lLlxd4 lLlf6 5 lLlc3 lLlc6 6 .itc4 b6
7 lLlb3 e6 8 0-0 a6 9 e3 Wlc7 1 0 f4
j.e7 1 1 f3 0-0 1 2 d3 b5, and
1 e4 c5 2 ltJf3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4
lLlxd4 a6 5 lLlc3 V//Jc 7 6 d3 lLlc6 7
e3 lLlf6 8 0-0 b5 9 lLlb3 .i..e 7 10 f4
d6 1 1 'iWf3 0-0. It is clear that this
move order is favourable for Black
because he is a tempo up compared
to the variation 4 .. . 'ib6.
After 1 2 ... b5 White has several
continuations at his disposal. One of
the most significant, 13 g4, is sepa
rately given in the next chapter. Other
continuations are:
C3 1 : 1 3 h1
C32: 1 3 a3
C33: 13 Qg3
C34: 1 3 Qh3
C35: 1 3 e5!
13 An was seen in Matulovic
Chiburdanidze, Vinkovci 1 982. The
idea of re-routing the dark-squared
bishop to the kingside to support the
c4-e5 attack is interesting, but it costs
two tempi. The best reply is 13 Ab7
1 4 'Wh3 f.tad8 with equal play. In
stead the game continued 13 b4 (It's
not necessary to hurry with this move)
14 l2Jd1 .itb7 ( 1 4 e5? 1 5 lLle3 exf4
1 6 l2Jd5 ! l2Jxd5 1 7 exd5 l2Je5 1 8
xe5 ! dxe5 1 9 d6+-) 1 5 'fi'h3 e5 1 6
h4 ( 1 6 lLle3) 1 6 ... l2Jd7 1 7 lLie3
.i.xh4 1 8 'Wxh4 'Wd8 1 9 'iWxd8
axd8 20 lLlc4 with slightly better
chances for White.

C3 1 :
13
Whl
b7
Instead 13 b4 14 lL\d1 b7 1 5
ii. f2 a5 1 6 h3 g6 1 7lLie3 l:tfe8 1 8
..th4 with chances for both sides, was
played in Jones-Suzuki, Novi Sad OL
1 990. It is more in the spirit of the
line is to refrain from ...b5-b4. The
better plan is to post the knight on
the b4 square with the idea of con
trolling White's very strong light
squared bishop.
b4
14
1rh3
14 ... b4? 15 e5 ! dxe5 16 fxe5 l2Jxe5
1 7 f4 lLixd3 1 8 .1i.xc7 lLlxe 1 19
.l:l:.xe1 bxc3 20 bxc3 Savanovic
Djukic, Kladovo 1 994.
15
itld4 (D)
...

...

...

This position, which is important


for the 4 . . . 'iWb6 system, has been
tested in several games from tourna
ment practice:
a) 15 g6?! 1 6 f5 gxf5 1 7 exf5 e5
1 8 .i.h6 h8 19 xf8 l:txf8 20
liJf3 Pritchett-Large, British eh
1 980.
b) 15 d5 (This typical central
...

...

.16 Classical Line with 9 .i.eJ (without g4)

break is premature here, but a possi


ble alternative is 15 . /t)xdJ!? 1 6
cxd3 b4 1 7 lba4 l:.ac8 intending
. . . WaS) 1 6 eS lt:Je4 1 7 xe4 d.xe4
1 8 a3 'Llc6 1 9 lLlce2 'Llxd4 20 'Llxd4
aS 2 1 'f!Vg3 l:.a6 22 l:.d1 b4 23 fS
exfS 24 'Llxf5 l:.g6 25 ..tb6! 1 -0
lvanovic-Kocovski, Dojran 1 992.
c) 15 Dac8 1 6 a3 'Llxd3 1 7 cxd3
Wd8! 1 8 :n 'Lld7 1 9 l:.d1 .i.f6 20
l:.g3 l:.e8 2 1 f5 ctJffl22 'ii'g4 l:.c7 23
l:.fl c8 and Black had enough de
fensive resources, Belikov-Akopian,
St. Petersburg 1 993. This is an in
structive example of how Black
should treat the diagram position.
..

..

C32 :
13 a 3
Ab7 (D)
13 ...Db8, retaining the bishop on
the c8-h3 diagonal, is. another possi
ble plan. For example, 1 4 'f!Vg3 b4
1 5 axb4 l:.xb4 ( 1 S ... 'Llxb4!?) 1 6 d2
l:td8 1 7 e5 d.xe5 1 8 fxeS l:.xd3 1 9
cxd3 l:.xb3 20 exf6 cS+ 2 1 hi
'ixg3 22 hxg3 with better chances
for White, Fogarasi-Bech Hansen,
Budapest 1 992.

14 fi'h3
Or 14 Wh1l:He8 ( 1 4... l:.ac8 1 S g4
b4 1 5 axb4 'Llxb4 1 6 gS ctJd7 1 7 ctJd4
ctJcS=) 1 5 'i!Vh3 l:.ad8 16 ctJd4 'Llxd4
1 7 xd4 ctJd7 ( 1 7 ... eS !?) 1 8 eS and:
a) After 1 8...g6!? White's attempt
to attack at once with 1 9 f5? ! ( 1 9
exd6) 1 9 . . . exf5 20 l:.xf5 collapsed
after 20 . . . 'LlxeS 2 1 l:.exe5? (21 xeS
dxe5 22 l:.fxe5 c6) 2 l . . .d.xe5 22
xeS l:. xd3 ! 23 cxd3 W c8 0- 1 ,
Christian-Liicke, Hamburg 1 990.
b) 18.. f81 9 fS d.xe5 (19 ... exfS !?)
20 xeS 'flcs 21 f6 gxf6 22 xf6
xf6 23 l:.xf6 figS 24 l:.efl l:.d4 25
l:.xt7 l:.h4 26 l:.xf8+ l:xf8 27 'il!Vxe6+
r3;g7 28 Wd7+ g8 29 'ife6+ Yz-Y2
Somlai-Liicke, Budapest 1 99 1 .
14
b4
14 ... Dad8 1 S g4 h6 1 6 g5 ctJh7
1 7 g6 was dubious for Black in
Myrvold-Razuvaev, Gausdal 1 993,
but 14...Dfe8 is interesting: 1 5 f5 ( 1 5
e 5 dxe5 1 6 fxe5 'Ll x e S 1 7 .i.f4
'ifb6+!) 1 5 . . .exf5 1 6 'ixf5 'Lle5 1 7
h 3 l:tac8 1 8 .i.d4 d8 1 9CLld2 'id7
20 'ii'f4 'ife6 with an unclear posi
tion, Thipsay-Vasiukov, Delhi 1 987.
In case White played 'Oth 1 instead of
lhe 1 , then, in playing ...b4, Black
has to take into account the possible
central break e4-eS, which was dis
cussed earlier.
axb4
15
The game Kupreichik-Tal, Sochi
1 970, was also interesting. The same
position arose with a different move
order where White was a tempo up,
that is, the move 'lt>h 1 was already
played. There followed an unex.

Classical Line with 9 eJ (without g4) 27

pected "semi-correct" sacrifice 1 6


tt:Jd5 ! ? exd5 1 7 exd5 tLlb8 1 8 J.d4
g6 1 9 l:tf3 ( 19 l:te3 ! ) 19 .. . Axd5 20
l:tfe3 d8 2 1 '*'h4 lZJbd7 22 'ifh6
'irb7 23 l:tg3 and now, instead of the
most consistent 2 3 . . . b6 ! , Black
played the incorrect 23 ... tt:Jc5? and
lost in a few moves after 24 lZJxc5
dxc5 25 f5 ! cxd4 26 fxg6 fxg6 27
xg6 'Oi;>h8 28 1Wxf8+ tLlg8 29 f5 !
l:tb8 3 0 l:te8 W fl 3 1 l:th3 1 -0.
xb4
15
16
d4! (D)
16 e5? is wrong: 1 6 .. . dxe5 1 7 fxe5
1Wxe5 1 8 .l:txf6 lZJxd3.

practice after 1 6 tLld4 (the diagram


position), Black did not have the
worse of it:
a) 16 . .xd3 1 7 cxd3 :res 1 8
tt:J f3 .l:lac8 1 9 g4 tt:Jd7 20 g5 f8 2 1
g6 hxg6 22 tt:Jg5 tt:Jf6 2 3 d4 tt:Jh5
24 f5 exf5 25 exf5 l:txe 1 26 lhe I
iVa5 with a sharp position, Peters
Fedorowicz, USA eh I 984.
b) 16...d7 I 7 'if;hi (I7 f5 !?) I 7...
tLlc5 (Perhaps it is better to keep this
knight closer to the kingside, so I 7...
tt:Jxd3 and I 7 ... l:tac8 deserve attention)
1 8 l:td1 lZJcxd3 I 9 cxd3 Af6 20 l:tf3
.l:lae8 21 l:tg3 h8 with an unclear
position, Vuruna-Z.Ilic, Tivat 1 995.
.

C33:
13 1lg3
The transfer of the queen to h3 is a
much more usual option but the alter
native '1Wg3 should also be seriously
considered. In both cases, regardless of
whether the queen is on g3 or h3,
White's plan to organise the attack is
based on the timely e4-e5.
a) 13 Wh8 I4 h i b7 1 5 tLld4
( 1 5 e5? dxe5 1 6 fxe5 'i!Wxe5 ! 1 7 f4
'Wh5 1 8 Ae2 '1Wg6 :::;: ) 1 5 ... .l:lae8!? 1 6
tt:Jxc6 .i.xc6 1 7 e 5 tt:Jd7 1 8 'iih3 g6
19 Ad4! (19 exd6 1Wxd6=) 19 . . . dxe5
20 fxe5 c5 2 1 xc5 lZJxc5 22 'ifh6
and, according to Nadanian, White
has a small edge (Muhametov
Nadanian, Czestochowa 1991).
b) 13 b4 1 4 tLldi a5 15 tt:Jt2 a4
16 tLld4 tt:Jxd4 1 7 .txd4 e5 1 8 fxe5
tt:Jh5 19 'iff3 dxe5 20 1Wxh5 exd4 2 1
e5 g 6 2 2 'ife2 Yz- Yz Y .Griinfeld
Grivas, Novi Sad OL 1 990.
...

Here we have a position similar to


variation C3 1 . The difference is that
the a-pawn has been exchanged and
White did not play 'if;hl , which, theo
retically speaking, favours Black. It
seems that the best plan for Black is
. . . tt:Jd7, . . . f6, and then perhaps
... l:tae8 or ... l:tac8. Here, too, it is dangerous to play the provocative 16 ...g6?!
because White obtains an attack after
1 7 f5 e5 I 8 fxg6! exd4 I 9 l:txf6 fxg6
20 l:txfE+ l:txfE 2I xd4 .
In two examples from tournament

28 Classical Line with 9 eJ (without g4)

C34:
13
1th3
White plays this regardless of the
fact that the black bishop is still on
the c8-h3 diagonal.
a) Among several ways to parry
the e4-e5 threat, I consider the flex
ible 13 ... b4 is best.
b) In the game Waitzkin-Olesen,
New York 1 993, Black treated the
variation poorly and it was convinc
ingly shown that the plan of pushing
the queenside pawns ( ... b4, ... a5) is
slow in this particular position. White
achieved a clear advantage after
13 ...1ld8 14 g4 b4?! 1 5 'Lle2 tLld7
1 6 g5 a5 1 7 'Llg3 a4 1 8 tLld2 g6 1 9
l:te2 Jl. f8 2 0 f5.
c) For the forcing variation 13 ... e5
1 4 f5 'Llb4 1 5 g4 d5 1 6 g5 the criti
cal move is 16 ... d4! ? since the alter
native 16 ...xe4 1 7 'Llxd5 tLlxd5 1 8
.i.xe4 is favourable for White. In the
game Payen-Wauters, Cannes 1 989,
followed 1 8 ... lLlxe3 19 l:txe3 .i.xg5
20 l:tg3 .i.f6 21 '4Wg2! 'iYa7+ 22 c;i;>h1
l:tb8 23 l'hg7+ c;i;>h8 24 .l:r.xh7+
xh7 25 'ifh3+ 1 -0.
C35:
13
e5! (D)
The most challenging continua
tion, which is the main line recom
mended for White against the 2 ...
lLlc6, 4 ... 'i!Vb6 system b y Nunn &
Gallagher in BTSJ. Therefore your
opponents are most likely to be aware
of the possibility!
This central breakthrough used to
be regarded as a premature reaction,

but the latest example from practice


puts this j udgment under severe
doubts. As in many other Sicilian
positions, the question is - whether
to play .. . dxe5 or to prefer ... 'Lld7,
avoiding the opening of the c 1 -h6
diagonal that activates White's dark
squared bishop. Does the weak e5pawn balance White's activity?
Black now has three continuations
at his disposal.
a) 13 ... dxe5 14 fxe5 when:
a 1 ) 14 ... d7 15 .i.f4! (Better then
1 5 'ifh3? ! g6 1 6 h6 l1d8 ! with an
unclear position) 1 5 ... b7 1 6 'iYg3
and, according to Nadanian, White
has the advantage.
a2) For many years, theory con
sidered that Black could sacrifice the
aS-rook by 14 ...xe5? 1 5 xa8
lLleg4 when most continuations fa
vour Black. For example, if 16 Af4?
'ikb6+ 1 7 h1 .i.b7-+ while after 16
l:lf4 lLlxe3 17 'iff3 'Llc4! 18 l:tfl
lLlxb2 1 9 a4 b7 20 ifh3 tLlxd3 2 1
irxd3 l:tc8 (Delekta-Z.IIic, Capelle
la Grande 1 992) Black had the supe
rior position.

Classical Line with 9 eJ (without g4) 29

However, the latest e xample


clearly disproved this line: 16 g3!
(The only move) 16 . . . b7 ( 1 6 . . .
lLlxe3 1 7 llxe3 b6 1 8 'i!V f3 b7
1 9 f4 lLl g4 20 lle 1 lLl xe3 2 1
'it'xe3+-) 1 7 f!/a7 f!/c6 1 8 .i.e4! (The
key move which seals Black's fate)
l 8 . . . lLlxe4 19 lLla5 'ikc5 20 xc5
xc5+ 21 f!/xc5 lLlxc5 22 b4 1 -0
Uicke-Grivas, Dortmund 1 992.
b) The practical experience with
the continuation 13 ... d7 is, I think,
not encouraging from Black's point
of view. The game Nadanian-Palevic,
corr. 1993, had the following course:
1 4 exd6 (Weaker is 1 4 fi'h3 g6 1 5
cxd6 Axd6 1 6 f5 exf5 1 7 lL:\d5 'id8
1 8 l:'txf5 f6 1 9 l:!.ffl lL:\de5 with a
good play for Black, Kofidis-Grivas,
l l ioupolis 1 995) 14 l'Wxd6 (not
l4 . . . .txd6? 1 5 kxb5 !) (D)
...

IV

15 aS lLlxa5 1 6 V!Wxa8 b7
( 1 6 ... b4? ! 1 7 lLle4 'Wic7 1 8 'i!Va7 .i.b7
1 9 i.t2! 'Wic6 20 'iVe3! lLlc5 2 1 'i!Wh3
tuxd3 22 cxd3 :1: ) 1 7 'Wia7 b4 ! 1 8

l:tdl ! (Both 1 8 lL:\b5? 'iVc6 1 9 l:!.t2


:ta8 20 lL:ld4 'ird5, and 18 lLle4?
'ifc6 19 l:te2 f5 20 lLlg5 J:a8 21 'ifd4
c5 are losing for White) 1 8 .. .'iVc7!
( 1 8 . . . bx c3? 1 9 xh7+ 'i17xh7 20
l:txd6 .txd6 2 1 'ii'd4! c5 22 'ii'd3+
g8 23 xc5 lLlxc5 24 'ifc3+-) 1 9
..ltxa6! l:ta8 ( l 9 ... bxc3 ! ? 20 _txb7
etJxb7 21 b3 ::!; ) 20 lL:\b5! 'ifxc2! 2 1
l:!. d 2 ( 2 1 .txb7 ! ? ) 2 1 . . . l:txa7 2 2
l hc2 l:!.x a6 2 3 l:!. d 1 etJf6 ( 2 3 . . .
lL:\f8 ! ?) 24 llc7 .i.f8! \ll- Y2.
Instead of these complicated vari
ations involving grabbing the ex
change, White can, in the diagram
position, play the simpler 15 l0e4!
'Wic7 1 6 ..Wh5 g6 1 7 'iWh6 with the
initiative. (All the above analyses are
given by Nadanian.) Additionally,
BTSJ says that 15 .ae4 .i.b7 16 f5
is a dangerous-looking continuation
and it also indicates the possibilities
15 Wih3 and 15 l:ld1 as well as 1 5
lLle4.
c) 13 ... l0e8!? is also possible. It
is not easy to make a proper assess
ment of whether thi s move or
1 3 .. . lL:\d7 is more reliable.
In the game S ocko-Bielczuk,
Hlohovec 1 993, after 14 etJd4 lLlxd4
( 1 4 ... ..ltb7!?) 1 5 .txd4 (If 15 'Wixa8?
then 1 5 . . . b7 1 6 'f!ia7 dxe5 with the
idea . . . i.c5) 1 5 . . . .tb7 1 6 h3 g6 1 7
'i17 h 1 l:d8 1 8 lLle4 ..ltxe4 19 l:xe4
White had a certain advantage.
However, it cannot be concluded
from this example that 1 3 ... etJe8 is
unplayable.

Cl assical Line : White


Attacks with g 2-g4

In this chapter we shall examine


the variations where White plays g2g4 in conjunction with kingside
castling.
It goes without saying that the plan
involving g2-g4 is the most aggres
sive one. Here we have a case where
White quite reasonably applies the
well-known strategic rule that the side
with the opening advantage should
attack. The sharp positions that arise
are reminiscent of those from the
Scheveningen Sicilian. The differ
ence that his light-squared bishop has
been developed at d3 and not at e2
suits White.
Usually the advance g2-g4 is made
after the following introductory
moves: 1 e4 c5 2 l0f3 l0c6 3 d4 cxd4
4 l0xd4 1lb6 S l0b3 l0f6 6 l0c3 e6
7 _ad3 a6 8 0-0 ll.e7 9 e3 .c7 10
r4 d6 u trn o-o (DJ.
It is also interesting to play the line
g2-g4 without the move 'it'f3. With this
White can gain time if, later in the
game, he plays directly 'iWh5 without
the intermediate move 'iff3. For ex
ample, 11 a4 b6 1 2 g4 .i.b7 1 3 g5 tZ:Id7
14 f5! tZ:Ide5 15 'ith5 gave a prefer
able position for White, Kolker
Nadanian, USSR 1 99 1 .

As usual, instead of 'i!Vf3, White


can also develop his queen on the e2square: 1 1 .e2 0-0 (It's possible to
postpone castling and first start
counterplay on the queenside, 1 1 ... b5
1 2 g4 Ab7 { 1 2 ... h5?! 1 3 gS tZ:Ig4 14
.i.d2} 1 3 gS tZ:Id7 ;!; ) 12 g4 l:e8
(12 ...b5) 13 g5 tZ:Id7 1 4 l:tf3 g6 1 5
:afl ! b5 1 6 :h3 b4? (This move
only helps White to move his knight
to the kingside and exploit the weak
f6 and h6 squares.) 1 7 tZ:Idl f8 1 8
lLlt2 ii.g7 1 9 tZ:Ig4 dS 20 lLlh6+! with
a clear advantage for White, A.
Rodriguez-Carlier, Amsterdam 1 987.

Again we have the position after


1 1 . . .0-0 which was the main subject
of Chapter 2, but here White's plan

Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

is more aggressive. It is convenient


to consider separately:
A: 1 2 g4 and
8: 1 2 l:!.ae 1 b5 1 3 g4.
The ideas are similar but there are
also differences, which are better no
ticed if the material is given separately.
Before starting to examine these
variations, let us mention the follow
ing. If White intends to play the varia
tion with g2-g4, it is unnecessary to play
1 2 a3 ftrst, which here can be consid
ered a waste of time. The following
two examples, where this move order
was played, are interesting:
a) l2 b5 1 3 g4 b7 1 4 g5 lt:Jd7
I 5 'i!Yh3 l:!.fe8 1 6 f5 exf5 1 7 lt:JdS
ft'd8 1 8 'iWxf5 lt:Jce5 1 9 h4 -tf8 20
i.. d4 g6 2 1 'iWf4 -txd5 22 exd5 Ag7
and Black managed to solve his prob
lems, Schweber-Rubinetti, Mar del
Plata 1 968.
b) That Black cannot treat the
variation passively is seen from the
example Pyhala-Perlstein, Warsaw
1 989, where after 1 2 l:le8 1 3 g4
{jj d7 1 4 g5 g6 1 5 h4 b5 1 6 h5 l:!.b8
1 7 'it>g2 b4 1 8 l:th 1 ! bxc3 1 9 hxg6
fxg6 20 l:!.xh7! White obtained an ir
resistible attack.
For other lines with 1 2 a3 see
Chapter 2.
...

...

31

details. In particular, their suggestion


at White's 1 5'h move in l ine A23
awaits practical tests.
Black has these possibilities:
A 1 : 1 2 . . . lt:Jb4!?
A2: 1 2 ... b5
He cannot be satisfted with:
a) 12 d5?! 1 3 e5 lt:Jd7 14 l:!.ae1
b5 1 5 'Wh3 g6 1 6 :n f6 1 1 'Wh6
lt:JdxeS! (The only chance. 1 7 . . . l:tf7
loses after 18 .i.xg6 hxg6 19 l:th3
l:tg7 20 lt:Jxd5 ! ) 1 8 fxe5 lt:Jxe5 1 9
.l:h3 .i.d6 2 0 'ifh4 .i.b7? (20 . . . ..td7)
2 1 'Lld4 lhe8 22 lt:Jcxb5! axb5 23
lt:Jxb5 'ffd7 24 lt:Jxd6 lt:Jf3+ 25 l:txf3
xd6 26 l:th3 l:!.e7 27 g5 f5 28 .i.d4
1 -0 Geller-Gufeld, Moscow 1 970.
The central structure which appears
after ... d6-d5, e4-e5, where Black
doesn't have the possibility ... lt:Je4,
but is forced to play ... lt:Jd7, favours
White in the majority of cases.
b) 12 1:le8!? 1 3 g5 lt:Jd7 (D)
...

...

A:

12 g4
Editor's Note: As this is one of
the options GMs Nunn and Gallagher
give for White in their popular book
Beating The Sicilian J, players of the
black side need to be attentive to the

Now:
b 1 ) 14 lrh3 is imprecise. White
loses a tempo, because he will later
play 'YWh5 anyway. For example,

32 Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

1 4... ltJf8 1 5 f5 lL\e5 1 6 ltJd4 b5 1 7


'it'h5 i..d7? ! (Better i s 1 7 ... i..b7) 1 8
f6 i..d8 1 9 ltJD ! ltJxd3 ! 20 cxd3 b4
2 1 fxg7 lL\g6 22 ltJe2 and now, in
stead of22 ....i..b 5? (Gallagher-Z.Ilic,
Bern 1 989), which was too slow,
Black should have played 22... 'it'c2
with counterplay.
b2) After 14 1rh5 it is best for
Black to continue 14... g6 1 5 h6
i.. f8 1 6 'ifh4 b5 1 7 .:n, transposing
into variation A22, discussed below.
Also possible is 14 ... b4 1 5 .l:tf3 g6
1 6 'ifh6 Af8 1 7 'ti'h4 i..g7 1 8 .l:tafl
ltJxd3 1 9 cxd3 f5 20 gxf6 (20 exf5 ! ?)
20 . . . i..xf6 oo Delgado-Larduet, Ha
vana 1 997. The plan which avoids the
move . . . g6, played in the game
Hawelko-Sznapik, Slupsk 1 988, is
less reliable: after 14... f8 1 5 f5
lL\e5 1 6 f6 i.. d8 1 7 ltJd4 White's
position was preferable.
b3) There is another way of con
ducting the kingside attack: 14 fS
lL\de5 1 5 g3 i..f8 1 6 l:[f4 seems
promising for White, Bezgodov
Kozlov, Perm 1 997.
A1:

b4!?
12
d7
13
gS
14
lrhS
g6
15
1Wh6
l:te8 (D)
This is one of the typical positions
for the 1 2 g4 variation. Instead of
1 5 ... .:e8, it's probably better to play
lS...bS and after 1 6 .l:tf3 to transpose
into the main line (A23 below) with
the radical 1 6... f5.
After 15 ... lle8 both the attack and

defence need to be extremely precise


and enterprising. Even a slight im
precision is sufficient for the oppo
site side to gain a decisive initiative.
a) 16 .a.ad 1 ! ? (A seldom played
idea that deserves attention. White
brings the queen's rook into the game,
combining threats on the kingside
with the pressure along the d-file.)
16 ... b5 1 7 a3 ltJxd3 18 l:.xd3 i.. f8
1 9 'ii'h4 i.. b7 ( 1 9 ... i..g 7?! 20 .l:tfd 1 )
2 0 i..d4 e5 2 1 fxe5 ltJxe5 2 2 .l:th3 h 5
2 3 gxh6 h7 2 4 'iVf4 .l:te7 2 5 ltJd2 !
with advantage to White, G.Mainka
Martinovic, Dortmund 1 988.
b) 16 llf3 Af8 1 7 'ilfh4 'ifds! 18
1'ff2 (White gives up the idea of a
direct attack) 1 8 ...f6 1 9 h4 b5 20 .l:tg3
fxg5 2 1 hxg5 i.. g 7 22 i.. fl ltJc6 23
:d1 b4 24 ltJa4 'fiic7 with chances
for both sides, Ciobanu-Lupu, Odor
heiu 1 993 . Worthy of consideration
is 18 l:lh3 h5 ( 1 8 ...h6!?) 1 9 ltJe2 with
the idea lL\g3.
A2:

12
bS (D)
Preference should be given to this
continuation.

Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

13
g5
13 ffh3! ? is a cunning move with
which the talented Bojan Knezevic
scored two effective victories against
renowned grandmasters. The fact that
Knezevic has the variation 4 . .. 'ib6
in his repertoire as Black leads to the
conclusion that the continuation 1 3
fVh3 i s the result of his home analy
ses and should not be underestimated.
White threatens to play g4-g5 after
e4-e5 and thereby eliminate the de
fence of the h7-square.
Black has to be very cautious:
a) 13 . b4? is a mistake because
White obtains a winning attack by
force after 1 4 e5 ! , e.g. 1 4.. . dxe5 1 5
g 5 lLlh5 1 6 ..txh7+ 'ifr>xh7 1 7 fVh5+
g8 1 8 l:!.f3 ..txg5 19 fxg5 lLle7 20
'Lle4 f5 21 gxf6 4Jf5 22 l:!.h3 1 -0 B.
Knezevic-Kurajica, Zaragoza 1 996.
This is an instructive example which
shows that the d3-bishop must always
be kept under control.
b) With the continuation 13...g6,
which in a radical way eliminates the
threats to the h7-square, Black was
not successful either in the game B.
Knezevic-Barlov, Yugoslavia eh,
..

33

Belgrade 1 998. There followed 14 g5


lLlh5 15 f5 b4 1 6 lLla4 exf5 17 exf5
'Llg7? (A mistake that enables White
to sacrifice the exchange and gain an
irresistible attack.) 1 8 lLl b6 .i.xf5 1 9
Axf5 lLlxf5 20 l:!.xf5 gxf5 2 1 lLld5
'ii' d7 22 lLld4 lLle5 23 lLlxf5 .i.d8 24
l:!.fl 'ii' e6 25 lLlf4 d7 26 .i.d4 l:ta7
27 lLld5 l:!.b7 28 'ii' h6 f6 29 lLlde7+
fl 30 'Wxf6+ We8 3 1 lLlg7+ 1 -0.
The centralisation of the white knight
should not have been allowed. Cor
rect is 1 7 . .. .l::t b 8! when in the case of
1 8 'it'h4 l:Ie8 1 9 l:!.ae 1 lLle5 20 f6
..ttE 2 1 ..te2 Black has 2 1 . . .'ii' c 6.
These two examples clearly dem
onstrate the hidden dangers lying be
hind the continuation 1 3 Vit'h3. What
is the best defence for Black?
c) The usual 13 it)b4 is also un
satisfactory because of 1 4 e5! dxe5
1 5 fxe5 'ffx e5 1 6 .i.f4! c5+ 1 7
g2! .i.b7+ 1 8 'it>g3 and Black loses
the queen.
d) Apart from Barlov's 1 3 . . . g6
where, despite Black's defeat, mat
ters are not quite clear, Black has at
his disposal 13 it)d7. In that case
one of the possible variations is 1 4
e 5 g 6 1 5 exd6 xd6 1 6 lLle4 J.. e7
1 7 f5 exf5 1 8 gxf5 lLlde5 19 g3
l:lfe8 20 fxg6 (20 a4!?) 20 . . .hxg6 21
lLlf6+ ..txf6 22 l:Ixf6 fie?. Thanks
to the centralised e5-knight, Black's
position is defensible.
13
it)d7
The position with the inflexible
13 ..ltle8?! arose by a different move
order in the game Fischer-Saidy, New
York 1 966. Black quickly faced se...

...

34 Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

rious problems after 1 4 'it'h5 g6 1 5


'it'h6 f5 1 6 exf5 gxf5 1 7 lt:Jd4 lt:Jd8
1 8 l:tae 1 lt:Jg7 1 9 l:tf3 lLlfl 20 'iVh4
lt:Jh8 2 1 l:lh3 h5 22 e2 etc.
14
'lfh5 (D)
The most enterprising plan. Before
considering thi s in detail, let us men
tion that the attacking plan involving
the march of the h-pawn is possible
but less dangerous. For example: 14
.x::la d1 l:le8 15 l:tf2 f8 16 h4 l:tb8
1 7 h5 lt:Jb4 1 8 ...g3 i.b7 19 ...h3
lt:Jc5 20 g6 fxg6 21 hxg6 h6 22 ll:Jd4
..tc8 23 'ifh5 lt:Jd7 24 An lLlf6 25
'ifh4? (This mistake allows Black to
achieve a winning position by force)
25 . . .e5! 26 fxe5 lt:Jg4 27 l:.xfl ._,b6!
28 i.f2 dxe5 and Black had a deci
sive advantage, Shamkovich-Z.I\ic,
Saint John 1 988.
Another less direct approach was
seen in the game Sarnrnalvuo-Grivas,
Moscow OL 1 994, in which after 14
a3 b4 15 axb4 lt:Jxb4 1 6 ll:Jd4 l:tb8
17 l:tf2 l:le8 18 f5 lt:Je5 1 9 'i!ie2 exf5
20 lt:Jxf5 .i.f8 there appeared a com
plex position with mutual chances.
White's direct attack with heavy
pieces along the h-file seems danger
ous and Black has to be extremely
skilful and cool-blooded in his de
fence. A single mistake is enough to
lose the game. Nevertheless, although
Black's situation seems dangerous, in
practice players on several occasions
have demonstrated the vitality of their
positions.
There are several modes of de
fence. Different types of positions
arise when Black plays:

A2 1 : 1 4 ... l:te8 (followed by ... ll:Jf8


without the move ... g6),
A22: 14 . .. g6, and
A23 : 1 4 liJb4.
. . .

A21:
14
15

.x::lf3 (D)

.x::le8

Now:
a) 15 b4 1 6 .il.d4 (With the
idea 1 6 ... g6? 1 7 'trxh7+ ! ) 1 6 ... e5 1 7
fxe5 lUxe5 1 8 AxeS g6 1 9 l:txfl
'it'a7+ 20 .i.d4 gxh5 \12-\12 Schiifer
Liicke, Munster 1 992.
b) 1 5 ... .ab7 16 l:th3 liJf8 1 7 l:tfl
b4 1 8 liJd1 g6 1 9 'i:Vh4 ( 1 9 'ffh6)
19 ... a5 20 f5 exf5 2 1 exf5 lt:Je5 22
...

Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

4Jd4?! (I don't see how Black would


defend himself in the case of 22 f6 !
'iWc6 23 .l:.g3 d8 24 'ii'h6 4Je6 25
4Jd4) 22 . . . d8 23 f6 h5 24 e2
'iWd7 25 .l:.g3 4Jh7 26 .i.xh5 gxh5 27
'i!Vxh5 h8 28 :f4 4Jg6 and Black
managed to parry White's threats and
win the game, Stebbings-Plaskett,
London 1 993.
c) 15 18 (It is better to play this
move after White 's :h3) 1 6 e5 g6
(If 1 5 . . . dxe5?, then 1 6 .i.xh7+ 4Jxh7
17 .l:.h3 wins) 1 7 exd6 'ii'xd6 1 8 'ifh6
f5 1 9 gxf6 ..i.xf6 20 4Je4 'it'd8 21
4Jxf6+ 'it'xf6 2 2 .i.e4 .i.b7 23 .l:.d l
(23 4Jc5) 2 3 . . . :ac8 2 4 ..i.c5 Yz-Yi
Nekrasov-Fomichenko, Krasnodar
1 996.
Although in the last two examples
Black scored good results, the impres
sion is that in both games he had a
hard time. The most economical de
fensive set-up for Black - where he
plays . . . 4Jf8 without the prior ma
noeuvre ...g6, ... ..i.f8, ... g7 - is not
entirely reliable. It's true that the f8knight is a powerful kingside de
fender, but it's not a sufficient
guarantee for a successful defence.

35

...

A22:
g6
14
1 5 'ffh6 (D)
In the case of the straightforward
attack 15 'ffh4 .l:.e8 1 6 :n h5 1 7
4Je2 .i. f8 1 8 4Jg3 .i.g7 1 9 4Jxh5
gxh5 20 'it'xh5 4Jf8 2 1 c3 .l:.e7 22
l:g3 .i.b7 Black had sufficient de
fensive resources in the game David
B. Knezevic, France 1 997.

After the correct 1 5 'it'h6, Black


has in practice played two continuations.
15
This is the stronger. The other is
15 f6 e.g. 1 6 4Jd4 4Jxd4 (Weak is
16 ... 'Llc5? 17 f5 'Lle5 18 fxe6 'Llxe6
1 9 tLld5 'i!Vd8 20 tLlxe6 J&.xe6 2 1
.i.b6 'i!Vd7 22 gxf6 .td8 2 3 tLle7+
and White won, B.Knezevic-Zivic,
Kladovo 1 994) 1 7 ..i.xd4 d5 ! ( 1 7 ...
:n?! 1 8 f5 .i. f8 1 9 'it'h3! Ulybin
Akopian, USSR 1988) 1 8 exd5 .i.c5
1 9 .i.xc5 'ii'x c5+ 20 l:!f2 exd5 2 1
.i.xg6 hxg6 22 'iVxg6+ h8 2 3 l:1 e 1
l:!a7 24 b4 'i!fxb4 25 'it'h6+ Yz-Yz
Schiifer-Kohlweyer, Germany 1 992.
Af8
16 l:ln
16 . . . b4? loses after 17 :h3 tLlfS
1 7 f5.
17
'ffh4 (D)
This is an important position for
the g2-g4 variation. In practice, it can
also appear from the move order char
acteristic of the Sozin line: 1 e4 c5 2
tLlf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 tLlxd4 tLlf6 5
tLlc3 tLlc6 6 .i.c4 'ii'b6 7 tLlb3 e6 8
.i.e3 'i!fc7 9 f4 .i.e7 10 0-0 0-0 1 1
.i.d3 a6 1 2 g4 b5 1 3 g5 tLld7 1 4 'ifh5
...

36 Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

g6 1 5 'it'h6 .l:.eB 1 6 .l:.f3 fll 1 7 h4


(We see that White compensated for
the loss of tempo c4-d3 by playing
not d1 -f3-h5 but directly d1-h5).

The dynamic position above re


quires a concrete approach and en
terprising play by both sides. From
the existing examples from practice
it is not easy to conclude which of
Black's defensive plans is superior.
b4
17
It seems that this is a useful inter
mediate move in this particular posi
tion. The point is that White plans to
attack with f4-f5 and in the event that
the c3-knight has been chased away,
Black may be able to answer f4-f5
with . . . exf5, not worrying about the
d5 square. 17 ...Ab7?! is definitely
weaker: 1 8 l:th3 h6 1 9 gxh6 h7 20
:n Jle7 2 1 'it'f2 l:g8 22 'Lld2 'Llb4
23 'Llf3 Z.Markovic-Martinovic,
Niksic 1 997.
The alternative is 17...Jlg7 when:
a) 18 J:lafl ! ? b7 ( 1 8 . .. b4) 1 9 f5
(Probably 1 9 l:th3 lt:lfll 20 f5 is bet
ter and after 20. . b4 2 1 f6 bxc3 22
.

fxg7 xg7 it is less favourable for


Black that his bishop is on the b7
square) 1 9 . . . b4 20 f6 h8 2 1 'Lldl
lt:lce5 22 l:h3 'Llfll 23 .li.d4 'Llxd3
24 cxd3 e5 25 f2 c8 26 l:lg3 lt:le6
27 i.e3 'ii' c 2 and Black obtained
counterplay in A . Martin-Garcia
Ilundain, Spain 1993.
b) 18 l:lh3 lZ:lf8 19 f5 and now:
b 1 ) 19 ... exf5 20 'Lld5 d8 2 1
b6 is in White 's favour,
b2) while in case of 19 ...Axc3?
there follows 20 f6 ! with the inde
fensible attack as in the game
Akopian-Prakash, Mamaia 1 99 1 .
After 20 . .. xf6 2 1 gxf6 h5 22 'i!Vf4
e5 23 1Wh6 'Lle6 24 ""h1 'id8 25
1:.fl Black resigned since he is de
fenceless against 26 l:rxh5 and 27
l:g l .
b3) 1 9... b4! 20 f6 (Forced because
after the knight move there would
follow 20 . ..exf5 and White does not
have the 'Lld.5 option.) 20 ... bxc3 2 1
fxg7 xg7 22 bxc3 e5 23 .l:.f3 e6
24 .l!tafl lt:la5 25 'Lld4 exd4 26
xd4+ f6 27 'it'h6+ ""g8 28 llxf6
l:leb8 29 h4! (29 f!f7? 'it'xf7 30 l:txf7
xf7 3 1 g7+ 'ltr>e8) 29 ... lt:lc6 30
h5 lt:lxd4 3 1 cxd4 xa2. This analy
sis is by Ulybin and Lysenko (Jnf
onnator 66). Further they recommend
32 d5 !? or 32 e5!? with the idea .te4,
assessing the positions in both cases
with the unclear sign ( oo ).
18 llh3
Weaker is 1 8 'Lldl g7 19 'Llf2
( 1 9 l:th3 !?) 1 9 . . . f5 (Or 1 9 . . . 'ftfd8 20
l:h3 h5 2 1 f5 exf5 22 exf5 lLlde5 23
e4 gxf5 24 i.d5 f4 25 .txf4 xh3

Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

26 'ifxh3 l:tc8 27 'ifxh5 liJe7 28 Ae4


liJ7g6 29 Ae3 liJc4 + A .Martin
Eiguezabal, Alicante 1 989) 20 gxf6
xf6 2 1 'ig3 'Ot>h8 22 :n b7 oo
Gul l aksen-Mochalov, Debrecen
1992.
h5
18
19 itle2 (D)

Now:
a) 19 ...Ag7 when:
a 1) 20 itlg3 a5 2 1 l:!.fl a4 22 liJd2
liJc5 when unclear complications
arose after the direct attack 23 liJxh5
gxh5 24 'i!Vxh5 in Schurade-Borriss,
East Germany 1 989. The game con
tinued 24 . . . liJxd3 25 cxd3 l2Jd4 26
e 5 ! ? (26 'Ot>h 1 ) 26 . . . liJf5 27 liJe4
lUxe3 (Interesting is 27 ... b7 28
lbf6+ 'Ot>f8 29 llc1 'i!Vd8) 28 CUf6+
'Ot>ffl 29 'ifh8+ xh8 30 l:!.xh8+ <J;;g7
31 l:!.xe8 b7? (The decisive mis
take: after 3 l ...'it>g6 32 f5+ 'ifi>xg5 33
l:tg8+ h6 White would have noth
ing better than perpetual check) 32
l:txa8 'Ot>g6 33 f5+ and White won.
a2) 20 Dn Axb2? 2 1 f5 exf5
22 liJf4 liJe7 23 exf5 liJf8 24 liJxh5

37

gxh5 25 'ir'xh5 liJxf5 26 liJd4 lll h6


27 gxh6 xh3 28 'it'g5+ liJg6 29
'iVf6 1 -0, Ulybin-N.Kirov, Capelle
la Grande 1 996. The capture on b2
was overoptimistic, but the line
20 . . itlf8 21 liJd2 .i.xb2? ! (2 1 . . .
l:!.b8) 2 2 'Llc4 .tg7 2 3 lll b 6 l:!.b8
24 liJxc8 l:bxc8 25 f5 is also in
White ' s favour according to Ulybin
and Lysenko.
b) 19... a5!? (In cold blood Black
hurries with his counterplay on the
queenside.) 20 itlg3?! .i.a6 21 xa6
l:xa6 22 CUxh5 gxh5 23 'tlfxh5 g7
24 1i'h7+ 'it;fl! 25 l:tfl a4 + Ulybin
Ruban, Kursk 1 987. To assess the
validity of the continuation 1 9 ... a5,
it is necessary to test in practice the
position arising after the superior 20
Ilfl instead of the committal move
20 'Llg3?! .
.

A23:
itlb4
14
This is the introductory move for
a defensive system that essentially
differs from the two previously ex
amined ones. The standard move
. .. lll b4, as in many other positions, is
useful here too. The knight controls
the d5 square and, if necessary, can
eliminate White ' s light-squared
bishop. The control of the d5-square
will enable Black to take a radical
action on the kingside with . . . f7-f5,
with which he parries White's threats
along the h-file. This theme gives the
variation a completely independent
character.

38 Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

15 :o
BTSJ says that 15 f5!?, to fore
stall Black's planned reaction, de
serves consideration.
g6
15
15 lle8 transposes into the game
Schiifer-Liicke, given above in A2 l .
1 6 .h6
f5!
17 exf5 (D)
Less enterprising is 17 gxf6 l:txf6
1 8 l:g3 ( 1 8 tlJd4 g5 !) 1 8 ... t2Jf8 1 9
t2Jd4 ( 1 9 e5?! dxe5 2 0 fxe5 l: f7 2 1
.i.e4 .i.b7 ) 1 9 . . tlJxd3 ( l 9.. . e5? 20
tLlf5 ) 20 cxd3 .i.d7! with a satis
factory position for Black, Bellia
Grivas, Vinkovci 1 989.
..

t2Jxd3 19 d5 (If 19 l:th3 l:tf7 20


tlJd5 'it'b7 21 tlJxe7+ l:xe7 22 cxd3
'ii' d 5 and B l ack i s doing fine)
l 9.. .'iVd8 2 0 cxd3 (20 d4? ! tlJ3e5!)
2 0.. b7 2 1 d4 l:lf7 and Black i s
O.K., or here 20 xe7+ 't!Vxe7 21
cxd3 .i.b7 and Black has promising
play once more.
1s
:n
19
.i.d4
19 .i.xf5 doesn't work because
after 1 9 . . gxf5 20 g6 B lack has
20 . . l:tg7.
fB (D)
19
.

w
B

exf5
17
18 l:th3
It should be noticed that in this
l i n e B l a c k sti l l hasn ' t p l a y e d
. . . .i.b7. Is the reduced control o f
the d5-square significant, that is,
can White utilise this square in a
concrete way?
A brief analysis shows that Black
has a satisfactory defence in all lines.
For instance: 1 8 d4 tlJc5, or 18 a3

The only adequate defence; Black


keeps his head above water.
Compare this position with the one
from the game Chandler-Gufeld,
Dortmund 1 983 (Variation B 1 1 ).
Things are more favourable for Black
here since White doesn't have the
move 20 .i.xf5 because of the sim
ple 20 .. .i.xf5. In the above-men
tioned game the moves l:tae 1 and
... .i.b7 were interpolated, so White
had the decisive 2 1 .i.xf5.
If White now continues 20 l:te1 ,
.

Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

Black is not forced to play the in


correct 20 ... Ab7? 2 1 Axf5 ! gxf5
22 g6 ! + - , but i n stead chooses
20.../Qxd3. Then in the case of 2 1
lt:ld5 'it'b7 22 lhe7 l:xe7! (22 . . .
'ifxd5? 23 'ifg7+) 23 lt:l f6+ f7
Black' s king has escaped while his
opponent (the white king) has be
come the target.
The positions from chapters A and
B are very similar so it's necessary
to compare them in order to have an
adequate opinion about the line.
B:

12 llael
Everything in this section needs to
be compared with line C in Chapter
2, where Black' s alternative 1 2'h
moves and White's alternative 1 3'h
moves are analysed.
12
b5
Nunn points out that 12 .../Qd7
may be best, when if 1 3 g4 (avoiding
the transpositions discussed in Chap
ter 2) 1 3 ... b5 1 4 g5 Ab7 we reach
line B l l below. We shall see there
some improvements for Black on the
lines given in BTSJ.
13
g4 (D)
This is aggressive but perhaps
not as dangerous as 13 e5 (Chapter
2, line C35) which is Nunn's rec
ommendation.
We see that this variation differs
from the previous one because the
moves .:tae 1 and (usually) ... Ab7
have been interpolated. It's difficult
to say for which side it is the more
favourable.

39

At first glance, it seems that 1 2


.l:.ae 1 slows down the whole idea of
the g2-g4 attack but it is unsafe to
generalise because, in many posi
tions, the e-file becomes a very im
portant factor if the centre is opened.
On the other hand, notice the fact
that in the most common move order
(line 8 1 below) Black lacks the de
fensive potential of his bishop along
the c8-h3 diagonal.
Therefore, although the bishop can
play an active role on the b7-square,
one should seriously consider the
variations where Black postpones the
development of this piece.
The alternatives are:
B1 : 1 3 . .. Ab7
B2: 1 3 ... lt:ld7
a) 13 ... b4?! 1 4 lt:le2 d5?! (Black
has no justification for such activity)
1 5 e5 lt:le4 16 lt:lg3 f5 1 7 exf6 lt:lxf6
1 8 g5 lt:le8 19 'ifh5 g6 20 J.xg6! +
Videki-Varga, Harkany 1 993. Here
14 ... a5, with the idea ... J.a6, is a bet
ter plan.
b) 13 ... g6 14 g5 lt:lh5 1 5 lt:le2 f6
1 6 lt:lg3 lt:lxg3 1 7 'ifxg3 fxg5 1 8 fxg5
e5 oo Dervishi-Bellon, Bern 1 996.

40 Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

B1:

Ab7
13
This is the main continuation.
d7
14
g5
15
Ylh5 (DJ
1 5 Ylh3 c auses Black fewer
problems. After the correct 1 5 . . .
CZJ b4 there are several examples
from tournament practice where, as
a rule, there arose very complex
positions with m utual chances.
Black achieved satisfactory results.
a) 16 a3 is not in the spirit of the
sharp g2-g4 system. White's attack
loses its intensity. For example,
16 ... lbxd3 17 cxd3 ctJc5 18 CZJc 1 d5
1 9 exd5 l:ad8! (With the pawn sac
rifice Black achieves excellent play
along the diagonal a8-h 1 ) 20 d4 ctJa4
21 4Jxa4 bxa4 22 dxe6 'i!Vc6 23 ext7+
%1xt7 24 lbd3 i..xg5 ! 25 ctJe5 'it'h 1 +
26 <itt2 'We4 27 4Jxt7 h4+! 28
We2 't!Vc2+ 29 j.d2 Wxf7 0- 1 Rose
Liicke, Germany 1 992.
b) 16 d4 l:lae8 1 7 1:10 i.. d8 (An
interesting defensive set-up for
Black.) 1 8 'ii'h4 g6 1 9 l:!.h3 h5 20
j.e2 Wg7 2 1 f5 .l:!:h8 22 a3 (22 f6+ ! ?
Wh7 2 3 j.xh5? g8) 2 2... lbc6 23
l:fl lbde5 oo Bemdt-Grivas, Dort
mund 1 992.
c) 16 f5 exf5 17 exf5 lbxd3 1 8 cxd3
( 1 8 g6 ctJf6 ! eo ) 1 8 .. J:!.ae8! and now:
c 1 ) The direct advance 19 f6 fa
vours Black after 1 9 . . .gxf6! 20 gxf6
.ixf6! 21 l:txf6 lZJxf6 22 'llg 3+ h8
23 i..d4 :xel+ 24 flxe1 l:lg8+, while
19 g6 leads to perpetual check in the
case of l 9...hxg6 (1 9. . . lbf6!?) 20 fxg6
fxg6 21 'i!t'e6+ <1r>h7 22 1Wh3+.

c2) 19 d4 i.. d8! (Opens the e


file and prepares the transfer of the
bishop to the a7-g1 diagonal.) 20 a3
lbe5 2 1 f6 gxf6 22 gxf6 'ifi1h8 23 h6
'ifc5 24 .ag7+ Wg8 25 4Je2 'fi'd5
26 ctJ f5 ctJg4 27 lt:lh6+ ctJh6 28
.i.xh6 .i.b6+ 29 d4 ..txd4+ 30 lbxd4
'ifxd4+ 3 1 i.. e 3 'ifd3 ! 32 'i!t'g3+
'ifg6 33 h6 l:Xe 1 34 l:!.xe 1 l:lc8
35 l:le7 d5 36 l:a7 .te4 Y2 - Y2
Ulybin-Akopian, USSR 1986.

After 15 Vl\fh5 Black has in practice played two continuations:


B l l : 1 5 ... ctJb4 and
B 1 2: 1 5 .. . l:fe8.
GM Grivas, who is a great ad
herent of the 4 . . . Vl\fb6 system, has
concluded from his experience that
1 5 . . . l:!.fe8 is a more reliable con
tinuation.
There are several examples from
his practice .
Bll:
15
b4
16 l::lf3
xd3!
A significant improvement on the

Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

game Chandler-Gufeld, Dortmund


1 983, where there followed 16 .. . g6
1 7 h6 f5 1 8 exf5 exf5 19 l:th3 .l:tf7
20 d4 lLJ:ffl (20 .. . 'ifc6 21 't!Vxg6!+
:ffl 22 Jl.fl ! ?) 2 1 ..txf5 ! .
17 cxd3
Nunn gives an interesting analy
sis: 1 7 .l:.h3 ! h6 1 8 cxd3 .l:tfe8 1 9
lLl d5 ! exd5 20 .td4 ..txg5! (20. . .lLle5
2 1 gxh6 g6 22 h7+ and 23 fxe5) 2 1
.txg7! (21 fxg5? lLle5 !i= ) 2 l . . .'itxg7
22 fxg5 l:te6 23 gxh6+ 'ith8 24 'ti'xf7
.l!g6+ ! 00 .
l:lfe8 (D)
17

41

B12:
l:lfe8
15
g6
16 l:lf3
17
flh6
Ats
18 flh4
In the variation A22 we have this
position without the moves .l:.ae 1 and
... ..tb7.
18
b4
18 ... Ag7! ? is an alternative.
h5
19 l:lh3
20 gxh6
xd3
b4
21
cxd3
22
d1
l:lac8 (D)
Worthy of consideration is 22...
ffc2! ? 23 l0f2 h7.

w
w

Black intends to respond 1 8 . .. lLJ:ffl

if White plays 18 l::lh 3.

Now instead of entering 1 8


llefl ? ! g 6 1 9 'iWh6 ..t:ffl 2 0 'it'h4
il.g7 2 1 .l:.h3 h5, which was played
in the game, Nunn-Grivas, Athens
1 99 1 , White 's chances would be
slightly better after 18 Ad4! l::l ac8
(Nunn). Of course not 1 8... g6? 1 9
xh7+, while unsatis factory is
also 18 ... f8 19 f5 ! exf5 20 .l:.xf5
g6 2 1 'ii' h6 lLle6 22 .l:.xf7 ! with a
winning attack.

The diagram position was played


in two games:
a) 23 l:ln i;.. e7 24 'Wg3 ..tf6 25
lLld4 'lth8 26 lLlf2 e5 27 lLJf3 exf4
28 .i.xf4 lLle5 29 lLlg5 and the con
centration of pieces taking part in the
attack looks promising for White,
Dervishi-Grivas, Ano Liosia 1 996.
b) 23 d4 i&.e7 24 'Wg3 h8 25
f5 (Better is 25 lLlf2 e5 26 lLlf5! .i.f6
27 lLlg7 intending f5 with the initia-

42 Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

tive.) 25 .. . exf5 26 li:Jxf5 li:Je5 27 li:Jf2


.i.f6 28 lt:Jg7 l:tf8 29 'ii'f4 'f!ie7 30
d4 lt:Jc4 3 1 lLlg4 .i.h4? ! (Black
missed 3 I . ..lbxe3 and if 32 lt:Jxf6,
then 32 . . . li:Jd5 ! ) 32 l:txh4! 'ii'xh4 33
.i.f2 f!/e7 34 b3 li:Jb6 3 5 li:Jf6 l:!.c2
36 .i.h4 'ii' c7 37 li:Jf5 .i.c8 38 li:Jxd6
'ifc3 39 'ii' e 5 'Wf3 40 lt:Jxf7+ 1 -0
Agnos-Grivas, Greece 1 996.
B2:

d7
13
This continuation deserves respect.
14
g5 (D)

Now, as in variation A2, Black


here also has two methods of defence.
l:l.es
14
The alternative is 14 ... b4 1 5
'fi'h5 and now:
a) 15 ... g6 16 'ih6 when:
a l ) 16...f5? 1 7 exf5 exf5 1 8 Ji.d4!
(Here we clearly see the importance
of the move 1 2 l:!.ae l , controlling the
e-file.) 1 8 ... l:tf7 1 9 ..txf5! ..tf8 ( 1 9 . . .
gxf5 20 g6+-) 2 0 .:!.e8 b7 2 1 ..te6!
l:txe8 22 ..txf7+ 'it>xf7 23 'ifxh7+
and White wins. The same situation

was encountered in the game Bellia


Grivas, Variation A23. The differ
ence is that here l:ael has been
played instead of l:tf3. Since the rook
is still on fl , Black shouldn't hurry
with ... f5.
a2) 16 ... xd3 or 16 ...De8 are
better options while 16 ...Ab7?! 1 7
!l f3 f5 transposes into the game
Chandler-Gufeld, which is bad for
Black - see B l l above.
b) Worth considering is the con
tinuation of Dabetic-B.Knezevic,
Igalo 1 994, where Black at once ap
plied radical solutions. After 15 ...
1Llxd3 ! ? 16 cxd3 b4 17 li:Jdl f5 1 8
li:Jf2 g6 he achieved a satisfactory
game.
The position after 14 ... I:le8 ap
peared in the game Yagupov-A.
Kharitonov, Russia 1 996, via the
move order characteristic for the
Scheveningen: I e4 c5 2 li:Jf3 d6 3
d4 cxd4 4 li:Jxd4 li:Jf6 5 lt:Jc3 e6 6 f4
a6 7 'iYD \i'b6 8 li:Jb3 lt:Jc6 9 e3
'f!ic7 10 jLd3 ..te7 1 1 0-0 0-0 1 2
l:tae l b5 1 3 g4 li:Jd7 1 4 g 5 l:!.e8.
There followed:
g6
15
1rh5
16 1Vh6
According to Kharitonov, 1 6
'ii'h 4!? i s better.
16
Jlf8
17 flh4
Ag7
1s Do
1rd8!?
A useful move. Apart from mov
ing away from the potential attack
li:Jd5, Black - at the appropriate
moment - will be able to react with
.. .f5 or ... f6.

Classical Line: White Attacks with g2-g4

19 llh3
20 f5
This is a committal move but it's
di fficult to find any other way to
strengthen the pressure against the
black king. In the case of 20 /Odl,
with the idea lLlf2-g4, Black would
react with 20 . .. f5 !?.
exf5
20
21
exf5
tOes (D)
Black has managed to achieve the
optimal defensive set-up.
Yagupov-Kharitonov is a signifi
cant game for the whole variation 1 2
l:be I , 1 3 g4. In the further course of
the game Black unexpectedly quickly
achieved counterplay and won the
game.
From the diagram, there followed
22 e4 .txf5! 23 ..txf5 gxf5 24 lt:ld5
lt:lg6 25 ..,h5 l:te5 26 Wf3 lt:le6 27
l:th5 f4 28 ..tf2 lt:lxg5 29 ..,d3 Wd7
30 l:txe5 ..,g4+ 3 1 fl dxe5 32 lLlc7

43

..,xh5 33 lt:lxa8 e4 34 Wd8+ ..tf8


35 h4 lt:le6 0- 1 .
From the examples given above,
we see that in the variation 12 l:.ae l
b5 1 3 g4 ..tb7, as a rule, there ap
pear extremely complex positions
where Black faces not an easy task
of p arry i n g W hi t e ' s ki n g s i d e
threats. In the future Black might
pay more attention to the continu
ation 1 3 . . . lt:l d7, postponing the
fianchetto of the c8-bishop.

W h ite Plays Jld 2

In the variation discussed in this


chapter, White doesn't play .te3. It's
not necessary to chase away the black
queen from the active b6-square be
cause Black will in any case be forced
to move the queen in order to play
with the b-pawn. In the present line,
White typically plays the useful pro
phylactic move ..t>h 1 , which enables
the active f2-f4 advance, and devel
ops his dark-squared bishop on d2.
Compared to the previous exam
ples, this introduces two new factors.
Firstly, the bishop indirectly controls
the b4-square. Secondly, after the
l::.ae 1 move has been made, the threat
e4-e5 becomes more real, so in the
majority of cases Black is forced to
react with . . . e6-e5 himself at the ap
propriate moment.
(1 e4 c5 2 f3 c6 3 d4 cxd4 4
xd4 tWb6 5 tQb3 f6 6 c3 e6 7
Ad3 a6 8 0-0 Ae7)
9 Wh1
9 ffe2 d6 usually leads by trans
position to the main line A below.
An original way to treat the line was
shown by Black in the game Tal
Gufeld, Moscow 1 970. In that game

after 9 d5 I 0 exd5 exd5 ! I i..g 5


.tg4 12 'i!fd2 0-0-0 1 3 :re 1 'f!lc7
White had no easy task to refute
Black's risky play ( Y2- Y2, 27 moves).
9
d6
10
f4
1rc7
11
Ad2
After 1 1 flf3 it is best to trans
pose into the main line B with
1 1 0-0 in view of ll b4? !
( 1 1 . . . b5? is also premature because
of 12 e5) 1 2 'i!fg3 ctJh5 1 3 'ilf3 ctJf6
14 d2 d5 1 5 e5 ctJd7 1 6 e2 ! ;!;
Matulovic-Klaric, Vinkovci 19 82.
11
0-0 {D)
...

. . .

. . .

In the line where the bishop is de


veloped on d2, White can develop the

White Plays d2 45

queen on e2 or f3. Both continuations


have their significance and are given
separately:
A: 12 'li!Ve2 and
B: 1 2 'lWf3 .
Of these, 1 2 'i!Vf3 is the more dan
gerous for Black.

A:

b5
12
1te2
13 a3
The most often played continua
tion. White secures the knight' s po
sition on c3, but in a way this move
will also help B l ack to obtain
counterplay on the queenside more
easily. The point is that the bishop's
presence on d2 won't prevent Black
from playing .. . b5-b4 later.
The al ternative where White
doesn' t commit himself with the a
pawn is perhaps better and should
also be seriously considered. If the
knight is chased away from the c3
square with the ... b4 move, it will play
an active role either on the kingside
or in the centre, moving via d1 to the
f2 or e3 squares. The examples in
which White immediately played 13
ae1 are given below:
a) 13 ... d7 1 4 l:tf3 g6 ( 1 4 ... l:te8)
15 'YWf2 b7 16 .l:.h3 l2Jb4 17 a3
l2Jd3 18 cd3 l2Jc5? ! ( 1 8 . . . .i.f6 ! ) 19
l2Jd4 j,f6 20 f5 'i!Ve7 21 .i.h6 l:tfe8
22 :tfl exf5 23 l2Jxf5 Vujakovic
Djukic, Zlatibor 1 989.
b) 13 ...b7 14 e5 dxe5 1 5 fxe5
l2Jd7 16 f4 l2Jb4 17 l2Je4 l2J xd3 1 8
cxd3 'li!Vb6 1 9 .Ae3 YWd 8 2 0 .i.d4

h8 2 1 l:tf4 l:tc8= Dvoirys-Akopian,


USSR 1 99 1 .
c) 1 3...b4 1 4 'Lldl a5 1 5 c3 e5 1 6
'Lle3 exf4 1 7 .l:.xf4 li:le5 1 8 l2Jf5 .l:.e8
19 l2Jbd4 f8 oo Saltaev-Todorov,
Cappelle la Grande 1 995.
13
b7
13 ...l:lb8 is an acceptable alterna
tive. The rook supports the b-pawn,
which is quite reasonable if White has
played a2-a3. For example, 1 4 .l:.ael
b4 1 5 axb4 li:lxb4 and now:
a) 16 b5 axb5 1 7 xb4 e5 1 8
'Lld2 ( 1 8 .i.xb5 li:lxe4) 1 8 . . . g4 1 9
'li!V f2 e6 2 0 c 3 l2Jg4 2 1 'YWg3 exf4
22 'lWxf4 l2Je5 23 c2 l2Jc6 24 a3
b4 25 cxb4 l2Jxb4 and Black can't be
dissatisfied with the position (Santo
Roman-Kouatly, Lyon 1 988).
b) 16 e5 dxe5 17 fxe5 l2Jd7, and
not l2Jd7? 1 7 li:lb5 axb5 1 8 xb4
li:lc5 1 9 exd6 ..txd6 20 xc5 ..txc5
2 1 xh7+ xh7 22 'lWh5+ g8 23
l2Jxc5 with a strategically winning
position for White, Nikolenko
Egiazarjan, Ashkhabad 1990.
14 ae1 (D)
The diagram below shows a very
similar position with the difference

46 White Plays itd2

that a2-a4 and ... b7-b6 have been


played instead of a3 and ...b5 .
There are two examples in which
this very position was tested:
a) 14 g6 1 5 f5 'Lle5 1 6 .th6 l:.fe8
1 7 fxe6 fxe6 1 8 CLJd4 1i'd7 19 .tc4
lt:lxc4 20 'ii'xc4 d5 2 1 exd5 exd5 22
'ii' d 3 CLJg4 oo Salai-Bakalar, Brno
1 990.
b) 14 ... ttlb4 1 5 CLJd4 lt:lxd3 1 6
cxd3 1i'd7 1 7 b4 l: fc8 1 8 l:. b l l:tc7
1 9 b5 a5 20 'it'f2 l:.ac8 2 1 lt:lde2 ili
Edelman-Cabrilo, New York 1 990.
b4
14
xb4 (D)
15
axb4
...

18 f5 .tf6 1 9 .te3 l:.ae8 20 'ifh5 g6


21 'ii'h 3 exf5 22 exf5 .tt e 7 23 fxg6
hxg6 24 lt:lf5 l:te5 oo Schumi-Lutz,
Budapest 1 989.
c) 16 ttlbS axb5 17 .txb4 e5 ! (A
timely reaction that solves all Black's
problems):
c l ) White didn't achieve any ad
vantage in the game Gallagher
Avshalumov, Tbilisi 1988 where after
18 .d2 l:.ab8 1 9 fxe5 dxe5 20 .1L.xe7
'ii' x e7 2 1 'ii' e 3 l:.fc8 a draw was
agreed.
c2) In the event of 18 AxbS 'Llxe4
1 9 .td3, it ' s superficial to play
19...d5? as happened in the game
P.Popovic-Z.Ilic, Saint John 1 988,
where Black had problems after 20
.i.xe7 'ii'x e7 21 fxe5 l:tac8 (21 ...
'ifxe5 22 lt:lc5) 22 lZ:la5 .ta8 23
.txe4 dxe4 24 'Llc4 'ifc5 25 b3 .
B ut the continuation 1 8 .txbS
shouldn't worry Black because Black
could have played 19 f5! 20 fxeS
dxe5 21 .txe4 .i..xe4 22 lt:ld2 .tb7
and if 23 'Wxe5 then Black has
23 ... .txg2+ 24 xg2 't!Vg5+ with a
slight advantage.
c3) 18 c3 l:tfb8 ( 1 8 . . . l:t fd8 1 9
lt:ld2 ) 1 9 'Lld2 .tc6 2 0 .i.c2 l:te8
21 'iff2 (21 f5 d5 '=i= ) 2 l . ..'i!Va7 with
equal play, P. Popovic-Barlov, Yugo
slavia 1 988.
...

White has tried three continuations


in this position. The thrust 1 6 e5 is
premature. The other two, 1 6 lt:ld4
and 1 6 CLJb5 lead to a complex play
and practice has shown that Black's
chances are not weaker:
a) 16 eS?! tlJe8 1 7 CLJb5 axb5 1 8
.txb4 dxe5 1 9 .txe7 11fxe7 20 fxe5
l:ta2 21 CLJd4 l:txb2 22 ll:Jxb5 g6 =i=
Santo Roman-S imic, Montpellier
1 988.
b) 16 ttld4 lt:lxd3 1 7 cxd3 lt:ld7

8:

1 2 o
A more active continuation. Playing 'Wh3 or 1i'g3 later, White can
create some real threats sooner than
in the case of 12 'ife2.

White Plays ..l.d2 47

The a2-a4 move could be interpo


lated, but it helps Black to develop
his queenside more quickly: 1 2 a4 b6
1 3 'i't'f3 .i.b7 1 4 'f!Vh3 lLlb4 1 5 f5 e5
1 6 :Iae I l:lad8 1 7 lle3 lLlxd3 1 8 cxd3
d5 19 l:lg3 'iiih 8 20 exd5 .i.xd5 :;:
Soltis-Z.Ilic, Belgrade 1 988.
b 5 (D)
12
This is one of the key positions of
the 4 . . . 'i!Vb6 system.
In the 3rd edition of ECO, for ex
ample, it is analysed in 833/4, aris
ing from the sequence (1 e4 c5 2 CLJf3
tLlc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 lLlxd4 CLJf6 5 tLlc3
'tWb6 6 CLJb3 et 7 .i.d3 e7 8 0-0
a6) 9 Wh 1 'i/c7 1 0 f4 d6 1 1 'f!Vt3 0-0
1 2 i.. d2 b5. Since line B2 is recom
mended there, with a favourable ;l;;
assessment for White, one can expect
many opponents to follow that course
in future.

As in many other variations, here


too White can play the position with
or without the a2-a3 move.
Therefore we distinguish:
B 1 : 1 3 a3 and
B2: 1 3 l:lae l .

Although it is diffi cult to gener


alise, matters are more favourable
for Black when White has played
a2-a3 . Then his chances to create
active play on the queenside are
greater, and this claim has been
confirmed in practice.
Let us mention that 13 e5? doesn't
work because of 1 3 ... dxe5 14 fxe5
lLlxe5 1 5 i.. f4 ( 1 5 'i!Vxa8? .i.b7 16
'i/a7 xg2+) 1 5 ... CLJxf3 1 6 .i.xc7
lLlh4 :o: Kofi dis-Grivas, Portaria
1 996.
B1:

13
a3
.i.b7
Now we have a further divergence.
White can play:
B 1 1 : 1 4 l:.!.ae 1 or
B 1 2: 14 'flfh3
but in both cases Black achieves
good play.
Bl l :
14 l::lael
b4
There is no reason to postpone this
move, although it is possible to play
it a move later after 14 ... g6 1 5 'ilh3.
In M.Cid-Panno, Femeda Cup 1 99 1 ,
Black obtained very good game after
1 5 ... b4 1 6 CLJd1 ( 1 6 axb4) 1 6 . . . bxa3
1 7 bxa3 a5 1 8 a4 ( 1 8 f5) 1 8 ... lLlb4
1 9 CLJc3 d5 20 exd5 lLlxd3 21 'f!Vxd3
lLlxd5.
15 axb4
lC!xb4
16 lClb5
Or 16 lCld4 lLlxd3 17 cxd3 %labS
1 8 'iWg3?! 'i/b6 19 lll ce2 't\Yxb2 20
.i.c3 'ii' b6 + Zvara-Vokac, Prague
1 994.

48 White Plays d2

16
axb5
lla2
17
Axb4
More logical than 17 ...l:la4 18 c3
l:ta2 although Black was successful
with this move order too in the game
Arnason-Gostisa, Belgrade 1 988, af
ter 1 9 l:te2 ( 1 9 Aa3 d5 !?) 1 9 ... e5 20
fxe5 dxe5 21 il.xe7 'ifxe7 22 xb5
(22 b 1 ) 22 . .. tt:Jxe4 23 Itxe4 l:hb2
24 .i.. c4 Wa3 25 lLJcl? (25 'f!Ve3=)
25 . . . l:t b 1 26 d3 l:txcl 27 l:h4
l:xfl + 28 '@'xfl g6 and Black real
ised his material advantage.
e5
18 1Vh3
b4
19
il.c3
llxb2
20
Axb4
dxeS
fxeS
21
flxe7
22
Axe7
with an equal game, Kl undt
Cabrilo, Germany 1 992.
Bl2:
14

flh3 (D)

White threatens the direct 1 5 e5


and Black has two ways to parry this
threat:

B 1 2 1 : 1 4 . .. l:tad8 and
B 1 22: 1 4 . .. b4.
B121 :
llad8
14
b4
15 llae1
Probably the only satisfactory re
ply. That the superficial treatment of
the position leads to a quick catas
trophe is shown by the following two
examples:
a) 15 ...1lfe8 1 6 l2Je2 f8 1 7
l2Jed4 l2Jxd4? 1 8 a5+- Thipsay
Grivas, Manila OL 1 992.
b) 15 ...1ld7?! 1 6 l2Jd5! exd5 1 7
exd5 lLlb8 1 8 .!.c3 h 6 ( 1 8 . . . g 6 1 9
l:xe7 ! ) 1 9 l:txe7 ( 1 9 l2Jd4!?) 1 9 ...
l2Jxd5 ( 1 9 . . J:f.xe7 20 xf6 gxf6 21
f5+-) 20 xg7 ! with a winning
attack, Geenen-Goossens, Belgium
1 992.
The original version of the lL\d5
sacrifice was seen in the game Tal
Zaichik, Tbilisi 1 988. A completely
different move order gave a similar
position: 1 e4 c5 2 lL\f3 d6 3 d4 cd4
4 l2Jd4 l2Jf6 5 l2Jc3 e6 6 f4 a6 7 1Vf3
1Vb6 8 a3 lLl c6 9 l2J b3 'WIc7 1 0 .i.. d3
e7 1 1 d2 0-0 1 2 0-0 b5 1 3 l:ae l .
Now instead o f the logical move
13 ...Ab7, which, after 14 Wh 1 b4,
would transpose into the game
Arnason-Gostisa, Belgrade 1 9 88
mentioned above, Black played the
over-ambitious 13 ... b4?! . Unexpect
edly there followed 1 4 l2Jd5 ! (The
straightforward 1 4 axb4 doesn't give
an advantage after 14 ... l2Jxb4 1 5 'Llb5
{ 1 5 e5?! l2Jxd3 1 6 exf6? l2Jxe1 + }

White Plays d2 49

15 . . . axb5 1 6 Axb4 ..tb7 with equal


chances) 1 4 ... exd5 1 5 exd5 ..tg4
(Black immediately returns the piece.
However, it was better to retreat
1 5 . . . lLlb8 or 1 5 ... lLla7 although it's
obvious that White has a permanent
initiative for the sacrificed piece af
ter 1 6 axb4 ..tb7 1 7 c4 with the idea
c3, g4 etc.) 1 6 'ilt'g3 GLld5 1 7 1i'g4
lLlf6 1 8 'i!Vh3 and White had the more
promising play.
16 axb4
xb4 (D)

17
b5
17 e5 lLlxd3 1 8 exf6 lLlxe 1 1 9 fxe7
.i.xg2+ 20 'iVxg2 lLlxg2 2 1 exf8+
l:txf8 22 'itxg2 is better for Black.
axbS
17
18 Jlxb4
e5
We have the same position as in
Variation A with the difference that
the moves 'it'h3 and . . . l:!.ad8 have
been played.
B122:

14
b4! (D)
This is the most consistent move,
...

after which White players have tried


various continuations.

axb4
15
The fol lowing continuations,
which avoid the quick elimination of
his strong light-squared bishop, are a
better choice for White:
a) 15 e2 bxa3 16 bxa3 e5 1 7
lLlg3 ..tc8 1 8 f5 a 5 1 9 lLlh5 a4 20
lbc 1 GLld4 oo Cam i l l eri-Grivas,
Zouberi Z 1 993.
b) 15 d1 bxa3 16 %ha3 ! aS (It
is important to eliminate the light
squared bishop. Weaker is 16 ... d5 1 7
e 5 lLle4 1 8 .l:ta4 ) 1 7 ..tc3 Aa6 1 8
lLle3 Axd3 1 9 cxd3 l:tfb8 20 lLlg4
lLlxg4 (20 ... 'iid 8!?) 21 1Vxg4 i.f8 22
f5 e5 23 GLld2 d5 24 exd5 Axa3 25
bxa3 GLld4 26 f6 with a dangerous ini
tiative for the exchange sacrifice,
ZeiCic-Nadanian, Cannes 1 997.
15
lLlxb4
eS
16
The most challenging continua
tion. However, in this line, where
White has played h i and ..td2, the
forcing complications that arise after

50 Mite Plays .it.d2

this central break favour Black. There


is one example where White aban
doned this continuation but there, too,
Black was successful: 16 tt:la5 lLlxd3
1 7 cxd3 l:ac8 1 8 fS exfS 1 9 'f!YxfS
.i.. a 8 20 ltJc4 ti'b7 2 1 .igS? Jlc5
0- 1 Belotti-Sanchez, Biel 1 992.
dxe5
16
17 fxe5
1fxe5
18
l:ta5
Not 18 l:txf6? lLJxd3.
18
1rd6! (lJ)
18...-*.dS loses after 1 9 lLlxd5
exdS 20 .i.. x b4 .txb4 2 1 l:xf6+,
while the sacrifice 18...it:lxd3 is an
other weaker alternative. After 1 9
l:xeS lLlxeS 20 lLlaS Ac8? 2 1 'it'g3
lLlg6 22 lLlc6 White had a clear ad
vantage in Sharif-Z.Ilic, Cannes
1 9 89. Compare this game with
Timman-Kurajica where the white
bishop was placed on e3 - Chapter
Two, line B l . Black's position is very
sensitive and doesn't allow any waste
of time. Better is 20 ... l:lab8.

1 9 Axh7+ lLlxh7 20 .l:Ih5 e5 ! 21


.l:Ixh7 .i.xg2+ (In this variation, the
white king's position on the h l square
suits Black) and now:
a) 22 ffxg2? xh7 23 .l:I g 1 g6
24 ctJe4 'f!Yb6 25 il.. c 3 ctJc6 was
qui c k l y wi n n ing for B l a c k i n
Geenen-Kishnev, Belgium 1 997.
b) 22 Wxg2 'Yi'g6+ 2 3 .i. g5 !
xh7! (23 ... f6? ! 24 .l:Ih5 'it'xc2+ 25
ctJd2 ) 24 'i:Yxh7+ xh7 25 il.. xe7
l2Jxc2 26 g3 (26 .i.xf8? loses after
26 ... ctJe3+ 27 g1 ctJxfl 28 .i.c5
l:lb8 ! ) 26 ... l:tfb8 with the better end
game for Black, Schmalts-Kishnev,
Altensteig 1 993.
B2:

13 l:tael
This continuation poses more
problems for Black. Now Black can
go on:
821 : 1 3 .. . .i..b7 or
822: 1 3 . . . b4.
B21:
13
14

Two examples from the diagram


show the failure of White's attack:

ffh3 (lJ)

Ab7

White Plays d2 51

The most unpleasant continuation.


The white queen is placed most ac
tively on the h3 square focusing on
the potential weaknesses in Black's
camp - the h7 and e6 pawns.
14 a3 transposes into the variation
1 3 a3, which was examined earlier,
while the continuation 14 ffg3, with
the idea f4-f5 and .i.h6, is less prom
ising for White. For instance: 14 .. . b4
( 1 4 . . . g6 or the standard 1 4 ... 'Llb4 are
also playable alternatives.) 1 5 'Lld1
a5 (The plan ... b4, . . .a5 is not the best
for Black. More solid is 1 5 ... 'Lld7 !?)
and now:
a) 16 l0f2 e5 1 7 f5 l:.fd8 1 8 h6
.i.f8 1 9 g5 .i.e7 20 xf6 xf6
2 1 'Ll g 4 .;. f8 22 'Lld2 .;. e 7 oo
l . Marinkovi c - Dj u k i c , Kladovo
1 994.
b) 16 e5!? (This ambitious break
in the centre i s more energetic)
16 . . . 'Llh5 ( 1 6 ... 'Lld7 !?) 17 'ife3 ! g6
1 8 'Llf2 dxe5 1 9 fxe5 'Llxe5?! (An
incorrect piece sacrifice although in
response to other moves White would
play 20 'Llg4 with the advantage.) 20
'iVxe5 .1d6 21 't!Vd4 a4 and now in
stead of 22 .1xb4? (Kojovic-Djukic,
Nis 1 994), White should have calmly
continued 22 'Llc I . The variation
22 . . . xh2 23 'Lle2 'Llg3+ 24 'Llxg3
'iVxg3 25 'Lle4 xe4 26 .1xe4 'ifh4
27 'it'f6 clearly favours White.
14
Uad8 (DJ
The best move. Black indirectly
controls White ' s strong attacking
piece - the d3-bishop. Now 15 e5?
doesn't work because after 1 5 . . . dxe5
16 fxe5 'Llxe5 1 7 .1f4 .1d6 1 8 .1xe5

.1xe5 1 9 l:.xf6 Black has at his disposal the well-known 1 9 ... l:.xd3 ! .
The alternative i s 14 ...g6, after
which 1 5 e5 - played in the game
Klundt-Mainka, Germany 1 990 led to forced play where Black had
enough resources to defend his posi
tion. There followed 1 5 . . . dxe5 1 6
fxe5 'Lld7 1 7 .i.f4 'Llcxe5 1 8 'ifg3
.1d6 1 9 .1xb5 axb5 20 'Llxb5 'it'b6
2 1 'Llxd6 W'xd6 22 .1xe5 'Llxe5 23
'it'xe5 'iVxe5 24 .:txe5 .:txa2 with an
equal game.
15 f5! ? is probably a more prom
ising reply to 14 ... g6.
w

b4
15 a4
According to Gufeld, the opening
of the position with 15 ... bxa4 is a
better alternative.
16
l0d1
d5
This is the consistent follow-up to
the previous move. The knight is de
centralised, so White' s control of the
central squares is weakened.
17
e5
l0e4
18
l0e3!
The idea behind this move is to

52 White Plays d2

support f4-f5 . I t is stronger than ei


ther 18 Axe4 dxe4 19 .l:!.xe4 lZJa5
when it's obvious that Black has com
pensation, or 18 f2 lZJa5 1 9 lZJxa5
'ifxa5 20 b3 (20 f5? exf5 21 'ifxf5
g6 + ) 20 .. . f5 (A typical radical coun
terattack in such a position although
in this particular situation it seems
simpler to play 20 .. . lZJxf2+ 21 .l:!.xf2
g6, with equal play according to Sax)
21 exf6 .l:!.xf6 22 CDg4 l:tg6 23 f5 exf5
24 l:.xf5 ;t Lobron-Gufeld, Dortmund
1 983.
h8
18
18 ... a5 1 9 'Llxa5 'ixa5 20 f5 !
exf5 2 1 'Llxf5 .
f5
19 g4
gxf6
20
exf6
21
f5!
and White's chances in this ex
tremely complicated position are bet
ter, Sax-Wirthensohn, Graz 1 984.
B22:
b4
13
This is one of those few variations
within the 4 .. . 'Wb6 system where I
consider the plan with the straight
forward pawn advance on the queen
side to be superior to the manoeuvre
. . . lt:lb4.
14
/Qd1
After 14 /Qe2 .i.b7 15 'ifh3 l:tfd8
1 6 c4 ( 1 6 f5) 16 ... e5 1 7 f5 a5 1 8
.1g5? lt:lxe4 1 9 .1xe4 Axg5 2 0 f6
g6 2 1 'ifg4 .th6 Black had sufficient
defensive resources in Menvielle
Urday, Mesa open 1 992.
aS
14

15 c4 (D)
Moving the c-pawn is the best
plan for White. With it he either
achieves a considerable spatial ad
vantage or underlines the exposed
position of Black 's pawns on the
queenside. This way of playing is
also seen in the fol lowing two ex
amples:
a) 1 5 e5 lt:ld5 16 c4! bxc3 1 7
lt:lxc3 ;t Matulovi c - Marti novi c,
Smederevska Palanka 1982. This is
the line recommended for White in
ECO.
b) 15 c3 a4 (Better is 1 5 . . . bxc3)
16 lt:ld4 lt:lxd4? (Black completely
lost his sense of danger and very soon
was exposed to an irresistible attack.)
17 cxd4 d5 1 8 e5 CUd7 19 f5 ..ta6 20
f6 gxf6 2 1 xh7+! 1 -0 Saltaev
Grivas, Komotini 1 993.
15
bxc3
a4
16 Axc3
/Qxd4
17
/Qd4
18 Axd4
Aa6
19 /Qc3
'ffb 7
Y2- Yz Z.Aimasi-Grivas, K6pavogur
1 994.

White Plays g 5

(1 e4 c5 2 f3 c6 3 d4 cxd4 4
xd4 1!fb6 5 b3 f6 6 c3 e6 7
Ad3 a6 8 0-0 Ae7)
9 Ags
In this variation, the threat e4-e5
is emphasised in a similar way to the
variation where White develops the
bishop on d2. The active position of
the white bishop on the g5-square
brings more aggression into the po
sition and there are frequent instances
of sharp tactical battles that started
in the early phase of the game.
One of the features that disting
uishes this variation from others is
the possibility for Black to play the
provocative . . .h7-h6. Both sides have
to take this possibility seriously into
account. Although I am not in favour
of generalisations, I think that Black,
in principle, should avoid this move
unless it brings him some concrete
advantage. Certainly, each position
requires a careful approach and pre
cise calculation, because even a slight
imprecision can be costly.
d6 (D)
9
9 h6 I 0 ..te3 would favour White
because Black has weakened his
kingside too early. The move ... h6 is
more reasonable when White has al
ready played f2-f4.
The diagram position, as ex...

plained on page 1 36 in the Guide


To Transpositions, is a form of
Rauzer variation.
10 Wh1
This is considered to be the main
continuation but there are two rea
sonable alternatives:
a) With 10 ffe2 White refrains
from Wh 1 and plays a useful move.
Since Black sooner or later neverthe
less has to play . .. 'Wic7, White's idea
is to save a tempo, that is to make
the f4 move without the prophylactic
Wh l . This way of playing should not
be underestimated. Black players
have chosen various plans:
a 1 ) 10 ffc7 (Black should play
this move after White played ..t>h I )
1 1 f4 ( I I a4 b6 1 2 f4 h6 1 3 j,h4
b7 I4 f5 lLle5 I 5 fxe6 fxe6 1 6
xf6 il.xf6 1 7 'fVh5+ 'ii7 1 8 'ilfh3
0-0 19 il.e2 ;t Osadchenko-Razarian,
...

54 White Play5 g5

Kazan 1 997) 1 1 . . .h6 1 2 .ih4 b5


( 1 2 . . . tZ:l xe4? 1 3 tZ:l xe4 .ixh4 1 4
g4 ) 1 3 a3 il.b7 1 4 .ig3 ( 1 4 f5
0-0 1 5 h1 .l:.ae8 1 6 'iWt1 .i.. d8 1 7
'iVh3 'irc8 1 8 i0d2 tZ:le5 1 9 .l:.ae1 ;t
Zadrima-Krylov, Moscow OL 1994)
1 4 . . . h5 1 5 .1h4 tZ:lg4 1 6 .ixe7
'ti'xe7?! ( 1 6 ... tZ:lxe7) 17 1Wd2! 'irh4
1 8 h3 tZ:lf6 1 9 l:tae 1 Matulovic
Ennenkov, Vraca 1 975.
a2) 1 0 Ad7 (The idea of com
pleting the devel opment of the
queenside before castling does not
promise complete equality) 1 1 'if;>h 1
flic7 1 2 a4 l:tc8 1 3 a5 tZ:le5 1 4 tZ:ld4
.i.. c6 1 5 .ie3 0-0 1 6 f4 tZ:lxd3 1 7
cxd3 Suetin-Gulko, Moscow 1 984.
a3) I O h6 1 1 .i..e 3 li'c7 12 f4 0-0
( 1 2 ... b5) 1 3 g4 (The difference com
pared to the variations examined ear
lier is that Black has already played
...h6, which favours White.) 1 3 .. . tZ:lh7
and now:
a3 1 ) After 14 'frf2! Black cannot
prevent the advance of White's h
pawn; in the event of 14 ... 'ft'd8 there

would fol low 1 5 .ib6. Hracek


Ehlvest, Pula 1 997, went 14...b5 1 5
h4 tZ:lf6 and in this position White
accepted a premature draw.
a32) A weaker plan was chosen
by White in the game Arakhamia
Hracek, Oakham 1 990, where after
14 l:lf3?! b5 1 5 %th3 b4 16 l2Ja4 l:tb8
1 7 c3 .id7 18 e5 dxe5 19 tZ:lac5 .ic8
20 fxe5 tZ:lxe5 Black had a clear ad
vantage.
a4) We see tllat in all the above
examples, Black avoided 10 0-0 but
castling is a logical response and per-

haps this is the best reply to 1 0 li'e2.


b) 10 a4 (D) is a positional con
tinuation.

..

..

Instead of preparing the advance


in the centre, White is satisfied with
gaining space on the queenside. This
gives him a slight but not serious ad
vantage, e.g. 10 ... tZ:la5 ( 1 0 ... ft'c7 1 1
a5 0-0 1 2 li'e2 .id7 1 3 f4 tZ:le8 1 4
.1xe7 tZ:lxe7 1 5 e 5 f5 1 6 exd6 tZ:lxd6
1 7 'if;>h I tZ:lg6 1 8 l:.ad1 Lukin
Anikaev, USSR eh 1 975) and now:
b 1 ) 1 1 lLhaS li'xa5 1 2 .i.. d 2
'ilt'h5?! ( 1 2 . . .'ifc7 ) 13 'ife1 tZ:lg4 14
h3 tZ:le5 1 5 .ie2 'irh4 16 1Wd1 g5 1 7
f4 Ivanovic-Piachetka, Stara Pazova
1 988.
b2) 1 1 Ae3 "f!ic7 12 tZ:lxa5 flixa5
1 3 h3 ( 1 3 'ft'e l .id7 1 4 h3 l:.c8 1 5
f4 .ic6 1 6 l:.b1 'ilc7 1 7 b4 0--0 1 8
b5 .ixb5 1 9 tZ:lxb5 axb5 20 l:!.xb5
d5 !: Dorfman-Gulko, Moscow 1978)
1 3 ... .id7 14 f4 l:tc8 15 1Wd2 .ic6
1 6 f5 Y.Griinfeld-I.Ivanov, Toronto
1 984.
After 10 'if;>h l there are two main
lines:

White Plays ..l.g5 55

A: 1 0 ... 0-0 and


B: 1 0 . . .''ii' c 7.
Another plan, 10 Jld7, is weak
er: 1 1 j.e3 ( 1 1 a4 ltJaS 1 2 j.e3 fl/c7
1 3 ltJxaS 1WxaS 14 f4 0-0 1 S fl/e1
'f!ic7 16 aS j.c6 17 fl/g3 ;t Kudrin
Gulko, USA eh 1 987) 1 1 ...''ii'c7 1 2
ltJa4 ltJeS ( 1 2. . .bS ! ? 1 3 tiJb6 l:tb8 1 4
ltJxd7 ltJxd7 1 5 a4 ;t ) 1 3 ltJb6 l:tb8
14 f4 ltJg6 1 S ltJxd7 'irxd7 16 a4 0-0
1 7 aS J:fe8 1 8 'iff3 l:tbc8 19 'Lld2
'tWc6 20 c4 ltJd7 2 1 b4 Palac
Avshalumov, Belgrade 1 988.
...

A:

0-0 (D)
10
It should be emphasised that in
practice this position often arises via
the move order from the Richter
Rauzer Sicilian: 1 e4 cS 2 ltJf3 d6 3
d4 cxd4 4 ltJxd4 ltJf6 S ltJc3 ltJc6 6
gS 't!Yb6 7 ltJb3 e6 8 j.d3 j.e7 9
0-0 0-0 1 0 Wh1 a6.

h6
f4
11
This leads to massive complica
tions where both sides have to play
very precisely.

Safer is 1 1 . . .1i'c7 with the transi


tion into the main line B, 1 0 ... 1i'c7.
1 2 Jlxf6!
12 Jlh4?! ltJxe4 is weaker. In two
games from Twardon ' s practice,
Black was more successful after 1 3
liJxe4 .i.xh4 1 4 ltJxd6 (Bad is 1 4
'fllh 5? .i.e7 1 s : n fS 1 6 tiJgs j.d7
1 7 ifg6 .i.xgS 1 8 fxgS tiJeS 1 9 W'hS
.i.e8 20 'fih4 ltJxf3 2 1 gxf3 We3 and
Black won, Stypka-Twardon, Lubnie
wice 1 994) 1 4... tiJb4 1 S ltJc4 'f!lc7
1 6 ltJeS ltJxd3 1 7 1Wxd3 b5 1 8 c3
b7 19 'fih3 i1..e 7 20 J:ae 1 .i.d6
with better chances for Black, Socko
Twardon, Lubniewice 1 994.
Let us mention that in cases where
the black queen is on c7, the tactical
attack . . . ltJxe4 is not so efficient. This
can be seen in the game P.Ostojic
Polugaevsky, Skopje 1 97 1 , where the
critical position arose after the move
order characteristic of the Sozin,
where Black is a tempo up: 1 e4 cS 2
ltJf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 ltJxd4 ltJf6 S
ltJc3 ltJc6 6 .i.c4 'irb6 7 ltJb3 e6 8
0-0 .i.e7 9 'it>h1 a6 1 0 gS 'f#c7 1 1
.i.d3 0-0 1 2 f4.
Here after 12 ... h6! in the event of
13 .ilh4!? ltJxe4 White would have
1 4 .i.xe7 ltJxc3 1 S ..i.xd6 (White
doesn't have this option in above ex
ample because Black's queen is not
on c7) 1 S . .. tiJxd1 1 6 xc7 ltJxb2 1 7
.i.e4 ltJa4 1 8 ..i.f3 with an unclear
position according to Polugaevsky.
But, regardless of that possibility,
with this move order Black is a tempo
up, which is an advantage that be
comes visible after 13 Jlxf6?! ..i.xf6

56 White Plays g5

1 4 h5 b5. The game went on 1 5


l:he1 b7 1 6 e5? ! (Better is 1 6 l:.e3
CUb4 1 7 l'!g3 '1Ph8) 1 6 . . . dxe5 1 7
t0e4? (The decisive mistake. White
should have played 1 7 f5 ! CUb4! 1 8
..te4! with a n unclear position)
17 ... e7 1 8 f5 exf5 19 .!:txf5 CUb4!
and Black, eliminating White's ac
tive pieces, achieved a winning posi
tion.
12
Axf6
13
lrh5!
1rc7
We see that compared to Ostojic
Polugaevsky, Black is a tempo down
- he has not played ... b5, which is
an important difference. Instead of
1 3 . . . c7, according to R.Byrne,
13 .../t:}b4? is weak: 14 e5 ! dxe5 1 5
fxe5 4Jxd3 1 6 cxd3 e7 1 7 .!:tf3
..td7 18 .l:tg3 Wh7 19 .l:!.fl ..tes 20
g4.
14 ];lae1 (D)
The complications brought about
by White in the game Gufeld-Zaichik,
Daugavpils 1 978, with 14 g4 b5 1 5
e 5 led only to perpetual check after
15 . . . dxe5 1 6 g5 g6 1 7 gxf6 gxh5 1 8
.l:!.gl + 'ifi>h8 1 9 .l:tg7 b6 20 .l:lh7+
'Oti>g8 2 1 .l:tg7+.

From the diagram, R. Byrne


Fedorowicz, USA eh 1977, contin
ued 14 ... b5 1 5 l::t e 3 b4 16 CUd1 CUe7
17 l:tg3 'Oti>h8 18 4Jd2 .i..b7 19 4Jf3
lUgS 20 b3 a5 21 CUe3 (All White's
pieces are directed towards the black
king) 21 ... a4 22 e5 dxe5 23 CUxe5 g6!
24 'ifg4 and now, according to Byme,
instead of 24... h5? 25 l:th3 CUh6 26
.!:txh5+- Black could have held his
position with 24 ... a6 ! .
But even if his assessment is
correct, there remains an impres
sion that White 's chances in the
variation 1 0 . . . 0-0 1 1 f4 h6 1 2
..txf6! are better.
B:

10
'llc7 (D)
Now that the white king has taken
a tempo to prepare f2-f4, the queen
has done her job on b6.

f4
11
1 1 a4 b6 1 2 f4 ..tb7?! (It's inad
visable to abandon the control of the
e6 point quickly. Better is 1 2 ... 0-0)
1 3 f5 4Je5 14 CUd4 Kindermann-

White Plays g5 57

Liberzon, Beer-Sheva 1 984.


0-0
11
The best move. The alternatives
are weaker:
a) In this particular position where
Black has not castled, l l ... h6?! is
dubious. White plays 1 2 h4! and
now 1 2 ... xe4 1 3 tt:Jxe4 xh4
doesn't work because of 14 'ii'g4 with
a clear advantage. In the game
Mednis-Gulko, Sombor 1 974, Black
continued 12 Ad7 but his position
after 1 3 Ag3! 0-0 14 'ii'e2 tt:Jb4 1 5
e5 tt:Je8 1 6 e4 f5 ! 1 7 exf6 Axf6
1 8 l:tf3 was clearly weaker.
b) The plan with . . . h6 also ap
peared dubious in the game R.Byme
Benjamin, USA eh 1 984, in which
there followed l l .. Ad7 12 'ii e2 h6
1 3 h4 gS ? (Over-optimistic) 14
g3 with better chances for White.
13 ... xe4? is also weak: 14 "ifxe4
xh4 1 5 f5 ! with the initiative. The
best is 13 0-0 although there too
White retains the advantage.
c) ll ..bS (D) is an active move.
After 12 ffe2 0-0 it can transpose
into the main line below. However,
Black here has to reckon on the pas..

...

sible 12 Axf6 with the idea that af


ter 1 2 . . . xf6 he sacrifices at b5
(variation c3). Some possible lines:
c l ) 12 fin Ji.b7 1 3 a3 0-0-0? !
( 1 3 ... 0-0) 1 4 Ah4 Ribeiro-Vitor,
Lisbon 1 994.
c2) 12 Ve2 ii.b7 (instead of
1 2 ... 0-0) 13 %be l b4 1 4 CLJa4? (A
mistake after which White gets into
trouble by force; better is 1 4 CLJd1 )
1 4 ... CLJd7! 1 5 il..xe7 tt:Jxe7 (White has
problems with his a4-knight) 1 6 e5
.ltc6 1 7 exd6 'iYxd6 1 8 Ae4 b5
1 9 'ift2 :b8 and White lost mate
rial, Pokojowczyk-P.Popovic, Pol
anica Zdroj 1 982
c3) 12 Axf6 when:
c3 1 ) 12 ...gxf6 (Black recaptures
with his pawn, avoiding the possible
sacrifice) 13 f5 b4 (Black cannot or
ganise an adequate defence in the
case of 1 3 . . . 0-0 1 4 'ifh5 and the fur
ther f3-h3, because the plan ...'it>h8,
... g8 is slow - the f7 pawn is hang
ing.) 14 tLle2 a5 1 5 tLlbd4 tt:Jxd4 16
tLlxd4 e 5 1 7 tDb5 'ifb6 18 c4 d7
1 9 a3 Maciej ewski-Mochalov,
Katowice 1 993.
c32) 12 ... Axf6 13 Ji.xb5 !? axb5
( 1 3 ... xc3 ! ? 1 4 Axc6+ 'ifxc6 1 5
bxc3 'fi'xe4 1 6 'iYxd6 ) 1 4 tt:Jxb5
'ii' b6 1 5 CLJxd6+ 'Ot>ffi 16 e5 with com
pensation for the sacrificed piece.
Still, this was probably a better choice
for Black because after 1 2 ... gxf6 he
gets a positional inferiority.
12
'ffe2
12 1tf3 has not been tested in tour
nament practice. In the case of the
sharp 1 2 ... b5 (Possible is 12 . . . CLJd7)

58 White Plays g5

13 e5 dxe5 1 4 fxe5 lLlxe5 Black


seems to stand well in the coming
complications because 1 5 'ifxa8? !
doesn't work due to 1 5 ... .i.b7 1 6
'f!fa7? .i.xg2+, while in the event of
1 5 'i!Vg3 Black has 1 5 . .. lLlh5.
It is best for White to forget 13 e5
and instead play 13 llael, intending
to respond to 1 3 . .. .i.b7 with 1 4 'ft'h3.
b5
12
Possible is 12 b6 1 3 l:tae1 lLld7!
(An important freeing manoeuvre in
this variation) 1 4 'it'h5 .i.xg5 1 5
'irxg5 lLlb4 1 6 l:e3 'it'd8 with an
equal game, Ivanovic-Chiburdanidze,
Vinkovci 1 982.
13 llael (DJ
The prophylactic 13 a3 favours
Black: 1 3 ... .i.b7 1 4 l:tae1 h6 1 5 .i.h4
b4 1 6 axb4 lLlxb4 1 7 .i.f2 e5 1 8 fxe5
dxe5= Tiviakov-Velikov, Sochi 1 986.
...

phasises the threat e4-e5 but Black,


although required to play precisely,
has ways to deal with this threat ad
equately.
In practice Black has achieved
solid positions with the continuations
1 3 . .. .i.b7 (d) and 1 3 ... lLld7 (e) that
are not mentioned in ECO, while with
other moves Black has hit problems:
a) 13 !Qb4?! (This way of par
rying the e5 threat is not satisfactory.)
1 4 e5 ! lLlfd5 (14 ... dxe5 1 5 fxe5 lLlfd5
1 6 lLlxd5 lLlxd5 1 7 'ife4 g6 1 8
.i.f6 ) 1 5 lLlxd5 ! (Stronger than 1 5
.i.xe7 Wixe7 1 6 lLle4 dxe5 1 7 fxe5
lLlxd3 1 8 cxd3 .i.d7 19 lLlbc5 .i.c6
20 'ti'g4 h8 21 l:tf3 l:tae8 22 lLld6
f5 23 '*'d4 l:td8 24 l:.t2 Y2- Van
der Wiei-Benjamin, Wijk aan Zee
1 9 89) 1 5 . . . lLl xd5 ( 1 5 . . . exd5 1 6
Axh7+ xh7 1 7 Wih5+ g8 1 8 f6
is winning for White) 16 'it'h5 g6 1 7
'ifh6 l:e8 1 8 : n .JI..:ffi 1 9 'i!Vh4 .i.b7
20 l:th3 h5 21 'irg3 Wang Zili.
b) 13 b4?! 1 4 lLld5! exd5 15 exd5
lLlxd5 1 6 Wie4 g6 1 7 'ifxd5 ..te6 1 8
'it'e4 .i.f5 ( 1 8 . . . Axg5 19 fxg5 xb3
20 axb3 lLle5 ! 21 'ti'xb4 lLlxd3 22
cxd3 ;I; Wang Zili) 1 9 'irc4 .i.xd3 20
cxd3 .i.xg5 21 fxg5 Wib6 22 lLld2
lLle5 23 Wih4 l:tae8 24 lLle4 Wang
Zili-Gostisa, Belgrade 1988.
c) 13 h6! ? 14 .i.h4 b4 1 5 lLld1
lLld7 16 .i.xe7 lLlxe7 17 lLle3 e5 1 8
f5 ( 1 8 l:f2 ;t Kaminski) 1 8. . . lLlf6 1 9
lLlg4 lLlxg4 20 'irxg4 f6 2 1 lLld2
.i.b7 oo Kaminski-Petrienko, Kat
owice 1 992. This is almost the only
example ofthe .i.g5 plan to be given
in ECO section B33 (note 1 7).
...

...

...

After 1 3 l:ae l the key position for


the 9 .i.g5 continuation arises. The
same position, with the difference that
White has played .i.d2 instead of
.i.g5, was examined in the previous
chapter. The more active Ag5 em-

White Plays .l.g5 59

d) 13 Ab7 1 4 'tWo ( 1 4 a3 b4 1 5
axb4 tt:Jxb4 1 6 l:tal h6 1 7 xf6
.i.xf6 1 8 tLla5 Jlab8! 19 tt:Jxb7 l:lxb7
20 tLld1 tLlxd3 21 'ifxd3 .axb2 22
:txa6 l:.c8 and Black had a minimally
better endgame, G.Kuzmin-Kurajica,
Lyon 1 994) 14 ... tLlb4 1 5 'i!Vh3 tt:Jxd3
16 cxd3 l:.ac8 1 7 tLld4 tLle8 1 8 il..xe7
'flxe7 1 9 a3 l:tc5 20 f5 il.. c8 with a
more passive but solid position for
Black, Yudasin-Smirin, Moscow
1 994. In these two high-level exam...

pies White did not demonstrate how


to achieve the advantage after
1 3 .. . il.. b7 .
e) 1 3 /()d7 (With this move
Black reduces the tension in the cen
tre and achieves a solid game.) 1 4
1L.xe7 tLlxe7 1 5 e5 tLlg6 16 'iVf3 l:tb8
( l 6 . . . il.. b7? 17 exd6) 1 7 exd6 'ti'xd6
1 8 tLle4 W/c7 19 tLld4 tt:Jc5 20 tLlxc5
'ii'xc5 21 c3 b7 22 'ii'h3 l:tbd8 with
a satisfactory game for Black,
Kaminski-Grivas, Moscow OL 1 994.
...

. .

Jtb4 Variation

In the whole 2 . . . 'Llc6, 4. . .'tlr'b6


complex, there are two important
lines where Black plays the move
... -'.b4. These two variations are fun
damentally different and are given
separately.
In the first one, Black, as soon as
the 7th move, plays .. . -'.b4 after the
introductory moves:
c5
e4
1
i(:}c 6
2
f3
cxd4
d4
3
'ffb6
4
i(:}xd4
i(:}f6
5 bJ
e6
6 i(:}cJ
7 Ad3
The second, fundamentally differ
ent variation where Black plays
... .tb4, is characterised by the moves
1 e4 c5 2 'Llf3 'Llc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 'Llxd4
'i!Vb6 5 'Llb3 'Llf6 6 'Llc3 e6 7 i.e3
'fic7 8 f4 i.b4 and it is dealt with in
Chapter 7, line A.
Before starting with the variation
7 .td3 .tb4, I think that here it should
be mentioned that it is imprecise for
White to play 7 Ae2 early, that is
before Black has committed himself
with the development of his dark
squared bishop. The reason for this
is the pinning 7 ... .tb4, which in sev
eral examples from practice proved

effective: 8 0-0 0-0 (8 . . . a6 9 .te3


'f//c 7 1 0 f3 b6 1 1 'ifd2 h5 oo Li
Ruofan-Zhang Zhong, Beijing 1 997)
9 d3 i.xc3 10 bxc3 d5 1 1 exd5
exd5 1 2 .1f4 .l:te8 1 3 .l:tab 1 'Lle4!
(With the idea ... f5; this seems to
be stronger than 1 3 ... 'Lle5 14 'id4
't!t'xd4 1 5 'Llxd4 b6 16 'Llb5 'Llg6 1 7
-'.e3 .1a6 1 8 .l:tfe 1 :!: Fischer-Benko,
Stockholm IZ 1 962) 14 c4? 'Llb4 I S
'4W f3 't!t'f6 I 6 .1d3 'Llc3 1 7 .l:!be1
i.e6 I 8 e3 'Llxd3 I 9 cxd3 dxc4
20 dxc4 'Ll xa2 + Zelcic-Kurajica,
Vinkovci 1 995.
Ab4 (D)
7

This early pin is seldom played in


practice. The chief adherents of this
system are V .Karasev and GM
Bonsch. In practice they achieved
relatively solid results with it.

7. .. b4

The price of compromising the


white pawn structure after the most
often played 8 0-0 xc3 9 bxc3 is
quite high. Black, in the early phase
of the game, abandons his dark
squared bishop, which reduces his
defensive potential on the kingside.
This exchange determines the aims
of both sides. While White's further
strategy is based on the opening of
the position and the attempt to organ
ise a kingside attack, Black strives to
give the game a blocked character,
where in the long run his better pawn
structure would be important.
8 0-0 (D)
The most consistent. Other con
tinuations where White abandoned
the g5 possibility are less energetic:
a) 8 Ad2 0-0 and now:
a 1 ) 9 0-0 xc3 (9 .. . d5 10 exd5
i.xc3?! { 1 0 ...exd5 } 1 1 dxc6 xd2
12 cxb7 xb7 1 3 'ifxd2 Suetin
Reshko, Moscow 1 966) 1 0 xc3 e5
1 1 h l d6 12 'i!Ve2 e8 1 3 f4 e6
( l 3 . . . .)tg4! ?) 14 f5 i.xb3 1 5 axb3
ad8 1 6 i.c4 a6 1 7 .te1 'Lld4 1 8
'i\fd3 Polugaevsky-Reshko, Mos
cow 1 966.
a2) 9 a3 i.e7 (9... xc3 10 xc3
e5 1 1 0-0 d6 1 2 .i.d2 g4 1 3 'tWe 1
e6 14 i.e3 'f!lc7 1 5 h3 i.xb3 1 6
cxb3 d5 1 7 exd5 'Llxd5= Chuprikov
V.Karasev, Simferopol 1 989) 1 0 f4
d6 1 1 'fll f3 e5 (Better is 1 l ...a6) 1 2
f5? ( 1 2 'Lld5 ! 'Llxd5 1 3 exd5 'Lld4
14 'Llxd4 'fixd4 1 5 0-0-0 .tf6 16 c3!
't!Ya4 1 7 f5 ! ) 1 2 ... 'Lld4! 1 3 'Llxd4
exd4 14 'Lld5 'Llxd5 1 5 exd5 h4+!
1 6 g3 l:te8+ with the advantage for

Variation 61

Black, Suetin-Reshko, USSR 1 97 1 .


a3) 9 f4 i.xc3 ! 1 0 .)txc3 'fie3+
1 1 Wle2 'fllxe2+ (After 1 l .. .Wfxf4? !
1 2 l:tfl White has the initiative for
the sacrificed pawn) 1 2 'ifi>e2 e5 1 3
fx e 5 'Ll g4 1 4 'Ll d4 Brunner
Bonsch, Dortmund 1 990.
b) 8 Ae3 Wlc7 and now 9 f4 (rec
ommended in Beating The Sicilian J)
transposes to Chapter 7, line A .
White's alternative is 9 0-0 Axc3
(Forced; 9 ... 0-0?! is weak after 1 0
'Ll b 5 ! 'i!Vb8 1 1 f4 Gheorghiu
Forintos, Monte Carlo 1 968) 1 0
bxc3 and now:
b 1 ) 10 ...0-0 1 1 f4 d6 12 'Lld4 e5
1 3 'Llb5 W/e7 14 c4 'Llg4 15 i.d2
exf4 16 l:txf4 W/e5 with equal play,
Hohelj-Kishnev, MUnster 1 993.
b2) To open the position before
castling and without having the dark
squared bishop is not advisable :
10 d5?! 1 1 exd5 'Llxd5 1 2 .)tcs is
clearly in White ' s favour, Oral
Vokac, Luhacovice 1993 .
...

8
Axc3
In the case of 8... 0-0, White can

62

7. .. _j,b4

Variation

transpose into the main line with 9


i..g 5 i..x c3. Instead:
a) 9 a4 doesn't give any advan
tage: 9 ... 'i/c7 1 0 c4 d5 1 1 exd5 exd5
12 cxd5 li:Je7 1 3 li:Jc3 .l:.d8 14 li:Jb5
'ile5 1 5 'ile2 Y2- Y2 J. Horvath
Bonsch, Budapest 1 989.
b) 9 .i.e3 leads into unexplored
positions where it's important for
Black to react promptly in the centre
in order not to get into an inferior
position:
b l ) 9 1td8 1 0 f4 .i.xc3 1 1 bxc3
e5 1 2 c4 exf4 1 3 xf4 d6 14 h i
li:Jg4 1 5 i.. e2 Cbge5 16 li:Jd4 Wie7 1 7
:bi li:Jxd4 Y2-Yz Y.Griinfeld-Svidler,
Haifa 1 995.
b2) The provocative 9 ffc7?!
forcibly leads into a difficult position
after 1 0 li:Jb5! 'ilb8 1 1 a3 i..e 7 12 f4
e5 1 3 c4! exf4 1 4 .i.xf4 li:Je5 1 5 c5
Asrian-V .Karasev, Russia 1 997.
9 bxc3
0-0
An unavoidable move. In this sys
tem Black avoids the ...d6 move as
long as possible.
a) Tlte immediate 9 d6 is incon
sistent. In the game Emst-Kouatly,
Thessaloniki OL 1 984 there followed
10 a3 'i!lc7 1 1 .l:.e1 (Or 1 1 b5
{ 1 1 f4 e5 1 2 f5 b6 13 .i.b5 We7 oo
Radulov-Andonov, Warsaw 1 987}
I l ...d5 { l l ...li:Jxe4?! 12 'i!ld4 } 12
exd5 li:Jxd5 1 3 fr'd4 with the initia
tive) 1 1 .. .0-0 12 li:Jd4! ( 1 2 e5 dxe5
1 3 .i.xf8 c;f;>xf8 with compensation)
1 2 . . . J:.d8 1 3 lll b5 Wia5 1 4 xd6
li:Je8 15 e5 a6? ( 15 lt:lxd6 li:Jxd6 1 6
li:Jxe5 ..txh7+ is unclear according
to Emst) 1 6 xh7+! q,xh7 1 7 'i!h5

'1Pg8 1 8 .l:.e3 f6 1 9 .l:.h3 axb5 20


'ifb8+ q,f7 21 Wif8 q,g6 22 exf6!
with a decisive attack.
b) Another example where Black
avoids castling, Conquest-Giffard,
Clichy 1 99 1 , is also discouraging
from Black's point of view: 9 e5?
1 0 ..ia3 'ilc7 1 1 .i.b5 lt:le7 1 2 i.. d6
'ifb6 1 3 'i/d3 lt:\g6 1 4 l:tadl li:Jf4 1 5
'ti"c4 a6 1 6 .i.a4 li:Jg6 1 7 lt:lc5 1 -0.
10 .i.gS
e8 (D)
...

...

...

...

This is the basic position of the


line. White ' s chances lie on the
kingside where he will try to use the
absence of black pieces and organise
the attack. Black is forced to re-group
his pieces, patiently refraining from
the idea of quickly exploiting the
weakness of White's queenside pawn
structure. If White does not achieve
anything concrete on the kingside,
then, in the long run, the weaknesses
of his pawn structure will become
prominent.
Among the many continuations for
White that have been tried in the dia
gram position, from the theoretical

7.

and practical point of view the most


interesting are the continuations:
A: 1 1 'i!Vh5 and
B: 1 1 e5
Also seen:
a) 1 1 Wh1 'flc7 1 2 f4 f6 1 3 .i.h4
b6 1 4 'il!fh5 .i.b7 1 5 l:t ae 1 l:tf7 1 6
:Ie3 Ci:Je7 (This is the characteris
tic defensive set-up for Black in
this variation.) 1 7 c4 J:tc8 1 8 e5 f5
1 9 l:th3 g6 20 'fih6 'flc6 2 1 .l:rg 1
'fla4 2 2 Ci:Jd2 ! with the idea Ci:Jf3 ,
Ci:Jg5, Wedberg-Bonsch, Stockholm
1 989/90.
b) 11 /Lld4 f6 12 iLe3 'fla5 1 3
'Vel ! CUeS ( 1 3 . . . Ci:Je7 ! ? with the idea
1 4. . . b6) 1 4 f4 Ci:Jxd3 1 5 cxd3 d6 1 6
f5 e 5 1 7 Ci:Jb3 'Wa6 1 8 c4 ;l; Saltaev
V.Karasev, Azov 1 99 1 .
c) 1 1 c4 d6 1 2 c5 'flc7 ( 1 2 ... dxc5
1 3 e3) 1 3 .i.b5 ( 1 3 cxd6) 1 3 .. . e5
14 'fld3 ( 1 4 cxd6) 1 4... dxc5 1 5 Ci:Jxc5
Ci:Jd4 1 6 Ci:Jb3 Ci:Je6 1 7 .i.e3 Ci:Jd6 1 8
fi'd5 Ci:Jxb5 1 9 'ifxb5 .i.d7 20 'ii'e2
.l:tfc8 :'i' Klovans-V.Karasev, Lenin
grad 1 989.
A:

11
'ifhs
This is the most frequently played
continuation.
f6
11
A playable but weaker plan was
s e e n in the game I . Gurevich
Yermolinsky, New York 1 99 3 ,
where after l l . e S 1 2 c4 d6 1 3
llad 1 'ii' c 7 1 4 f4 White had the
more promising play.
12
Ae3
'irc7
13
f4 (D)
..

. b4 Van'ation 63

This is the main position for the


1 1 'Wh5 continuation.

a) 13 ... 'Lle7 1 4 f5 e5 1 5 c4 b6 1 6

nn .l:.t7 1 7 c 5 .i.b7 1 8 l:.h3 h6 1 9

'fl g4 'it>f8 2 0 c 4 d6 2 1 cxd6 'flxd6


22 %ld1 'flb4 and since Black has re
moved the direct threats, he now has
a chance to use White's pawn weak
nesses, Kindermann-Bonsch, Munich
1 990.
b) Black also has another plan
where . .. f5 can be carried out, al
though the idea of opening the posi
tion early doesn't seem convincing.
In two games an unbalanced complex
position arose: 13 ... g6 (This is a
weaker continuation than the other
two) 1 4 'i!Vh6 Ci:Jd8 ( l 4... d6 1 5 :n
'fl g7 1 6 'ifh4 j,d7 1 7 l:tg3 'it>h8 1 8
Ci:Jd4 Ci:Jxd4 1 9 cxd4 f5 2 0 l:tb1 b6 2 1
exf5 exf5 2 2 d5 Semeniuk-V.
Karasev, Russia 1 992) 15 l:tf3 Ci:Jf7
1 6 'it'h4 'it>g7 1 7 g4 ;l; V.Orlov
V.Karasev, St Petersburg 1 997.
c) 13 ...d6 14 l:tf3 ( 1 4 l:tad1 f5 1 5
exf5 exf5 1 6 'i!Vh3 j,e6 1 7 J:tfe 1 'il!ft7
1 8 a4 Ci:Jc7 1 9 Ci:Jd4 Ci:Jxd4 20 j,xd4

64

7. .

b4 Van'ation

d5 21 'i!fg3 lLle6 oo A.Kuzmin


V.Karasev, Blagoveschensk 1 988)
14 ... f5 1 5 exf5 tLlf6 16 h4 exf5 1 7
.l:th3 h 6 1 8 'Oth l fi f7 1 9 l2Jd4 l2Jg4
20 .i.g1 CLle7 2 1 l:r.f3 ..td7 22 h3 l2Jf6
23 .l:.e1 d5 with great complications,
Bonsch-Sznapik, Stara Zagora 1 990.

B:

11
e5!
This is an unpleasant possibility
for Black, preventing him from con
structing a defensive set-up with ...f6,
. . . ltJe7 etc.
I consider this to be the most test
ing continuation for Black, who now
faces the dilemma:
a) to open the position after ll f5
( I l .. .f6 1 2 'i!Yh5) 1 2 exf6 gxf6, or
b) to sacrifice the exchange with
l l laxe5 (D).
The second alternative was seen
in two games . In Matulovic-P .
Kovacevic, Belgrade 1 989, after
I 2 1&.e7 lLl f6 1 3 ..txf8 (Even bet
ter is 1 3 1&.c5 ! 'ikc6 { 1 3 . . . 'ifc7 1 4
..td6+-} 1 4 ..txf8 c;;txf8) 1 3 . . . Wxf8
14 c4 d6 1 5 'ikd2 a5 1 6 a4 flc7 1 7
l:tfd 1 b6 1 8 ..te2 White had an ad
vantage although Black had good
...

...

chances to hold on .
In Totsky-V.Karasev, Povedniki
1 992, Black also did not achieve
complete equality after 14 e2 (In
stead of 14 c4 above) 14 ... fic7 1 5
'iVd4 b6 1 6 f4 lLlc6 1 7 'iVd3 .!tb7
1 8 CiJd4 ltJe7 19 CiJb5 'ii'c 5+ 20
'i!Vd4 'tlfc6 21 An 'ikxb5 22 j,xb7
:ct.b8 23 ..te4.
From these two examples, we see
that Black does not have an easy
game after the exchange sacrifice
1 1 ... lLlxe5. As for the other option
- the possibility 1 l . . . f5 1 2 exf6
gxf6 - although this original posi
tion requires a practical test in or
der for the final evaluation to be
given, at first sight White's chances
here too are a bit better.

7 White Plays 8 f4

1 e4 c5 2 ltlf3 ltlc6 3 d4 cxd4 4


ltlxd4 'Cfb6 5 ltlb3 ltlf6 6 ltlc3 e6
7
i1.e3
fllc7 (D)
The lines where White immedi
ately disturbs Black's queen with 7
e3, are divided into three separate
chapters. The present one deals with
lines where, after 7 ... Wlc7, White im
mediately plays 8 f4. In this case
Black can choose between two com
pletely different variations. The first
is to respond with 8 . . . .tb4 (A) while
the second is the playable but more
passive 8 . . . d6 (B). Although the
choice is the matter of taste, from the
theoretical point of view preference
should be give to the continuation
8 . b4.
Chapter Eight deals with the pro
phylactic move 8 a3 that prevents the
possibility . . .tb4.
In Chapter Nine, we examine the
standard development 8 ..td3 . Po
sitions from this chapter are very
similar to those described in Chap-

ter Eight, so the transpositional


possibilities in practice are more or
less unavoidable and frequent. The
variations where White, after 8 . . a6
9 f4 d6, castles queenside are those
which gives Chapter Nine a spe
cial significance.
.

. .

Before moving to a detailed review


of the main continuations, let us men
tion that the plan with 8 f3 does not
create problems for Black. By quickly
advancing ... d5, he achieves good

66 White Plays 8 f4

play as in the game Nunn-Grivas,


Athens 1 99 1 , where there followed
8 . . . .i.b4 9 1!Vd2 d5 1 0 a3 i.xc3 1 1
'ifxc3 dxe4 1 2 fxe4 0-0 13 i.d3 'ife5
1 4 d2 'ifh5 1 5 0-0 tll g4 1 6 i.f4
tll g e5.
As indicated in the previous chap
ter, 8 i1.e2 is a mistake since Black
can reply 8 Ab4 when the e-pawn
lacks protection. In G.Magnusson
Kveinys, corr. 1 985, White gave up
the pawn by 9 0-0 but after 9 . . . i.xc3
he did not have compensation for it
and lost rapidly.
8 f4
As was mentioned above, Black
can now choose between:
A: 8 . .. i.b4, and
B: 8 . . . d6
...

squared bishop and he also does not


have the g5 possibility, which as
we saw in Chapter Six can be rather
unpleasant for Black when he lacks
the bishop on e7.
9 Ad3
After 9 Wn d5 10 d3 dxe4 1 1
xe4 tll x e4 1 2 1!Vxe4 0-0 1 3 0-0
xc3 14 bxc3 tll e7 15 c5 .l:te8 16
:ao d7 Black had the more com
fortable game in Kresovic-Efimov,
Badenweiler 1 990.
Axc3+
9
Black's idea of reacting with ... d5,
utilising the pin on White's knight,
is one of his basic motifs in this line.
But, in this particular case, it would
be a weaker option. For instance:
9 d5 10 e5:
a) IO lLle4 1 1 xe4 dxe4 12 0-0
xc3 1 3 bxc3 b6 1 4 g4! .i.b7!?
(In case of 1 4 ... g6 or 14 . 0-0 White
would play 1 5 tll d2 with a clear ad
vantage.) 1 5 'i\fxg7 0-0-0 1 6 l:!fd l
Ovanesian-Nadanian, USSR 1 99 1 .
b) The pawn sacrifice with 10
d4? is very dubious, as illustrated by
the following two examples: 1 1
tll xd4 tll xd4 ( 1 1 . tll d5 12 tll b5 Wie7
1 3 .i.d2 is also better for White,
Tverskaya-Bazhina, Moscow 1 986)
12 xd4 tll d5 1 3 0-0 tll x c3 14 bxc3
JJ..e7 15 0 0-0 16 e3 g6 1 7 l:1ae 1
.i.d7 1 8 f5 exf5 1 9 xf5 .i.. x f5 20
l:txf5 gxf5 2 1 1!Vg3+ Wh8 22 e6+ f6
23 '1Yfxc7 1 -0 Farkas-Papp, Szeged
1 998.
By a different move order, the
posi tion w i th 9 a6 instead of
9 . . . xc3 was played in the game
..

A:

AM (D)

. .

...

. .

The pin .. . i.b4 is more sensible


here than in the variation 7 d3 i.b4.
The difference lies in the fact that
White has already committed himself
with the development of his dark-

. . .

White Plays 8 [4 67

Arencibia-Anastasian, Lucerne 1993.


Black proved the vitality of the
. . . b4 system after 1 0 0-0 xc3 1 1
bxc3 b6 1 2 lZ:\d2 d5 1 3 e5 lll d7 14 c4
d4 1 5 f2 lllc 5 1 6 g4 .ab? 1 7
h4 lZ:\e7.
d6
bxc3
10
We see that, in comparison with
Chapter 6, things are more favour
able for Black. White doesn't have
the unpleasant .tg5. Another possi
ble plan is 1 0 b6 1 1 0-0 b7 1 2
e2 ( 1 2 'ii'e 1 lll e7 1 3 .td2 0-0 Gast
Wirthensohn, Switzerland 1 98 3)
1 2 . . . d6 1 3 f2 llle7 1 4 c 4 lZ:\g6 1 5
j_ e 1 0-0 1 6 c3 12- Y2 Mnatsakanian
Gufeld, Tbilisi 1 983.
11
0-0
e5 (D)
One should be careful and not
hasty to castle.
Superficial is 11 0-0 12 g4 with
advantage for White.
...

...

This is the basic position for the


variation. Both sides have a lot of
prominent weaknesses, so the situa
tion is very sensitive and requires un
derstanding and precise play.

Black should be patient in his at


tempt to make use of White's pos
itional weaknesses. White's chance
is tactical play, which can be easily
achieved if the position is opened up.
Superficial treatment can quickly
bring either of the players into a bad
position.
a) Black 's pieces would be active
in the event of 12 fxe5 lllx e5 1 3 g5
.i.. g4 1 4 d2 lZ:\fd7.
b) The plan with the 12 f5 block
ade and the further advance of the
kingside pawns is not efficient either.
The point is that Black does not cas
tle at all but with the important ma
noeuvre . . . lZ:\b8-d7-c5 soon obtains
counterplay by attacking the white e4pawn.
For example, after 1 2 ... h6:
b 1 ) 13 c4 b6 1 4 e 1 .i.b7 1 5 'iWg3
'lt>f8 1 6 .i.d2 lll b8 1 7 b4 lZ:\bd7
and, managing to neutralise White's
bishop pair, Black achieved the bet
ter position in the game Andrijevic
Z.IIic, Zlatibor 1 989.
b2) 13 1'ff3 b6 14 'iWg3 'itf8! and
now the best plan for White is to start
the kingside pawn roller as soon as
possible. Avshalumov mentions 15
1'ff3 ! ? .tb7 1 6 g4 lZ:\b8 17 h4 lll bd7
with an unclear assessment.
In practice, 15 .1tc1 ?! has been
played, the beginning of an incor
rect plan. White transfers the bishop
to the a3-f8 diagonal with the idea
of exerting pressure on the d6 square
but Black has a convincing way to
parry that and target the e4-square:
1 5 . . . lll b 8 ! (D)

68 White Plays 8 f4

White plays 1 2 f5 (see the examples


above).
c2) Black treated the variation
better in the game I s tratescu
S .Atalik, Bucharest 1 995 . After
12 /t)g4 ! 1 3 ..'tg1 exf4 1 4 l:xf4
lLlge5 1 5 lLld4 0-0 16 lLlf5 (D) the
critical position for the continuation
1 2 Wh 1 arose.
...

The manoeuvre . . . lLlb8-d7-c5 eas


ily solves all the problems of the d
pawn. In I . Rogers-Avshalumov,
Belgrade 1 988, White was outplayed
unexpectedly quickly after 1 6 a4
lLlbd7 1 7 a5 b7 1 8 axb6 axb6 1 9
l:ha8 xa8 2 0 a3 .i.xe4 21 l:rdl
Wg8 22 xe4 lLlxe4 23 d3 lLldf6.
Let us go back to the basic posi
tion after l l ...e5. It's best for White
not to commit himself with the f
pawn yet and to go on with the pro
phylactic 1 2 Wh 1 or 1 2 h3.
c) Vouldis-Grivas, Greece Ch
1 993, is cited as an important ex
ample in BTSJ to show that White
need not expend a tempo on a2-a3
to prevent the pin. In this game,
White was successful with the 1 2
Whl continuati on:
c l ) The game went on 12 h6 1 3
'i!Ye l b6 1 4 fxe5 dxe5 1 5 'i!Vg3 Wf8
16 lLld4 lLlh5 17 'f!Vg6 exd4 1 8 cxd4
lLlf6 1 9 l:txf6 gxf6 20 iVxf6 l:tg8 2 1
f4 'Wd7 22 d6+ We8 23 b5
.tb7 24 d5 l:tc8 25 h!dl a6 26 dxc6
xc6 27 :d5 1 0. The plan Black
chose in this game works only if
...

In the further course of the game,


with an original plan, Black succeeded
in neutralising White 's initiative.
There followed 16 ... f6 (16 ... l:te8) 1 7
.tb5 %:td8 1 8 .ta4 xf5 1 9 b3+
..'te6 20 ..'txe6+ Wfll 21 'i!Yh5 We7 22
..td5 h!h8 23 'iVh3 fVd7 24 'iVg3 WeB
25 l:.dl nd8 26 c4 'iVe7 27 'ifa3 b6
28 'ia4 'f!lc7 29 ..'td4 Yz-Yz.
d) The second prophylactic con
tinuation that maintains the tension
in the centre, namely 12 h3, is also
interesting. For example 1 2 ... b6 1 3
c 4 ..'tb7 1 4 fxe5! ( 1 4 'iVe1 lL'lb8 1 5
..'td2 lLlbd7 1 6 r! d l 0-0 1 7 f5 .ta6 +
Daifas-Grivas, Ano Liosia 1 997)
14 . . . lLlxe5 15 lLld4 .a.cs? 16 'f!lel
0-0 1 7 l:.xf6! gxf6 18 g3+ and

White Plays 8 f4 69

White had excellent compensation


for the exchange sacrifice, Tosic
Z.Ilic, Nis 1 997.
Black's 1 5th move was in conflict
with basic chess principles. It is clear
that Black cannot take on e4 because
of 1 6 lZ'lb5 but interesting is 15 ...
ed7! ? 1 6 etJf5 f8. with the idea
of exerting pressure on the e4-pawn
with 1 7 . .. l:te8.
B:

d6
8
A more passive continuation that
leads to a complex battle where White
soon achieves a significant spatial
advantage on the kingside.
9
g4! (D)

same as in the above diagram. Of


course the difference lies in the
number of moves played.
For the sake of improved presen
tation of material, the author has
taken the liberty of matching the
number of moves of all the examples
given below, affecting the early se
quence of certain games. (For exam
ple, Speelman-Gulko and Kudrin
-Gufeld reached the diagram position
with the above quoted move order).
a6
9
This is the main continuation in
ECO B60/4. Others:
a) 9 . . h6 1 0 1Wf3 a6 1 1 g2
(The second option is 1 1 0-0-0!?
retaining the bishop at the fl -a6
diagonal.) l l . . . etJd7 ( l l . . .b5? 1 2
e5) 1 2 h4 b5 1 3 0-0-0 lZ'lb6 1 4 bl
d7 15 g5 0-0-0 16 'ife2 lZ'lc4 1 7
c l ( 1 7 f2) 1 7 . . . e7? ! ( 1 7 . . .
b8) 1 8 f3 %:r.he8 1 9 'il'fl ! b8
20 .i.e2 Beliavsky-Cabrilo, Lvov
1 98 1 .
b) 9 d5?! 1 0 e5 etJd7 and unlike
the French Defence, the positions that
arise in the case of . . . d5, e5, ... lZ'ld7
in the system "Sicilian 4 ... 1Wb6" most
often favour White. But here Black
had no choice because 1 0... lZ'le4 1 1
lZ'lxe4 dxe4 1 2 ..tg2 is weak. Now
comes 1 1 lLl b5 ! :
b l ) ll d8 1 2 h4 f6 1 3 etJd6+?
xd6 1 4 exd6 etJb6 oo Speelman
Gulko, Hastings 1 989/90. Instead of
1 3 etJd6, Speelman gives 13 exf6
lZ'lxf6 1 4 g5 lZ'le4 1 5 g2, assessing
the position as .
b2) l l .ffb8 1 2 g5 ! a6 1 3 etJ5d4
.

...

An aggressive reaction quite suit


able for this particular moment. In
practice this position is most often
reached by an unusual move order
from the Richter-Rauzer: I e4 c5 2
etJf3 lZ'lc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 lZ'lxd4 lZ'lf6 5
lZ'lc3 d6 6 g5 1Wb6 7 etJb3 e6 8 .i.f4
lZ'le5 9 .iie 3 1Wc7 1 0 f4 lZ'lc6 1 1 g4.
It can be seen that this position is the

...

..

70 White Plays 8 f4

W/c7 1 4 W/f3 lLlxd4 1 5 lLlxd4 .tb4+


1 6 f2 ! ii.. e 7 1 7 h4 Topalov
Smirin, Elenite 1 994.
10
gS
1Cid7 (D)

This is the position most frequently


reached in the variation 8 f4 d6. Both
sides have to continue in an enter
prising manner. White has a spatial
advantage, and objectively speaking,
his chances are better. But Black is
not without chances either and he can
obtain counterplay on the queenside.
In practice, players with the White
pieces have developed their queens
on various squares (d2, f3, e2).

a) 11 Wd2 b5 1 2 0-0-0 ( 1 2 h4
lLlb6 13 W/t2 b8 14 d3 lLlc4 1 5
0-0-0 lLlxe3 1 6 Wlxe3 :;l;; Kovalev
Giffard, Clichy 1 99 1 ) 12 ... .te7 1 3 h4
ICicS?! 14 .tg2 b4 1 5 ftJe2 lLlxb3+? !
1 6 cxb3 ! lL\d4 1 7 b 1 ttJxe2 1 8
W/xe2 0-0 1 9 W/t2 Kudrin-Gufeld,
Palma de Mallorca 1 989. The move
. . . ftJc5 has more sense when White
develops his bishop on the d3 square,
so better is 13 ... 1Cib6 or 13 ...Ab7.
b) 11 g2 1i.e7 ( l l . . .b5 12 0-0
itJb6 1 3 W/e2 and now instead of
1 3 . . . e 7 ? ! 1 4 a4 P e t k e v i c
Budovsk i s , U S S R 1 9 7 5 , B l ack
should have played 13 . . . lLlc4) 1 2
h 4 ( 1 2 0- 0 ! ? ) 1 2 . . . b 5 1 3 Wle2
itJb6 ! = Yurtaev-Gufeld, Helsinki
1 992.
c) 11 Wf3 b5 12 Wif2!? (An inter
e sting manoeuvre that prevents
... lLlb6) 12 . . . 1i.b7 1 3 ..tg2 e7 14
0-0-0 0-0-0 !? 1 5 b1 b8 1 6 h4
J:tc8 17 .l:.he 1 a8 ( l 7 ... l:the8!?) 1 8
J!d2 l:thd8 with a complex game in
which the chances are approximately
equal, Kudrin-Gufeld, Las Vegas
1 997.

White Plays 8 a3

1 e4 c5 2 f3 c6 3 d4 cxd4 4
xd4 lrb6 5 b3 f6 6 c3 e6 7
il.e3 flc7
8
a3 (D)

The idea is to prevent . . . b4. If


White wants to play this move, it's
better to make it on the 7th move,
before 7 e3 is played. The point
i s that then, if Black doesn' t play
precisely, White can achieve an ad
vantage with .i.f4 - see Chapter
1 0, line D.
The negative side of the 8 a3 move
is that it sometimes limits White's
option to castle queenside because
Black's chances of organising quick
counterplay on the queenside are im
proved when a2-a3 has been played.
Therefore there are very few exam-

pies where White decides to castle


long after this move.
In my opinion, Black faces more
problems when White avoids or post
pones the prophylactic a3 move.
8
a6
9 f4
d6
Here White can choose among
several different plans:
A: 10 g4
B: 1 0 VWf3
C: 1 0 e2
D: 1 0 .td3
Undoubtedly, the most ambitious
plan is the one where White immedi
ately, or one move later, plays g2-g4
(lines A and B). The avoidance of
the standard .td3, preferring to de
velop the light-squared bishop on the
a8-h 1 diagonal (e2-f3), leads to a
kind of Scheveningen. Several exam
ples i llustrating this theme are given
under C. The classic continuation for
this chapter is discussed in line D.
A:

1 0 g4
The most ambitious move. Now
Black has different, equally playable,
continuations. It is a matter of taste
whether to play this position with or
without ... h6.

72 White Plays 8 aJ

a) 1 0... h6 1 1 Ag2 g6 (A non


standard way to treat the line; Black's
usual plan i s . . . b5, . . . Ab7, and
. . . li.Jd7-b6) 1 2 1We2 .iLg7 1 3 0-0-0
0-0 1 4 h4 h5 1 5 fJ hxg4 16 .1Lxg4
Ad7 1 7 h5 %t fc8 1 8 hxg6 fxg6
Makarichev-Vasiukov, USSR 1 978,
and now 19 e5 ! dxe5 20 li.Jc5 would
give White a definite advantage.
b) 10...b5 1 1 .iLg2 .iLb7 12 'ife2
e7 1 3 h3 0-0 1 4 0-0 l:tfe8 1 5 g5
li.J d7 1 6 "it'f2 A f8 oo Yilmaz- S .
Hansen, Budapest 1 992.
c) 10... /0d7 1 1 Ag2 .1Le7 12 g5
b5 1 3 0-0 li.Jb6 1 4 li.Jd2 .1b7 oo
Yilmaz-Kurajica, Pula 1 997.
B:

1 0 'Wf3
i1..e7
This position can also arise from
the Scheveningen: 1 e4 c5 2 li.Jf3 d6
3 d4 cxd4 4 li.Jxd4 li.Jf6 5 li.Jc3 a6 6
f4 e6 7 'iff3 'ff b6 8 a3 li.Jc6 9 ll:lb3
ii.e7 10 .i.e3 f4c7.
11
g4 (D)
Instead of this sharp advance, the
more peaceful 11 iJ..d 3 is also possi
ble, but after 1 1 ...0-0 1 2 0-0 b5 it
transposes into the classical line

where the early a2-a3 helps Black.


See Chapter 2 (page 1 9).
11
/Od7
12 g5
b5
In this position White can develop
his light-squared bishop on e2 or d3.
The second option is more logical.
a) 13 i1..e 2 b4 1 4 axb4 li.J xb4 1 5
llc1 .'tb7 1 6 0-0 0-0 1 7 ''h5 .Uae8
( 1 7 ... l:tfe 8 ! ? 1 8 l:.f3 li.Jf8) 1 8 l:. f3
g 6 1 9 'ifh6 f5 2 0 l:th3 l:.t f7 2 1 exf5
exf5 22 ..td4 li.Jf8 (22 . . . .tf8? 23
'i!Vxg6! +-) 23 .:f.e3 with chances for
both sides, Jahr-Liicke, Porz 1 989.
b) 13 iJ..d 3 Ab7 ( 1 3 . . . b4) 14 'i!Yh3
li.Jb6 ( 1 4 ... g6) 1 5 g6 fxg6? ( 1 5 ... li.Jc4)
1 6 e 5 ! ( 1 6 'ifxe6? .tc8 1 7 ll:ld5
'fib7-+) 1 6 . . . f7 ( 1 6 ... li.Jxe5 1 7 fxeS
i.xh1 1 8 'i!Yxe6 'f!Vd7 1 9 .txg6+! )
1 7 exd6 .txd6 1 8 li.Je4 1&.e7 1 9 0-0
ll:ld7 20 li.Jg5+ i.xg5 2 1 fxg5+ We7
22 li.Jc5 with a strategically winning
position for White, Kogan-Payen,
Singapore 1 990.
C:

b5!
10 i1..e 2
11
0-0
i1..e7 (D)
This i s more precise than 1 1
iJ.. b 7, which leaves the e6-spot un
defended too early. In principle,
this move should be played only
when White plays AD. Janosevic
Korchnoi, Belgrade 1 964, took a
sharp course, where after 1 2 f5 exfS
1 3 a4 b4 1 4 ll:ldS ll:lxd5 1 5 exdS
ll:le5 1 6 l:!.xf4 White had the better
chances.
The next diagram has all the char
acteristics of a classic Scheveningen.
..

White Plays 8 aJ 73

Black manages to complete his de


velopment by playing a subsequent
. . . 0-0 and . .. .i.b7, so he can be satis
fied with the position. In other varia
tions of the 4 . 'tWb6 system he has
more problems to face than here.
12
tre1
White 's usual plan is 'it'e 1 -g3,
with or without .i.f3. If White has
aspirations to start an attack on the
kingside, then it is far more favour
able for him to have his bishop on
the d3 square.
The plan with the g2-g4 advance
is less efficient here than in the vari
ation when the diagonal d1-h5 is open
for the white queen. In almost all the
examples from tournament practice,
Black achieved a good game.
a) 12 /Qd2 0-0 1 3 g4 lt:Jd7 14 g5
l:te8 1 5 .td3 b4 1 6 lt:Je2 .t b7 1 7
lt:Jg3 .tf8 1 8 lt:Jh5 bxa3 1 9 bxa3 lt:Je7
20 'ii'g4 lt:Jg6 2 1 l:f3 d5 with an ex
cellent game for Black, Adams
Kurajica, Eupen 1 997.
b) 12 An when:
b 1 ) 12 Ab7 1 3 'ir'e 1 0-0 (Dubious is 1 3 . . . h5?! 14 h3 g6 1 5 J::t d 1
0-0-0 1 6 'if2 lt:Jd7 1 7 a4 Kiss..

...

S inkovics, Hungary 1 99 1 ) 1 4 'it'g3


h8 ( 1 4 ... b4 15 axb4 lt:Jxb4 1 6 l:tf2
J::t a b8 oo Batakov-Vokac, Lubnie
wice 1 994) 15 l:tad1 l:ad8 ( 1 5 ... lt:Jd7
1 6 lt:Jd4 lt:Jxd4 I 7 xd4 e5 I 8 e3
exf4 1 9 xf4 lLle5 20 .ixe5?! dxe5
2 1 lLld5 .i.xd5 22 exd5 J::t ae8 :;:
Guadalpi-Z.Ilic, Orange 1 989) I 6
h i b4 1 7 axb4 lt:Jxb4 1 8 'iVf2 l:c8
1 9 lt:Jd4 'it'b8 20 J::t d2 '1Wa8 with good
play for Black, Heidrich-Rabiega,
Dudweiler I 996.
b2) Another plan characterised by
the . . . J::t b8 move was seen in the game
Bonsch-Kurajica, Olot 1 99 1 , in which
after 1 2 0-0 1 3 e 1 llb8 1 4 g4 b4
1 5 axb4 lL:lxb4 1 6 f2 lLld7 Black
obtained satisfactory play.
0-0
12
13
"Wg3
Wh8
The usual prophylaxis against the
threats f5 and h6. Also possible is
1 3 1le8 1 4 f5 (If 1 4 lt:Jd4, then
Black plays I4 . . . lL:lxd4 15 ..txd4 e5
with equality) 14 ... h8 1 5 lLld4 ( 1 5
l:tad1 ) 1 5 . . . lt:Jxd4 1 6 .i.xd4 e 5 1 7
.te3 b7 1 8 d3 .ic6 1 9 g5 b4
and Black had a nice game, Fougler
Z.Ilic, Lesneven 1 989.
After I3 . . .<it>h8 White has tried:
a) 14 Wh1 b4 I 5 axb4 lt:Jxb4 1 6
lt:Jd4 e 5 ! 1 7 fxe5 dxe5 1 8 l:ac l
lt:Ja2 l 9 lt:Jxa2 lt:Jxe4 20 'iV e 1 exd4
2 1 ..txd4 .i.b7 with an equal game,
Herrera-Alvarez, Colon 1 993.
b) Or 14 /Qd4 ..ib7 15 l:tad1 l:tg8
( 1 5 . .. l:tad8, 15 . .. lt:Jxd4) 1 6 ..td3 e5?
(It is a mistake to allow lt:Jf5, so bet
ter is l 6 ... lt:Jd7 with the idea 1 7 . . .
f6) 1 7 lL:lf5 exf4 1 8 .i.xf4 lt:Jh5 1 9
...

...

74 White Plays g aJ

h3 ll:lxf4 20 xf4 g5 (Black


does not have 20 . .. ll:le5 because of
2 1 ll:lxe7 Wixe7 22 :th4) 2 1 t:Ud5
Wi d8 22 e 5 ! ll:l xe5 2 3 t:Uxd6+
Jakovljevic-Djukic, Kopaonik 1 992.

D:

10 Ad3
This continuation offers transpo
sition into the variations with 7 .i.d3
discussed earlier.
b5
10
u
ffo
After 1 1...Ae7 1 2 0-0 0-0 we
again have transposition into the clas
sical line with the a2-a3 move, which
was dealt with in Chapter Two (page
1 9). Here we consider only examples
which avoid that transposition.
11
Ab7
a) ll b8!? 12 0-0 b4 1 3 ll:le2
( 1 3 ll:lb1 ) 1 3 ... e5 ( 1 3 .. . bxa3) 14 a4!
ll:la5 15 ll:lxa5 Wixa5 1 6 ll:lc1 Wic7
17 a5 ::!; Marjanovic-Kurajica, Yugo
slavia 1 979.
b) l l Ae7 12 g4 (For 1 2 0-0
and 1 3 g4 s e e Chapter Three)
1 2 . . . .li.b7 1 3 g5 t:U d7 1 4 h3
t:Uc5?! ( 1 4 ... 0-0) 1 5 t:Uxc5 dxc5 1 6
g6 with an advantage for White,
S chulz-Plachetka, Copenhagen
1 988.
Ae7 (D)
12 0-0
The move order with 8 a3 ena
bles Black to avoid the main line
where he, instead of . . . J.b7, has
...

. . .

played .. . 0-0. This has its positive


sides, but also the drawback that
the control of the e6-point is aban
doned too early.
After 12 ... ..te7 we have:
a) 13 g4 is inefficient here because
Black reacts 1 3 . . . d5 and after 14 exd5
( 1 4 e5 d4) 1 4 ... exd5 1 5 g5 the move
1 5 . .. d4! is strong.
b) 13 d4 0-0 14 h3 ll:lxd4 1 5
.i.xd4 e5 16 j_e3 l:!.fe8= Tsarsitalidis
Karayannis, Ano Liosia 1 996.
c) 13 tig3 g6 ( 1 3 . . . 0-0 14 f5 Wh8
1 5 I/Wh3) 14 l:.ac 1 l:!:d8 1 5 h3 b4 1 6
axb4 t:Uxb4 oo Kolesnik-Marasin,
Minsk 1 980.
d) 13 'lih3 b4 1 4 axb4 ll:lxb4 1 5
ll:la5 .i.c8 1 6 t:Uc4 ( 1 6 0 l:tb8
17 'fWe2 0-0 1 8 Wh 1 ll:ld7 1 9 ll:lb3
ll:lxd3 20 I/Wxd3 l:!.b4 and Black had
a very active game, Schrei ber
Kuraj i ca, Zaragoza 1 9 94) 1 6 . . .
lt::l xd3 1 7 cxd3 0-0 1 8 ll:l b6 l:!. b8
1 9 ll:l xc 8 1Wxc8 20 1 H2 d8=
Mozaliov-Balashov, Russia 1 996.

White Castles Oueenside

The topic of this chapter i s the


set of variations where White plays
0-0-0. As in all other systems of the
Sicilian Defence where White cas
tles long, positions arise which are
extremely sharp and inevitably de
mand enterprising play from both
sides. The well-known strategic
plans for Black and White in the Si
cilian Defence apply here, too.
1 e4 c5 2 f3 c6 3 d4 cxd4 4
xd4 1fb6 5 b3 f6 6 c3 e6 7
e3 'flc7
8 i!.d3
a6
It should also be noted that:
a) 8 iLe7 will normally prove to
be only a transposition, e.g. after 9
f4 d6 1 0 'flf3 ( 1 0 0-0 a6 see Chapter
2) 10 a6 reaching line C below.
b) 8 iLb4 is certainly playable.
After 9 f4 it transposes to Chapter 7,
while if9 0-0 we have Chapter 6, note
b to White 's 8'h move.
9 f4
d6 (D)
At this point it is still possible
for Whi te to transpose by 10 0-0
il.e7 to the main lines of Part One,
Chapters 2-3.
...

...

...

In the system when White intends


to play 0-0-0, three cases should be
distinguished:
A: 1 0 g4! ?
B: l 0 'i!fe2, and
C: 1 0 f3
As in the other variations of the
4 . . . 'iWb6 system, here, too, Black has
more problems in the case of the con
tinuation 1 0 'i!ff3.
A:

10 g4!? (D)
As Nunn and Gallaghcr point out
in BTSJ, this move is also playable
immediately, reserving the decision
about the placement of the queen.

76 White Castles Queenside

Now comes 14 'iVt2! lt:lb4? ( 1 4 ...


lt:lxd3+) 1 5 l2Jxc5 dxc5 1 6 .te2 and
with the queenside pawn structure
that has arisen, Black organises his
counterplay more slowly. An impor
tant factor is that the c-file is closed:
16 .. . j,e7 1 7 f5 l:tc8? ( 1 7 ... l:td8 !?)
1 8 g4 and White had already
achieved a decisive advantage,
Beliavsky-Gufeld, Sukhumi 1 972.
b5
10
Possible is 10... h6!? I I fVe2 b5
1 2 a4 ( 1 2 0-0-0 !?) 1 2 b4 1 3 lt:ldi d5 !
14 lt:lt2 b7 I 5 0-0-0 l2Ja5! I6 l2Jxa5
't!Vxa5 I 7 d4! 'ixa4 1 8 b3 fVa5 1 9
g5 with a sharp position where White
had an initiative for the sacrificed
pawn, Mokry-J.Polgar, Brno I 99 1 .
d7
11
g5
12
1Wd2
The queen is more seldom played
here compared to 1 2 'We2 and 1 2
'ii' f3 . In the game Lukov-Cabrilo,
Vama 1 983, there followed 12 ffo
l2Jc5 ( 1 2 .. . e7 13 0-0-0 transposes
into the main line) 1 3 0-0-0?! (Lukov
suggests 1 3 lt:lxc 5 ! dxc5 14 0-0-0)
1 3 . . . b4 14 l2Je2 lt:lxd3+ 1 5 llxd3
(White did not pl ay 'lfo>b1, so he has
to take with the rook, which is far
more favourable for Black than the
type of the position where White
strengthens the centre with cxd3)
15 . . . .i.b7 1 6 lt:lg3 a5 and Black had
excellent play.
12
b7
13
0-0-0
c5?!
Here 13...e7, 13...c8 or 13 ...
b6 are all better moves.

B:
10 We2
e7
In the game Bologan-Kurajica,
Las Palmas 1 993, Black developed
his light-squared bishop on the d7square, but this is inadvisable. More
common and sounder is to use that
square for manoeuvring the knight to
the queenside by . . . li:Jd7 -c5 (or -b6).
The game continued: 10...b5 1 1 0-00 b4 12 'lfo>b 1 .td7 1 3 l::t c l ! e5 1 4
h 3 e7 1 5 g4 exf4 1 6 .txf4 .i.e6 1 7
ttJd4 0-0 1 8 g5 ttJd7 1 9 l2Jd5 (Pre
mature; 1 9 a3 ! would give White the
advantage.) 1 9 .. . Ji.xd5 20 exd5 l:tfe8
2 1 nhe 1 g6 22 .te4 li:Jb6 with a com
plex game.
After 1 0 . .. b5 1 1 0-0-0 a possible
plan is 11 ... .t:lb8 1 2 Wb1 ttJd7 1 3 g4
lbb6 14 'fVt2 lt:Ja4 1 5 lt:Je2 and now
Black should have continued 15 ...
e7, instead of 1 5 .. g6 1 6 lt:Jed4
.i.g7 1 7 lt:Jxc6 'f!Vxc6 1 8 i.d4 e5 1 9
.i.a7 l:ta8 2 0 f5 with an advantage to
White, as in the game Palac- B .
Knezevic, Cannes 1 996.
11
0-0-0
b5 (D)
This line is very similar to the
Sozin where White plays 6 .i.c4, so
.

White Castles Queenside

several comparative examples are


given below with the aim of enabling
the reader to better understand the es
sence of the line and to make his own
conclusions by looking at the differ
ences between them.
The diagram above can arise from
the Sozin Variation after the follow
ing moves: 1 e4 c5 2 CDf3 d6 3 d4
cxd4 4 CDxd4 lLlf6 5 CDc3 lLlc6 6 c4
b6 7 tt::l b3 e6 8 e2 e7 9 f4 c7
1 0 d3 a6 1 1 .i.e3 b5 1 2 0-0-0.
The position is the same but it
should be noted that with this move
order Black is a tempo up because
White was forced to play c4-d3,
so in this basic Sozin line, Black is
to move.
He has three continuations at his
disposal : 1 2 .. . b7 (a), 1 2 .. . CDd7 (b)
and 1 2 . . . lLlb4 (c).
a) 12 .ab7 13 'lii>b l 0-0 14 g4
tt::l d7.
Here White has to be cautious. It
is best to play 15 1rf2 strengthening
the control ofthe a7-g l diagonal and
freeing the e2 square for the knight.
In the fo l l owing two examples
White chose weaker continuations:
..

77

a 1 ) After 15 gS b4 1 6 CDa4 one


can see the drawback of the move
e2 - White hasn't the possibility
lLle2-g3 and his knight stands badly
on the a4 square. Black plays 1 6 ...
lLl a 7 ! - a n original manoeuvre,
worth remembering. Since White will
have to defend the knight with the b3
move, his weakened squares c3 and
a3 become the target. Ilincic-Kozul,
Kladovo 1 990, continued 1 7 lL!d4 ( 1 7
'it'f2!?) 1 7...a5 1 8 b3 l:tfc8 1 9 cl
CDc5 ! 20 lLlxc5 dxc5 2 1 CDf3 CD b5
22 b2 CDc3+ 23 xc3 bxc3 24
Wal c4! 25 xc4 'Wa3 26 llbl b4!
and Black soon won.
a2) 15 l:lhg1 b4 1 6 lLla4 lLla7 !
(Again) 1 7 CDd4?! (Better i s 1 7 e5!?
c6 18 exd6 xd6 1 9 lL!ac5 tt:Jxc5
20 tt:Jxc5 CDb5 - Grosar) 17 ... a5
18 b3 tt:Jc5 19 tt::l xc5 dxc5 20 tt::l f3
tt::l b5 21 d2 .l:!.fd8 22 tt::l e5 CDa3+
23 Wa1 f6 24 .i.c1 c4 25 bxc4 g5 !
and Black achieved a preferable po
sition, G.Hemandez-Grosar, Manila
OL 1 992.
b) 12 .ft)d7 1 3 g4 (Or 1 3 bel 0-0
14 g4 tt::lc5 1 5 tt::lxc5 dxc5 1 6 e5 c4 1 7
e4 b7 1 8 f2 b4 1 9 .tb6 f!Yc8
20 tt:Ja4 b3 with complicated play,
Nijboer-Smirin, Tilburg 1993) when:
b 1 ) 13 .ltc5 14 tt:Jxc5! (The best
reaction: White gains space and the
e4 square in the centre, and Black's
queenside phalanx is less dangerous
than it looks) 1 4 ... dxc5 1 5 e5 ..tb7
and now:
b l l ) 16 il.e4 (This is consistent
with the previous move, and with the
whole idea started with 1 4 CDxc5)
..

..

78 White Castles Queens/de

1 6. . . 0-0 1 7 g5 ( 1 7 f2!?) 17 ... b4 1 8


l2Ja4 l2Ja5 1 9 xb7 'i:Wxb7 and now
instead of 20 b3 , Wedberg-Kozul,
Novi Sad OL 1 990, White should
have taken the pawn by 20 l2Jxc5 with
better chances.
b 1 2) Imprecise is 16 fff2 lLlb4 1 7
.l:l'.he 1 0-0 1 8 g 5 l2Jxd3+ 1 9 l:txd3
.ilad8 20 1:1ed1 .l:l'.xd3 21 xd3 b4 22
l2Ja4 c4 23 .l:l'.d1 c6 with better
chances for Black, Knoppert-Gulko,
Tilburg 1 992.
b2) A better plan in this particular
position would probably be 13. ..lLlb6
with the idea of 1 4 . . . l2Jb4, and then
1 5 . . . l2Jc4 or 1 5 . . . l2Ja4!?.
c) 1 2...b4 (D)

The idea of this move is to remove


the attacking piece, the d3-bishop,
and then push the pawns on the
queenside.
The same position appeared in the
game J.Polgar-Fedorowicz, Wijk ann
Zee 1 990, except that the moves g4
and ... h6 were interpolated there. The
value of the . . . h6 move is, as usual in
such positions, questionable. Black

slows down the white kingside ad


vance by depriving himself of the
possibility to castle. The game con
tinued 14 c;i;>bl l:tb8 1 5 .l:l'.c1 l2Jd7 1 6
a3?! l2Jc6 1 7 l2Ja2 g5 1 8 h4 gxf4 1 9
xf4 l2Jde5 2 0 l:thg 1 l2Jxd3 2 1
\Wxd3?! b4 22 axb4 l2Jxb4 23 c3
'lixc3 24 lLlxc3 e5 25 i.. d2 e6 and
Black had the more favourable end
game.
In the diagram position, the im
mediate 13 g4 is less precise than 1 3
c;i;>bl because it enables Black after
13 ... lthd3! to force White to recap
ture on d3 with the rook. In the game
Malinin-Krivun, corr. 1 989, Black
didn't take this opportunity. There
followed: 13 ... 0-0 1 4 g5 l2Jd7 1 5
hg 1 !? l2Jxd3 1 6 l:txd3 b4 1 7 i.d4
bxc3 1 8 'i:Wh5 cxb2+ 1 9 c;i;>bl . Now,
an interesting analysis that favours
Black is 1 9 ... b7 20 .l:l'.c3 'lidS 2 1
l2Jd2 .l:l'.e8 2 2 l:th3 l2J f8 2 3 g 6 fxg6
24 l:hg6 e5! 25 fxe5 dxe5, but it
shouldn't influence the final assess
ment of the continuation 1 3 . . . 0-0.
After 13 Wb1, Black has tried dif
ferent continuations:
c l ) Now 13 ...xd3 is ineffective.
After 14 cxd3 b4 1 5 l2Ja4 Black lacks
the knight on d7 in order to play
1 5 ... 'lic6. Of course 1 5 ... l2Jd7 is slow
because of 1 6 .:C:.c 1 .
c2) 13 ....1ld7!? is met by 1 4 l:tc 1 !
- a skilful manoeuvre, which dis
courages Black from 1 4 . . . l2J xd3
since, after 15 cxd3, the black queen
doesn't have an adequate retreat from
the c-file. In that way Black is halted
on the queenside, while White takes

White Castles Queenside

the initiative on the other side of the


board. Thus 1 4.. . 0-0 1 5 g4 lifc8 1 6
g 5 l2Je8 1 7 f5 when:
c2 1 ) 17 ... t!'fd8?! 1 8 f6! j_ffi (The
opening of the g-file is not a better
alternative) 1 9 f2! (Threatening 20
j_b6, White gains an important
tempo for the pressure along the f
file.) 1 9 . . Jhb8 20 l:tcfl l2Jxd3 21
cxd3 b4 (If 2 l .. .g6, there follows 22
h4 with a fast break along the h-file)
22 fxg7 l2Jxg7 23 xf7+ h8 24
l2Je2 ii..b5 25 l2Jbc 1 with a winning
position for White, Velimirovic
Cabrilo, Kladovo 1 990.
c22) 17...Af8 1 8 f6 a5 1 9 l2Jd4
a4 20 a3 l2Jxd3 2 1 cxd3 "i'Vb7 22 fxg7
xg7 23 l2Ja2 d5 oo Minic-Portisch,
Palma de Mallorca IZ 1 970.
c3) 13 ... e5 14 l:tc 1 ! 0-0 (D)

Now:
c3 1 ) 15 Ilhgl ..te6?! ( 1 5 ... exf4 16
xf4 ..tg4 ! ) 1 6 g4 exf4 1 7 ..txf4
l2Jd7 1 8 l2Jd5 ! and Black encountered
serious problems, Kuczynski-Kozul,
Novi Sad OL 1 990.
c32) Or 15 Ithn ..te6? ! (Better
is 1 5 . . . exf4) 1 6 f5 ..tc4 1 7 g4 d5 1 8

79

exd5 e4 ( I 8 ... tt:Jfxd5 1 9 tt:Jxd5 tt:Jxd5


20 g5 is better for White) 1 9 ..txc4
'iVxc4 20 'iVxc4 bxc4 2 1 l2Jd2 l2Jfxd5
22 l2Jxd5 l2Jxd5 23 l2Jxc4 l:tac8 24
.l:!.cd1 l:tfd8 25 l:txd5 .l:!.xd5 26 l2Jb6
and White was a pawn up in Ivanovic
Kozul, Cetinje 1 990.
c4) 13 . .il.b7 and now:
c4 l ) 14 .tlct 0-0 1 5 g4 d5 1 6 e5
l2Je4 1 7 ..td4 l2Jxc3 1 8 xc3 l2Jc6? !
( 1 8 . . . d4!?) 1 9 l::thfl b4 20 d4 a5
2 1 'ife3 l2Jxd4 22 l2Jxd4 Z.Varga
G.Hernandez, Santiago Wch-jr 1 990.
c42) 14 klhg1 0-0 1 5 g4 d5 1 6 e5
l2Je4 17 xe4? ! ( 1 7 d4 ! ?) 1 7 . . .
dxe4 1 8 "i'f f2 l2Jd5 ! 1 9 l2Jxe4 lhc8
20 l2Jbc5? (20 .l:!.d2) 20 . . . l2Jxe3 ! 2 1
.l:!.d7 ..txe4 22 1:hc7 ..txc2+ 2 3 a1
.!:txc7 24 b4 l:txc5 25 bxc5 ..txc5 0-1
Sion Castro-Komljenovic, Seville
1994.
c43) In the previous two examples
we saw that Black reacted in the cen
tre with ... d5 . This option is much
more seldom available if the basic
position (in the diagram on page 77)
is reached via the 4. . . "i'Vb6 move or
der where Black is a tempo down.
In a few examples, Black success
fully carried out the classical plan of
transferring his king's knight to the
queenside: 14 g4 d7 ( 1 4 . . . 0-0 !? 1 5
g 5 l2Jd7 1 6 .!:thg 1 ? { 1 6 l:!. c 1 ! } 1 6 ...
l2Jxd3 1 7 ifxd3 { 1 7 cxd3? b4 1 8 l2Ja4
c6} 17 ... .!:tfd8 1 8 l2Jd4 l2Jc5 1 9 'ife2
l2Jxe4 20 f5 'ifxc3 -+, Shernoff
Castaneda, North Bay 1 996) IS l:lhgl
( 1 5 l:he I 0-0 1 6 g5 l2Jxd3 17 l:hd3
b4 1 8 'tfh5? .l:.fc8 19 d4 bxc3 20
.l:!.xc3 1i'd8-+, Ibraheem-Chan Peng,
.

80 White Castlt:!s Queens1de

Dubai OL 1 98 6 ) 1 5 . . . ttJc5 ! ? 1 6
xb5+ axb5 1 7 1Wxb5+ ttJc6 1 8
tt:Jxc5 dxc5 1 9 xc5 0-0 20 xe7
1Wxe7 2 1 e5 l:tab8 22 l:td6 .i.a8 23
'id3 Wia7 24 l:Id 1 Wia3 25 b3 ttJb4
26 Wid2 e4 2 7 l:I c 1 l:Ibc8 0- 1
Leyva-Vera, Las Tunas eh 1996.
After this survey of the Sozin
move order, w e re turn to the
4 ... 'ib6 line .
12
g4
Another idea is to play in the cen
tre: 12 label ti:Jd7?! 1 3 'Lld5! exd5
( B l ack i s also in trouble after
14 . . . ti:Jb4 15 d4) 1 4 exd5 ti:Jde5 1 5
dxc6 .i.g4 1 6 Wi f2 tt:Jxc6 1 7 l:Id2
Velimirovic-V.Dam\janovic, Bel
grade 1 99 3 . H owever, if White
doesn't play g2-g4, then Black has
no reason to hurry with . . . ti:Jd7. Bet
ter is 12 ...0-0.
l0d7!
12
A flexible move order which can
easily confuse White. A superficial
treatment of this dynamic position
was seen in the game Abramovic
B . D am ljanovic, Belgrade 1 984,
where after 12 b4 13 tt:Ja4 l:Ib8 1 4
b1 g6?! 1 5 l:tg1 ..td7 1 6 Wif2 .i.d8
1 7 g5 ttJh5 1 8 e5! dxe5 1 9 ttJc5 ..t.c8
20 fxe5 0-0 2 1 .txa6 White had a
clear advantage.
13
Wbl (D)
A precise move order. Consider
ably weaker is 13 g5?! 'Llb4 ! , after
which Black accomplished two goals
- exchanging White's light-squared
bishop while forcing him to recap
ture with a piece, and starting the
queenside pawn storm.

This way of playing was seen in


the game Abramovic-A. Fishbein,
New York 1 990, which abounded
with mutual tactical breaks and which
Black won in great style. The whole
game is worth seeing: 1 4 l:Ihg1 (The
point was that 1 4 'itb 1 ti:Jxd3 1 5
cxd3? b4 1 6 tt:Ja4 loses a piece to
1 6. . . 'i!Vc6) 1 4 . .. 'Llxd3+ 1 5 Wixd3 b4
1 6 ti:Jb1 a5 ! (Black is already better)
1 7 ti:Jd4 tt:Jc5 1 8 'ib5+ d7 1 9 Wic4
Wib7 20 ti:Jd2 0-0 2 1 f5 l:tfc8 22 g6
fxg6 23 fxg6 a4 24 vwn b3 ! 25
ti:J2xb3 axb3 26 gxh7+ h8 27
xg7 ! ti:Jd3 + ! 28 .!:.xd3 bxa2 ! 29
l:Ig8+ l:txg8 30 hxg81W xg8 3 1
Wig2+ 'itf7 32 Wif3+ ..tf6 33 'fi'h5+
'itf8 34 .Ah6+ e7 35 ..tg5 a1 'iY+
36 'itd2 'ia5+ 0- 1 .

..

13
Ab7
In the earlier examples (Sozin
move order) Black was a tempo up,
as he had already played this move.
The question is whether this is of cru
cial importance. Namely, when Black
plays . . . .i.b7, his alternative plan
. . . I:I.b8 followed by . . . ti:Jd7-b6-a4,
which looked rather attractive, is less

White Castles Queenside

efficient. Also, the defensive role of


the black bishop along the c8-h3 di
agonal is significant.
One example where Black avoided
playing the standard 1 3 . .. b7 is the
game Nevednichy-Grivas, Debrecen
1 992. Black carried out a quick knight
manoeuvre 13 .lllb6 14 .l:.he 1 lt:Ja4
and achieved an acceptable position
after 1 5 d2 ft:Jxc3+ 1 6 xc3 e5
17 f5 h6.
14 g5
14 l:lhfl ft:Jb4 15 'fi'f2 .l:.c8 16 g5
0-0 1 7 f5 ft:Jxd3 1 8 cxd3 b4 1 9 lt:Je2
lt:Je5 ( 1 9 . .. exf5) 20 f6 lt:Jg4 21 'iff4
'ifc2+ 22 ..tal 'iVxe2 23 fxe7? (23
.l:.fe 1 ! wins) 23 .. . ft:Jxe3 with an ad
vantage for Black, Tringov-Cabrilo,
Prokuplje 1 987.
14
lllc5
14 ... lllb4 1 5 a3 ! ft:Jxd3 1 6 cxd3,
with the idea 17 .l:. c 1 , seems to be
unpleasant for Black. But Akopian's
suggestion 14 l:lc8!? is acceptable
for Black and an alternative is
1 4 . lllb6. In the latter case, the line
1 5 xb5 axb5 1 6 ft:Jxb5 'iVd8 1 7
.ltxb6 '@'xb6 1 8 ft:Jxd6+ xd6 1 9
.l:.xd6 0-0 should not worry Black.
15
l:lhfl !
In the event of 15 xc5 dxc5
White is too late with 1 6 e5 and 1 7
e4, because after 1 6 . . . ltJd4 h e
would lose the exchange. Therefore
it's necessary to move the rook.
In the game Velimirovic-Djukic,
Svetozatevo 1 990, White chose 1 5
l:thg1 and after 1 5 ... b4 ( 1 5 .. . lt:Ja4!?
is a promising alternative) unexpect
edly sacrifi ced a piece with 1 6
..

81

d5!?. 1t is questionable whether the


sacrifice was correct, but it's certain
that it's not easy to refute it in an
actual battle. The alternative is 16
xc5 dxc5 ( 1 6 . . . bxc3 1 7 lt:Jxb7
fr'xb7 is also possible) 1 7 lt:Ja4 'ifa5
( 1 7 . .. ft:Ja5 1 8 c4!) 1 8 b3.
After 16 ft:Jd5 !? the game contin
ued 16 ... exd5 1 7 exd5 and now Black
incorrectly returned the material im
mediately with 17 . xd3? 1 8 dxc6,
which gave White a big positional ad
vantage. Black should have played
17 . llla5 and in that case 18 ltlxc5?!
dxc5 1 9 d6? xd6 20 xc5+ Wie7
is losing for White. The critical line
is 1 7 ... ft:Ja5 18 xa5 'ifxa5 1 9 d4.
15
llla 4! (lJ)
..

The best way to create counter


play. Both 15 ... b4?! 1 6 lt:Jxc5 dxc5
1 7 lt:Ja4 lt:Ja5 ( 1 7 ... ft:Jd4 1 8 'iVf2 )
1 8 c4! and 1 5 ... xb3 1 6 axb3 0-0-0
1 7 'if2! (Akopian) are less promism g.
16 ltlxa4
bxa4
1 7 itld2
itlb4
18 .ad4
0-0!
19 ltlc4

82 White Castles Queenside

Perhaps th e sharper 19 f5!? is a


better option.
d5
19
xd3
20 exd5
21 cxd3 .i.xd5 22 l:lcl 1lrb7 23 b6
l:lad8 and this complex position of
fers chances to both sides, Kengis
Akopian, Manila OL 1 992.

C:

. .

Jl.e7
10 lff3
Or 10 ... b5 1 1 0--0--0 (According
to BTSJ, 1 1 g4 is also possible)
1 l . . . b7 1 2 b 1 lZ:laS 1 3 'Oxa5
'i!r'xa5 14 g4 0-0-0 1 5 g5 COd7 16 a3
b8 17 'it'f2 Ae7 18 Ad4 e5 19 fxe5
dxe5 20 .ta7+ aS 21 COdS King
Wirthensohn, Bern 1 988.
11
g4
This direct thrust is one of the rec
ommendations for White in BTSJ. Of
course 11 0-0 transposes to Chapter 2.
The immediate g2-g4 is more pre
cise than 1 1 0-0-0 b5 1 2 g4, as in that
case after 12... b4 1 3 ..t>b1 ( 1 3 g5
lUxd3+! 14 lhd3 lZ:ld7 or 14 cxd3
b4 ! ? seems to be fine for Black)
Black can react in the centre with
1 3 . d5 ! (D)
..

This is the game Hjartarson


Agdestein, Tilburg 1 989. In the bal
anced position after 1 4 e5 lUd7 1 5
.l:he1 lLlb6 1 6 f5 lUa4 1 7 d4 lZ:lc6
1 8 fxe6 lZ:lxc3+ 19 Axc3 Ae6 20
Ad4 the draw was agreed. The quick
. dS is possible when the knight is
not driven away from the f6-square.
In practice, instead of 1 2 ... lZ:lb4
and 1 3 ... d5, the standard 12 . . d7 is
attempted more often. This plan is
also playable. There are several ex
amples from tournament practice,
following 13 b1 :
a) 1 3 ... b6 (If l 3 ... c5, then
after 14 lLl xcS dxc5 1 5 e5, with
the idea 1 6 e4, White obtains the
advantage) 1 4 g5 lUa4 1 5 lUe2
j_d7 16 f5 lZ:leS 17 'it'h3 lZ:lcS 1 8
COf4 0-0-0 1 9 'Wg3 lLlxb3 20 axb3
Wb8 2 1 l:thfl ;!;; Kotronias-Grivas,
Heraklion 1 992.
b) 1 3 . . . Ab7 14 g5 lLlc5 (Or
14 .. . lLlb4 1 5 a3 lZ:lxd3 1 6 cxd3 'Oc5
17 lZ:ld4 g6 1 8 'it'e2 e5 19 'Of3 exf4
20 j_xf4 lLle6 with an unclear posi
tion, Guedon-Ilic, Clermont-Ferrand
1 989) 1 5 'it'h3 'Oa4 1 6 lLle2 (The
position after 16 g6? ! lLlxc3+ 1 7 bxc3
fxg6 18 'it'xe6 'it'c8 is unclear accord
ing to Akopian) 1 6 ...'it'd7 ( 1 6 ... 0-0-0
1 7 f5 ) 1 7 .l:hfl 0-0-0 1 8 'i!r'g3 b8
1 9 f5 e5 ( 1 9 . . . lZ:le5 20 Af4 f!ic7 2 1
fxe6 fxe6 22 lUed4 i s in White's fa
vour, but 1 9 ... a8 !? 20 fxe6 fxe6
21 %:lf7 l:hg8. with the idea lZ:leS, is
the possible line suggested by
Akopian) 20 f6 ! gxf6 21 gxf6 j_f8
22 'ife 1 ! Kotroni as-Akopian,
Debrecen 1 992.

White Castles Queenside

b5
11
The most consistent. Black did not
have success with the alternatives in
practice:
a) 1 1 ...0-0 12 g5 lLld7 13 0-0-0 b5
14 e5! dxe5 1 5 .te4 .tb7 16 f5 ! (By
playing the instructive advance e4e5 and f4-f5 at the right time, White
gets the important e4-outpost for his
pieces) 16 ... g6 1 7 f6 .tb4 18 h4 1:tfc8
1 9 h5 CLlf8 20 hxg6 fxg6 2 1 lLld5 !
exd5 22 .txd5 'ofr>h8 23 f7 "ii'd6 24
.l:.xh7+! lLlxh7 25 .l:. h 1 g7 26
.l:.xh7+ f8 27 'ii' f6 1 -0 Hellers
Djukic, Malmo 1 988.
b) 11 . .h6 12 0-0-0 b5 13 l:hg1
CLld7 14 'it'f2! and now it is hard for
Black to redeploy the knight on d7.
For example, 14 ... l:b8 1 5 'ofr>b l lLlb6?
1 6 .txb5 axb5 1 7 lLlxb5 d8 1 8
lLlxd6+ .txd6 1 9 e5) 1 4 . . . .tb7 1 5
'ofr> b 1 %1 c 8 (As Nunn says, Black
should play the standard 15 . .. lLlb4;
1 5 . . ..tf6? is careless because of 1 6
e5 ! dxe5 1 7 .txb5 ! 0-0 { 17 . .. axb5 1 8
lLlxb5 'ti'b8 1 9 'it'd2!+- } 1 8 g5 hxg5
and now instead of20 lLle4?! , Estrin
I.Kopilov, Omsk 1 973, White could
have developed an irresistible attack
after 20 "ii'h 4! axb5 2 1 .l:.g3) 1 6 h4
lLla5 1 7 g5 hxg5 1 8 hxg5 b4 1 9 lLla4
lLlc4 20 g6 lLlxe3 2 1 gxfl+ 'it>xfl 22
'it'xe3 .tf6 (22 ... .tc6 23 'it'd4) 23
e5 ! dxe5 24 .tc4 l:thd8 (24 ...lLlf8 25
lLlac5 wins) 25 l:txd7+! l: xd7 26
lLlac5 l:d5 27 "it'h3 1Vb6 28 .txd5
.txd5 29 fxe5 .te7 30 1Vh5+ 'lt>g8
3 1 'it'g6 .tf8 32 CLld7 1 -0, Tiviakov
Yuanning Rong, Singapore 1 990. A
nice achievement by Tiviakov.
.

83

c) 1 1 . .b6 (The idea of this move


is to support ... c5 in anticipation of
the manoeuvre ... lLld7-c5) 12 g5 lLld7
1 3 0-0-0 lLlc5 1 4 bl .td7 1 5 h4
"ii'b7 16 .te2! (Now the c5-knight
isn't doing much) 1 6 . . . lLla7 1 7 f5
lLlb5 1 8 .td4 .tc6 1 9 fxe6 lLlxc3+
20 .txc3 lLlxe6 21 l:!:hfl 0-0 22 .td3
b5 22 a3 lLlc5 24 lLlxc5! dxc5 25 'it'f5
.l:.ae8 26 .txg7! .td7 (26 ... 'lt>xg7 27
e5) 27 'it'e5 .td8 28 "ii'd6 'it>xg7 29
'tfh6+ h8 30 e5 f5 3 1 exf6 .te6 32
.l:.de1 c4 33 .tg6 .l:.fl 34 .txfl 'ii'xfl
35 g6 'it'xg6 36 f7 1 -0 Kavalek
Hlibner, Buenos Aires 1 978.
d) 1 1 ...g5 (An unjustifiable ex
periment in thi s position) 1 2 e5
dxe5 1 3 fxg5 lLld5 14 lLle4 Fris
Yegiazarian, Czestochowa 1 992.
12
g5
12 0-0-0 lLlb4 1 3 'itbl d5 ! ? trans
poses into Hjartarson-Agdestein, see
above.
12
d7
13
0-0-0 (D)
.

Black has tried several moves here:


C l : 1 3 ... lLlb4
C2: 1 3 ... lLlb6

84

White Castles Queenside

Also possible is 13 ..1l.b7, which


often has a transpositional character
and leads into the main line of the
variation. In the case of14 Wb1 lLlb4
we have the main line C l , while the
following examples have an inde
pendent character:
a) 14 ffhJ (Nunn' s recommenda
tion) 14 ... lLlb4 1 5 g6 f5 ( I 5 ... ltJxd3 !?)
16 liJd4 lLlc5 Jorgensen-S.Hansen,
Lyngby 1 990.
b) 14 W b 1 'Llc5 1 5 h4 lLlb4
(15 ... 0-0-0 1 6 'Wf2 h6 17 e5 lLlxd3
1 8 cxd3 d7 1 9 b6 l::tdffl 20 exd6
xd6 2 1 lLle4 Fercec-G.Kuzmin,
Pula 1 994) 1 6 d4 iLl bxd3 1 7 cxd3
lLlxb3 1 8 axb3 e5 1 9 .i.e3 exf4 20
xf4 'ii'd7 2 1 h5 with slightly better
chances for White, Ernst-Astrom,
Haninge 1 997.
Other continuations from the last
diagram are weaker, as can be seen
from the examples given below.
a) The immediate 13 . 0-0? is pre
mature because of 1 4 e5! dxe5 1 5
f5 . I n Beckemeyer-Daverkausen,
Germany 1 990, B lack soon got into
a lost position after 1 5 . . . liJd4 1 6
ltJxd4 exd4 1 7 f6 ! lLle5 1 8 xh7+
'it>xh7 19 'ifh5+ 'it>g8 20 fxg7 'it>xg7
21 h6+ 'it>g8 22 xd4 etc.
b) The manoeuvre 13 ...b4 14 lLle2
a5 is too slow in this particular posi
tion. In the game Magem-Sarmiento,
Spain 1 989 after 1 5 ttJbd4 'Llxd4 1 6
l2Jxd4 a4 1 7 l2Jb5 'i'b8 1 8 'it>b 1 lta5
19 'Lld4 'i!/c7 20 f5 e5 21 'Lle2 White
had better chances.
c) If 13 . 'Llc5, then White has an
unpleasant option in 14 ttJxc5 ! (Pos.

..

sible also is 1 4 '8tb 1 .i.b7 1 5 h4 'Llb4


1 6 f5 Sieiro Gonzalez-Bellon, Ha
vana 1 997) 1 4. . .dxc5 1 5 e5 (Over
ambitious is 1 5 'Lld5? exd5 1 6 exd5
'Lla5 1 7 d6 b7 1 8 j,e4 xd6, or
1 8 e2 xd6 1 9 .i.xc5+ e7 and
Black is winning in both cases ac
cording to Tiviakov) 1 5 . . . b7 1 6
.i.e4 l::t d8 1 7 h4 and White's space
advantage in the centre and at the
kingside ensures a long-lasting
(though not big) positional advantage,
Tiviakov-Anastasian, USSR 1989.
It should be noted that the prom
ising manoeuvre 1 4 'Llxc5 dxc5 1 5
e 5 i s possible only if the moves
bl and . . . b7 have not been in
terpolated.
In practice there have been games
where Black earlier played . . . .i.b7
instead of ... .i.e7, in which case there
are differences. In Kindermann-Stohl,
Hamburg 1 995, the critical position
arose with the Scheveningen move
order: 1 e4 c5 2 l2Jf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4
ttJxd4 l2Jf6 5 lLlc3 a6 6 f4 e6 7 f3
'i!Vb6 8 'Llb3 Wfc7 9 g4 b5 1 0 g5 l2Jfd7
1 1 e3 ..i.b7 1 2 0-0-0 l2Jc6 1 3 ..i.d3
lUeS (D).

White Castles Queenside

As mentioned above, 14 lLlxc5 is


ineffective here because Black has
played ... .tb7.
The game went on 14 Wbl CLJb4?!
(Stohl suggests 14 ... 0-0-0 1 5 'ilt'h3
b8 1 6 g6! fxg6 1 7 l2Jxc5 dxc5 1 8
'ifxe6 with a slight advantage for
White) 1 5 'tl'h3 ! CLJbxd3 1 6 cxd3 b4
( 1 6 . . . lLlxb3 1 7 axb3 g6 I 8 l:rcl 'flle7
1 9 .td4 e5 20 fxe5 dxe5 21 CLJd5 ! )
1 7 lLle2 lLlxd3 1 8 l:rxd3 ..txe4 1 9
l:!. d 1 :cs 2 0 a1 ..tf5 21 'iffl lLlxd3
22 l:hd3 .1ie7 23 f5 with the initia
tive for White.
C l:

13

/l)b4 (D)

85

White simply plays 1 5 cxd3 and af


ter 1 5 . . . b4 he has 1 6 lLle2 when
1 6 .. . a5 1 7 l:!.c1 was better for White
in Dussart-B . Knezevic, Argente
1 997. If the queen were posted on e2,
then White would be forced to play
1 6 lLla4, which loses to 1 6 ... 'i!Yc6.
The continuation 14 Ab7 is the
most logical. However, this move, in
a way, favours White. The thing is
that the e6-square becomes very vul
nerable, which is going to cause se
rious problems for Black later.
Perhaps it's better to keep the
bishop temporarily on the c8-square
and try another plan by playing
14 1lb8 (D).
...

...

This is considered the main con


tinuation, but in future one can expect
that Black will pay more attention to
the alternative l 3 ... lLlb6 (C2).
14
Wbl
Ab7
The difference between this posi
tion and the one from line B is ap
parent. Here the queen is on the
f3-square and this favours White.
Namely, in the case of 14 /l)xd3,

The idea is, in the event of 15


'ff h 3, to continue 15 ... CLJb6 and then
1 6 ... lLla4 or 1 6 . . . lLlc4, with which
Black would achieve counterplay on
the queenside more quickly than with
the continuation 1 4. . . .tb7.
White does have other possibili
ties after 14 ... l:!.b8. For example, 15
a3 lLlxd3 16 cxd3 b4 and 15 l!cl
CLJb6 1 6 a3 CLJc6! with the idea 17 .. b4

...

86 White Castles Queenside

(or 1 7 . . . 'Da4) and in both cases Black


will have satisfactory play. Doubtless,
the idea 1 4 . . . l:tbB deserves to be
tested in practice.
Finally, it is worth mentioning that
the immediate 14 b6 is imprecise
because after 1 5 a3 'Dxd3 1 6 cxd3
Black doesn't have 1 6 ... b4.
15
lrh3 (D)
A logical and multi-purpose con
tinuation. The white queen moves
from the a8-h 1 diagonal, strengthen
ing the pressure on the kingside and
the e6-point.
Other moves pose fewer problems:
a) 15 fff2 0-0-0 ( 1 5 . ..0-0!?) 1 6
l:.hel 'iii'b 8 1 7 fl ;!;; Tolnai-S.Peric,
Balatonbereny 1 988.
b) 15 f5 'De5 1 6 'Wf4 exf5 (16 ...
CDc5 1 7 'Dxc5?! dxc5 1 8 a3 CDxd3 19
cxd3 'iii'b8 20 e5 'iii'a8 21 'De4? l:txd3 !
and Black won, Walter-Liicke, Ger
many 1 990) 1 7 'ifxf5 0-0 1 8 h4 l:tac8
19 h5 CDbxd3 20 cxd3 b4 2 1 'Dd5 (21
'De4? l:txd3 ! ) 2 l .. .xd5 22 exd5
'Wc2+ 23 'iii'a 1 't!Ve2 with counterplay,
Loffier-Grivas, Cannes 1 995.
c) 15 Dhfl l:c8 (In the game
Wallace-Bellon, Osterkars 1 995,
White played over-ambitiously, ne
glecting Black's possibilities. There
followed 1 5 .. . 0-0 16 'ii'h 5 l:.ac8 1 7
.l:.f3? 'Dxd3 1 8 l:th3 h 6 1 9 l:txd3
..txe4 20 d4 e5 21 l:tde3 g6 and
Black achieved a decisive advantage)
16 Wf2 'Dxd3 1 7 cxd3 b4 1 8 'Da4
'ifc6 1 9 'Db6 'Dxb6 20 .i.xb6 0-0 2 1
C0a5 'tWd7 with chances for both
sides, Z.Almasi-Kurajica, Moscow
OL 1 994.

..

The diagram position after 1 5 Wh3


is the key one of the 4 ... 'ifb6 system
when White castles long. Now White
directly threatens g5-g6. His further
plan is to play f4-f5, which will en
able him to be the first to achieve a
concrete breakthrough and take the
initiative. In order to avoid playing
the inferior role and being exposed
to attack, Black must, as soon as pos
sible, organise counterplay either on
the queenside or in the centre. The
frequent motif of his counterplay is
the e4-point.
Black players have tried several
different plans. The radical way to
prevent the 1 6 g6 threat by playing
1 5 . . . g6 (line ' a ' ) is inadvisable. In
practice, players have usually pre
ferred the more challenging . . . 0-0
( ' b ' ) either at once or a move later.
Although it seems to be the most
reasonable al ternative, B l ack ' s
practical experience with this plan
is not encouraging. The relatively
unexplored c on tinuation w i th
which Black has had success in
practice is 1 5 . . . C0c5 (line ' d ' ) .
a) 1 5 g 6 1 6 l:t hfl l:t c8 (Or
. . .

White Castles Queenside

1 6 . . . 0-0-0 1 7 f5 gxf5 1 8 exf5 e5 1 9


f6 it.:ffl 20 .i.f5 d 5 2 1 a 3 d4 22 tLlxd4
exd4 23 l:txd4 'Llxc2 24 'iPxc2 1 -0
Grosar-Gostisa, Maribor 1 990) 1 7
l:[ d2 tLlxd3 1 8 cxd3 tLlc5 1 9 tLlxc5
dxc5 20 f5 'ifd7 2 1 fxg6 and in the
game Beulen-Ravikumar, Dieren
1 990, White prematurely accepted the
draw.
b) The position after 15 0-0 was
tested in several games in practice:
b 1 ) 16 J:lhgl l:r.ac8 ( 1 6 . .. tLlxd3 1 7
cxd3 l:r.ac8 1 8 l:cl tLlc5 1 9 d4
'it'd7 20 f6 l:fe8 2 1 l:tg3 b4 22
xg7 bxc3 23 tLlxc5 l:.xc5 24 d4
f8 25 g6 Z.Almasi-Ricardi, Bue
nos Aires 1 996) 1 7 f5 exf5 1 8 exf5
tLlxd3 19 cxd3 b4 20 tLle4 d5 21 l:r.c 1
'lfd8 22 tLlec5 tLlxc5 23 tLlxc5 xc5
24 xc5 l: e8 25 d4 and with the
centralised bishop White had better
chances, P.Wolff-Akopian, Adelaide
1 988.
b2) 16 d4 l:r.fe8 ( 1 6 ... tLlxd3!? 1 7
cxd3 l:r.ac8) 1 7 f5 exf5 1 8 g6 ( 1 8
ltJxf5) 1 8 . . .hxg6 ( 1 8 . . . fxg6) 1 9 exf5
g5 20 l:thg1 tLlxd3 2 1 xg5 and here
the opponents unexpectedly quickly
agreed a draw, Vouldis-Grivas,
Komotini 1993.
b3) 16 l:lhfl (D)
Probably the best. There are two
fine examples, both illustrating the
difficulties Black has in finding an
adequate way to parry White's attack.
b3 1 ) 16 Dfe8 1 7 f5 exf5 ( 1 7 .. .
.i.ffl 1 8 fxe6 fxe6 19 tLld4 tLlc5 20
g6 ) 1 8 exf5 tLlxd3 19 l:hd3 tLlf8
(This move loses directly, but if
19 . . . .i.:ffl , then 20 l:f4 with the idea

87

...

...

2 1 l:h4 is very unpleasant) 20 f6 it.d8


2 1 tLld4 (The knight enters the game
with decisive effect. In order to pre
vent tLlf5, Black is forced to aban
don the d5 square) 2 l .. ...i.c8 22 'iff3
l:b8 23 fxg7 xg7 24 tLld5 ft'b7 25
tLlc6 ! 1 -0 Sax-Urday, Manila OL
1 992.
b32) 16 Dfc8 17 f5 tLlxd3 ( 1 7 . . .
exf5) 1 8 fxe6 ! lLJxb2 1 9 exf7+ 'iPh8
20 g6 tLlf8 2 1 d4 tLlxg6 (2 1 . . .
tLlxd1 2 2 ft'h6 ! ) 2 2 l: f5 tLlh4 2 3
l:t g 1 tLlxf5 24 fi'xf5 .i. ffl 2 5 't1Vf6
The final point. Black is defenceless,
Vehi Bach-Anastasian, Groningen
1 993 ( 1 -0, 34).
b33) It is better to take first:
16 xd3 1 7 cxd3 and then 1 7 . . .
l: ac8.
c) Let us also mention Black 's
option o f castling one move later, i.e.
after 15 l:lc8. In the game Petelin
G.Kuzmin, Saint Petersburg 1 993,
White was outplayed because he hesi
tated to carry out the basic plan f4-f5
as fast as possible. There followed
16 l:ld2 0-0 1 7 l:tg1 ( 1 7 l:tfl ) 17 . . .
tLlxd3 1 8 cxd3 l:tfe8 1 9 tLld4 ( 1 9 f5)
1 9 . . . b4 20 tLlce2 tLlc5 2 1 f5 exf5 22
...

...

...

88 White Castles Queenside

exf5 f8 23 lt:l f4 g6 24 'tWg3 g7


25 h4? lt:le4! 26 dx.e4 xe4+ 27 lt:ld3
'ifc4 and it is obvious that Black has
won the tactical battle. Instead of 1 6
l:.d2, better is 16 d4 0-0 1 7 f5 exf5
1 8 lt:l x f5 Petrov-Todorov, Sofia
1 994.
The fact that, in such types of posi
tion, White has to be cautious and take
care of his sensitive d3- and e4-points
in the centre is also illustrated by the
following example where there was
another tactical duel in the centre.
d) 15 ... /l:}cS!? (D)

to be a better continuation. After


1 6... dxc5 in the case of 17 g6 fxg6
1 8 'tWxe6 c8 1 9 lt:ld5 lLlxd5 20
'tWxd5 b7 2 1 'ife6 c8 if White
avoids the draw by repetition, Black
would obtain good play, for exam
ple, after 22 'ir'b3 c4 23 'iVc3 0-0 with
the idea .. . e6. Instead of 1 7 g6, 17
Jle2 is better, after which the black
knight on b4 is misplaced.
Nevertheless, 1 5 ... lLlc5 !? is an in
teresting continuation that should be
seriously considered by both sides in
the future.
C2:

13
/l:}b6
This is the best alternative to the
main continuation 1 3 ... lt:lb4.
14 Wb1 (D)

Exerting pressure on the e4- and


d3-squares, Black forces the game:
d l ) 16 llhfl lZ'lbxd3 17 cxd3 b4
18 lLle2 liJxd3 19 .l:.xd3 xe4 20
d4 'ifc4 2 1 liJec l 0-0 22 'i!Ye3
xd3 + 2 3 ltJ x d3 a5 S . P o l g ar
Saltaev, Debrecen 1 990. In this com
plex position, Black's chances are
slightly preferable.
d2) If White wants to avoid the
tactical complications that unavoid
ably follow the previous variation, he
can play 16 /l:}xc5, which I consider

There are several examples from


tournament practice where, as a rule,
a complex game arose, with mutual
chances:
a) 14 ... b8 1 5 h4 lLlc4 16 cl
0- 0 1 7 h 5 d7 1 8 VWg3 :fc8 oo
Tolnai-Vragoteris, Katerini 1 992.

White Castles Queens1de

b) 14 . Ad7 (A weaker continua


tion) 1 5 h4 b4 1 6 'Lle2 a5 1 7 'Llbd4
'Llxd4 1 8 .i.xd4 ;t Rios Alejandro
Bakre, Argentina 1 997.
c) 14...b4 1 5 'Lle2 and the ques
tion arises, whether in such types of
position it is useful for Black to react
in the centre with ... e5. I think that
the drawbacks of this move are more
prominent than its advantages: 1 5 ... e5
1 6 f5 a5 1 7 f6 gxf6 1 8 gxf6 f8 1 9
'Llg3 a4 2 0 'Ll c 1 a3 2 1 b 3 h6! 22
..

89

'Llce2 (22 xh6? loses after 22 . .


'Lld4 with the idea 23 ... 'ifc3) 22 .. .
.i.xe3 23 1Wxe3 oo Urday-Bellon,
Benasque 1 993 .
d) 14 ... /t)a4 1 5 'Lle2 d7 1 6 't!Yg3
0-0-0 1 7 'ite 1 b8 1 8 'Llbd4 l:.c8=
Vouldis-Grivas, Ilioupolis 1 995.
13 ... 'Llb6, not mentioned in BTSJ,
is a relatively uninvestigated continu
ation. Some higher level examples are
needed in order for more reliable con
clusions to be made.
.

1 0 Whi te's Alternatives


At M ove 7

The fundamental position of the


whole 4 .. .'tib6 system arises after 1
e4 c5 2 f3 c6 3 d4 cxd4 4 xd4
'Wb6 5 b3 f6 6 c3 e6 (D).

Now we shall consider:


A: 7 g3
B: 7 't!Ve2
C: 7 g5, and
D: 7 a3.
Although these continuations are
seen less often, all of them deserve
respect and should not be under
estimated.
A:

g3 (D)

In the previous Parts, we dealt with


the two main continuations, 7 d3
and 7 e3.
In this Third Part, we shall exam
ine various deviations that White can
make in the early phase of the game.
This chapter discusses moves for
White in the above position other than
7 ii..d3 and 7 e3. Chapter 1 1 ex
amines the variation where instead of
defending the e-pawn with the knight,
White plays 6 d3. Chapter 1 2 deals
with various moves that White can
make at move five instead of 5 lLlb3,
namely 5 e3 and 5 lLlb5.

The fianchetto line is quite play


able and sound, although a bit too
reserved for my taste.
7
b4
Black takes his chance to react
quickly in the centre with . . . d5 .
Instead, the continuation 7 d6
...

White 's Alternatives A t Move 7 91

transposes into lines analogous to the


Scheveningen fianchetto, 1 e4 c5 2
lZJO d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 lZJxd4 lZJf6 5
lZJc3 e6 6 g3 lZJc6 7 g2 d7 8 0-0
e7 9 lLlb3 (ECO B80). I recom
mend those players who are familiar
with the finesses of the Scheveningen
to use this possibility.
The positions that arise after 7 ... d6
are, as usual, very complex with
positional manoeuvring that demands
patience and skill.
An example is the game Pohl
Efimov, Philadelphia 1 990, where
there followed: 8 g2 il..e7 9 0-0 0-0
1 0 ..-e2 a6 1 1 .i.e3 ... c7 1 2 f4 b5 1 3
e5? (This move only creates weak
nesses in the white position; he should
have continued 1 3 .l:.ad1 or 1 3 g4)
1 3 . . . dxe5 1 4 fxe5 lZJd7 1 5 .i.f4 b7
16 l:tae 1 b4 with a clear advantage
for Black.
d5 (D)
8 Ag2

Only this main line seems to give


some hope for achieving a certain
advantage in the opening.
Two other modest possibilities
don't cause Black any problems:
a) 9 .A.d2 dxe4 1 0 lZJxe4 lZJxe4
1 1 xe4 ..txd2+ 1 2 't!Vxd2 0-0 1 3
0-0-0 a5= Xie Jun"Gant, Novi Sad
OL 1 990.
b) 9 exd5 lZJxd5 10 i.d2 lZJxc3 1 1
bxc3 .i.e7 1 2 0-0 0-0 when although
White has a lead in development, this
advantage can easily evaporate, leav
ing his weaknesses along the c-file
prominent: in the later phase of the
game:
b l ) 13 lre2 i.d7 1 4 l:tab1 ..-c7
1 5 l:fe 1 l:tad8 1 6 lZJd4 'ffc8 ! 1 7 f4
lZJxd4 1 8 cxd4 J/..c6 =i= Inkiov-Lukov,
Vama 1983.
b2) 13 bl f!ic7 1 4 lZJd4 l:d8 15
lZJxc6 bxc6 16 ...e2 'iVa5 ! 17 l:fd1
( 1 7 xc6? i.a6) 1 7 ... .i.a6 18 11Ve1
11Va4 and Black in this example, too,
achieved the advantage, Stoinev
Kovalev, Berlin 1992.
9
Axc3
9 d4 is also possible although
the position that arises by force af
ter 1 0 e5 lZJd7 1 1 lLle2 lZJdxe5 1 2
lZJexd4 0-0 1 3 c 3 il.. e 7 i s slightly
more favourable for White. For ex
ample 14 Ae3 lZJxd4 1 5 'f!V xd4
'it'xd4 1 6 lZJxd4 i.d7 1 7 l:ad1
Romero Holmes-B e l l on, Ceuta
1 993, or 14 lre2 lZJxd4 1 5 cxd4
lZJc6 1 6 l:td1 lLlb4 1 7 d5!? lZJxa2 1 8
l:xa2 'it'xb3 19 l:a1 .i.c5 20 d6 .i.d7
2 1 e3 and the strong d6-pawn
turned to be more than sufficient corn...

Experience with this position is


still fairly limited. White has tried
several continuations.
9
0-0!

9.1 White 's Alte.matives At Move 7

pensation in the game Campora


Kurajica, Bor 1 983.
After 9 ... ..i.xc3, White has the
choice between:
Al : 1 0 bxc3, and
A2: 1 0 exd5
A1:

10
bxc3
xe4
This move leads to sharp compli
cations in which White does not hesi
tate to sacrifice pawns to get the
initiative. Simpler is 10 ... 0-0, which
after 1 1 exd5 tt:lxd5 transposed into
the variation I 0 exd5 (A2).
11
c4!
Risky is 11 Axe4 dxe4 1 2 'Wg4
..i.d7 1 3 'ii'xg7 0-0-0 with the idea
. . . tt:le5-0, but 1 1 1l'g4 is worthy of
consideration. The game A.Ivanov
Gufeld, USSR 1 983, had an exciting
course: 1 I . . ..i.d7 ( I l . . . g6 ! ?) 1 2
xg7 0-0-0 1 3 c4 l:thg8 1 4 'ii'b2 ( 1 4
'ii'h6 oo ) 1 4. . . tt:lxg3 1 5 hxg3 %hg3 1 6
e3 l:.xg2+! 1 7 Wxg2 d4! with a
dangerous attack.
0-0
11
Or ll /t)e7 1 2 cxd5 exd5 1 3 c4
..i.e6 1 4 ..i.e3 with compensation,
D .Pavlovic-Djukic, Svrljig 1 994.
12 Jte3
1Wd8
/t)f6
13 lle1
1 4 cxd5
/t)xd5
l:le8
15
Acs
/t)b6
16 c4
e5
17
1fc2
18 l:::ta d1
and White had a very active posi
tion in Cam pora-Akopian, D o s
Hermanas 1 992.
.

...

A2:

10 exd5
/t)xd5
0-0
bxc3
11
11 ... /t)xc3 1 2 'ifg4 is out of the
question.
1 2 c4
/t)de7
c5
13
ffa6! (D)

It is not a good idea to retreat as


the queen will be disturbed down the
open d-file. In Tosic-B. Damljanovic,
Vmjacka Banja 1 984, after 13 .. 11d8
1 4 'iYe2 e5 1 5 ..i.b2 f6 1 6 l::t adl ,
White had the better chances with the
option of occupying the d6-square.
e5!
14
Ab2
15 f4
Ae6
16 1fe1
Ads
Axg2
17 fxe5
18 Wxg2
1l'c4
l:Iad8
19 l:ln
20 'i'fe2
fldS+
ft)g6
21
Wg1
with good play for Black, Szmetan
Panno, Buenos Aires 1 995.
.

B:
7
'ff e2 (D)
An unpleasant continuation :

White 's Altematives At Move 7 93

White's idea is to castle long and push


the kingside pawns as soon as possi
ble. The light-squared bishop won't
be exposed on the a8-h1 diagonal and
will support the pressure on Black's
position. If he plays superficially,
Black can easily face serious prob
lems. Practice has shown that this
system can be extremely dangerous
for an unprepared opponent.

Examples with that continuation are


not promising from Black's point of
view:
a) 7...d6 8 g4 a6 (8 . . .h6 9 h4 a6 10
h3 g6 1 1 e3 'f!lc7 1 2 0-0-0 b5 13
g 5 hxg5 1 4 hxg5 lLl h5 1 5 g4
P.Popovic-Skembris, Greece 1990) 9
g5 (9 g2 'ii'c7 10 e3 e7 1 1 g5
lL:ld7 1 2 f4 b5 1 3 'i\ff2 .l::tb 8 1 4 lL:ld4
lL:lxd4 1 5 xd4 0-0 1 6 0-0-0 b7
1 7 h4 :res oo Savicevic-Cabrilo, Nis
1 994) 9 ... lL:ld7 1 0 f4 'fllc 7 1 1 e3
( 1 1 g2 b5 1 2 e3 lLlb6 1 3 lLld2
e7 14 0-0 0-0 1 5 a3 b7 16 f5
exf5 1 7 exf5 .l:!.fe8 1 8 'it'f2 ..td8 1 9
g6 lLle5 oo Zlatanovic-Z.Ilic, Svrljig
1 994) l l ...b5 12 'f!lt2 b7 1 3 a4 b4
1 4 lLle2 lLla5 1 5 lLlg3 .l::t c 8 1 6 lLla5
'f!la5 1 7 i.g2 d5 oo Gavri lakis
Cabrilo, Kavala 1 990.
b) 7 $J..e7 (A weaker version of
the main line with 7 ... i.b4; Black
allows White to play e4-e5) 8 e5 lL:ld5
9 lL:lxd5 exd5 10 i.f4 'ii' b4+ 1 1 i.d2
'4!r'e4 1 2 'it'xe4 dxe4 1 3 i.c3 0-0 14
0-0-0 with a positional advantage for
White, Zontakh-V.Damjanovic, Bel
grade 1 993.
c) 7 flc7 8 g4! h6 (8 ...d6 9 i.g2
a6 10 a4 b6 1 1 0-0 i.e7 1 2 f4 .l:b8 1 3
g5 lL:ld7 1 4 e3 lLla5 1 5 i.d4 with a
considerable advantage for White,
Velceva-J.Ivanov, Burgas 1 993) 9
i.g2 a6 10 f4! d6 1 1 d2 (D)
Experts on the 4 .. .'YWb6 system such as Akopian, Anastasian and
Avshalumov - have had problems
with this position:
c l ) ll ...iJ.e7 12 h4 g6 1 3 0-0-0
i.d7 14 f1 0-0-0 1 5 g5 (White
...

After 7 'ii'e2 Black has the choice


between two completely different
systems, leading to quite different
types of position.
7
b4
An old continuation - but still the
most reliable and flexible. The moves
7... 'flc7, 7 . d6 and 7 . e7 lead to
a more complex game and the types
of positions that arise resemble the
Keres Attack in a more favourable
form for White. White's spatial ad
vantage is the dominant factor and it
i s not easy for Black to organise
counterplay. This claim is most con
vincingly confirmed by those games
where both sides castle queenside.
.

..

...

94 White 's Altematives At Move 7

but less ambitious than 9 ... JI..x c3.


10 eS
dS
Possible is 10 . . e8. In the game
V.Spasov-Kuraj ica, Moscow OL
1 994, after 1 1 0-0-0 'filc7 12 f4 a6 1 3
lL!e4 d6 1 4 exd6 lL!xd6 1 5 g 3 bS 1 6
.i.g2 lL!xe4 1 7 .i.xe4 .tb7 1 8 .i.c3 a
draw was agreed.
exd5
11
/Qxd5
d6
1 2 0-0-0
13 exd6
.axd6
14
.t.c3 (D)
.

missed I S lL!xdS ! exdS 1 6 exd5 lL!b8


1 7 'it'xe7 ) 15 ... lLlh5 1 6 l:lhe1 hxgS
1 7 hxgS .i.f8 1 8 'iVf2 bS 19 lLJdS !
exdS 20 exdS lL!b8 2 1 .i.aS 'iib7 22
.i.xhS l:txhS 23 'fi'd4! .i.e8 24 l:le3 !
1 -0 Mik.Tseitlin-Avshalumov, Balat
onbereny 1 989.
c2) ll . .bS 12 0-0-0 .i.b7 13 .i.f3
Jl..e 7 14 h4 lL!d7 IS lL!xdS exd5 1 6
exd5 lL!ceS 1 7 fxeS lL!xe5 1 8 .i.e4
w i th th e superior position, Y e
Jiangchuan-Anastasian, Beijing 1 99 1 .
c3) l l ...b 6 1 2 0-0-0 .i.b7 1 3 h4
0-0-0 14 g5 lLJd7 15 g6 lL!cS 16 fS
'iPb8 1 7 gxf7 'it'xf7 1 8 fxe6 'ifxe6
1 9 lL!d5 with an advantage for
White, A.lvanov-Akopian, New
York 1 994.
Now we return to the main con
tinuation, 7 ... .i.b4.
0-0
8 .ad2
9 a3
Here Black again faces the choice:
B 1 : 9 . .. J.. e 7 and
B2: 9 . .. .i.xc3

B1:

9
.ae7
This older continuation is playable

Black remains with an isolated


pawn in the centre, but as compensa
tion he has a harmonious develop
ment of his pieces and the possibility
of play along the c-file.
In the game Short-Gufeld, Dort
mund 1 983, White chose another plan
but after 14 .ae3 f!lc 7 1 5 Wb 1 (In
the case of 1 5 l:txd5 .i.e6 1 6 l:.d1
:ac8 Black would have had good
compensation) 1 5 . . . .i.e6 1 6 .tcS
l: fd8 17 .i.xd6 l:hd6 18 lL!d4 lL!xd4
19 l:[xd4 .tfS 20 'fild2 'i!Vc5 21 l:lf4
d4 Black had an equal game.
14
Jle6

White 's Altematives At Move 7 95

15
d2
c7
More precise is 15 ... J:lac8.
Ae5
16 g3
1 7 xe5
White also achieved a small ad
vantage in Klinger-Wirthensohn,
Graz 1 984, after 17 Ag2 lhc8 1 8
.i. xe5 'tixe5 ( 1 8. . . lt.Jxe5 1 9 'iii b 1
lt.J c 4 20 1lld3 ;t ) 1 9 lt.Jd4! ;t .
17
1rxe5
18 .S.b5
l:lac8
19 Dhe1
f6
Ag4
20
Wb1
21
J:lct
l:lfd8
bxc6
22
Axc6
23 .b4
The control of c5 and the possi
bility of making a blockade on the
dark squares are the factors that en
sure a small positional advantage for
White, P . Cramling-Wirthensohn,
Zurich 1 984. Still, there remains the
impression that with precise play
Black can hold the balance.
B2:

Axc3
9
This, the most challenging con
tinuation, is relatively unexplored. It
leads to a more complex game than
9 . . . J&.e7.
e5
10 Axc3
11
0-0-0 (D)
The diagram shows one of the
critical positions for the whole sys
tem with 7 1lfe2. Although at first
sight it doesn't look it, the position is
full of dynamics and hidden tactical
possibilities. Black's basic idea is to
free himself from the pressure along

the d-file and make the ...d5 advance.


However, it is not easy to realise this
idea successfully in practice, as can
be seen from these examples.
a) l l .l:le8 1 2 g4! d5 (The only
move) 1 3 exd5 J&.xg4 14 f3 lt.Jd4! 1 5
lt.Jxd4 exd4 1 6 J&.xd4 1lld6 with a
sharp position that is playable for both
sides. A lot of tactics were seen in
the further course of the gam e
Sorokin-V.Karasev, Blagoveschensk
1 988: 1 7 'it't2 1lff4 1 8 l:.d2 J&.xf3
( 1 8 . . . 1Wxf3 1 9 l:. g 1 ) 1 9 J&.xf6
l:.e4?! ( 1 9 . . . gxf6 !) 20 J&.g2 l:le2 2 1
'ti'd4 l:.e4? ! (2 I . . . 'ti'xd4) 2 2 l:.fl !
l:tae8 23 'il:Yg l l:te2 24 c3 'ti'xd2+
25 .i.xd2 l:txg2 26 'it'd4 f6 1 -0.
b) l l .Dd8 is met by 12 Dd6!
which prevents ... d5 and threatens 1 3
.1&.a5 or 1 3 l:.xf6; this i s stronger than
12 g4 d5 1 3 exd5 lt.Jxd5 1 4 J&.xe5
xg4 1 5 'il:Yxg4 lt.Jxe5 1 6 'iVe4
'it'h6+! and now if 17 'iifb l ?, then
1 7 .. . lt.Jc3+ wins. Also, the positional
treatment of the position with 12 g3
doesn't cause Black any trouble. In
the game Kudrin-Yermolinsky, Chi
cago 1 993, Black had good play af
ter 1 2 ... d6 1 3 J&.g2 .i.g4! 1 4 f3 e6
..

..

96 White 's Alternatives At Move 7

1 5 f4 xb3 1 6 c x b3 xb3 1 7 'iiib 1


b5 ! 1 8 l:. d3 'fi' e6 1 9 exf4 20 l:.xb5
fxg3 21 hxg3 lUeS.
After 12 d6! Black cannot avoid
the exchange sacrifice because of the
threat a5 . For example 12 ... d4?
loses to 1 3 l:.xd4 exd4 1 4 a5. There
fore he must try 12 .Oc7 1 3 l:.xf6
gxf6 14 g4+ 'ii?h 8 (Better is 14...c;t.f8
15 'it'h4 d6 16 'ilt'xf6 e6 1 7 f4 'itie8
1 8 ..tb5 with compensation accord
ing to Adams) 1 5 "Wh4 'it'd6 ( 1 5 ... d6)
1 6 f4! (Black has insoluble problems
on the a1 -h8 diagonal) 16 ... 'f!Ve7 1 7
b5! rle8 (Or 1 7 . . . d6? 1 8 xc6 bxc6
1 9 fxe5 dxe5 20 b4 .e6 21 CUeS
'ille7 22 CUb7+-) 1 8 .:d1 d6 1 9 'Lla5
d7 20 CUb7 CUd4 2 1 l:.xd4! xb5
(2l ...exd4 22 xd4 'it>g8 23 d3 !
'ilt'e6 24 f5+-) 22 CUxd6 with a deci
sive attack for White, Adams-B .
Knezevic, Royat 1 997.
After this game it became clear
that 1 1 .. J:td8 is not satisfactory. Bet
ter alternatives are 1 1 ... .l:le8 (line 'a')
and the modest but probably most
reliable ll . .e8 with the idea . . . d6
and ... e6. Though relatively slow,
this idea deserves attention. The tem
porary abandonment of control of the
d5-point does not have direct conse
quences because the white knight is
on the b3-square.
I think that the further fate of the
9 . . . xc3 tine depends on the assess
ment and practical testing of the con
tinuation 1 1 . .. ctJe8.
..

C:
7

ilg5 (D)

ile7
7
If Black doesn't want to play the
Rauzer Sicilian type of position, he
has a fine alternative in 7. Ab4. For
example: 8 xf6 gxf6 and now:
a) 9 1ff3 e7 1 0 ..te2 (The
greedy policy is unjustifiable: 1 0
'f!Vg3 d6 1 1 'illg7? ! lt f8 1 2 'ifxh7
.i.d7 13 0-0-0 0-0-0 14 'it'h6 'it'xt2 +
Grabics-Kerek, Hungary 1 994)
1 0 .. . d6 1 1 0-0 d7 12 'i!fh5 0-0-0 1 3
a4 l:.dg8 with a balanced position,
Novak-Papacek, Karvina 1989.
b) Or 9 Vd2 a6 10 a3 (White
achieves nothing after 1 0 'fih6
xc3+ 1 1 bxc3 'ii?e7 12 V/iig7 V/ii d 8)
e7 1 1 0-0-0 d6 1 2 f4 .i.d7 1 3 e2
h5 14 l:.hfl 0-0-0 1 5 l:.f3 .:dg8 with
equal play, Milosevic-Karpman, Beta
Crkva 1 989.
8 1td2
Instead 8 _ad3 transposes into the
9 g5 line (Chapter 5) and this is
the most often played plan in prac
tice. 8 Ae2 has its independent char
acter: 8 .. . a6 (8 .. .h6?! 9 ..te3 'Wic7 1 0
f4 d6 1 1 0-0 a6 1 2 a4 Genin-Reshko,
Leningrad 1 967) 9 0-0 d6 (9 ... W/c7
1 0 f4 h6?! { 1 0 ... d6} 1 1 xf6 gxf6
..

WhJfe 's Alternatives At Move 7 97

1 2 .i..h 5! b5 1 3 ..t>h 1 .i.b7 1 4 'i!Ve2


Maki-Ce. Silva, Malta OL 1 980) 1 0
a4 ( 1 0 .i..xf6 gxf6 oo ) I O .. . 'i!Vc7 1 1
a5 0-0 ( l l ...b5 ! ? 1 2 axb6 'ifxb6) 1 2
l:t e 1 b5 1 3 axb6 'f!Yxb6 1 4 .i.fl .l:.d8
1 5 .l:.a4 lt:Jb4 1 6 lLla5 J.d7 1 7 .l:.a3
J.e8 1 8 lLlc4 'fli c7 oo Gii .Garcia
Z.Ilic, Saint John 1 988.
8
a6
9 0-0-0 (D)
A more peaceful plan doesn ' t
promise any advantage: 9 Ae2 'file?
(Less precise is 9.. . 0-0 1 0 f4 d6 1 1 g4
Vatter-Bialas, Germany 1 989) 1 0 0-0
b5 1 1 a3 .i.. b7 1 2 .l:r.ad1 .l:.d8 1 3 f4 d6
1 4 'ife3 h6 1 5 J.h4 b4 1 6 axb4 lLlxb4
with good play for Black,
Timmerman-Piket, Netherlands 1 987.

lLJxd5 lLlxd5 1 7 J.f3 Badalov


Kevorkian, corr. 1 994) 1 1 ... lLle3 1 2
lLla4 'iWc6 1 3 'iWxe3 'iWxa4 1 4 'ic5
lLlc6 1 5 a3 b6 16 .i.b5 and White
won, Klovans-Kveinys, Riga 1 986.
b) 9 d6 10 h4 J.d7 1 1 f3 fife?
1 2 h 5 ! h6 1 3 .i.. e 3 ;!; Rossolimo
R.Byme, USA 1 968.
c) 9...0-0 10 f4 d6 ( 1 0 ... h6 1 1
J.xf6 J.xf6 1 2 h4 { 1 2 e5? lLlxe5 !
1 3 fxe5 .i.g5 } 1 2 cl5 1 3 e5 il..e7 1 4
g 4 a 5 oo Emunds-Liicke, MUnster
1 992) 1 1 .i.e2 jtd7 1 2 .i.f3 ( 1 2
.i.xf6?! .i.. xf6 1 3 e5 dxe5 1 4 'iWd7
l:ad8-+ and 1 3 'fixd6 .i.xc3 + do not
satisfy either) 1 2 ... l:tac8 1 3 .tlhe 1
.l:.fd8 oo Calcado-Antonio, Parana
1 993 .
...

. . .

D:
B

This position is similar to those


that arise in the Richter-Rauzer At
tack. There are several examples
from tournament practice:
a) 9 /0g4?! (Too early. Black
isn't sufficiently developed to sup
port this active play) 1 0 il..xe7 lLlxe7
1 1 f3 ( 1 1 lLld4 d6 12 h3 lLlf6 13 g4
h6 14 .i.e2 d5 15 exd5 lLlfxd5 1 6
...

a3 (D)

Similarly to the line 7 .i.e3 "i/c7


8 a3 (Chapter Eight), the idea of this
move is to prevent the pinning ... b4.
However, one should note a differ
ence between these two cases. Here
White still hasn 't committed himself

98 White 's Altematives At Move 7

with his dark-squared bishop, so it is


possible - if Black continues care
lessly - for White to play the con
venient .i.f4, w i th the idea of
exploiting the d6 square. This is what
happens in several examples given
below.
For Black it's best to play 7 ...d6
or 7... "fkc7 and thus offer a transposi
tion into a kind of Scheveningen or
Paulsen, where White has played the
moves t0b3 and a3 . In general, these
two moves can be useful for White
but one should have in mind that fre
quently opponents don't have in their
repertoire those lines of the Schev
eningen which include these two
moves.
Now Black has several moves to
consider:
D l : 7... a6
02: 7... e7
03: 7 ...d6
04: 7 ..."fkc7!?

Dl:

a6

Imprecise.

8 .i.f4! (D)
A strong move. White threatens 9
eS and prevents Black from playing
the logical continuations 9 ... e7,
9. . . d6 and 9... flc7.
In practice after 8 .i.f4 Black has
had problems:
a) 8 dS?! 9 exdS t0xd5 10 lDxdS
exdS 1 1 "fkxdS .i.e6 12 'ife4 0-0-0
13 .i.e3 "fkc7 14 c4 .i.xc4 1 5 _.xc4
b8 1 6 0-0 and Black didn't have
adequate c ompensation, Zakic..

Djukic, Kladovo 1 991 .


b) 8...eS 9 gS e7 10 ii.e2 ( 1 0
.i.xf6 .i.xf6 1 1 /OdS "fkd8 1 2 CZJd2
b5 13 a4 :b8 14 axb5 axb5 1 5 .i.d3
0-0 1 6 0-0 d6 1 7 tZ:lf3 g6 1 8 'i!Ve2 b4
1 9 ..tb5 .i.b7 20 .l:a4 ;t Si on Castro
Bellon, Spain 1 994) 1 0 ... 0-0 1 1 0-0
'ird8 1 2 'ii'd3 tt:le8 1 3 ..te3 d6 14
tt:ld5 ..te6 15 .i.b6 'i!Vd7 1 6 c4
Wahls-Bonsch, Dortmund 1990.
c) 8...e7 (An original manoeu
vre which seems to be better than the
two previous continuations) 9 e5
tt:ledS 1 0 tt:lxd5 tt:lxdS 1 1 ii.g3 ( 1 1
d2 !?) 1 l . . .h5 12 h4 lDe3 1 3 "fkd2
tt:lxfl 1 4 :xn 'i!Vc6 1 5 f3 b5 16 tt:la5
fJJc 7 1 7 0-0-0 ;l; Novik-V .Karasev,
Novosibirsk 1 989.

D2:

7
.i.e7 (D)
This continuation is also inad
visable.
8

.i.f4!

White emphasises the weakness of


the d6 square.
Less enterprising is 8 .i.e2 d6 9
0-0 a6 10 ..te3 'f!/c7 1 1 f4 b5 1 2 .i.f3
b7 Pienski-Carlier, Baden-Baden

White 's Alternatives At Move 7 99

1 99 1 , which transposes into a kind


of classic Scheveningen. Several ex
amples of this type are given in Chap
ter Eight, line C. Black could also
obtain a solid game with the quick
central reaction ... d5 which occurred
in the game Karai-Zitin, Tallinn 1 997,
where after 8 e2 0-0 9 0-0 d5 ! 1 0
exd5 l:td8 1 1 .i. f4 l2J xd5 Black
equalised.
8
0-0
9 eS
tOes
10
.*.d3
a) lO a6 1 1 0-0 Wlc7 1 2 l:te1 g6
( 1 2 . . . f5 !?) 1 3 'ifd2 d6 14 exd6 ..txd6
1 5 ..txd6 'f!Vxd6 1 6 l:tad1 Wlc7 1 7
l2Je4 Ljubojevic-Panno, Vina del
Mar 1 988.
b) lO f6 1 1 exf6 (1 1 .te3 'ic7 12
exf6 l2Jxf6 1 3 0-0 d5 1 4 l2Jb5 'f!Vd8 1 5
f4 ) 1 l ...l2Jxf6 12 0-0 d5 1 3 .i.g3 ..td7
14 l2Ja4 'id8 1 5 l2Jac5 e5 16 c4
Enders-Avshalumov, Budapest 1 989.
...

D3:

7
d6
This continuation is better than the
previous two. Some examples are
given below where the transition into

the earlier examined variations is


avoided.
a) 8 Ae2 (If 8 Af4 Black plays
8 .. . l2Je5) 8 ... ..te7 9 0-0 0-0 1 0 ..te3
Wlc7 1 1 f4 a6 1 2 .to b5 1 3 g4 l:te8
14 g5 l2Jd7 1 5 ..tg2 l:tb8 1 6 :n b4
with a typical sharp Sicilian battle,
Rajna-Cabrilo, Pancevo 1 987.
b) 8 Ae3 'f!Vc7 9 ..td3 (9 f4 a6 10
g4 ..te7 1 1 g5 l2Jd7 12 a4 b6 oo
Dukaczewski-Giffard, Torcy 1 991)
9 ...a 6 1 0 0-0 ..te7 1 1 f4 b5 1 2 'itr>h1
b4?! (Premature. Better is 1 2 ... 0-0)
1 3 axb4 l2Jxb4 14 W/d2! d5 15 e5
l2J d7 1 6 l2Jb5 'ib8 1 7 l2J 5 d4
Luther-Grivas, Corfu 1 99 1 .
D4:
7
tfc7! ?
Probably the best move order.
Black immediately avoids the ..tf4
possibility and the game inevitably
transposes into some kind of Schev
eningen or Paulsen where White
played l2Jb3 and a3 early. This early
commitment by White, theoretically
speaking, favours Black, who thus
manages to avoid many variations.
White can continue in various
ways. For example:
a) 8 f4 d6 9 ..td3 a6 1 0 0-0 ..te7
1 1 h 1 b5 1 2 ..td2 ..tb7 1 3 'iVt1
0-0 1 4 l:he 1 M.Cid-Panno, Femeda
Cup 1 99 1 , leads to the main line
that has been considered in Part
One.
b) 8 g3 a6 9 f4 d6 10 a4 b6 1 1
..tg2 ..tb7 1 2 0-0 j.e7 1 3 ..te3 0-0
1 4 'We2 l:tfe8 1 5 l:ad1 l2Jb4 with
equality, Pesic-Z.Ilic, Nis 1 99 1 .

1 1 Dev iations on White's


Sixt h Move

After l e4 cS 2 /t)O /t)c6 3 d4 cxd4


4 /t)xd4 1rb6 5 b3 /t)f6
The alternative to 6 tLlc3 is
6 d3 (D)
with which White retains the pos
sibility of c2-c4. This continuation
doesn't cause any difficulties for
Black, who achieves a good game by
reacting at the right moment in the
centre with . .. d5.

Kurajica, Bor 1 983, after 7 0-0 i.g7


8 i.e3 'Wic7 9 tLlc3 0-0 1 0 h3 d6 1 1
f4 a6 1 2 a4 b6 1 3 'Wie2 t2Jb4 1 4 t2Jd2
'Lld7 1 5 CDc4 4::\ c 5.
A:

6
7
8

0-0
c4 (D)

e6
e7

Black has at his disposal two


equally good continuations:
A: 6 ... e6 and
B: 6 ... d5.
Black also equalised with the con
tinuation 6 g6 in the game Pavlovic...

Black rnustn't underestimate this


position. If he plays superficially, he
could easily get into a kind ofHedge
hog that is unfavourable for him be
cause he played an early . . . 4::\ c6. The
right way to treat the position was
demonstrated by GM Epishin, who

Deviations on White 's Sixth Move 101

reacted at once in the centre with


8 . . . d5 ! (line 'c').
a) 8 d6 9 lLic3 "f!lc7 10 .tf4 b6
1 1 l:tc 1 'illd7 1 2 'iVe2 .i.b7 1 3 l:tfd1
Rechlis-Maryasin, Israel 1 997.
b) 8 ltle5!? (As Black wants to
play a flexible Hedgehog, he has to
transfer this knight to d7) 9 lLic3 d6
(Weaker is 9 ... a6 1 0 .i.f4 d6 1 1 l:r.cl
lL\fd7 1 2 .i.e3 'flc7 13 f4 lLixd3 1 4
x d3 b 6 1 5 $. d 4 Filguth-Van
Riemsdijk, Lone Pine 1 978) 1 0 .i.e3
Wic7 1 1 Ae2 0-0 1 2 l:.c1 a6 1 3 lLid4
b6 1 4 b3 l:te8 1 5 f4 lLied7 1 6 J.f3
b7 transposing into a classical un
clear Hedgehog.
c) 8 d5! 9 cxd5 (9 lLic3 d4 10 c5
'l!Wd8 1 1 lLib5 0-0 1 2 $.g5 e5 1 3 l:tc1
lLie8 14 .i.d2 .i.e6 15 f4 exf4 1 6
.txf4 a6 1 7 lLia3 .i.g5 'i' Brooks
Epishin, New York 1 989) 9.. .exd5 1 0
lLic3 dx.e4 1 1 lLixe4 0-0 1 2 'ilfe2 ( 1 2
j_e3) 1 2 ... lLid4 1 3 lL\xd4 xd4 1 4
l:td1 ? ! .i.g4 1 5 lLixf6+ J.xf6 1 6
xh7+ Wh8 1 7 l:Xd4 .i.xe2 1 8 .:d2
l:.fe8 1 9 .i.c2 l:tac8 and Black had
excellent compensation for a pawn,
Geo. Timoschenko-Epishin, Tbilisi
1 989.
...

...

...

B:

d5
6
7 exd5
itlxd5
8 0-0 (D)
This is the basic position for the
6 . . . d5 continuation. 8 .axh7?! l:txh7
9 Wixd5 e5 is not advisable for White.
e5!?
8
At first sight this active move ap
pears risky but practice has shown

that it is quite playable.


Others:
a) The most logical continuation
8 e6 - doesn't promise an easy
and complete equality. In two exam
ples from tournament practice, White
was more successful . After 9 c4 lLif6
1 0 lLic3 ii.e7 1 1 e2 0-0 the games
diverge:
a 1 ) 12 .ags .i.d7 1 3 1lad1 ( 1 3
J.xf6 i.. x f6 1 4 Axh7+? c;i;>xh7 1 5
'ti'd3+ c;i;>g8 1 6 \i"xd7 l:tad8) 1 3 . . .
.:tfd8 1 4 lLib5 ! lLib4 1 5 .i.e3 1!fc6
1 6 .i.b 1 ! Kuzmin-Gufeld, USSR
1 975.
a2) 12 .ar4 .i.d7 13 l:lad1 e5 14
lLid5 (14 .i.xe5? .i.g4) 14 ... lLixd5 15
cxd5 lL\b4 16 J.xe5 l:te8! 17 i.. d4
\'f"h6 1 8 .i.e3 .i.g5 1 9 Axg5 1!fxg5
20 "f!/f3 and now instead of 20 . . .
lLixa2? 2 1 lLic5 Vogt-Z.Ilic, Bern
1 990. Instead of 20 ... lLixa2 Black
should have played a useful interme
diate move 20 . . . h6! with the idea
. . . .i.g4.
b) Geller's recommendation 8 g6
is playable and solid:
b 1 ) 9 Vn .i.e6 1 0 c4 lLif6 ( 1 0 ...
lLidb4!?) 1 1 .i.f4 J.g7 12 lLic3 0-0
-

...

...

102 Deviations on White 's Sixth Move

1 3 lLlb5 ! .l:.ac8 (If 1 3 . . . .tg4!? 1 4


'ifg3 e5 1 5 ..t.g5 ! oo Uhlmann) 1 4
J.. c 7! .l:.xc7 1 5 c 5 lLle5 1 6 cxb6
lLlxO+ 17 gxO l:d7 1 8 lLlc5 l:xd3
1 9 lLl xd3 axb6 ! Yz- 'l) Rajkovic
Gufeld, Skopje 1 97 1 .
b2) 9 .1lxg6?! i s weak as after
9 ...hxg6 I 0 'ilxd5 Black has compen
sation for the pawn sacrifice.
b3) But 9 c4 is possible: 9... lLldb4
(9 ... lLlf6 is safer) l 0 e4 .tf5?! 1 1
.txf5 gxf5 1 2 lLlc3 e6 1 3 lLlb5 'ir'd8
1 4 'ii'h5 with advantage for White,
Holzl-Felsberger, Austrian Bund
esliga 1 989.
9 .1lc4! (D)
According to Sax and Hazai, this
is White's best chance to obtain a
minimal advantage.
Others:
a) 9 Axh7? is bad: 9 ... lLlf6 1 0
j,d3 e4 1 1 l:te I .tfS with the idea
0-0-0 + .
b) 9 c4 lLldb4 and now:
b l ) 10 l0c3 J.e6 1 1 ..te3 'ti'a6 !
1 2 lLld5? i.xd5 1 3 cxd5 'ii'x d3 1 4
'ifxd3 lLlxd3 1 5 dxc6 bxc6 1 6 lLla5
c5 17 lLlc4 .te7 18 .l:.adl l:d8 and
Bl a c k remained a pawn up i n
Mortensen-S.Hansen, Copenhagen
1 992.
b2) 10 .1le3 'id8 ! 1 1 .te4 'ir'xd1
1 2 l:lxd1 f5 ! (Weaker is 12 ... ..i.e6 1 3
lLla3 f5 1 4 .td5 ! 'l;t7 1 5 lLlb5) 1 3
Axc6+ bxc6 ! 1 4 lLla3 and now in the
game Sax-B.Andonov, Warsaw Z

1 987, Black should have continued


1 4 ... e4! 1 5 lLld4 .td7 with an unclear
game. Black also doesn't have to
worry about 1 5 .tc5 lLld3 1 6 .txf8
l:txf8 17 l:d2 with equal play accord
ing to Sax. This is a quite convincing
example from Black's point of view,
that is, for the continuation 8 ... e5.
c ) Editor 's Note: ECO cites
Andonov's recommendation 9 a3!?,
to take away the b4 square from
Black ' s knights before advancing
c2-c4.

Sax and Hazai 's analysis of the


diagram position after 9 Ac4! goes
as follows: 9 . . . lLlf6 1 0 lLlc3 i.. e7
( 1 0 ... a6?! 1 1 .i.g5 ! Ae7 1 2 i.xf6
Axf6 1 3 lLle4 J..e7 1 4 lLlxd6+ j,xd6
1 5 'i!Vxd6) 1 1 J..e 3 'f#c7 ( l l .. .'f#d8
12 'ii'xd8+ .txd8 1 3 lLlb5 0-0 1 4
.tcs ;t ) 1 2 lLl b5 'ib8 1 3 Ac5 0-0
14 Jixe7 &iJxe7 1 5 'Wd6 with a slight
advantage for White.

1 2 Deviations o n White ' s


Fifth M ove

After 1 e4 c5 2 'Llt3 'Llc6 3 d4 cxd4


4 'Llxd4 'ffb6 some moves not yet
analysed come into consideration:
A: 5 .ie3
B: 5 lll b5
Editor 's Note: 5 'Llxc6 is rarely
seen. Hector-Grivas, Katerini 1 992,
continued 5 ... bxc6 6 .i.d3 e5 7 0-0
lll f6 8 lll d2 .i.e7 9 lll c4 'fllc7 10 f4
d6 1 1 fxe5 dxe5 1 2 'fll f3 0-0 1 3 'fl!g3
l:te8 14 '>Ph 1 llld7 oo .
A:

.i.e3 (D)

An aggressive idea that has been


seldom exploited in practice. Com
pared to other variations of the Sicil
ian Defence, where White obtains a
dangerous initiative by sacrificing the
b2 pawn (as for instance the Najdorf
Poisoned Pawn Variation), here we
have a case where the benefits are
quite unclear. The sacrifice can be
assessed as "semi-correct".
5
1rxb2
Black doesn't have any alternative.
6
'Llxc6
The alternative 6 'Llb3 was tested
in the game Vitolins-Zaichik, Mos
cow 1 983, where White obtained
enough compensation for a pawn but
it still feels as if Black could have
played better. There followed 6...'flle5
7 lLl 1 d2 lLlf6 8 f4 c3 9 .i.d3 d5 1 0
e 5 lll g4 1 1 .i.cS h 5 1 2 0-0 e6 1 3
.i.xf8 Wxf8 1 4 'it'e 1 t!fb4 (Better is
14 ... lll b4) 15 c4 dxc4 1 6 lll xc4 'fixe 1
1 7 l:.fxel . Maybe the modest 8 'ffc7
is a better choice because the white
...

104 Deviations on White 's Fifth Move

knights don't have access to the d5


and b5 squares.
bxc6
6
It's logical that anybody who plays
this line as White must be prepared
to answer 6... ffxal. Unfortunately
that position hasn't been tested in
practice. A possible line is 7 .td4
'i!Yxa2 8 lt:\c3 '\We6 (8 ... 'ifa3? 9 lt:\b5)
9 lt:\xa7 with the idea lt:\d5 or lt:\b5.
6... dxc6! ? is also possible.
d6
7 d2
'i!'fc3
8 .x::lb t
This position arose in the game
Van der Wiel-Kouatly, Cannes 1 990,
where the opponents agreed a draw
after 9 R.d3 lt:\f6 1 0 0-0 ti'a5 1 1 lt:\c4
'flc1 1 2 f4 e5 1 3 \'We 1 Ae6 14 lt:\a5
exf4 1 5 xf4 lt:\d7 1 6 .l:tb7 'iVc8 1 7
a6 !il..e7 1 8 'iVe2 0-0 1 9 .l:txa7.
B:

b5 (D)

B 1 : 5 ... a6 and
B2: 5 ... lt:\f6.
Bl:

5
a6
6 .i.e3
White achieves less with 6 5c3
e6 7 d3, for example:
a) 7 . 'flc7 8 0-0 b5 9 a3 lLlf6 1 0
g5 $.e7 1 1 lt:\d2 l:b8 1 2 'ire2 d6
1 3 f4 h6 oo Danilovic-B.Knezevic,
Budva 1 996.
b) 7...f6 8 0-0 ii.e7 9 lt:\d2 0-0
1 0 h1 d5 1 1 exd5 exd5 1 2 lt:\b3
.l:td8 13 f4 !il..g4= Dvoirys-Lastin,
Russia Cup semifinal, Perm 1 997.
After 6 e3 Black has the options:
B 1 1 : 6 . . . 'li'a5+ and
B12: 6... 'ifd8 ! .
.

Bl l :

6
Vas+
An enterprising but dubious con
tinuation. The exposed queen will
help White to accelerate his devel
opment.
7 5c3
e6
Or 7 f6 8 lt:\d2 b5 9 lt:\b3 'filc7
1 0 e2 e6 1 1 a3 ..tb7 1 2 0-0 d6 1 3
f4 $.e7 1 4 !il.. f3 0-0 oo Sanchez
Schreiber, Zaragoza 1 994.
8 d2
Or:
a) 8 .i.d3 b5 9 lt:\d2 Wlc7 (9... b4
1 0 a4! xc3 1 1 axb5 ! ..txd2+ 1 2
xd2 Yudasin) 1 0 0-0 lLlf6 1 1 f4
b4? (1 L.d6 ) 1 2 lt:\a4 l:tb8 1 3 '*ie2!
'f/a5?! (Better is 1 3 ... a5) 14 lt:\c4
'ifxa4 1 5 b3 'ifb5 1 6 lt:\d6+ and
Black doesn't have enough compen...

This, the main alternative to 5


lt:\b3, is slowly starting to enjoy a
respectable theoretical status. Black
has to choose between:

Deviations on White 's Fifth Move

s ation for the queen, Yudasin


J.Polgar, Madrid 1 992.
b) 8 .i.e2 b5 9 lUd2 lUf6 1 0 0-0
'ii c 7 1 1 f4 d6 1 2 il.f3 .i.. e 7 1 3 a4
b4 1 4 lUe2 l:.b8 1 5 lUb3 e5 1 6 a5
0-0 1 7 f5 - I . Almasi-Csom,
Zalakaros 1 995.
b5
8
Others:
a) 8 Jlb4 9 lUc4 xc3+ 1 0 bxc3
't!Vxc3+ 1 1 il.d2 'ii' d4 1 2 c3 ! is also
favourable for White (Donchev-Teo
Kok Siong, Thessaloniki OL 1 988).
b) But 8...ffc7 is interesting: 9
lUc4 b5 1 0 lUb6 l:tb8 1 1 lUxc8 l:[xc8
1 2 a4 b4 1 3 lUb1 l:.a8 1 4 lUd2 lUf6
1 5 f4 d5 1 6 e5 lUxe5 (0- 1 in 3 1
moves) Lugo-A.Annas, Cuba 1 988.
b4
9 a4
10
c4
'ffc 7
11
d5! (D)
This knight sacrifice is the best
way to utilise the opening advantage.
Less enterprising is 11 'Llbl a5 1 2
lUb6 l:tb8 1 3 lUxc8 l:.xc8 1 4 lUd2
lUf6 1 5 a6 l:ta8 1 6 b5 e7 1 7
0-0 0-0 1 8 f4 d5 1 9 e5 lUd7 20 lUb3
and now in the game Arnason
Avshalumov, Belgrade 1 988, Black
...

105

could have equalised after 20 ...f6 2 1


xc6 't!Vxc6 2 2 exf6 il.xf6.
Following the excellent 1 1 d5!,
Black's position soon collapsed in the
game Ehlvest-Smirin, Moscow 1 992,
after 1 l ...exd5 1 2 exd5 lUd8 ( 1 2 . . .
lUes 1 3 d6 ) 1 3 'ie2! d6 1 4 b6+
'fie? 1 5 lUxd6+ 'it>d7 1 6 lUe4! (With
the idea 1 7 'Wb5+! axb5 1 8 i.. b 5+
mate) 1 6 ... i..b7 1 7 0-0-0 f5 1 8 lUc5+
e8 19 d6! 'irxe2 20 xe2 lUf6 2 1
..txd8 xg2 2 2 xf6 ..txh 1 23
..th5+ g6 24 xh8 1 -0.
B12:

'C'fd8!
6
7 5c3
Others:
a) Interesting and original play was
seen in the game I .Gurevich-J.
Polgar, New York 1 992, where there
followed: 7 5a3 b5 8 c4 b4 9 lUc2
lUf6 1 0 lUd2 il.b7 1 1 f4 d6 1 2 'ifn
g6 1 3 0-0-0 g7 1 4 e5 dxe5 1 5 fxe5
CLJd7 16 e6 fxe6 with a complicated
game.
b) The second alternative is 7
d4. Now, depending on Black's
reaction, different types of Sicilian
position can arise. The most ener
getic, quick reaction in the centre with
7 ... e5 gave Black a solid play in two
games following 8 CLJf3 lUf6:
b1) 9 c3 b4 10 il.c4 0-0 1 1
'li'd.3 d5 ! ? ( 1 1 ... i..xc3+!? 1 2 bxc3 d6)
1 2 i.. xd5 CLJxd5 1 3 'fixd5 xc3+ 1 4
bxc3 i..e6 1 5 xd8 lHxd8 1 6 0-0
l:lac8 -, Micic-Z.Ilic, Novi Becej
1 994.
b2) 9 .i.c4 'fia5+ 1 0 lUbd2 CLJxe4

106 Deviations a.n White 's Fifth Move

1 1 0-0 lLlxd2 1 2 .i.xd2 'it'c5 1 3 'it'e2


iL.e7 1 4 b4 lLlxb4 1 5 lLlxe5 0-0 1 6
iL.xb4 'it'xb4 1 7 'W'h5 d5 1 8 iL.xd5
\11- Yz Svicevic-P.Kovacevic, Tivat
1 995.
e6 (D)
7

This position was tested in several


games:
a) 8 .i.e2 lLJf6 (8 . . . b5 9 f4 iL.b7
10 0-0 iL.e7 1 1 J.D d6 1 2 lLl d2
l0f6 1 3 'it'e 1 0-0 1 4 'ii'g 3 'ith8 oo
Hendriks- Z . I li c , Sas van Gent
1 994) 9 f4? ! (Carelessly played:
Black's position has a strong hid
den possibility) 9 . . . d5 ! 10 e5 lLld7
1 1 .to g5! + 1 2 fxg5 lLldxe5 1 3
iLxd5 e x d 5 1 4 lLJ xd5 iL. g 4 ! - +
Rogers-Karpman, Belgrade 1 98 8 .
White should have been satisfied
with the solid 9 0-0.
b) 8 g3 lLl f6 9 iLg2 iLb4 1 0 0-0
0-0 1 1 f4 d6 1 2 'ithl .l:te8 1 3 .i.gl d5
1 4 e5 lLld7 1 5 llle 2 iL.c5 with an
unclear game, A.Rodriguez-Alvarez,
Colon 1 993.
c) 8 a4! ? b5 9 lLlb6 .l:tb8 1 0
lLJxc8 'it'xc8 ! (With the idea . . .lZJ f6,

... d5) 1 1 .i.f4 e5 ! 12 iL.e3 lLlf6 1 3


iL.d3 d5 1 4 exd5 lLlxd5 1 5 0-0 lLlxe3
16 fxe3 with a playable position for
both sides, Kaidanov-Yermolinsky,
Asheville 1 992.
B2:
s
f6
The postponement of the unavoid
able . . . a6 move is only temporary.
After this move the main line is dif
ficult to determine.
6 lc3
There are several unexplored pos
sibilities.
a) 6 Sc3 e6 7 iL.e2 J.e7 8 0-0
0-0 (8 . . . a6) 9 lLld2 d5 10 exd5 exd5
1 1 lLlb3 d4 ( l l .. .iL.e6 is more solid)
1 2 lLlb5 l:ld8 1 3 a4 l:ld7 1 4 a5 'tWd8
1 5 l:a4 ;!; Rantanen-Akopian, Palma
de Mallorca 1 989.
c) 6 .i.e3 'it'd8 (Weaker is 6 ...
'it'a5+ 7 'ii'd2 'it'xd2+ 8 lLJxd2 'itd8
with a considerable developmental
advantage for White) when:
c I ) The variation 7 d2 a6 8 lLlc4
axb5 9 ..tb6 bxc4 10 iL.xd8 c;Pxd8
1 1 iL.xc4 lLlxe4 12 .i.xf7 e6 1 3 iLxe6
iL.c5 Yeo-Mendez, Havana 1 994,
leads to great complications.
c2) 7 lc3 a6 (7 ... d6?! 8 lLld5)
and now:
c2 1 ) 8 d4 e5 when:
c2 1 1 ) 9 xc6 bxc6 10 J.c4 iL.b4
1 1 'it'd3 0-0 1 2 .l:td1 'it'e7 1 3 iL.g5 h6
14 .i.xf6 'it'xf6= Paramos-Kurajica,
La Corufia 1 995.
c21 2) 9 fS d5 ! .
c2 1 3 ) 9 b3 .i. b4 1 0 ..tc4 b5 1 1
iL.d5 lLJxd5 1 2 'ii'xd5 0-0 1 3 0-0 'Wic7

Deviations on White 's Fifth Move

14 l:.ad1 d6 1 5 'tlt'd3 ti:Je7 with good


play for Black, L. Papp-Z.Papp,
Szeged 1998.
c22) 8 a3 b5 (8 ... e6? 9 ti:Jc4) 9
ti:Jd5 :Z.b8 1 0 ti:Jxf6 gxf6 1 1 d3 e6
1 2 0-0 (If 1 2 f4, then Black plays
1 2 . . . 'tlt'a5+! 1 3 ._,d2 Wxd2+ with
equality; if instead 1 3 d2 ._,b6 )
1 2. . .ti:Je5 ! 1 3 Ji.e2 Ab7 1 4 f4 ti:Jg6
1 5 Ji.d3 l:tg8 16 l:tf2 l:tc8! and Black
had active play for his pieces,
Kotronias-Z.IIic, Lenk 1 990.
6
a6
7
a3
Or 7 Ae3 Wa5 8 ti:Ja3 b5 9 Ad3
e6 1 0 ti:Jb1 b4 1 1 ti:Je2 d5 1 2 ti:Jd2
A b7 Yz-Yz Howeii-Voka, Lazne
Bohdane 1 995.
7
e6 (D)

This way of playing for White cer


tainly doesn't promise him any ad-

107

vantage. In all the games where the


diagram position arose, Black was
more successful than his opponent:
a) 8 g3? ! is an unreasonable con
tinuation in this particular position.
In the game Shabalov-Anastasian,
Podolsk 1 990, White was clearly in
ferior after 8 ... Axa3 9 bxa3 ._,c5 1 0
Ab2 b5 1 1 Ji.g2 Ji.b7 1 2 l:l b 1 ti:Ja5
1 3 0-0 e5 14 h1 0-0 1 5 'tlt'd3 l:.ac8
1 6 h3 l:fe8 17 f4 ti:Jc4 =F .
b) 8 c4!? is playable but insuf
ficient to obtain the advantage. After
8 . .. ..-c7 9 Ae3 b5 1 0 ti:Jb6 .l:.b8 1 1
ti:Jxc8 White had played seven moves
with his knight in order to exchange
it for Black's undeveloped piece.
Now in the game Amold-IIlner,
Karlsruhe 1 997, after 1 l ... l:.xc8 1 2
a3 ..ktd6!? White played badly with
1 3 Ji.xb5? and lost in a few moves
after 1 3 .. . axb5 1 4 ti:Jxb5 'iVa5+ 1 5 c3
'fi'xb5 1 6 ._,xd6 ti:Jxe4 17 'tlt'f4 'tlt'xb2
1 8 0-0 ti:Jxc3 etc.
c) Finally let's mention the game
Zhelyandinov-Gufeld, USSR 1 97 1 ,
where White was also outplayed af
ter 8 J\.d3 ._,c7! (Black has already
equalised) 1 1 ti:Jc4 b5 1 0 ti:Je3 Ji.b7
1 1 0-0 e7 1 2 f4 d6 1 3 1fe 1 0-0
1 4 a4? ( 1 4 b3 oo ) 1 4 . . . ti:Jd4! 1 5 e5
dxe5 16 fxe5 'tlt'xe5 ! 1 7 ti:Jf5 -'.c5 !
with a decisive advantage for
Black.

1 3 Kvei nys Variation :


I ntrod uction and 5 c3

1
2
3
4

c5
e6
cxd4
'ffb6 (D)

e4
f3
d4
xd4

This is deservedly called the


"Kveinys Variation" after the Lithua
nian GM Aloyzas Kveinys who has
been playing it for many years. The
system is similar to
but also fun
damentally different from - the pre
viously examined system 2 . . l2lc6,
4 ... 'it'b6. The basic strategic idea is
the same - the decentralisation of
the white knight from the d4 square.
However, the way it is applied here
-

is less direct because the knight at d4


is not already attacked twice on the
fourth move. This fact makes White's
choice wider at the beginning.
Black's idea of exerting pressure
along the a7-gl diagonal with ... .ii. c5
gives this variation an independent
character. Of course there are trans
position options between this and the
system examined earlier, if Black
sooner or later decides to play ... l0c6.
But in practice, in most cases he pre
fers the flexible method of playing
with the development . . . l0b8-d7.
Sometimes this line may transpose
into a branch of so-called Basman
Variation characterised by the follow
ing introductory moves: 1 e4 c5 2
lOO e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 l2lxd4 c5.
White has a wide spectrum of op
tions after 4 ... b6 but two continua
tions make the essence of the system:
5 l0c3 (this chapter) and
5 l0b3 (Chapters 1 4- 1 5).
The first allows the option 5 ... .i.c5
that can provoke tactical play in the
early phase of the game. With the
calm 5 lLlb3 White avoids early con-

Kveinys Variation: Introduction and 5 -0cJ

flicts and the positions that arise are


similar to those from the Schev
eningen and Paulsen Sicilians. Other
quite reasonable and less investigated
options for White are 5 Ae3, 5 c3, 5
'Oa3 and 5 'Ob5 which are all dis
cussed in Chapter 1 6.
5
/()c3
The main continuations now are:
A: 5 . .. tt::lf6 and
B: 5 ... .i.c5.
Also possible is 5 ... a6 after which
the position of the black queen on b6,
which exerts pressure on the points
d4 and b2, prevents White from trans
posing the game into the standard
Scheveningen/Paulsen lines. The fol
lowing two examples have an origi
nal course, which is difficult to evade
if White does not want to play tt::lb3 :
a) 6 Ae2 tt::l c 6 7 tt::l x c6 xc6
(7 . . . bxc6) 8 0-0 .i.c5 9 h1 tt::l e7 1 0
f4 f5 1 1 h5+ g6 1 2 A n Wkc7 1 3
d3 0-0 oo German-Panno, Villa
Martelli 1 996.
b) 6 a3 tt::le7 7 ...te3 tt::l g6 8 h4 'ilic7
9 h5 tt::l e5 1 0 f4 tt::l ec6 l l tt::l b 3 d6 1 2
d2 tt::ld7 1 3 0-0-0 b6 1 4 .i. f2 tt::l c5
15 Wb 1 with a preferable position for
White, Short-J.Polgar, Novgorod
1 996.
A:

/()f6
5
In practice this position can arise
from the move order 1 e4 c5 2 tt::l f3
e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 tt::lxd4 tt::l f6 5 tt::l c3
b6.
6 e5! (D)
White has no reason to refuse this

109

challenge. This provocative continu


ation leads by force to complex tac
tical complications. Another option
is 6 'Ob3, which transposes into the
5 tt::l b3 line (Chapter 1 4).
6
Ac5
7 Ae3
Weak is 7 'Oa4? a5+ 8 c3 xd4
9 lifxd4 tt::l c6 + .
/()d5
7
The only move. Both 7 ffxb2?
8 tt::l a4 and 7 . /0g4? 8 'irxg4! 'ii'xb2
9 tt::l d l 'ii'x a1 10 'i!Vxg7 :rs l l tt::l b5
are losing for Black.
exd5 (D)
8
'Oxd5
This is the key position for the
continuation 5 ... tt::l f6.
In the early phase of the game
...

JlO Kveinys Variation: Introduction and 5 .fJcJ

there has been a radical transfonna


tion of the pawn structure. The main
drawback of Black's conception is the
weakening of the f5- and d6-squares,
which influences the further course
of the battle.
The absence of minor pieces on
the kingside makes the safety of the
black king problematic, and if we add
to that the problem of the develop
ment of Black's light-squared bishop,
it becomes evident that the whole idea
5 . . . 'Llf6 is dubious.
However, White too has the weak
e5-pawn, and, since in the position
there are hidden tactical possibilities,
any imprecision can easily cause the
assessment of a White advantage to
be overturned.
In practice White has ventured
several continuations. The most in
teresting are:
A 1 : 9 'Llf5 and
A2: 9 -'.e2 ! .
Alternatively:
a) 9 c3 'Llc6 (9 ... -'.xd4 1 0 'ifxd4
'ifxb2 l l l:tc 1 ; 1 0 .i.xd4!?) 1 0 b4!?
(For 1 0 -'.e2 see the 9 -'.e2 line)
1 0 ... -'.xd4 1 1 Axd4 'Llxd4 1 2 'tlfxd4
't!Vxd4 1 3 cxd4 with a somewhat bet
ter endgame for White.
b) 9 'Llbs 0-0 (9 . . . -'.xe3? 1 0
'Lld6+ 'iiti>d8 1 1 fxe3 't!Vxe3+ 1 2 -'.e2
is winning for White according to
G.Camacho) 10 .ixc5 't!Vxc5 1 1 't!Vd4
(This way of playing is certainly not
the refutation of the continuation
5 . . . 'Llf6) 't!Vxd4 12 'Llxd4 'Llc6 1 3
0-0-0 'Llxe5 1 4 g3 'Llg4 1 5 l:t d2 b6
1 6 -'.g2 -'.b7 17 'Ll f5 l:t fd8 1 8

'Lle7+ f8 1 9 'Llxd5 ;t De Zeeuw


Beulen, Netherlands 1 995.
A1:

9 'Llrs
The sharpest continuation, that
leads to wild positions, where the
positions of both kings get unavoid
ably compromised.
9
1rxb2
9 .i.xe3? 1 0 'Lld6+ transposes
into the 9 'Llb5 0-0 -'.xe3? line given
above.
10 Ad3! (D)
...

The critical continuation. Other


options, according to Pia Cramling's
analysis in Infonnator 67, favour
Black:
a) 10 Ad4 -'.b4+ 1 1 e2 'iia 3 + .
b) 1 0 !Li d 6+ -'.xd6 1 1 exd6
'it'b4+ + .
c) 10 'Llxg7+ 'iiti>d8 and White have
problems with 'Llg7 and the e5 pawn.
d) 10 f4 .i.xe3 1 1 'Llxe3 'iVb4+ 1 2
'ii'd2 'ifxf4 1 3 'Llxd5 't!Vxe5+ 1 4 'ii'e2
'iVxe2+ 1 5 -'.xe2 'iiti>d8 1 6 0-0 d6! + .
e) 10 AxeS 'it'c3+ 1 1 'iifi>e 2 ( 1 1

Kveinys Van'ation: Introduction and 5 ttJcJ

111

Wfd2 'it'xa l + 1 2 e2 'it'xe5+ 1 3


Wfe3 'i\Vxe3+ 1 4 xe3 d6! 1 5 lZJxd6+
d7 1 6 lZJxfl :es+ 1 7 d2 lZJc6 +
P.Cramling) 1 L.'ihc5 1 2 lZJd6+
'it>f8 1 3 f4 lZJc6 14 f3 f6! 1 5 lZJxc8
fxe 5 1 6 fxe5 lZJxe5+ and Black made
use of the exposed position of the
white king, Skripchenko-P.Cramling,
Belgrade 1 996.
10
11
wn
1 1 ..0-0 doesn't work because of
12 .i.xc5 'it'xc5 1 3 lZJxg7+ xg7 1 4
'ii' g4+ 'it>h8 1 5 'iff5 and White wins.
We7!
12
itld6+
This suggestion by GM Mar
janovic is the only satisfactory option for Black. 1 2...Wf8? loses after
1 3 'ii'f3 ! while 1 2... d8 was played
in the game Joa.Diaz-Bellon, Cien
fuegos 1 996, in which White after
12 ...Wd8 1 3 lZJxfl+ c7 14 lZJxh8
had the decisive advantage accord
ing to Diaz.
After the correct 12 ... e7 ! , one
can't see a forcing tactical variation
that would bring White some concrete
advantage. In the case of the most
logical 1 3 lZJf5 + f8 1 4 lZJxe3
'i\Vxe5, it is not easy to give a proper
assessment of the position.

develop his light-squared bishop


without adverse consequences.
9
ftlc6
10 c3!
The continuation 10 itlf5 doesn't
give any advantage. After 1 0...0-0 1 1
xc5 'it'xc5 1 2 0-0 d6 1 3 lZJxd6
lZJ x e 5 1 4 lObS ( 1 4 lZJ x c 8 \tl - Y2
Peelen-Beulen, Netherlands 1 994)
14 . .. lZJc4 1 5 .i.xc4 dxc4 1 6 a4 .i.f5
Black has an easy game, Belkhodja
Beulen, Hyeres 1 992.
10
Axd4
Or 10 ... /tlxeS 1 1 b4 xd4 12
xd4 'ife 6 1 3 0-0 f6 1 4 f4 lZJc6
1 5 f3 with a strategically win
ning position for White, Szalanczy
Wiedermann, Vienna 1 99 1 .
11
cxd4
xb2
d6 {D)
12 0-0

A2:

In the case of 12...0-0 the black king


can easily be exposed to attack, which
can be seen from the game Holzke
Svensson, Gothenburg 1 993. White
won efficiently by 1 3 .i.d3 'it'a3 14
g5 ! d6 15 .i.f6 gxf6 16 exf6 l:r.d8
1 7 'it'd2 ffi 1 8 l:tael .i.e6 1 9 :xe6

9 Ae2
The most solid continuation that
gives White a permanent advantage
without great risk. White calmly com
pletes his development while on the
other hand, Black will not be able to

112 Kveinys Vuiation: Introduction and 5 tiJcJ

fxe6 20 'iVh6+ e8 2 1 f#g7 1 -0.


lfa3
13 l:lb1
lfxa2
14 .tlb3
0-0
15
exd6
Ag4
16 i1.d3
Ae6
17 f3
18 Dxb7
and the d6 pawn, supported by the
rook on the seventh rank, guarantees
White an advantage, Milos-Bellon,
Oviedo rpd 1 993.
B:

Ac5
5
This seems to be more reason
able than 5 ... co f6 . Now White is at
a crossroads:
B l : 6 e3
is for those who like original and
wild positions, while the alternative
B2: 6 COa4 has more of a positional
nature.
B1:

l:tbl 'ii'x bl 9 COxb1 f4 1 0 g3 a6 1 1


gxf4 axb5 1 2 COc3 COe7 1 3 COxb5 and
White soon won, Morphy-Paulsen,
New York (7) 1 857.
This position after 6 ... COc6 more
often arises in practice from the
Basman Variation move order: 1 e4
c5 2 COf3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 COxd4 .i.. c S
5 COc3 'iYb6 6 .i..e 3 COc6. Black
maximally strengthens the pressure
on the d4-point, so now White has to
commit himself.
At his disposal he has either the
sharper and relatively unexplored
continuations:
B 1 1 : 7 codb5 and
B l 2: 7 l0cb5,
or the calmer
B l 3 : 7 coa4.
Bl l :

7
8

db5
fxe3 (D)

Axe3

6 Ae3
c6 (D)
Note that 6 ...ffxb2? loses by force
after 7 codb5 xe3 (7 . 'ilb4 8 .: b 1
and 7 ... b4 8 d2 lose as well.) 8
. .

In practice there are few examples


with this sharp position.
8
1rxe3+

Kveinys Variation: Introduction and 5 .fJcJ

Not 8 . a 6 9 ctJ d 6+ e 7 1 0
'Wd2 ! ( 1 0 ctJc4 'Wc7 1 1 "i!Yg4 ctJ f6
1 2 "i!Yf4 'ii x f4 1 3 exf4 b5 1 4 ctJb6
l:[b8 1 5 lL\xc8+ hxc8= Hoynck
van Papendrecht-Galje, corr. 1 997)
10 ... ctJf6 1 1 0-0-0 'fkc7 12 'it'f2! ctJe5
1 3 "i!Yg3 ctJg6 14 e5 ctJe8 1 5 .i..e2
Tosic-Milovanovic, Cetinje 1 996.
Since IM Miroslav Tosic has dem
onstrated a convincing plan for White
to achieve an advantage in the case
of 8 . . . a6, Black has no better choice
than to enter the uncertain complica
tions that arise after the text move.
9 .a.e2
Wf8!
Black loses after 9 .1!rf4? 10 l:tfl
'fi'xh2 1 1 ctJd6+ d8 12 liJxf7+ or
9 tfb6 1 0 \!Yd6 ! 1 -0 Segovia
H.Martin, corr. 1 986
10 U.n
Although two examples from
Basman's practice are very old, they
unmistakably show the intricacy of
the complications that inevitably
anse.
a) 10 .. ftlf6 1 1 'ifd6+ 'ifii> g8 1 2
:xf6! gxf6 1 3 .l:td1 h5 1 4 l:td3 'iVc l +
1 5 f2 h 4 1 6 ctJc7 ctJe5 ! 1 7 lLlxa8
'YWf4+ 1 8 'ifii>g 1 ctJxd3 1 9 'ifxd3 b6
20 'ifc4 Ab7 2 1 lLlc7 'iWe3+ 22 fl
'tlif4+ 23 Wg1 'it'e3+ Yz-Yz Hartston
Basman, Hastings 1 973.
b) 10 ttlge7 1 1 a4 ctJg6 1 2 l:!.f2
ctJge5 13 fl h5 14 h3 h4 15 l:ta3
c5 16 a5 l:th6 oo Hartston-Basman,
England 1 974.
.

..

...

B12:

113

ttlcb5 (D)

7
ltlf6
a) The alternative 7 ... a6 is unsat
isfactory. According to Velicka and
Didisko, all possible variations after
8 ctJxc6 give advantage to White. For
example:
a 1 ) 8.. .xc6 9 kxc5 'fi'xc5 1 0
ctJd6+ ;
a2) 8 .a.xe3 9 ctJd6+ Wf8 1 0 fxe3
\!Yxe3+ 1 1 ile2 bxc6 1 2 ctJxc8 llxc8
1 3 'fi'xd7 ;
a3) 8 .. axb5 9 ctJd4 ;!; .
b) It is necessary to check in prac
tice the continuation 7 ...d5!?. The
move seems to be quite playable. For
instance, White's attempt to directly
refute this ambitious plan with 8
lLlxe6 is unsuccessful, as is shown
by the variation 8 ... .txe6 9 .txc5
xc5 10 ctJc7+ We7 1 1 lLlxa8 ctJf6
1 2 exd5 ( l l ctJc7 'i!Va5+) 12 ... ctJxd5.
8 ftlxc6!
.a.xe3
9 fxe3
Stronger than 9 ttld6+ 'ifii> f8 I 0
fxe3 because in that case Black can
play 1 0 ... 'ifxe3+. In the game Rogulj
Sale, Zagreb 1 996, after 1 1 .te2 bxc6
1 2 l: fl We7 1 3 ctJc4 'it'c5 ( 1 3 . . .
xe4 !?) 1 4 e5 lL\ d5 1 5 'fkd2 f6 1 6
.

...

114 Kveinys Variation: Introduction and 5 tiJcJ

0-0-0 .ta6 White had problems along


the diagonal a6-f1 and with the e3point.
bxc6!
9
It is better to retain the queen
along the a7-gi diagonal. 9 ffxc6
is inferior: I 0 lb d6+ rJiJe7 I I e5
lLJeS ( I I . . .lLJe4 12 .tb5 1Wd5 1 3
lLJf5+) 1 2 il.b5 'Wc5 1 3 lLl xcS+
'Wxc8 1 4 0-0 f6 I 5 'it'd4 'ii'c 7 1 6
.:tadl Velicka-Hracek, Czecho
slovakia 1 99 3 .
We7
1 0 d6+
'Wcs
11
c4
dS (D)
12 eS
...

In the game Boudenne-Sale,


Cannes 1 995, there followed from the
diagram 13 c3 (threatening 1 4 b4)
1 3. .. a5 1 4 e4?! (As 1 4 1Wg4 .ta6 is
good for Black, White's best is I 4
._,d4! with a slightly better endgame
after 1 4 . . . 'it'xd4 I 5 exd4 .i.a6)
14....ta6! I 5 exd5 .txc4 1 6 d6+ <ot>eS
17 .i.xc4 't!Vxc4 I S 't!Vf3 :lb8 and
White's spatial advantage was not of
primary importance in the position
that arose. The advanced white pawns
in the centre became a target, which
was the factor that dictated the fur
ther course of the game.
Bl3:

7 a4
In practice this continuation has
been the least problematic for Black.
1ta5+
7
8 c3
.a.xd4
xd4
9 .a.xd4
eS (D)
10 xd4

An important position for the con


tinuation 7 lLJcb5. White's plan is to
chase away the centralised black
knight and exploit the weakened dark
squares in Black's position. But Black
has time to carry out the key defen
sive manoeuvre ... .tc8-a6, which
enables him to eliminate the impor
tant c4-knight and establish a dy
namic balance. For example, in reply
to 1 3 e4 it i s possible to p lay
1 3 ... .ta6.

This position arises by force after


7 lLla4. With the important move
I O . e5 Black achieves simplification
..

Kveinys Vanation: Introduction and 5 tiJcJ

into an equal endgame. Weaker is


1 0 ... 'Llf6 1 1 e5 'Lld5 1 2 'Llc5 0-0 1 3
..t.c4 ( 1 3 ..t.d3) 1 3 . . . 'Lle7 1 4 ..t.d3
'Llc6 1 5 We3 ;t Botterill-Basman,
London 1 973.
11
..b4
Or 1 1 'ff d 1 'Llf6 1 2 d3 0-0 1 3
0-0 b5 1 4 'Llc5 1Wb6 1 5 'Llb3 b7
16 .l:te1 l:He8 Mohmann-Kveinys,
Sankt Ingbert 1 990.
11
1 2 cxb4
b6
13
c3
There is no need to hurry with the
move ... d6, which would give White
a target. By developing the bishop on
b7, Black forces the move f2-f3 and
the text is therefore more precise than
13 ...d6 1 4 g3 (Or 1 4 f3 <3;;e 7 1 5 <3;;f2
Ae6 1 6 Ad3 .l:hd8== Deshmukh
Vaidya Arun, Calcutta 1 992) 1 4 . . .
Ae6 1 5 -'.g2 e7 1 6 0-0-0 l:hc8
with a roughly level game, J.Polgar
S. Arkell, London 1 988.
14 0-0-0
b7
15
f3
We7
16
c4
and now in the game Chacon-Jose
Alvarez, Cuba 1 997, instead of
16 l:lhd8, Black should have gained
space on the kingside by playing
16... hS! .
...

8
9

f6
cS (D)

White hurries to centralise his


knight. The above position has been
discussed at high level in recent tour
nament practice.
c6
9
The most logical move. Variations
where Black moves the queen to h5
offer less. For example:
a) 9 ... b6?! 1 0 'Llb3 'Wh5 1 1 f3
0-0 1 2 Af4 ! 'Llc6 ( 1 2 . . . d5 1 3 e5
'Llc6 1 4 'ir e3 'Lld7 1 5 g4 'i!Vh4+ 1 6
g3 ;t Ivanchuk) 1 3 'i!Ve3 e 5 1 4
Ag5! 'Lle8 1 5 g 4 'Wg6 1 6 0-0-0
'ii' e6 1 7 b l -'.b7 1 8 'i!Vd3 d6 1 9
h4 and White had a permanent ad
vantage, Ivanch uk-Short, Dort
mund 1 997.
b) 9.. 0-0 10 'Llb3 'ih5 1 1 f4 h6
12 e5 'Llc6 1 3 'Wf2 'Lld5 1 4 Ae2
'ikg6 1 5 'Wg3 We4 oo Arencibia
Christiansen, Lucerne 1 993.
10 ffe3
10 1Wd6?! is dubious, as can be
seen from the example Lamoreux
Sale, Cannes 1 99 3 , where after
.

B2:

6 a4
VaS+
c3
7
xd4
8 1'lxd4
Compared to variation B 1 , here
White's dark-squared bishop is not
exchanged, which is better for him.

115

116 Kveinys Variation: Introduction and 5 tlJcJ

1 0 . . . b6 1 1 b4 ( 1 1 'Llb3 'Llxe4)
1 1 . ..'Llxb4 12 'Llb3 'Llc2+ 1 3 'Otd1
'Llxe4 14 'Llxa5 (Both 14 'ii'f4 'i!fxc3
and 1 4 'ii' d3 'Llxal ! are also bad for
White) 1 4 . . . 'Llxd6 1 5 'iti>xc2 bxa5
Black was clearly better.
0-0
10
11
.ae2 (D)
This is more precise than 1 1 l0b3
when:
a) ll tfc7 ( l l .. .'it'h5 is also in
ferior to line b) 1 2 ..te2 d5 1 3 exd5
'2Jxd5 14 'if g3 e5? ( 1 4 ... 'i!fxg3 1 5
hxg3 ;!; ) 1 5 ..th6 f5 1 6 ..tc4 l:td8 1 7
l:tdl h8 1 8 .i.xg7+ 'ii'xg7 1 9 l:txd5
l:txd5 20 ..txd5 Ninov-Kirov, Bul
garia 1 995.
b) lt. .'8a4! 12 ..td3 (12 'Llc5=)
12 . . .b6 1 3 0-0 ..ta6 1 4 ..txa6 'i!fxa6
1 5 l:te1 d5 1 6 e5?! ( 1 6 exd5 'Llxd5
17 'ffe2) 16 . .. 'Lld7 when Black has a
typical French Defence type position,
with the light-squared bishops ex
changed, and he is doing fine: 1 7
'ifg 3 h8 1 8 'Lld4 l:lac8 1 9 '2Jxc6
l:.xc6 with a better game for Black,
Topalov-Short, Novgorod 1 997.
After 1 1 .i.e2 Black has two dif
ferent ways to complete the develop
ment of his queenside. The second
of these, characterised by a quick ac
tion in the centre, is a more reliable
way of playing for Black.
a) l l b6 12 'Llb3 'i!Va4 1 3 '2Jd2
'Lle5 ( 1 3 . . . d5 ! ? is possible, but
13 ... ..ta6? loses a piece after 14 b3

...

'it'a5 15 b4 a4 16 ..td1 b5 1 7 a4
'ti'd3 1 8 b5 'l!\Yxe3+ 19 fxe3 i.b7 20
bxc6 ..txc6 2 1 ..tf3+- Coleman
Emms, Monarch Assurance 1 997) 1 4
0-0 ..ta6 1 5 b 3 'l!\Ya5 1 6 c4 b5 1 7 ..tb2
bxc4 1 8 ..tc3 c7 1 9 l:tac 1 l:tfc8 20
h3 d6 2 1 .i.xe5 dxe5 22 ..txc4 ;!;
Dvoirys-Sale, Berlin 1 995.
b) 1 1 . \'Wb6 (Threatening 12 . . .
d6 with the win o f the e4-pawn)
1 2 f3 d5 1 3 0-0 ( 1 3 e5? 'Llxe5)
l3 ... e5 14 exd5 '2Jxd5 15 f2 f5
1 6 ..tc4. This position was met
twice in Kveinys' practice. Both
times he had a slightly inferior but
playable position:
b1) 16...l:Ld8 1 7 ..tg5 f6 18 l:tad1
'Lle7 19 .i.c1 'i!fc6 20 ..tb3 b6 2 1
'Lle4 Dvoiri s-Kveinys, Katowice
1 992.
b2) 16 t0ce7 1 7 ..tb3 l:tfd8 1 8
l::t e 1 Wic7 1 9 'Lle4 ;!; / oo Sznapik
Kveinys, Manila OL 1 992.
Black's way of playing in the sec
ond example is better.
..

...

1 4 White Plays 5 b3

1
2
3
4
5

e4
iOn
d4
l0xd4
i0b3 (D)

cS
e6
cxd4
'ffb6

where White plays an early lLlb3.


There are very many possible move
orders that lead to the critical positions
that we see in this variation.
Those lines where, sooner or later,
Black plays . . . lZJc6 will not be dis
cussed in this chapter. That continu
ation leads into the system 2 . . GUc6,
4 .. .'ib6 which was dealt with in the
first three parts of the book.
After he has completed his strate
gic goal - the decentralisation of the
d4-knight, Black most often returns
the queen at once by 5 . .'f!ic7 (B) and
tries to develop his queenside as soon
as possible. He tries for a quick . . . d7d5 after ... GUf6 and ... a6 ifWhite plays
..td3. If not, Black hopes for a fa
vourable transposition into a Schev
eningen!Paulsen or a 2 . . GUc6, 4. . .
'1Wb6 Sicilian. A provocative alterna
tive, 5 . GUf6 (A), has a more forcing
character and is seldom played.
Editor 's Note: Kveinys himself
played 5 . . lZJc6 in his first corre
spondence games with the system
(circa 1 986) but later developed the
characteristic move of his variation,
namely 5 . .'ilt'c7.
.

By playing 5 GUb3, White avoids


all the possible tactical complications
that were seen in the previous chap
ter. This continuation immediately
eliminates Black's possible active play
along the a7-g l diagonal and neutral
ises the pressure down the b-file.
The types of position that arise, un
like those from Chapter 1 3, have a lot
of similarities with those from vari
ous lines of the Scheveningen!Paulsen

..

118 White Plays 5 tZJbJ

A:

f6
5
6 cJ
6 e5!? is intriguing but unfortu
nately there are no examples from
practice. The following analysis is by
Martens - 6 ... e4 7 .i.e3 1Wc7 8
'iVd4 f5 9 0 llJc6 1 0 'iVc4 d5 1 1 'j!fe2
'ifxe5 1 2 fxe4 d4 with the assessment
that Black has compensation for the
sacrificed piece. This is neither suf
ficient nor reliable for making a con
crete evaluation of the variation. I
think that 6... d5 is better than the
extravagant 6 ... llJe4.
Ab4
6
d5 (D)
1
AdJ

The most consistent reaction. In


the case of 7...Axc3+ 8 bxc3 Black
would have problems, either after the
greedy 8 ... 'iVc6 9 0-0 llJxe4 1 0 a3
llJxc3 1 1 \'fg4, Upton-Helrnond,
Cattolica 1 993, or after 8 ... d6 9 0-0
llJbd7 10 Wh1 'flc7 1 1 .lla 3 0-0 1 2
f4 ( 1 2 e5?! dxe5 1 3 xf8 llJxf8 with
compensation) 1 2... l'td8? 1 3 e5 !
Istratescu-Badea, Bucharest 1 996.

Even in the case of the superior


1 2 ... e5 1 3 fxe5! llJxe5 14 llJd4 a6 1 5
'f!Vd2 White would have realistic
chances to achieve pressure on the
kingside (Istratescu).
8 exd5
Possible is 8 Ad2 .llxc3 (8 ... dxe4)
9 xc3 dxe4 1 0 Aa5 'iVd6 1 1 .tb5+
We7 1 2 'ilfe2 with compensation,
D . Ol affson-Karason, Reykj avik
1 994.
8
xd5
9
0-0!
This is the introductory move for
an energetic pawn sacrifice that gives
White superior play.
9 Ad2 llJxc3 1 0 bxc3 .ll e7 is less
efficient. For example:
a) 1 1 tfh5 llJd7 1 2 c4 llJc5 1 3
.i.c3 llJxd3+ 1 4 cxd3 b4 1 5 .l:.c 1
.txc3 1 6 l'txc3 \\fb4 1 7 b5+ 'ifxb5
1 8 cxb5 Ad7= Borge-Svensson, Oslo
1 992.
b) 11 c4 llJc6 1 2 0-0 -'.f6 1 3
.ll b 1 0-0 1 4 e2 'flic7= Nikac
Milovanovic, Cetinje 1 996.
9
xcJ
10 bxcJ
AxcJ
c6
11
llb1
Or 1 1 . . .0-0 1 2 llJd2 ! 'iV c7 1 3
llJe4! Fogarasi.
12
AaJ
White has excellent compensation.
He is clearly better either after
12 Ae5 1 3 llJd2 'f!lc7 1 4 llJc4!
Axh2+ 15 Wh l or 1 2...Ab4!? 1 3
llJd2 xa3 1 4 l'txb6 axb6 1 5 llJc4
c5 16 'f/Jbl 0-0 1 7 llJxb6 xb6 1 8
W'xb6 l:Xa2 1 9 f4 ! Fogarasi
Z.Varga, Budapest 1 995.
..

White Plays 5 ttlbJ 119

B:

'ff c7 (D)

Black can also carry out this plan


after first playing 5 .a6, in which case
it is not advisable to postpone the
move . . . "fic7. After 6 tLlc3 the best
reply for Black is either 6 .. . tLlc6!? or
6 . . . "fic7, which after 7 d3 trans
poses into the main line 5 .. . f/ic7.
Imprecise is (5 .. .a6 6 tLlc3) 6...d6.
This was proved in the game J.Polgar
Short, Dortmund 1 997, which con
tinued 7 .i.f4! tLlf6 8 'it'd2 e7 9
0-0-0 0-0 1 0 g4! ? (Apart from this
aggressive pawn sacrifice, White has
also the classic approach 10 f3 !? with
transposition into a kind of Richter
Rauzer Attack which would be fa
vourable for h er . ) I O . . . lL\ xg4
( I O . e5 1 1 e3 'ii' d8 1 2 f3 ) 1 1
l: g I lL\e 5 1 2 'tj' e2 'fl c 7 (After
12 ... tLlg6 ! ? 13 e3 "i!Vd8 14 f4 with
the idea 'flh5, f5 White would have
compensation according to J.Polgar)
1 3 e3 b5?! (Better is either 1 3 .. .
ttJbc6 1 4 f4 tLlg6 1 5 h4! ? or 1 3 . . .
tLl bd7 1 4 f4 tLlg6 1 5 f5 tLlge5 1 6
..

. .

h6 J. f6 1 7 'ifg2 g6! 1 8 xf8


tLlxf8 with good play for the sacri
ficed exchange - Seirawan) 1 4 f4
tLlc4 1 5 d4 g6 16 'Wh5 ! and it was
not easy for Black to find a defence
against the plan l:ld1 -d3-h3 ( 1 -0 39).
After 5 ... "1Wc7:
8 1 : 6 g3
82: 6 c4
B3: 6 d3
84: 6 ttJc3
White' s main continuation is 6
tLlc3 but the others are also reason
able and they should not be underes
timated.
Bl:
6

g3 (DJ

This is an attempt to transpose into


the Fianchetto line of the Schev
eningen/Paulsen Sicilian. Black has
various ways of replying:
a) 6 f6 7 ..tg2 j.e7 (Prema
ture is 7 . . . d5 8 exd5 tLlxd5 9 0-0 e7
10 xd5 exd5 l l ttJc3 0-0 1 2 tLlxd5
"fid8 1 3 f4 tLlc6 1 4 tLlxe7+ lL\xe7
1 5 'Wxd8 l:1xd8 1 6 c3 Bielczyk..

120 White Plays 5 flbJ

Kveinys, Bydgoszcz 1 990) 8 0-0 0-0


9 lZ:lc3 a6 1 0 a4 GDc6 1 1 .i.f4 d6 1 2
a5 lZ:le5 with transposition into a kind
of Scheveningen Sicilian with g3,
with equal chances, Filipowicz
Ostrowski, Mikolajki 1 99 1 .
b ) 6. . .l0 c 6 7 _ag2 lZ:lf6 8 0-0
(More natural then 8 il.f4 d6 9 ltJa3
(9 ltJc3) 9 ... a6 1 0 0-0 il.e7 1 1 c4 0-0
1 2 l:.c1 oo Kir.Georgiev-J.Polgar,
Budapest 1 993) 8 . . . .i.e7 9 ltJc3 a6
1 0 a4 0-0 1 1 f4 it F elgaer-Quinteros,
Villa Ballester 1 997.
c) 6 . b6 7 ltJc3 a6 8 .i.g2 .i.b7 9
0-0 d6 1 0 l:l:e1 ltJ f6 1 1 .i.f4 ltJbd7
1 2 ltJd5 ltJxd5 ( 1 2 . . . exd5 1 3 exd5+
d8 1 4 'i!Vd4! - with the idea l::! e 3,
l:.ae 1 - is unclear) 13 exd5 e5 1 4
ltJd4 g6! 1 5 ltJc6 .i.g7 16 b4 0-0 1 7
.i.e3 lLlb8= Pablo Marin-Epishin,
Manresa 1 995.
.

B2:

6 c4
This continuation, with which
White gains space in the centre, has
a sound positional basis. It is GM
Nunn & Gallagher's principal recom
mendation for White against the
Kveinys Variation in BTSJ.
l0f6 {D)
6
7 l0c3
White has no reason to avoid the
... .i.b4 pin.
Instead 7 Ad3 avoids the pin but
allows Black to equalise with a quick
7 ... d5 (line 'b3 '). The alternative to
this is the Hedgehog set-up as seen
in notes 'b1 ' and 'h2 ' .
b1) 7 l0c6 8 'Llc3 lt:le5 9 0-0 a6
...

1 0 .i.f4 d6 1 1 l:tcl b6 12 .i.e2 .i.b7


1 3 'it'd4 Ermenkov-Todorov,
Elenite 1 993.
b2) 7 ..d6 8 lLlc3 a6 9 0-0 lZ:lbd7
1 0 f4 .i.e7 1 1 'ie2 0-0 1 2 .i.d2 b6
1 3 l:!ae1 Y2-Y2 Am.Rodriguez-Wahls,
Cienfuegos 1 996.
b3) 7 d5 (The simplest.) 8 cxd5
exd5 9 ltJc3 dxe4 1 0 ltJxe4 ltJxe4 1 1
.i.xe4 JLd6 1 2 h3 0-0 1 3 0-0 .i.e5=
Kubien-Kveinys, Polanica Zdroj
1 992.
7
Jlb4
Editor 's Note: Since this move is
unsatisfactory, attention must be
given to Nunn's own suggestion for
Black, namely to adopt a Hedgehog
fonnation with the untested 7. a6, al
though this does not guarantee equal
ity either.
After 7 . .. .i.b4:
a) 8 Ad2 ltJc6 (More cautious is
8 . . . a6 9 a3 .i. e 7 1 0 f4 d6 1 1
.i.d3 it Nunn) 9 lt:lb5 ! 'it' f4 (Or
9 ... 'it'e5 1 0 .i.xb4 ltJxb4 1 1 'fi'd2!
ltJc6! 12 ltJd6+ e7 1 3 0-0-0 ttJxe4
1 4 ltJxe4 'it'xe4 1 5 .i.d3 with the ini
tiative for White according to Nunn)
1 0 .i.xb4 ltJxb4 1 1 f3 b6? ! (Better,
.

...

..

White Plays 5 tiJbJ 121

but also not achieving equality, are


either 1 1 .. .0-0 1 2 'Wd2! 'irxd2+ 1 3
xd2 ;!; , or 1 l ...a6 1 2 lLld6+ e7 1 3
cS ;!; Nunn) 1 2 e2 a6 1 3 g3 eS
1 4 f4 'ii'xb2 1 5 lLld6+ rj;e7 1 6 0-0
Nunn-J.Polgar, Hastings 1 992.
b) According to BTSJ, 8 Ad3 is
probably better with 8 .. . lLlc6 being
the best reply.
B3:

f6
6 Ad3
6 ... a6 7 i.e3 lLlf6 8 f4 d6 9 c4 b6
1 0 lLlc3 J;.e7 1 1 0-0 lLlbd7 1 2 'ii'f3
b7 1 3 l:tae1 g6 1 4 f2 0-0 1 S h4
:ae8 with a complex game, Olivier
Giffard, Cannes 1 996.
0-0
7
7 ltlc3 a6 transposes into the 6
lLlc3 line while the original 7 .aS 8
a4 b6 9 e3 lLlc6 1 0 0-0 did not
achieve equality in the game Nataf
M.Ivanov, Enghien 1 997. Also pos
sible is 7 ltlc6 with transposition to
Part One after 8 0-0 a6.
Editor 's Note: Pulkis-Kveinys,
6'h Baltic Sea corr. tch 1 993, went
7 f4 dS ! ? 8 eS lLl fd7 9 0-() lLlc6 1 0
'Ll 1 d2 b6 1 1 ll:Jf3 lLJcS 1 2 ll:Jxc5
ii.xc5+ ( 1 2 . . . bxc5 ! ?) 13 rj;h 1 .i.b7
1 4 c3 0-0-0 1 S b4 e7 16 a4 f6
1 7 'if e2 fxeS 1 8 fxeS :df8 1 9 aS
and White 's attack was very strong.
dS (D)
7
Variations where White delays the
lLlc3 move offer Black, almost as a
rule, the possibility of reacting in the
centre with ... dS and equalising with
relatively few problems. If Black
wants to avoid simplification, he al-

..

ways has the option of playing the


Hedgehog set-up:
a) 7 a6 8 f4 d6 9 c4 g6 1 0 lLlc3
ii.g7 1 1 ii.e3 lLlbd7 1 2 a4 b6 1 3 aS
bxa5 14 l:txa5 ;!;; Matulovic-Zagorskis,
Budapest 1 996.
b) 7 d6 8 lLlc3 (8 c4) 8 ... a6 9 a4
b6 1 0 f4 lLlbd7 1 1 'fi'e2 b7 1 2 i.d2
ii.e7 1 3 l:tae 1 e5 1 4 g4 exf4 1 5 i.xf4
lLl e 5 oo Pozdniakov-Altshul, St.
Petersburg 1 997.

..

..

.. .... .

..- ..-
'- - --
-

lii;'lfrir

'

,
i d

dxe4
8 lllc3
9 fllxe4
ltlbd7!
9 ltlxe4 10 xe4 'Lld7 is slightly
inferior:
a) 1 1 ltld4 a6 1 2 e2 (White
played a weaker plan in the game
Dobrovolsky-Kveinys, Rimavska
Sobota 1 990, where after 12 b3 lLlf6
1 3 'Yi'd3 d6 1 4 lLlf3 lLJxe4 1 S xe4
ii.d7 1 6 h3 J;.c6 Black solved all his
problems.) 12 ... lLlf6 1 3 ii.f3 ii.d6 1 4
h 3 0-0 1 S ii.gS ;!; Lukin-Kveinys,
Beside 1 99 1 .
b) 1 1 d4 J;.d6 1 2 'iVxg7 ii.xh2+
1 3 Wh 1 i.e5 1 4 h6 oo Torok
Kveinys, Budapest 1 992.
1 0 1tf3
Or 1 0 ill xf6+ lLlxf6 1 1 ii.bS+

..

122 Mite Plays 5 tfJbJ

d7 1 2 xd7+ tbxd7 1 3 tLld4 a6


1 4 l:te1 e7 1 5 'iff3 0-0= Luther
Kveinys, Bonn 1 993.
10
Jle7
10 ... /(lxe4 1 1 xe4 d6 12 h3
tLlf6 13 'Wh4 d7 1 4 i..g5 .i.e5 (The
simpler 1 4... i..e7 is better) 1 5 c3 tLld5
1 6 l:tfe 1 and White had the advan
tage, Anorak-Khamrakulov, Cala
Galdana jr 1 996.
1fxg3
11
'lrg3
0-0
12
xg3
13 lle1 l:le8 14 Ad2 b6 with a
roughly equal game, V. Gurevich
Kveinys, Katowice 1 993.
B4:
6
7

c3
Jld3 (D)

a6

This position is the most frequent


arising in practice from 5 tLlb3 . Both
sides can choose among various
plans. The further organisation of the
available material is given according
to whether Black advances ... b5 later
(see below) or at once (Chapter 1 6).
f6
7
8 f4
8 a4 b6 9 0-0 J..b7 1 0 'ti'e2 d6 1 1

f4 tLlbd7 1 2 h1 i..e 7 1 3 i..d2 0-0


1 4 l:tae1 e5 1 5 l:!.f3 l:.fe8 16 l:.g3
Affl 17 l:!.fl d5 oo Stets-M.Ivanov,
Krasnodar 1 996.
d6
8
9 0-0
Here White can also play:
a) 9 g4 d5 (9... b5) 10 e5 tLlfd7 1 1
h4 tZ:lc6 1 2 'it'f3 b5 1 3 Ad2 i..b7 1 4
0-0-0 tLlb6 1 5 b 1 tLlc4 oo Wallace
Kveinys, Kuopio 1 995.
b) 9 1re2 i..e 7 (Safer is 9 ... tLlbd7
1 0 i.. d2 i..e 7 1 1 0-0 b5 P.Popovic
Cabrilo, Budva 1 996) 1 0 e5 with
risky complications for Black :
1 O ... dxe5 1 1 fxe5 tLlfd7 1 2 i.. f4 lZJc6
1 3 0-0 tLldxe5 1 4 l:!.ae 1 'ti'b6+ 1 5
h 1 tLlxd3 1 6 'ti'xd3 0-0 1 7 'ii'g3
'Ot> h 8 1 8 il.. c 7 'it' a7 19 lZJ a4 oo
Shirov-Topalov, Linares 1 998.
c) 9 1rf3 tLlbd7 10 e3 b5 ar
rives at one of the important positions
that can be reached also via the
Scheveningen, 1 e4 c5 2 tLlf3 d6 3
d4 cxd4 4 lZJxd4 tLlf6 5 lZJc3 a6 6 f4
e6 7 'fif3 'ii'b6 8 tLlb3 'ii'c7 9 e3
b5 10 d3 tLlbd7. White can play:
c l ) the classical plan 11 0-0 b7
12 l:tae1 .i.e7 1 3 a3 0-0 1 4 'it'h3 e5
15 fxe5 lZJxe5 16 ttJd4 g6 oo Socko
Kveinys, Polanica Zdroj 1 993.
c2) or the aggressive 1 1 g4 h6 1 2
h4 b4 1 3 lZJe2 d5 14 e 5 tLle4 1 5 g5
hxg5 16 hxg5 l:txh1 + 1 7 'ti'xh1 g6
1 8 .i.xe4 dxe4 1 9 'it'xe4 b7 20
'it'd3 0-0-0 21 tLled4 ;t L.Schneider
Suba, Eksjo 1 982.
The position after 9 0-0 can be
reached by various move orders.
Black is at an important crossroads.

White Plays 5 t0bJ 123

/t)bd7
9
Other options are:
a) 9 ..Ae7 1 0 'ti'f3 lLlc6 1 1 d2
lZJ b4 1 2 .l:. ae 1 (Frolov- Kandza,
Katowice 1 993) transposes into the
2 . . . lZJc6 line.
b) 9 . b5? is bad because White
gains a dangerous advantage with a
quick action in the centre, as can be
seen from the course of the game
Zezulkin-Bereziuk, Czech Republic
1 997. There followed 1 0 e5! iZJfd7
1 1 exd6 xd6 1 2 e3 ! J.e7 (Def
ending against the 1 3 .ixb5 threat)
1 3 f5 lLlf6 1 4 fxe6 .txe6 1 5 'tff3
lLlc6 1 6 lLld4 l:c8 1 7 lZJxe6 fxe6 1 8
\'f'h3 lZJe5 1 9 'tlfxe6 lZJxd3 2 0 l:hf6
gxf6 2 1 lLld5 and White won.
c) 9 b6 is more cautious, but 1 0
e5 lLlfd7 1 1 exd6 .i.xd6 12 lLle4 e7
1 3 'iff3 lZJc6 14 it.d2 Kindermann
Hillarp Persson, Reykj avik 1 998,
looks dangerous for Black.
10
a4
10 1Vn b6 o o .. b5) 1 1 ..td2 ..tb7
1 2 l:.ae1 g6 ( 1 2 ... ..i.e7) 1 3 'ii'h 3 ..tg7
1 4 lZJd4 0-0 1 5 ltlf3 'tlfc5+ 1 6 'Oth 1
'tfh5 1 7 'it'g3 l:.ac8 1 8 lLlg5 .l:.c5 1 9
..i.e2 'tlfh6 2 0 'tfd3 Hector-Hillarp
Persson, Reykjavik 1 997.
b6
10
11
'fle2
Probably 1 1 n. with the idea
'W'h3 or 'it'g3, is more dangerous for
Black.
Ab7
11
Ae7
12 Ad2
13 l:Xael (D)
A very similar position is seen in
Chapter 1 5 with the difference that

...

there a3, ... b5 is played, instead of


a4, b6. This choice is a matter of
taste, though, from Black's point of
view, I personally would prefer the
line where White plays a2-a4.
In the above position, White has
prepared an attack in the centre with
e4-e5. Is this a real threat? The opin
ions of the two most famous adher
ents of this system, Kveinys and
Kengis, differ in this matter. The
former, in the first example, allowed
the e4-e5 advance while Kengis, in
my opinion, chose a more reliable
counter-thrust, 1 3 ... e5:
a) 13...0-0 1 4 e5 lZJd5 15 'ilh5 ( 1 5
lZJxd5; 1 5 exd6) 1 5 ...g6 1 6 Wh6 dxe5
1 7 fxe5 ltlxe5 1 8 ltlxd5 exd5 ! 1 9
.i.c3 ( 1 9 l:.xe5 Wxe5 2 0 ..tc3 d4!
with the idea 2 I . . ...i.c5) 1 9 ... .i.d6 20
lZJd4 .l:.ae8 2 1 :e2 f6 and Black de
fended himself successfully in
lmanaliev-Kveinys, Manila OL 1992.
b) 13 e5 14 5 0-0 15 ..tg5 (15 g4!?
d5) 15 ... l:.fe8 16 l:d1 d5 17 exd5 e4 18
.i.c4 lZJe5 1 9 d6 .txd6 20 ..txf6 lLlxc4
21 'iig4 ..bh2+ 22 'Oth1 'it'g3 23 'ifxg3
.i.xg3 + Stefansson-Kengis, Arhus
1 997.
. . .

...

1 5 Enhanced Kveinys
Variation

This chapter discusses a currently


popular variation that arises after 1
e4 c5 2 f3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 xd4
'ff b 6 by the sequence
'ffc7
5
b3
a6
6 c3
7 Ad3
and now, instead of7...'Llf6 (Chap
ter 14), Black plays the immediate
b5 (D)
7
Black builds a flexible position,
giving priority to queenside develop
ment. He can place his b8-knight on
c6 or d7; we shall concentrate on the
latter option. In the literature, this is
sometimes referred to as "The En
hanced Kveinys Variation".The entire
system is still under investigation and
it is difficult to define the main line.
In practice the position most of
ten arises after the move order 1 e4
c5 2 'L:lf3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 'Llxd4 a6 5
'Llc3 b5 6 d3 'irb6 7 b3 'irc7. In
that case, White has other options:
a) 7 Ae3 c5 g lLlce2 'Llf6 9 h3
b7 and Black already had some
advantage in Hoiberg-Kveinys,
Alborg 1 997.
b) 7 f3 should not be underesti
mated; it supports the e4-e5 advance
so Black is more or less forced to play

an early ... d7-d6. However, with our


sequence based on 4 ...'iVb6 this awk
ward possibility does not arise.
White is the player who dictates
the further course of events from the
diagram:
A: 8 .lie3
B: 8 f4
C: 8 0-0
The most logical plan is f2-f4 with
the development of the bishop on d2
and the preparation of the advance
e4-e5 or f4-f5, depending on Black's
defensive set-up. The option of de
veloping the queen on f3 or e2 is an
other important factor.
We should also note that 8 ..tg5
is likely to attract interest in the fu
ture . The development o f t h e
bishop o n e3 i s less efficient while

Enhanced Kveinys Variation 125

8 'i\ff3 and 8 a4 are marginal from


both the practical and theoretical
points of view.
Examples of these moves are:
a) 8 tro ..i.b7 9 'it'g3 d6 1 0 e3
liJf6 1 1 f3 liJbd7 12 0-0 l:tc8 1 3 l:tfd 1
b4 1 4 ltJ e 2 d5= Van der Wiei
Hoeksema, Leeuwarden 1 994.
b) 8 a4 b4 9 etJe2 .tb7 1 0 ltJed4
( 1 0 0-0 etJf6 1 1 ..i.f4? e5 1 2 e3 d5
1 3 f3 liJbd7 + Leiber-Kengis, Bad
Zwesten 1 997) 1 0 . . . etJf6 1 1 'ile2
ltJc6 1 2 ltJxc6 ..i.xc6 1 3 e5 ltJg8 1 4
0-0 ltJe7 1 5 ..i.g5 ltJg6 and Black
achieved a soli<! position, Svidler
Ehlvest, Pula 1 997.
c) 8 ft'e2 ..tb7 9 0-0 (9 ..i.d2 b4
1 0 ltJd1 ltJf6 1 1 f4 ltJc6 1 2 ltJf2 d6
1 3 0-0 il.. e7 1 4 l:tae1 ltJd7 1 5 g4
h5 1 6 'Wh3 ;t Mortensen-Kengis,
Copenhagen 1 997) 9 . .. ltJc6 (9 ... ltJf6
1 0 f4 b4 1 1 ltJd1 d6 1 2 h1 i.e7 1 3
..i.d2 etJc6 oo Giegler-Oratovsky,
Brazil 1 994) 10 f4 d6 ( l O ... ltJb4 1 1
i.e3 ltJf6 1 2 Wh 1 il.. e7 1 3 :ac 1 0-0
1 4 :n d6 1 5 l:tg3 g6 16 a3 ltJxd3
1 7 cxd3 'ti'd8= S ahu S ekhar
Vasiukov, India 1 987) 1 1 ..i.d2 ltJf6
1 2 l:tae1 ..i.e7 1 3 a3 0-0 1 4 f5 ( 1 4 Wh1
transposes into the 2 ... ltJc6 system Chapter Four) 1 4... l:tae8 15 fxe6 fxe6
1 6 ..i.e3 etJe5 1 7 etJd4 ..i.d8 1 8 h3 'ifd7
1 9 ltJf3 etJg6 20 d2 c6 2 1 etJd4
'it'c8 22 etJf3 'it'c6 23 etJd4 'lWc8 Yi-Yz
Khalifman-C. Hansen, Arhus 1 997.
d) 8 Ag5!? (A provocative con
tinuation) 8 . .. ..i.b7 (D) and now:
d 1 ) After 9 ft'e2 ltJc6 1 0 .i.h4
ltJ f6 1 1 ..ig3, White has completed
the transfer of his bishop to the h2-

b8 diagonal. This manoeuvre is use


ful but the price of three tempi is high:
1 l ...d6 1 2 0-0 .te7 13 a4 b4 14 itJb1
0-0 1 5 a5 g6 16 il.. f4 .l:.fe8 17 li:l 1 d2
li:lh5 1 8 ..i.h6 ..i.f6 1 9 g4 Yi-Yz Salov
Nijboer, Wijk aan Zee 1 998.
d2) 9 0-0 li:lf6 10 f4 b4 (With
1 O . d6 Black would have weakened
the e6-point, giving White the advan
tage after 1 1 .i.xf6 gxf6 1 2 f5) 1 1 e5
bxc3 ( 1 l .. .ltJd5) 1 2 exf6 cxb2 1 3 .l:.bl
g6 ( 1 3 ... gxf6) 1 4 l:txb2 h6 15 ..i.h4
g5 1 6 fxg5 hxg5 1 7 ..tg3 ..i.d6 1 8
fig4 ..txg3 1 9 'Clfxg3 'ifxg3 20 hxg3.
As compensation for his weakened
pawn structure, White has active
pieces and the initiative, Hellers
Kveinys, Oslo 1 992.
.

A:

8 Ae3
From the theoretical point of view,
White' s early commitment of his
dark-squared bishop in this variation
favours Black.
8
Ab7 (D)
Now:
a) After 9 f4 li:lf6 White has prob
lems with the e4-point:

126 Enhanced Kvcinys Vanation

a 1 ) 1 0 0-0 (A dubious pawn sac


rifice.) 1 0 ... b4 ( I O . . . d6 1 1 a3 lLlbd7
1 2 'i!Vf3 h5 1 3 h3 iie7 oo S. Polgar
Oratovsky, Netanya 1 993) 1 1 lLla4
xe4 12 xe4 lLlxe4 13 f5 d6
1 4 l:t e 1 i.xh2+ 1 5 h i 0-0 1 6
i.b6 'iVf4 1 7 l:Xe4 'fi'xe4 1 8 xh2
lLlc6 + Link-Kveinys, Reykj avik
1 994.
a2) 10 fff3 b4! (Inferior is 10 ... d6
1 1 g4 b4 1 2 lLle2 lLlc6 1 3 lLled4 h6
14 0-0-0 lLld7 15 h4 Berg-M.Ivanov,
Mariehamn 1 997) 1 1 lLle2 d5 1 2
exd5 ( 1 2 e5 d4! ) 1 2 ... iLxd5 1 3 'ir'h3
lLlbd7 14 0-0 lLlc5 15 lLlxc5 iLxc5
16 lLld4 0-0 and Black obtained a
good position in Ginzburg-R.Garcia,
Pena City 1 996.
b) 9 fle2 lLlf6 10 f3 h5! ? ( 1 0 . ..
lLlc6; IO. .d6) 1 1 'Wf2 lLlc6 1 2 iLb6
'irb8 13 0-0-0 e7 14 b1 d6 1 5 f4 ;t
V.Georgiev-Oratovsky, Brazil 1 994.
.

B:

d6
8 f4
Black postpones the development
of the c8-bishop for a while, with the
idea of preventing possible pressure
on e6.

9 ffn
d7
10 0-0
gf6
It is too early to play 10... .ab7 in
view of 1 1 'ifh3, followed by 1 2 f5.
11
Ad2
After 11 Whl i.b7 we reach, via
a different move order, Svidler
Kasparov, Gennany (rpd) 1998. That
game is interesting because the World
Champion applied the idea of a
fianchetto of the dark-squared bishop.
After 1 2 a3 g6! ? 1 3 'i!Vh3 g7 1 4 fS
gxf5 1 5 exf5 e5, a highly complex
position arose, with mutual chances.
b4! ? (D)
11
w

Black weakens his queenside in


order to spoil the coordination of
White's pieces. It is quite risky, but
l l ...Ae7 12 l::l a e1 i.b7 ( 1 2 . . 0-0?
loses to 1 3 e5! iLb7 1 4 'iVh3 dxe5 1 5
fxe5 lLlxe5 1 6 l:Xe5 Wxe5 1 7 %hf6)
13 'ifh3 is probably even riskier. For
example, 1 3 ... b4 1 4 lLldl d5 1 5 e5
lLle4 1 6 i.e3 g6 1 7 lLlf2 lLldcS 1 8
lLlxcS ll::lx c5? ( 1 8 ... xc5) 1 9 .i.d4
0-0-0 20 'ife3 Wb8 2 1 c3 Hartman
Kengis, Alborg 1 997.
Instead, after 1 I ...iLe7, White's
cautious play with the prophylactic
.

Enhanced Kveinys Vanation 127

moves 1 2 a3 0-0 1 3 h 1 helped


Black to consolidate in the example
Thipsay-Cs.Horvath, Calcutta 1 998,
where after 1 3 ... .i.b7 14 l:tae1 l:te8
1 5 'ifh3 e5 16 'Lld5 .i.xd5 17 exd5
e4 Black achieved active play.
12
d1
.i.b7
Playable is 12...d5 1 3 'Llf2 dxe4 1 4
'Llxe4 .i.b7 1 5 l:lae1 'Llc5 1 6 'Llbxc5
.i.xc5+ 1 7 .i.e3 'Llxe4 1 8 .i.xe4 .i.xe4
1 9 'ifxe4 0-0 20 l:.f2 Y2- Smyslov
A.Sokolov, Moscow 1 988.
aS
13
fl
14 c3
This natural move is a bit prema
ture. 14 g4! ? was preferable, when
both 1 4 . .. 'Llc5 and 14 ... 'Llb6 lead to
very sharp play (Svidler).
bxc3
14
Ae7
15
Axc3
16 l:lacl
ffb6!
and Black obtained a comfortable
game in Shirov-Svidler, Tilburg
1 997. After a couple of inaccuracies
by White, Black convincingly won
as follows: 1 7 g4? ! a4 1 8 .i.d4 'ifd8
1 9 'Lld2 0-0 20 g5 'Lle8 2 1 h4 e5 22
.i.c3 exf4 23 'ifxf4 'Lle5 ! 24 .i.xe5
dxe5 25 'ifxe5 .i.d6 26 'iff5 g6 27
'iff3 .i.e5 28 'Llc4 .i.d4 29 l:tcd1 f5
3 0 .i.e2? (30 'Lle3) 30 ... fxe4 3 1 'ifg3
'Llg7 32 'it'd6 'Llf5 33 'ife6+ h8 34
etJd6 'fie? 35 'Llxf5 l:txf5 0-1 .
C:

8 0-0
.i.b7
Black did not manage to equalise
with the direct 8 b4 in the game
Stefansson-S.Atalik, Reykjavik 1 994,
where after 9 etJe2 'Llf6 1 0 .i.f4! ( 1 0
...

f4 .i.b7 1 1 e5 etJd5, with the idea


. . . d6, is good for Black) 1 0... ..1d6 1 1
.i.xd6 '1Vxd6 1 2 etJg3 'ilf4 ( 1 2 ... h5
1 3 '1Ve1 etJc6 14 f4 ) 1 3 a3 ! bxa3
1 4 l:ha3 White had a slightly better
position.
If Black employs the imprecise
move order 8 f6, then after the
consistent 9 f4 he has nothing better
than 9 . . . .i.b7 leading to Lukin
Khal i fman, below. In the game
Kasparov-Smirin, Israel (simul)
1 998, White replied with the more
modest 9 Del, enabling Black to
achieve a satisfactory game after
9 ... ..td6 (9 . . . d6!?) 1 0 g3 b4 1 1 etJe2
etJc6 12 etJed4 lLJxd4 1 3 lLJxd4 h5
14 .i.fl h4 15 ..tg2 hxg3 16 hxg3
..tb7 17 .i.d2 Ac5.
9 f4 (D)
...

As in similar positions, the active


advance f2-f4, transposing to a kind
of Scheveningen, is White's most
common plan. However, in Nijboer
Glek, Groningen 1997, White instead
tried a quick action on the queenside,
challenging the exposed b-pawn. Af
ter 9 1fe2 d6 1 0 a4 b4 1 1 etJa2 etJf6
1 2 .i.f4 etJc6 1 3 a5 .i.e7 1 4 c3 bxc3

128 Enhanced Kveinys Variation

lUxc3 0-0 1 6 l:tfcl White 's position


was somewhat preferable.
d6
9
This is probably more reliable than
the provocative 9 f6:
a) 10 e5 leads to a different type
of position. In Lukin-Khalifman,
Moscow rpd 1 997, after 10 ...b4 1 1
lUe2 ( 1 1 exf6 bxc3 1 2 'ti'e 1 gxf6 1 3
bxc3 .l:.g8 with counterplay) 1 1 . . .
lUdS 1 2 lUg3 il.e7 ( 1 2 . . .'ti'b6? ! is
dubious in view of 13 'iti>h 1 lUe3 1 4
xe3 VWxe3 1 S lUhS , but 12 ... d6!?
is possible.) 13 'ife2 g6 14 lUe4 lUc6
1 5 Wh1 aS 16 c4 bxc3 1 7 bxc3 White
had the better game.
b) Also possible is 10 'fle2 b4 1 1
lUb1 e7 1 2 lU 1 d2 d6 1 3 eS dxeS
14 fxeS lUd5 1 S lUc4 lUd7 Matros
Hellsten, Stockholm 1 997.
10
'fle2
10 'ffe 1 lUd7 1 1 'it'g3 lUgf6 1 2
a3 e7 1 3 d2 0-0 1 4 l:tae1 eS 1 5
fxe5 dxe5 1 6 h 1 .l:.fe8 oo Ankerst
Zagorskis, Groningen 1 996.
d7
10
10 f6 1 1 a4 b4 12 lUd1 lUbd7
1 3 lUt2 lUeS (White intends lUg4, to
threaten e4-eS and weaken the black
kingside after the exchange of the f6knight) 14 lUxc5 dxcS 1 S b3 (A rigid
pawn structure often seen in this vari
ation.) 1 S ... e7 16 lUg4 lUxg4 1 7
'ifxg4 f6 1 8 e S .ie7 1 9 't'Ve2 g 6 20
b2 1'Vc6 2 1 l:r.ae l l:td8 oo Komeev
S.Ivanov, Ubeda 1 996.
11
d2
11 coPh1 lUgf6 12 a4 b4 1 3 lUa2
lUeS 14 lUxcS dxc5 1 S b3 il.e7 1 6
iLb2 0-0 1 7 eS lUd5 (Both sides have
. .

...

permanent strongholds) 1 8 c4 bxc3 1 9


lUxc3 lUb4 20 il.c4 g6 2 1 lUe4 iLxe4
22 'ti'xe4 llad8 23 l:lad1 llxd1 24
l:.xd1 Y2- Liang Jinrong-P.Schlosser,
Lippstadt 1 997.
11

1 2 a3
The types of position that arise
when White plays a3 or a4 are fun
damentally different. The choice is a
matter of taste, though I think that it
is more unpleasant for Black when
White disrupts the queenside by play
ing a4. In the following example we
see once again a position where the
knights were exchanged after a4 was
played: 12 Wh1 e7 1 3 a4 b4 1 4
lUa2 lUeS 1 S lUxc5 dxcS 1 6 c 3 c4
1 7 xc4 lUxe4 1 8 e1 bxc3 1 9
lUxc3 lUd6 20 d3 Moberg
M.Ivanov, Gausdal 1 99S.
12
e7
13
Uae1
e5 (D)
Here too - as in the variation B4
at the end of the previous chapter,
where instead of a3, ... bS, the moves
were a4, ..b6 (see the diagram on page
1 23) - it is better for Black to react
with 1 3 ...eS and not to allow e4-e5 .
.

Enhanced Kveinys Variation 129

In Nagatz-Dautov, Bad Lauterberg


1 99 1 , Black obtained good play with
13 . 0-0 after 14 g4 tt:lc5 1 5 g5 tt:lfd7
1 6 l:f3 l:.fe8 1 7 l:.h3 tt:lf8 1 8 'ifg4
tt:lxd3 1 9 cxd3 d5. Nevertheless, this
example is unconvincing as 14 e5
needs to be checked in practice.
A.Bach and Cosma (Jnfonnator 58)
suggest 1 4 . . . e8 ! ? in view o f
14. ..dxe5 (or 14. ..d5 1 5 'IW'h5 g6
16 tWh6 with the initiative) 1 5 fxe5
tt:ld5 16 'i!Yh5 g6 17 h6 and now if
17 ... tt:lxe5 White wins with 1 8 tt:lxd5
.i.xd5 1 9 .l':.xe5 'IW'xe5 20 .i.c3.
..

After 1 3 ... e5, both sides have com


pleted their development. The harmo
nious placing of the white pieces and
Black's flexible position promise a
complex battle with mutual chances.
In practice Black has achieved satis
factory results. For example:
a) 14 h3 0-0 1 5 fxe5 dxe5 1 6 l:!.f3
c6 1 7 g4 l:!.ae8 1 8 l:efl tt:lb6 1 9
tt:la5 .i.a8 2 0 b4 .:.cs 2 1 l:.f5 tt:le8
22 'iff2 tt:ld6 23 l:f3 tt:lbc4 and in
the further course of the gam e
White' s weaknesses along the c-file
become prominent, Wang Zili
Yakovich, Beijing 1 997.

b) 14 d1 (The idea of using the


a5-square is worthy of attention.)
14 ...0-0 15 lba5 ( 1 5 a5 tWc6 16
fxe5 dxe5 17 .i.b4 l:!.ae8 18 .i.xe7
lhe7 19 tt:le3 'fi'b6= Zjukin-Kiik,
Tallinn 1 997) 15 ... l:!.fe8 ( 1 5 ... c8 16
b4 exf4 1 7 xf4 'be5 1 8 xe5 dxe5
19 c4 .i.g4 20 c2 bxc4 2 1 .i.xc4
llac8 22 ttJe3 .i.e6 R.Popov-M.
Ivanov, Krasnodar 1 996) 16 ltJxb7
'Wxb7 1 7 f3 f8 1 8 tt:le3 exf4 19
CUg4 tt:lxg4 Y2-Y2, Gallagher-Emms,
Hamburg 1 995 .
c) 14 g4! ? (The sharpest continu
ation) 14 ... exf4 1 5 g5 f3 ! 1 6 .l:xf3
tt:lg4 17 tt:ld5 xd5 1 8 exd5 CUge5
and Black' s strategy is based on the
powerful position of his e5-knight.
On the other hand, the transforma
tion of the position enables White to
carry out the promising manoeuvre
tt:ld4-f5 or -c6, e.g. 1 9 l:l:f2! (This is
more logical than 1 9 .l':.g3 as played
in Perez-Vazquez, Cuba 1 998; the
rook remains on the f-file where it
exerts pressure on the f7 -square and
closes the a7-g l diagonal) 1 9 ... g6 20
CUd4 0-0 2 1 tt:lf5!? (White acts be
fore Black can consolidate with
... l:tfe8 and .. . .i.f8) 2 l .. .gxf5?! (In
stead of accepting the sacrifice,
2 l . .. l:.ae8, 2 l . . . tt:lc5 and 2 I ....i.d8
were better moves according to
A.Bach and Cosma) 22 .i.xf5 l:.fe8
23 'i't'h5 h6 (Both 23 ... tt:lg6 24 ..txd7
'li!Yxd7 25 l:txf7! and 23 . . . tt:l f8 24
l:txe5 dxe5 25 .i.xh7+ are hopeless
for Black) 24 .i.xd7 tWxd7 25 l:.xe5
dxe5 26 xf7+ Wh8 27 g6+- A.
Bach-Kveinys, Bad W6rishofen 1993.

1 6 Various Deviations o n
White 's Fifth M ove

This chapter gives the current state


of the theory of a few less common
continuations after 1 e4 c5 2 10f3 e6
3 d4 cxd4 4 10xd4 b6 (IJ).

A:

5 c3
A modest continuation that won't
find many followers.
5
a6
With the direct 5 ... 10c6 6 tll d2
tt:lxd4 Black had problems in the
game Dvoirys-N everov, Russia
1 997, where after 7 tt:lc4 'iVc6 8
'iVxd4 tt:lf6 9 e5 Ac5 1 0 tt:l d6+
.i.xd6 1 1 exd6 0-0 12 .i.f4 tt:ld5
13 .i.g3 b5 14 .i.e2 .i.b7 1 5 .i.f3
White was clearly better.
6 .i.e2
With these examples:
a) 6 'ffc7 7 f4 .i.c5 (7 ... d6) 8 0-0
d6 9 'ith1 tt:lf6 1 0 .i.f3 0-0 1 1 'f!Ve 1
e5 12 tt:lb3 .i.a7 1 3 'fi'g3 l!Jbd7 1 4
l!Ja3 b5 1 5 fxe5 dxe5 16 .i.h6 l!Je8
17 tt:lc2 .i.b7 1 8 l:tae1 'it>h8 19 .i.e3
- Short-Khalifman, Piirnu 1996.
b) In this variation Black can also
build a favourable, flexible Hedge...

All these possibilities are still in


the initial phase of research:
A: 5 c3
B: 5 tt:la3
C: 5 .i.e3
D: 5 tt:lb5

vanous Deviations on White 's Fifth Move 131

hog set-up, as can be seen in the game


Liiva-Kiik, Kalev I 997, where there
followed 6 ...d6 7 0-0 l0f6 8 t0d2
e7 9 b3 l0bd7 IO l:lei 'fkc7 I I c4
b6 I 2 b2 b7 1 3 fl 0-0 I 4 l:.ci
l:tac8.

C:

iLeJ!? (D)

B:

5
IOaJ ! ?
With this original attempt to uti
lise the exposed position of the black
queen, White had a small advantage
in the game Dvoirys-Agrest, Cattolica
I 994. There followed 5 ... a6 6 l0c4
'ftlc7 7 a4 d6 8 a5 l0d7 9 d3 'Llgf6
I O 0-0 e7 1 1 hi 0-0 I 2 g5 b5
I J axb6 t0xb6 I 4 'Lla5 ;!; . In the case
of 5 iLxa3 Dvoirys gives the fol
lowing variation that is favourable for
White: 6 bxa3 ctJf6 7 'i\Vd3 0-0 8 .te2
'Llc6 9 'Llb5 d5 I O exd5 exd5 I I
Ab2! 'Lle4 I 2 0-0 .te6 1 3 l:.abi a6
I 4 t0d4 t0xd4 I 5 .txd4 'fkc7 I 6
a4 ;!; .
His assessment of this variation is
not disputable but let's mention that
Black has a couple of promising di
vergences. The first is the interpolated
check 5 ... iLb4+!? with the idea of
closing the ai -h8 diagonal after 6 c3
.txa3.
The second option is 5 ... Axa3
6 bxa3 l0 f6 7 'i\Vd3 and now 7 ... a6
8 Ae2 0-0 with the idea . . . d6 and
. . . l0bd7 . The drawback of the sec
ond variation is the weakness of the
d6 pawn, but at first glance it seems
that Black arrives in time with an
adequate defence.
..

Compared with the system I e4


c5 2 t0f3 'Llc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 t0xd4
'ii' b6, the idea 5 .teJ is here more
promising for White because the
knight on d4 is not attacked by a
knight from c 6. In the case of
5 ... 'ilixb2, White has 6 t0d2 and later
'Llc4, with the idea of exploiting the
d6-square.
After 5 Ae3 Black has a choice
between:
C l : 5 .. . 'ili'xb2
C2: 5 .. . Ac5
5 . . . Wxb2 is the riskier. The solid
continuation 5 .. . Ac5 can transpose
after 6 lLlc3 'Llc6 into the variation 5
tLlc3 Ac5, which has been discussed
earlier (Chapter 1 3, B l ) . Here we will
consider the examples where White
avoids the transposition into this vari
ation, i.e. he does not play 6 tLlc3 .
In both variations White, with a
pawn sacrifice, achieves a consider
able advantage in development. How
ever, he needs to show a skilful

132 Van"ous Devia lions on White 's Fifth Move

inventiveness to maintain that advan


tage. Black, being a pawn up, still has
a sound pawn structure and White's
lead in development can easily dis
appear.
Cl :

1Jxb2
5
The most challenging and consist
ent continuation.
6
d2 (D)

a6
6
Black has to cover the b5 square.
6 c6? is a direct mistake, as
shown by the game Fontaine-Giffard.,
France 1 997, where after 7 'bb5 'i!Ve5
8 f4 'ifbS 9 lbc4 'Llf6 1 0 Gbcd6+
..1xd6 1 1 Gbxd6+ f8 12 e5 'bd5 1 3
c5 g8 1 4 h5 g6 1 5 'iVh6 c7
1 6 'be4 White won the game.
7 ..t.d3
7 c4? doesn't work because of
7 . . . Wc3+, while after 7 c3 Black
plays 7 ... Gbc6 and one can't see a
forcing variation for White to exploit
the queen's position on b2.
1fc3
7

8 0-0
For the sacrificed pawn, White has
an advantage in development.
We see that practical experience
with 5 ... 'i!t'xb2 is very limited. More
examples and a detailed analysis are
of essential importance for the assess
ment of the continuation 5 e3.
C2:
5
..t.c5 (D)
In practice this position can also
arise from the move order that is char
acteristic of the Basman Variation: 1
e4 c5 2 Gbf3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Gbxd4
c5 5 e3 'iVb6.
Black's problem here is that White
does not have to go on with 6 lbc3,
which was analysed earlier on page
1 12, as he has the strong 6 c3 ! which
enables him to carry out the manoeu
vre 'bd2-c4.

...

6 c3!
Another possibility, 6 a3, also
should not be underestimated, e.g.
6 ... d5 7 c3 when:
a) 7 e5 (An ambitious continua...

Various Deviations on White 's Fifth Move 133

tion) 8 b5+ .id7 (8 ... f8) 9 ltJf5


when:
a I ) Both 9 . Axb5 I 0 xc5
"ir'xc5 I I ltJxb5 "ixb5? I 2 ltJd6+ +
and 9 . Axe3 I O ltJxe3 dxe4 ( 1 0 . . .
.!.xb5? 1 1 ltJxd5) 1 1 ltJac4 and I 2
ltJd5 are bad for Black.
a2) 9 /(lf6 I 0 ..i.xc5 "i!Vxc5 I I
exd5 0-0 1 2 .ixd7 ltJ bxd7 1 3 0-0 b5
I 4 ltJc2 (The simple I 4 't!!Vd2, with
the idea I 5 l:tad i , offered better
chances for White. ) 14 ...g6 I 5 ltJfe3
ltJb6 I6 'ire2 ltJfxd5 1 7 ltJxd5 "ifxd5
with an equal position, Brenjo
Nestorovic, Jagodina 1 998.
b) Also interesting i s the sharp
7 ... 1lxb2 8 ltJ ab5 ltJa6 while i f
Black wants a calmer game, h e has
7 . Ad7! ?.
Now we return to the main line
with 6 c3 (D). Here White has a
strong initiative for the sacrificed
pawn.
. .

...

..

Not 6...ffxb2? 7 ltJd2 .


7 /(ld2
7 b4!? also comes into consideration.
7
/(lxd4
7 .....i.xd4?! is a weaker alterna
tive: 8 J.xd4 (8 ltJc4? .ixe3 9 ltJxb6
.ixb6) 8 ... ltJxd4 9 ltJc4 'Wc5 I O b4
"ic7 (Or 1 0 . .. "ig5 1 1 1!Vxd4 ltJf6 1 2
h 4 "iff4 1 3 ltJd6+ q;e7 1 4 l:t d 1
Geenen-Uhoda, corr. 1 990) 1 I t!Vxd4
f6 1 2 ltJd6+ 'i;e7 1 3 l:d1 ltJh6 1 4
f4 Jakic-Sale, Zadar 1 996.
8 /(lc4
1rc6
9 Jtxd4!
1rxe4+
Basman' s suggestion 9 ./(lf6 1 0
...ix c5 'i!Vxc5 1 1 ltJd6+ q;e7 should
be checked in practice.
10
Jte2
a) 10 Jtf8 1 I 0-0 ltJf6 ( 1 1 . . .
"ic6 1 2 b4 ! a6 1 3 a4 Geenen) 1 2
.!. f3 ( 1 2 ...i d3 ! ) 1 2 . . . 'Wf5 1 3 .l:.e1
d5 ? ( 1 3 .. . ...i e 7) 14 ltJe3 'i g6 I 5
ltJxd5 ltJxd5 1 6 .ixd5 Bradbury
Johnstone, London 1 979.
b) 1 0 ... Jte7 (More natural) 1 I
o-o ( 1 1 't!Va4 b5 ! ) I l . ..ltJf6 I 2 ..to
'if5 I 3 fl e 1 0-0 14 l:te5 'Wg6 1 5
h4 h6 1 6 h 5 "ih7 1 7 :la5 with com
pensation for the sacrificed pawn,
Rogulj-Sale, Pula 1 998.
..

...

D:

White threatens b2-b4, so Black


will be forced to commit himself in
the centre, which favours White.
6
/(lc6

5 /(lb5
A rather uninvestigated continua
tion that deserves attention..
5
Jlc5
The strongest. 5 ...a6 6 ...i e 3 is fa
vourable for White. Black has weak
ened the d6-square so he doesn't have

134 Various Deviations on White 's Fifth Move

the option of playing the solid .. .'it'd8


as in the variation with 2 .. . llJc6.
After 6 ... 'ifa5+ (Weak is 6... c5?
7 il.xc5 'ifxc5 8 'it'd6 'lfxc2 9 llJc7+
d8 1 0 llJxa8 'Vel + 1 1 'it'd1 Wc6
1 2 llJc3 b5 1 3 'ifd4 llJe7 14 llJb6
..ib7 1 5 a4 1 -0, Yemelin-Kiik, St.
Petersburg 1 997) 7 llJ 5c3 llJc6 8
llJd2 b5 9 a4 we have a transposition
into a form of the 2 ... llJc6 variation
that is favourable for White.
a6
6 'Rf3
/t)c6 (D)
7 /t)5c3
The diagram position was played
in two games. White's manoeuvre,
transferring the queen to the kingside,
is useful. He achieves a minimal ad
vantage, but it is not something that
Black should be particularly worried
about.
a) 8 'f!fg3 l:i:Jge7 9 Ad3 (9 llJd2!?)
9 ... 0-0 10 0-0 ( 1 0 l:i:Jd2 ! ? ;t Kruppa)
1 o ... 'lfd8 1 1 l:i:Jd2 l:i:Jg6 1 2 llJb3 il.e7

1 3 a4 d5 14 f4 dxe4 1 5 il.xe4 llJb4=


Dutreeuw-Christiansen, Antwerp
1 993.
b) 8 _ad3 l:i:Jf6 9 0-0 'it'c7 (9 ... 0-0
10 l:i:Ja4 ! ) 10 il.f4 d6 ( 1 0 ... il.d6 1 1
il.xd6 'ifxd6 1 2 l:i:Jd2 'lfc7 1 3 l:tae 1
0-0 1 4 ._,h3 Kruppa-Mochalov,
Minsk 1 993) 1 1 l:i:Jd2 l:i:Je5 12 'iVe2
b5 1 3 a4 b4 14 l:i:Jd1 J.b7 1 5 l:i:Je3
0-0 16 llJec4 l:i:J fd7 with an equal
game (Kutuzov i c - S al e, Tucepi
1 996).

G uide To Transpositions,
ECO and N I C codes
This short section o f the book
shows how the author's analytical
structure of the early Sicilian . 'it'b6
variations relates to the well-known
opening codes used in Infonnatorand
the Encyclopaedia ofChess Opemngs
(ECO). Also, for those who are used
to the New In Chess (NIC) classifi
cation system, the keys for the corre
sponding variations are given in
parallel, referring to the version
NICKey 4.2.
The main purpose of this brief
guide is to orient readers with respect
to the early move orders that typi
cally lead to the systems discussed
in this book. Many other later trans
positions and analogous positions are
discussed in the main part of the text.
The author advises Black to em
ploy the move order 1 e4 c5 2 llJf3
/Qc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 lLlxd4 b6 (TJ)
..

T2
B

This position is classified as B32/3


(p202 in ECO, Jrd edition) and SI
32.01.13 (MCKey 4.2). The sub-vari
ations covered are 5 lLlb5 and 5 lLlxc6
(Chapter 1 2 in the present work), and
5 lLlb3 lLlf6 6 .i.d3 (Chapter 1 1 ).
However, S /Qb3 /Qf6 6 /QcJ (T2)
is the main line, transposing to lines
considered in ECO under B33 (MC
S/-34. 01).
Prior to this book, opening litera
ture has tended to treat the . 1Wb6sys
tem as an option for Black at move
five, the most important move order
being 1 e4 c5 2 llJf3 /Qc6 3 d4 cxd4 4
lLlxd4 /Qf6 5 /t)c3 b6 (T3), which
is also the sequence treated as the main
line in BTS3 (Chapter 1 4).
This line is classified as B33. The
move 6 lLlb3 in this position (see
Diagram T2) is dealt with in ECO 3
on p.208, lines 1 -4.
..

T1
w

136 Guide To Transpositions andECO codes

However, this move order with


5 . . . 1Wb6 is inadvisable, which both
ECO and BTS3 fail to explain ad
equately. The reason is White's re
ply 6 Ae3!, creating a problem which
Black avoids if he plays 4 ... 'tWb6.
(Here 6 db5, will usually transpose
to our Chapter 12, line B.)
In the position after 6 e3 Black's
options are very limited. It is prob
ably best for him to play 6...g4 and
simplify quickly into an endgame the
exchange down. The game Vitolinsh
Akopian, Daugavpils 1 989, showed
that after 7 lZJd5 tt:Jxe3 8 lZJxb6
lZJxd1 lJ lZJxa8 lZJxb2 10 c7+ Wd8
1 1 lZJcb5 lZJxd4 12 lZJxd4 lZJa4 1 3
b5 lZJc5 1 4 f3 e6 1 5 a4 g6 1 6 lZJb3
a6 1 7 d3 b6 18 e2 c7, Black,
by controlling the dark squares, re
tains the balance without problems.
Even if this variation is playable for
Black - and the possibility 10 xc6
dxc6 1 1 a4 g6 12 c3 ! JJ..g 7 1 3 Wd2
0-0 deserves a serious check - as a
rule, players who decide to play
. . . 't!!Vb6 strive for a complex battle,
not an endgame witb a material dis
advantage.

Let us also mention that the con


tinuation 6 ... a6 which ECO mentions
as an improvement after 5 ... 't!!Vb6 6
JJ..e 3 is out of the question because
of 7 lZJxc6 'irxc6 8 e5! . Also, taking
the pawn on b2 is the least favour
able option for Black. In Danker
Stock, Germany 1994, there followed
6... 1lxb2 7 lZJdb5 't!!Vb4 8 l:!.b1 'it'a5
9 'ilt'd2 a6? 1 0 b6 lZJxe4 1 1 lZJc7+
d8 1 2 lZJxa8+ 'ii'xb6 1 3 lZJxb6 and
White won.
Returning to Diagram T2, Black
invariably chooses 6...e6, bringing
about D iagram T4 (B33 and SI
32. 01.14), which is the dividing point
for Parts I and 2, and Chapter I 0 of
Part 3. This position can also be
reached via I e4 c5 2 lZJD e6 3 d4
cxd4 4 lZJxd4 1rb6 5 c3 c6 6
b3 f6.

The lines considered in Chapter 5


are mostly classified as B60 (SI
32. 01.15), the Rauzer Variation, since
transposition is normally achieved
once Black has played both . . . a6 and
.. . d6. Thus the position reached after
I e4 c5 2 lZJf3 lZJc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 lZJxd4
'tWb6 5 lZJb3 lZJf6 6 lZJc3 e6 7 iJ.. d3

Guide To Transpositions and ECO codes

T5
w

a6 8 0-0 j.,e7 9 .tg5 d6 1 0 h 1 0-0


(T5) is classified as B60/5 because it
would normally arise via a Rauzer
move order: 1 e4 c5 2 ctJf3 d6 3 d4
cxd4 4 'Llxd4 'Llf6 5 'Llc3 'Llc6 6
.tg5 'ilr'b6 7 'Llb3 e6 8 .td3 .te7 9
0-0 0-0 (or immediately 9 .. . a6) I O
h 1 a6.
Here ECO is unhelpful as it fails
to indicate transpositions from B33
to B60, giving two examples of a cer
tain position under the latter heading
and another under the former!
It should also be noted that with
the Rauzer move order, White has
alternatives at moves 7 and 8, some
of which fall outside the scope of this
book. However, the line 8 j_f4 (in
stead of 8 .td3 in the above se
quence) is in fact covered in this
work, since it leads by a curious trans
position to Chapter 7, line B. This is
covered in ECO under code B60/4.
Part 2 of the present work covers
the line (from Diagram T4) 7 .&.e3
1tc7. The types of position that arise
if Black adopts the .. . d6 and .. . a6 for
mation are very closely allied to the
Scheveningen variation and there can

137

be actual transpositions.
The above position, for example,
is classified in ECO as B82. Possible
routes to it are many - including 1
e4 c5 2 ctJf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 'Llxd4
ctJf6 5 'Llc3 a6 6 f4 e6 7 'iWf3 'iib6 8
a3 'Llc6 9 'Llb3 .te7 I 0 .te3 'ilc7
1 1 g4 - and it is discussed in Chap
ter 8, B under 2 ctJf3 tl:lc6 3 d4 cxd4
4 'Llxd4 b6 5 'Llb3 'Llf6 6 'Llc3 e6
7 j.,e3 'f!lc7 8 a3 a6 9 f4 d6 1 0 'ii f3
iLe7 I I g4. Other lines in this book
can arise via 8 b3 in this Schev
eningen sequence (882/I 7- I 9) for
which see Chapter 9.
Many similar examples are noted
in the text, including several where
Black is a tempo down if he reaches
it via 4 . 'ifb6 because in the Sozin
(B57), for example, White loses time
and returns the tempo by playing
c4-d3.
Part Four of the book deals with
variations having a different ECO
classification. The Kveinys Variation
arising via 1 e4 c5 2 'Llf3 e6 3 d4
cxd4 4 'Llxd4 Wb6 is classified as
B40/6 (p246 in ECO J) and SI
41.04.05, where 5 b3 and various
. .

138 Guide To Transpositions and ECO codes

minor possibilities are considered in


ECOJ.
If White then plays 5 'Oc3, the re
ply 5 . Ac5 (our Chapter 1 3, line B)
is discussed at the end of ECO note
4 1 on page 249, while for 5 a6 ECO
refers its readers to B43 where they
have to hunt down note 1 on page
260. Kveinys himself, in a corre
spondence game played in 1 985,
chose 5 /0c6 6 lDb3 lDf6 (Diagram
T4) and thus transposed to the main
system discussed in Parts 1 -3 of this
book. ECO does not mention this sig
nificant option.
The main line of the Kveinys
Variation goes 5 'Ob3 Vc7 while
the main alternative 5 /0f6 is our
Chapter 1 4, A.
Here, too, the possibi l i ty of
5 /0c6 has escaped the notice of
ECO 's editors.
In that case 6 lbc3 lbf6 would
return play to Diagram T4, but there
is another possibility which arose in
games , played by the originator of
this system at a time when he was
still experimenting with it in corre
spondence play.
In the 5'h Baltic Sea Team Tour
nament ( 1 986-91 ) two games contin
ued 6 .i.e3 ec7. Now Hahn-Kveinys
transposed to Chapter Eight after 7
a3 lDf6 8 lbc3, while Maciejczak
Kveinys went 7 f4 d5 !? (the thematic
pawn offer when White plays f4 pre
maturely) 8 e5 f6 9 .i.b5 fxe5 1 0
'it'h5+ g6 1 1 'it'xe5 'it'xe5 1 2 fxe5
lbge7 1 3 lLJ 1 d2 .i.g7 and White's e.

...

...

. ..

...

pawn was beginning to look weak.


After 2 ... e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 lbxd4
.b6 5 'Ob3 .c7 the main line in
ECO, 6 c4, is dealt with in Chapter
1 4, B2. However, this critical con
tinuation is seldom seen, the most
frequent course in recent master play
being 6 'Oc3 a6 7 Ad3 b5 (D), which
is known as the Enhanced Kveinys
Variation.
The diagram position frequently
arises via the Paulsen route 1 e4 c5 2
lbf3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 lbxd4 a6 5 'Oc3
b5 6 Ad3 eb6 7 'Ob3 ..c7 but it
should be noted that in ECO (B43)
the possibility 6 ... eb6 is not men
tioned! The position receives some
coverage in B4 1 at the end of note
43 on page 249.
As for the NIC classification sys
tem dealing with the Enhanced
Kveinys Variation, it differs consid
erably depending on the move order
by which the main position is reached.
The move order with 4 'itb6 has
been marked as SI 4 1 .04.05 and the
move order from the Paulsen with the
code SI 4 1 .09. 1 3 .
. . .

Suggested Repe rtoire


for Black
Readers who intend to include this
system into their repertoire should
recognise that it is tricky to play for
both sides. The . .. ._,b6 line is suited
to practical players familiar with Si
cilian themes and for those ready both
to take risks and prepare thoroughly.
If you want to avoid complications,
this system is not for you.
A few years ago this line could be
improvised over the board, without
fear that one would enter prepared
analyses. However, times have
changed and even in this relatively
rare system it's necessary to be fa
miliar with a Jot of particular lines.
Having said all that, it is an extremely
useful surprise weapon, particularly
in open tournaments.
When deciding how to implement
the systems discussed in this book, the
reader should take into account ques
tions of taste - for example, the
choice between 2 ... e6 and 2 ... ll::lc6 as well as the theoretical state of the
actual variations to be adopted. Three
(inter-related) repertoires may be dis
tinguished, highlighting critical lines
where further analysis is advisable.
After 1 e4 c5 2 ll:lf3 ll:lc6 3 d4
cxd4 4 ll:lxd4 I recommend the move
order 4 ... ._,b6 because it avoids the
critical continuation 6 .i.e3 in the

case of 4 ... ll:lf6 5 ll:lc3 'ti'b6, as ex


plained on page 1 36. Matters are far
more favourable for Black in the vari
ation 4 .. 'Wb6 5 .i.e3 ._,xb2 (Chap
ter 1 2, line A).
After 4 b6 5 ll:lb3 ll::lf6 6 ll:lc3
e6 (D) Black must be prepared for
two main continuations from the dia
gram: 7 e3 and 7 d3 .
.

...

The early pin by Ab4


A solid system for Black, when
White allows it, is the pin by ... b4
as seen in the twin variations 7 .i.e3
Wic7 8 f4 b4 (Chapter 7), which in
case of the usual 9 .i.d3 can arise by
transposition from Chapter 6, and 7
e3 ._,c7 8 .i.d3 .i.b4 (Chapter 9,
note b to Black's 8lh move) which can
transpose to a relatively non-critical
line in Chapter 6. The line recom
mended for White in BTSJ can be
...

140 Suggested Repertoire for Black

improved on for Black, as shown in


Chapter 7, line A - in particular,
Istratescu-Atalik should be studied.
Playing 8 .. ii.b4 in these lines, after
the early ii.e3, has the advantage that
it stops White's dangerous plan of
castling long and playing g4 which
seems to give White the advantage.
White can prevent the pin by
means of 7 ii.e3 'fllc7 8 3.3 (Chapter
8) or the immediate 7 a3 (Chapter 1 0,
D). In the former case, Black has lit
tle to fear because if White plays the
main line of Part 1 (with 0-0) then
a2-a3 slows up his attack, usually
giving Black the tempo required to
advance ... b5 without fearing e4-e5
in reply. Moreover, the a-pawn ad
vance does not fit in at all well with
plans based on 0-0-0, as it makes it
easier for Black to open lines against
the white king. In the case of 7 a3,
by playing 7 .. ."'1c7 or 7 ... d6 Black
reaches viable lines of the Schev
eningen or Paulsen variations.
It is hard to recommend 7 ... .i.b4
immediately against 7 ii.d3 (Chap
ter 6) since White has not yet com
mitted his dark-squared bishop. Still,
in this variation too White can easily
go astray. If he doesn't manage to
seriously endanger the Black king at
an early stage, in a long-term battle
his positional weaknesses on the
queenside become obvious.
Black should note the sequence 7
ii.d3 a6 8 ii.e3 Wic7 9 f4 .i.b4 trans
posing to Arencibia-Anastasian, Lu
cerne 1 993, in Chapter 7 (second note
to Black's 9th in main line A). White

can avoid this by 8 0-0 but then Black


has achieved his first objective of
ruling out White's 0-0-0 option.

Scheveningen-style with ... Ae7


If Black prefers the lines where
his dark-squared bishop goes to e7,
White ' s attacking plan with 0-0-0
should be avoided ifpossible. If by 7
e3 f!lc7 8 Ad3 or 8 f4, White sig
nals his intention to play that way,
the most accurate move is 8... a6 9 f4
Ab4 as indicated above. However,
after 7 Ad3 a6 8 0-0 Black must be
prepared for the main system dis
cussed in Part One, Chapters 1 -5.
Generally speaking, the lines with
a4 (Chapter 1 ), as Akopian has
shown, are not bad for Black although
there is one game where White com
bined a4 with g4 (Kolker-Nadanian,
page 30) that requires home analysis
to find an improvement, which should
be sought by analogy with Akopian's
treatment of other a4 lines.
The system with Ad2 is more
dangerous for Black if White avoids
the move a2-a3 (which would make
it easier to obtain counterplay on the
queenside ). The attacking plan of
'i!ff3-h3 and l:tae l obliges Black to
tread a narrow path and above all to
avoid superficial play. The very simi
lar White plan with Ag5 instead of
ii.d2 (which can also arise via the
Rauzer Variation) is sharper but, once
more, with accurate play down the
main lines a satisfactory position can
be reached.
In Chapter 4, the line B2 (high-

Suggested Repertoire for Black 141

lighted by ECO) is somewhat favour


able for White according to current
theory, in particular Matulovic
Martinovic, but the positions arising
are sufficiently complex for improve
ments to be available, giving plenty
of scope to outplay opponents in the
middlegame. Much the same is true
of the lines in Chapter 5.
In the classical attack with e3
(Chapters 2-3), it is apparent that af
ter 12 :ael the once-favoured reply
1 2 b5 is dubious. Generally speak
ing, the ... b5, ... Ab7 plan is only vi
able in analogous positions arising by
transposition from the Sozin Varia
tion where Black has an extra tempo.
Equally, . .. l:tb8 is not good for Black
unless White has already played a2a3, as it just represents a loss of tempo
if White goes for the g2-g4 plan.
The flexible 12 .. lCid7! looks the
best reply to 1 2 l:he 1 . Then Black
can transpose to viable lines whether
or not White continues g2-g4. White
may also show his hand directly with
12 g4 when after 1 2 . . . b5 a worrying
line for Black is Knezevic's idea of
1 3 'ih3 !? in Chapter 3, A2 (note to
White's 1 5'h move). Nevertheless, a
remedy based on ... CUd7 is available
which has the merit that Black may
be able to adopt a consistent scheme
of defence against both forms of the
classical attack.
On that basis, he can approach his
task with some confidence, despite
the variety and complexity of the
positions that can arise.
If Black prefers not to use the
...

... .i.b4 option, then he must direct


his home preparation chiefly to
White' s often-played attacking plan
with 0-0-0, as seen in Chapter 9, line
C (though lines A and B are also criti
cal). The little-known 1 3 ... 'Ub6 (line
C2) shows that there is still life for
Black in this variation.
However, it is advisable for play
ers who are learning the ... '1Wb6 sys
tem to avoid the variations in Chapter
9 until they become familiar with its
nuances.
Line with 2 e6
With 2 e6 and 4 'ffb 6 Black
usually aims to transpose, via 5 lCib3
'ff c7, to the fashionable Enhanced
Kveinys Variation (Chapter 1 5)
which has stood up well to high-level
competition in 1 996-8.
White's other principal reply, 5
fCic3, usually leads after 5 fCic6 to
main lines of the 2 ... 'Uc6, 4 ... 'il!Yb6
system. However, 5 ... c5 (Chapter
1 3, line B 1 ) is definitely worthy of
more study.
An important option for White af
ter 4 . .. 'ltb6 5 liJb3 e6 is 6 c4 (Chap
ter 14, B2) where Nunn-J.Polgar, and
accompanying analysis, suggests that
Black will have to switch to a Hedge
hog fomation which is largely out
side the scope of this book.
Finally, Black, by starting with
2 ... e6, can successfully transpose into
the 2 . . . 'Uc6 system by playing ... 'Uc6
at an appropriate moment - for ex
ample, when White commits himself
with 'ife2 and/or .i..e 3.
...

...

...

..

I ndex of Variations
Main System (Parts 1-3):
1 e4 c5 2 f3 c6 3 d4 cxd4 4
xd4 1Jb6
5

b3

Part Three:
Chapter 1 2. Deviations on White's
Fifth Move
103
103
A: 5 Ji.e3 (5 l2Jxc6)
B: 5 l2Jb5 104
B l : 5 . .a6 6 Ji.e3
104
104
B 1 1 : 6 . . 11fa5+
B 1 2: 6 ... 11fd8
105
B2: 5 ... l2Jf6 (6 lLl 1 c3)
106
f6
5
6 c3

For 7 d3, See be/ow (Part 1).


For 7 e3, See below (Part 2).

Chapter 10. White's Alternatives at


Move 7 90
A: 7 g3 (7 ... .tb4 8 .tg2 d5 9 0-0
.txc3)

9 a3) 92
94
95

Chapter 11. Deviations on White's


Sixth Move
lOO
6 Ji.d3
100
A: 6 ... e6
100
B: 6. . . d5
101

e6 (D)

90

A 1 : 1 0 bxc3
92
A2: 1 0 exd5
92
B: 7 "ti'e2 (7 . . . .tb4 8 Ad2 0-0
B 1 : 9 ... .te7
B2: 9 ... Axc3
C: 7 .tg5 96
D: 7 a3 97

Part One:
7 Jld3

a6

7 . . . .i..e 7 (7 . . . d5, 7 ... d6) 10


Chapter 6. 7 . . . Ab4 (8 0-0 Ji.xc3 9
bxc3 0-0 1 0 Ag5 l2Je8) 60

A: 1 1 "ti'h5 63
B: 1 1 e5
64
8 0-0
8 Ae3 1!t'c7 see Part Two.
8
Jle7
8 . . . 1!Vc7 (8 ... d6)

9
9 a4

11

.*.e3
12

Chapter 4.
44
9 h l d6 1 0 f4 "ti'c7
1 1 Ad2 o-o

44

A: 1 2 1We2 45
B: 1 2 "ti'f3 b5 46

Index of Van"ations 143

B l : 1 3 a3 b7 47
B l l : 1 4 l:lae1 47
B 1 2: 1 4 'it'h3 48
B2: 1 3 l:.ael
50
B21 : 1 3 . . . b7
B22: 1 3 . .. b4 52

50

Chapter 5.
53
9 g5 d6
1 0 'it'e2 53
1 0 a4
54
A: 1 0 'ifi>h l 0-0 55
B: 1 0 'ifi>h l Wc7 56
1Wc7
9
d6
10
f4
11
en
Others: 1 7, 30
0-0
11
12
Aael
12 a4 (by transposition) 15
1 2 a3 without g4 19
with g4
31
Chapter 2. 17
1 2 ttJd4 19
1 2 'ifi>h l 20
Chapter 3. 30
31
1 2 g4
A l : 1 2. . . '2Jb4 32
A2: 1 2 .. . b5
( 1 3 g5 ttJd7 14 'it'h5) 32
A21 : 1 4 .. . l:teS
34
A22: 1 4 ... g6 35
37
A23 : 1 4 . .. '2Jb4
b5?! (D)
12
1 2 . . . '2Jd7
22
C l : 1 2 . . . l:lb8 23
C2: 1 2 . . . '2Jb4 23
13 g4
Others, Chapter 2 25-28
13
Jlb7

1 3 .. . ttJd7 42
14 g5
15
1Wh5
B l : 1 5 .. . '2Jb4 41
B2: 1 5 .. . l:lfe8 42
Part Two:
7
Jle3
Chapter 7.
66
8 f4
A: 8 . .. b4 66
B: 8 . . d6 69

d7

flc7 (D)

Chapter 8.
8 a3 a6 9 f4 d6
A: 1 0 g4 71
72
B: I 0 '@'f3
C: 1 0 e2
72
D: 1 0 d3
74

71

Chapter 9.
White Castles Queenside
8 d3 a6 9 f4 d6 75
A: 1 0 g4 75
B : 1 0 'We2 76
C: 1 0 '1Wf3 ( 1 0 .. . e7 1 1 g4 b5
1 2 g5 ttJd7 1 3 0-0-0) 82
C l : 1 3 . . . '2Jb4 85
C2: 1 3 .. . '2Jb6 88

144 Index of Variations

Part Four:
Kveinys Variation
1 e4 c5 2 lQn e6 3 d4 cxd4 4
lQxd4 Wb6

B: 5 lba3 131
C: 5 e3 131
C l : 5 . . . xb2 132
C2: 5 . . . c5
132
D: 5 lt::l b5
133
5
flc7
5 ... lt::l f6 118
5 ... a6
119
6 lQc3
6 g3
119
6 c4
120
6 d3 121
6
a6
7 Ad3
b5 (D)
7 . . . lt::l f6 122
...

...

lQb3

Chapter 13.
White Plays 5 lQc3 108
A: 5 ... lt::l f6 6 e5 c5 7 e3 lt::l d5 8
lt::lxd5 exd5 109
A l : 9 lt::l f5 110
A2: 9 .i.e2 111
B: 5 ... c5
112
B l : 6 Ae3 lt::l c6
112
B 1 1 : 7 lt::l db5 112
B l 2: 7 l2Jcb5 113
B l 3 : 7 l2Ja4 114
B2: 6 lt::la4 115
Chapter 16:
Various Deviations after
2 ...e6, 4...tlb6
130
A: 5 c3 130

{OR 1 e4 c5 2 lQf3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4


lQxd4 a6 5 lQc3 b5 6 Ad3 1Vb6 7
lQb3 (Others: 124) 1 'Y!Ic1}
...

Chapter 15. Enhanced Kveinys


Variation 124
8 e3
125
126
8 f4
127
8 0-0