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FIRST ZEAL INTERNAL MOOT COURT COMPETITION

16th October, 2016


Team no:- ZL55

Before
The Honble Supreme Court of India, Delhi

Appeal Filed Under


Article 132 &
134 of
The Constitution of India, 1950

Criminal Appeal No.

/ 2016

[Under Section 326A r/w Section 34, Section 354D, Section 366 of
Indian Penal Code, 1860]
[Under Section 357A of The Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973]

In the Matter of
The state ..Appellant
Vs.
Mr. Ramesh...Respondent
Memorial on Behalf of the Appellant

Most Respectfully Submitted to the Honorable Chief Justice of India &


Other Companion Judges of

MEMORIAL ON BEHALF OF THE APPELLANT

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The Honorable Supreme Court of India

Table of Contents
Abbreviations
...3
Index
of
authorities
..4
Statement
of
jurisdiction
..5
Statements
of
facts
..6
Issues
raised

...8
Summary
of
arguments
.9
Arguments
advanced
...11
Issue 1:- Whether common intention was present when Ramesh
and Mahesh
agreed to use acid. Whether acid thrown on Nimisha was in
furtherance of the
common
intention?
.. 11

Issue 2:- Whether the actions of Ramesh were fit for awarding of
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life
imprisonment under Sec 326Ar/w Sec.34 IPC and Sec 354D IPC.?
.

Issue 3:- Whether the compensation awarded by the Sessions


Court
to the victim under Sec 326A IPC in addition to compensation to be
paid
by the State Government under Sec 357A CrPC should be
enhanced?

Issue 4:- Whether permission should be given to add the


charge
under
Sec

366

IPC.?

Prayer
.

Abbreviations

Honble:- Honorable
Sec:- Section
IPC:- Indian Procedure Code
Rs.:- Indian rupees[(INR) Indian currency]
Vs.:- Versus
r/w:- read with.
CrPC:- The Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973
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A.I.R:- All India Report


SC:- Supreme Court
SCC:- Supreme Court Cases
e.g. :- Exempli Gratia (For Example)
Art. :- Article
Vol. :- Volume
Edn. :- Edition

Index of Authorities
Index of Laws:I. Acts/Statutes
Indian Penal Code, 1860
Section 326A r/w Section 34
Section 354D
Section 366
The Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973
Section 357A
The Constitution of India

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Evidence Act

II. Books
1. Ratanlal & Dhirajlals The Indian Penal Code 33rd Edition Reprint 2012
2. Ratanlal & Dhirajlals Law of Crimes, A commentary on The Indian Penal
Code, 1860 26th edition.
3. Criminal Procedure- R.V.

Kelkars Criminal Procedure by Dr.

C.N.

Chandrasekharan Pilai.
4. Text book on Indian Penal Code by Krishna Deo Gaur, Fourth Edition.
BI. Internet Sources
1. http://www.findlaw.com
2. http://www.indiankanoon.com
3. http://www.indlawinfo.org/
4.

http://www.jstor.org.

5. http://www.judis.nic.in
6.

http://www.lawsofindia.org

7. http://www.manupatra.com
8. http://www.scconline.com
IV. Case Laws and Citations

1. R. v. Mohan [1994] 2 S.C.R. 9


2. Bengai Mandal vs. State of Bihar,[ para. 18]
3. Rajesh Govind Jagesha v. State of Maharashtra, 2000 Cri LJ 380: (AIR 2000 SC 160)
4. Ram Chander Mandal Vs.State, 1997IAD(Delhi)1, 1996(39)DRJ363
5. State of Karnataka v Joseph Rodrigues, , Criminal Appeal Nos. 1065, 1066 and 1239/2004
6. Mahesh v. State of M.P, MANU/SC/0246/1987 : (1987) 3 SCC 80
7. Jashubha Bharatsinha v state of Gujarat, 7MANU/SC/1561/1994 : (1994) SCC 353

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8. Ravji v. state of Rajasthan, MANU/SC/0215/1996 : (1996) 2 SCC 175


9. Laxmi Vs. Union Of India & others 2013 (9)
10. Khalil-Ur-Rahman, (1933) 11Rang. 213,
11. Moniram Hazarika v State of Assam, (2004) 5 SCC 120; 2004 Cr LJ 2553.
12. Rajinder v state of Maharashtra (2002) 7 SCC 721.
13. (1953-54) 6 SauLR 329(333)(DB).

Statement of Jurisdiction
The appellant has approached the Hon'ble Supreme Court of India under Article 132 and Article
134 of The Constitution of India, 1950. The case is listed for arguments before the Division
Bench of the Hon'ble Supreme Court.
Article 132 of The Constitution of India, 1950 reads as hereunder:
Article 132: Appellate jurisdiction of Supreme Court in appeals from High Courts in certain
cases (1) An appeal shall lie to the Supreme Court from any judgment, decree or final order of a
High Court in the territory of India, whether in a civil, criminal or other proceeding, if the High
Court certifies under Article 134A that the case involves a substantial question of law as to the
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interpretation of this Constitution


(2) Omitted
Where such a certificate is given, any party in the case may appeal to the Supreme Court on the
ground that any such question as aforesaid has been wrongly decided Explanation For the
purposes of this article, the expression final order includes an order declaring an issue which, if
decided in favor of the appellant, would be sufficient for the final disposal of the case
Article 134 of The Constitution of India, 1950 reads as hereunder:
Article 134: Appellate jurisdiction of Supreme Court in regard to criminal matters
(1) An appeal shall lie to the Supreme Court from any judgment, final order or sentence in a criminal
proceeding of a High Court in the territory of India if the High Court has on appeal reversed an
order of acquittal of an accused person and sentenced him to death; or has withdrawn for trial
before itself any case from any court subordinate to its authority and has in such trial convicted the
accused person and sentenced him to death; or
(c) Certifies under Article 134A that the case is a fit one for appeal to the Supreme Court: Provided
that an appeal under sub clause (c) shall lie subject to such provisions as may be made in that behalf
under clause ( 1 ) of Article 145 and to such conditions as the High Court may establish or require
(2) Parliament may by law confer on the Supreme Court any further powers to entertain and hear
appeals from any judgment, final order or sentence in a criminal proceeding of a High Court in the
territory of India subject to such conditions and limitations as may be specified in such law.

Statement of Facts
1. Nimisha, 18, a bright and ambitious student of 12th standard belonging to a lower middle class
family used to give tuitions to support her family.
2. Ramesh, accused number 1 (respondent) is a math teacher at Nimisha's school.
3. On Nimisha's 18th birthday Ramesh organized a birthday party for her at his house and gifted
her an expensive watch.
4. On 14th February 2015, Ramesh proposed marriage to Nimisha, Nimisha asked him to speak to
her parents about the proposal, Ramesh approached her parents with the proposal which was
rejected by them. Ramesh was warned by Nimisha's parents to stay away from their daughter.
Nimisha's parents also warned Nimisha and threatened to discontinue her studies. Thereafter
Nimisha maintained her distance from Ramesh and made her intentions to adhere to her parents'
orders strictly.
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5. Despite resistance, Ramesh continued to contact Nimisha personally, through phone and
internet, as well as follow her to her tuition class.
6. Nimisha reported Ramesh's behavior to her parents, they rebuked Ramesh for his acts despite
their warning and disinterest. Nimisha's parents beat Ramesh and ordered him to leave.
7. Ramesh enraged with Nimisha's parents decision and actions went to Mahesh, 45, and narrated
the entire sequence of events. Mahesh was Ramesh's confidante and a fatherly figure.
8. Mahesh suggested that Ramesh should force Nimisha to marry him without informing her
parents, he further suggested that Ramesh should carry a bottle of acid to threaten Nimisha with
in case she resists the marriage.
9. After initial hesitation, Ramesh agrees to do as Mahesh suggested.
10. On 23rd March 2013 as planned Ramesh and Mahesh found Nimisha on a lonely road and
ordered her to accompany them to the temple so that Ramesh can marry her. Nimisha refused, on
her refusal, Mahesh threatened her with the bottle of acid while Ramesh started dragging her into
the car. Nimisha shouted in resistance on her shouting, Mahesh opened the bottle of acid and
threw it on her face.
11. Ramesh and Mahesh both fled the scene of crime.
12. Nimisha was left behind in immense pain.
13. Nimisha was taken to the hospital by a passerby, where she underwent surgeries and
treatment for grievous injuries and burns.
14. Nimisha's statement was recorded and a FIR was lodged against both the accused under Sec
326A r/w Sec 34 IPC, 1860 and Ramesh was also charged under Sec 354D, IPC, 1860.
15. Mahesh absconded and was declared a proclaimed offender while Ramesh was arrested by police
from his home and the bottle of acid and car, used in the crime, were seized from his possession.
16. Ramesh was put to trial before the sessions court where he pleaded not guilty, Sessions Court
convicted Ramesh under Sec. 326A r/w Sec. 34 IPC, 1860 and sentenced him to 10 years of
rigorous imprisonment. He was also asked to pay compensation of Rupees two lacs to Nimisha.
He was also awarded rigorous imprisonment for 2 years under Section 354D, IPC. Both the
sentences were to run concurrently.
17. Ramesh filed an appeal in the High Court seeking acquittal, state filed an appeal seeking life
imprisonment and enhanced compensation.
18. The High Court adjudicated in Ramesh's favor, the court acquitted him from the charges under
Sec.326A r/w Sec. 34, IPC, and Sec 354D IPC, 1860 and dismissed the appeal of the State, being
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bereft of any substance. It held that under the circumstances of the case the Sessions Court had
wrongly held the accused liable under Sec. 326A, IPC, by invoking Section 34 IPC, 1860 as no
common intention to commit the offense of acid attack under Sec.326A could be proved. The
High Court also held that the offense of stalking under Sec. 354D was not made out against the
accused. The High Court, however, recommended the State Legal Services Authority to decide
upon the quantum of compensation to be awarded by the State Government to the victim as per
Sec. 357A, CrPC within one month.
19. Aggrieved by the said judgment of the High Court, the State filed an appeal before the Supreme
Court on the ground that High Court has failed to take notice of the fact that common intention
was present as Ramesh and Mahesh agreed to the use of bottle of acid in their plan of abduction.
Acid was thrown in furtherance of that common intention.
20. The State appealed for considering the offense as heinous and to award life imprisonment under
Sec 326Ar/w Sec.34 IPC and Section 354D IPC and also to enhance the compensation awarded
by the Sessions Court, to Rupees three lac fifty thousand, to be paid by the accused to the victim
under Sec. 326A, IPC, 1860, in addition to the compensation to be paid by the State Government
under Sec 357A CrPC. The State also sought permission for addition of charge under Sec 366
IPC.

Statement of Issues
The Appellant respectfully asks the Hon'ble Supreme Court of India, the following
questions:
1.

Whether common intention was present when Ramesh and Mahesh agreed to use acid.
Whether acid thrown on Nimisha was in furtherance of the common intention.

2.

Whether the actions of Ramesh were fit for awarding of life imprisonment under
Sec 326Ar/w Sec.34 IPC and Sec 354D IPC.

3.

Whether the compensation awarded by the Sessions Court to the victim under Sec
326A IPC in addition to compensation to be paid by the State Government under Sec 357A
CrPC should be enhanced.

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4.

Whether permission should be given to add the charge under Sec 366 IPC.

Summary of Arguments
1. Common intention was present when Ramesh and Mahesh agreed to use acid and
acid thrown on Nimisha was in furtherance of the common intention.
It is humbly submitted to this court that common intention was present between Ramesh and Mahesh
from the moment Ramesh agreed to Maheshs plan of using acid to force Nimisha to marry him. As
per Sec 34 IPC any act done by several persons in furtherance of common intention makes each
person liable for that act in the same manner as if it were done by him alone. The honble HC fails to
take notice of this common intention and the actions by Ramesh which were clearly in furtherance of
this common intention.

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2. Rameshs actions were fit for awarding of life imprisonment under Sec 326A r/w Sec
34 IPC and Sec 354D IPC.
It is humbly submitted to this court that Rameshs actions in connivance with Mahesh caused
permanent damage, deformity, burns, disability and dis-figuration amounts to grievous hurt by
throwing Acid and as per Sec 326A these actions of Ramesh and Mahesh are punishable by life
imprisonment. It is also submitted that Ramesh may be convicted under Sec 354D as it is a known
fact that Ramesh had been following her, contacting her on phone and internet despite her resistance,
disinterest and warning by her parents these actions of Ramesh amount to stalking.

3. Compensation awarded by the Sessions Court to the victim under Sec 326A IPC in
addition to compensation to be paid by the State Government under Sec 357A CrPC
should be enhanced.
It is humbly submitted to this court that the compensation awarded to Nimisha by the Sessions Court
should be enhanced as per Sec 326A the compensation should be sufficient to support the medical
treatment of the victim, however the given compensation of two lacs (2,00,000/-) is not sufficient as
the expenditure occurred is over six and a half lacs (6,50,000/-) and further treatment needs to be
done which includes fifteen more surgeries. The court is requested to enhance the compensation to
three lacs and fifty thousand (3,50,000/-) along with the compensation which the state needs to pay as
per Sec 357A CrPC.

4. Permission should be given to add the charge under Sec 366 IPC.
It is humbly submitted to this court that permission may be granted to add the charge under Sec 366
IPC against Ramesh. Sec 366 IPC deals with kidnapping, abducting or inducing women to compel her
marriage. As per Sec 366 IPC Rameshs plan and actions clearly had the intention to forcefully marry
Nimisha against her will with coercion.

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Arguments Advanced
ISSUE 1
Whether the High court has failed to take notice of the fact that the common intention was
present as Ramesh & Mahesh agreed to use the bottle of acids in their plan of abduction and
acid was thrown in furtherance of that common intention.
1. It is humbly submitted to this court that common intention was present between Ramesh and Mahesh from
the moment Ramesh agreed to Maheshs plan of using acid to force Nimisha to marry him. As per Sec 34
IPC any act done by several persons in furtherance of common intention makes each person liable for
that act in the same manner as if it were done by him alone. The honble HC fails to take notice of this
common intention and the actions by Ramesh which were clearly in furtherance of this common intention.

2. Intention is defined in R. v Mohan

[1]

as "the decision to bring about a prohibited consequence..

Intention A range of words represents shades of intention in criminal laws around the world. The
mental element, or mens rea, of murder, for example, is traditionally expressed as malice
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aforethought, and the interpretations of malice, "maliciously" and "willfully" vary between pure
intention and recklessness depending on the jurisdiction in which the crime was committed and the
seriousness of the offense.

3. The 4 essential elements of an offense are:


a. Mens Rea (Intention): Mens rea refers to the crime's mental elements of the
defendant's intent. This is a necessary elementthat is, the criminal act must be voluntary or
purposeful. Mens rea is the mental intention (mental fault), or the defendant's state of mind at the
time of the offense, sometimes called the guilty mind. It stems from the ancient maxim of obscure
origin, "actus reus non facit reum nisi mens sit reas" that is translated as "the act is not guilty
unless the mind is guilty."

b. Actus Rea (Conduct): The actions or the conduct or the execution of mala fide intentions is Actus
Rea. Posession.

[1]

R. v. Mohan [1994] 2 S.C.R. 9


c. Concurrence: In general, mens rea and actus reus must occur at the same timethat is, the
criminal intent must precede or coexist with the criminal act, or in some way activate the act.
d. Cause: Causation is the "causal relationship between conduct and result". That is to say that
causation provides a means of connecting conduct with a resulting effect, typically an injury.

4. In the case in hand, all four elements of crime are present without doubt, in

furtherance of that attention must be drawn to the Common Intention aspect of this case
the test of intention for those who administer the criminal justice system is that , when
planning their actions, people may be aware of many probable and possible consequences.
Obviously, all of these consequences could be prevented through the simple expedient either of
ceasing the given activity or of taking action rather than refraining from action. So the decision
to continue with the current plan means that all the foreseen consequences are to some extent
intentional, i.e. within and not against the scope of each person's intention. In the given case,
when Mahesh suggested to Ramesh the use of Acid in order to intimate, threaten and forcefully
marry Nimisha Ramesh was fully aware of all the possible and probably consequences of using
acid of which one happened to be causing grievous hurt or even death of Nimisha. Knowing
the possible and probably consequences Ramesh agreed to Mahesh's plan this satisfied the test
of intention, which was clearly mala fide and criminal in this case.
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5. The fact that Ramesh did not resist Mahesh's plan as well as stood as a mute witness to
Mahesh's action of throwing acid on Nimisha clearly show the intention was common and
equally mala fide. It can be said with certainty that Ramesh had the intention to inflict bodily
harm on the victim otherwise Ramesh would have disagreed of use to bottle of acid and would
have not accompanied Mahesh to abduct Nimisha with the use of bottle containing acid. Since
the conduct of the accused Ramesh whose presence at the scene of the occurrence stands proven
beyond doubt, at the time when Mahesh was throwing acid gives sufficient proof that both
shared common intention and further Ramesh simply watched to the accused Mahesh throwing
acid on Nimisha neither tried to intervene or save nor prevented the accused Mahesh from doing
it so it is clearly established that the accused Ramesh had intended to cause injury,
disfigurements and disabilities of the victim.

6. However keeping in mind the facts that Nimisha had turned down Rameshs marriage proposal and
further Ramesh had accompanied Mahesh who was carrying the bottle of acid to the scene of incident, it
can be said with certainty that the accused Ramesh had the intention to inflict bodily harm on the victim
otherwise accused Ramesh would have disagreed of use to bottle of acid and would have not
accompanied the accused Mahesh to abduct Nimisha with the use of acid. Since the conduct of the
accused Ramesh whose presence at the scene of the incident stands proved beyond doubt, at the time
when Mahesh was throwing acid gives sufficient indication that both shared common intention and
further Ramesh simply watched Mahesh using acid to cause hurt to Nimisha - he neither tried to intervene
or save Nimisha, neither did he stop Mahesh from doing it so it is clearly established that the accused
Ramesh had the intention to cause injury, disfigurements and disabilities of the victim. The silence on the
part of Ramesh and failure to intervene goes to show that Ramesh developed common intention with the
accused Mahesh of throwing the bottle containing acid. [2]

7. Perpetrators of the crime act cruelly and deliberately. Acid violence is a premeditated act of
violence as the perpetrator of the crime carries out the attack by first obtaining the acid, carrying
it on him and then stalking the victim before executing the act supporting this act done to be
premeditated the Hon'ble SC in Rajesh Govind Jagesha v. State of Maharashtra,[3] has held:-

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"No pre mediation or previous meeting of mind is necessary for the applicability of Section 34 of the
I.P.C. The existence of common intention can be inferred from the attending circumstances of the
case and the conduct of the parties. No direct evidence of common intention is necessary. For the
purposes of common intention even the participation in the commission of the offence need not be
proved in all cases. The common intention can develop even during the course of an occurrence.
8. These facts clearly establish that common intention on the part of both the accused and section 34. IPC
is rightly pressed into service. The togetherness of the two accused at the time at the time of the incident
and soon after the incident clearly establishes their common intention to commit the crime. A question
arises that if there was no common intention why did not Ramesh tried to prevent or intervene and why
did he run away along with Mahesh leaving Nimisha in immense pain? The only answer to this question
is that there was a common intention (which happens to be essential element 1 of a crime as stated in
paragraph 3) and their actions on March 24th were in furtherance of that common intention -

[2]
[3]

Bengai Mandal vs. State of Bihar [para. 18]


2000 Cri LJ 380: (AIR 2000 SC 160)

Completing the essential element 2, 3, 4 for a crime as stated in paragraph 3 of both the accused in the
crime. Thus the appellant finds no merit in the argument that section 34, IPC cannot be invoked in the
facts of the present case so as to convict the appellant as per this case Ram Chander Mandal V. State. [4]
9. From the above circumstances it is crystal clear that they had common intention to commit such heinous
crime. Yes, the act of throwing the acid was clearly a manifestation of the plan and carrying the acid was an
essential and important action plan.

ISSUE 2
Rameshs actions were fit for awarding of life imprisonment under Sec 326A r/w Sec 34
IPC and Sec 354D IPC.

A.

It is humbly submitted to this court that Rameshs actions in connivance with Mahesh caused
permanent damage, deformity, burns, disability and dis-figuration amounts to grievous hurt by
throwing Acid and as per Sec 326A these actions of Ramesh and Mahesh are punishable by life
imprisonment. It is also submitted that Ramesh may be convicted under Sec 354D as it is a

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known fact that Ramesh had been following her, contacting her on phone and internet despite her
resistance, disinterest and warning by her parents these actions of Ramesh amount to stalking.

B. Acid throwing is an extremely violent crime by which the perpetrator of the crime seeks to
inflict severe physical and mental suffering on his victim. This kind of violence is often
motivated by deep-seated jealousy or feelings of revenge against an innocent woman.
Perpetrators of the crime act cruelly and deliberately. The act of using bottle of acid was a
premeditated act of violence as the perpetrator of the crime carries out the attack by first
obtaining the acid, then carrying it on him and then stalking the victim before executing the
act.

[4]

1997IAD(Delhi)1, 1996(39)DRJ363

C. As elaborated upon in Argument 1, paragraph 4 Ramesh did not do anything to prevent


Mahesh from throwing the acid, he stood there watching it while Nimisha suffered.
Further so he was the one who drove Mahesh to Nimisha, abducted Nimisha, dragged
her and also fled along with Mahesh. The fact that Ramesh had no sense of remorse or
resentment clearly shows his mala fide intentions and equal participation in throwing of
acid on Nimisha.
D. As per section 34 IPC each of such persons is liable for that act in same manner as if it
were by him alone, this section clearly holds Ramesh liable for the act of throwing acid
on Nimisha as argued in argument 1 paragraph 1-7 there was clear common intention
between Mahesh and Ramesh, which makes Ramesh equally liable.
E. Sec 326 IPC deals with offenses in which grievous hurt is caused voluntarily by
dangerous weapons or means, in the given cases sub section A will apply as that specifies
Acid as the means for causing damage, dis-figuration or disability. Sec 326A states that :
'326A. Whoever causes permanent or partial damage or deformity to, or burns or maims or

disfigures or disables, any part or parts of the body of a person or causes grievous hurt by throwing
acid on or by administering acid to that person, or by using any other means with the intention of

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causing or with the knowledge that he is likely to cause such injury or hurt, shall be punished with
imprisonment of either description for a term which shall not be less than ten years but which may
extend to imprisonment for life, and with fine:
Provided that such fine shall be just and reasonable to meet the medical expenses of the treatment of the
victim.

F. The damage caused to Nimisha has been proven beyond doubt to be of grievous nature which
has ruined her life, career and future for her and her family. Nimisha has had to undergo 6
surgeries and 10-15 more surgeries will need to be conducted, Nimisha has lost vision in one
eye, Nimisha has permanent scars on the skin of her hands and face. Nimisha has suffered
physically, emotionally and mentally beyond repair and the suffering can is beyond measure.
G. In the given case, Ramesh clearly caused the most severe degree of damage possible and

deserves the maximum punishment in order to set precedent which will deter others from
abusing and ruing lives of women.
H. Further, Ramesh's action prior to the attack on Nimisha on March 24 th amount to
conviction under sec 354D IPC, which states that '354D. (1) Whoever follows a person and contacts, or attempts to contact such person to foster
personal interaction repeatedly, despite a clear indication of disinterest by such person, or
whoever monitors the use by a person of the internet, email or any other form of electronic
communication, or watches or spies on a person in a manner that results in a fear of violence or
serious alarm or distress in the mind of such person, or interferes with the mental peace of such
person, commits the offence of stalking:
Provided that the course of conduct will not amount to stalking if the person who pursued it
shows
(i) that it was pursued for the purpose of preventing or detecting crime and the person accused
of stalking had been entrusted with the responsibility of prevention and detection of crime by
the state; or
(ii) That it was pursued under any law or to comply with any condition or requirement imposed
by any person under any law; or
(iii)

That in the particular circumstances the pursuit of the course of conduct was
reasonable.

Whoever commits the offense of stalking shall be punished with imprisonment of either

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description for a term which shall not be less than one year but which may extend to three years,
and shall also be liable to fine.
I. Here in this case Ramesh proposed to Nimisha for marriage and Nimisha however told him to
speak to her parents. When Ramesh approached Nimishas parents with the proposal of marriage,
they rejected his offer and warned him not to contact her anymore. Thereafter, Nimisha started
avoiding Ramesh and made Ramesh clear that she wont go against her parents wishes. Despite
such disinterest shown by Nimisha and warning by her parents Ramesh started following
Nimisha to her tuition classes and even contacted her personally on the phone and through
internet. Here Ramesh tried to foster personal interaction with Nimisha against her will. Ramesh's
actions clearly fulfils the conditions of offence Stalking under Section 354D IPC. The appellant
submits this court to convict Ramesh under S354D IPC and give maximum punishment of three
years to Ramesh.

J. In similar cases where a person threw acid on someone causing great amount of damage and
despair, the courts have confirmed as well as awarded life in prison to the accused one such case
is of State of Karnataka v. Joseph Rodrigues, [5] where the Karnataka HC confirmed that such ghastly
attacks are punishable by life in prison.

K. In Mahesh v. State of M.P [6]. Reported in the Hon'ble Supreme Court while considering death
sentence observed thus: It will be a mockery of Justice to permit the accused the escape the extreme
penalty of law when faced with such evidence and such cruel acts. To give the lesser punishment for
the accused would be to render the justice system of this country suspect. The common man will lose
faith in Courts. In such cases, he understands and appreciates the language of deterrence more than

the reformative jargon. Therefore, undue sympathy to impose inadequate sentence would do
more harm to the justice system to undermine the public confidence in the efficacy of law, and
society could not long endure such serious threats. The duty of every Court to award proper
sentence having regard to the nature of the offence and the manner in which it urns executed or
committed etc. (see Sevak Perumal v. State of T.N.). The criminal law adheres in general to the
principle of proportionality in prescribing liability according to the culpability of each kind of
criminal conduct.

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L. In Jashubha Bharatsinha v. state of Gujarat [7] the Hon'ble Supreme Court observed: The Courts
are required to answer new challenges and mold the sentencing system to meet these challenges.
The object should be to protect the society and to deter the criminal in achieving the avowed
defect of law by imposing appropriate sentence. It is expected that the Courts would operate the
sentencing system so as to impose such sentence which reflects the conscience of the society.

M. In the case of Ravji v. state of Rajasthan [8] it is held that it is the nature and gravity of the

crime and not the criminal, which art germane for consideration of appropriate
punishment in a criminal trial. The Court will be failing in if duty if appropriate
punishment is not awarded for a crime which has been committed not only against the
individual but also against the society to which the criminal and the victim belong.
State of Karnataka by Jalahalli Police Station Vs. Respondent: Joseph Rodrigues S/o V.Z. Rodrigues, Criminal Appeal Nos.
1065, 1066 and 1239/2004
[6] MANU/SC/0246/1987 : (1987) 3 SCC 80
[7] MANU/SC/1561/1994 : (1994) 4 SCC 353
[8] MANU/SC/0215/1996 : (1996) 2 SCC 175
[5]

ISSUE 3
Compensation awarded by the Sessions Court to the victim under Sec 326A IPC in addition
to compensation to be paid by the State Government under Sec 357A CrPC should be
enhanced.
1. It is humbly submitted to this court that the compensation awarded to Nimisha by the
Sessions Court should be enhanced as per Sec 326A the compensation should be
sufficient to support the medical treatment of the victim, however the given compensation
of two lakhs (2,00,000/-) is not sufficient as the expenditure occurred is over six lakhs
(6,50,000/-) and further treatment needs to be done which includes fifteen more surgeries.
The court is requested to enhance the compensation to three lakhs and fifty thousand
(3,50,000/-) along with the compensation which the state needs to pay as per Sec 357A
CrPC.
2. As argued in argument 2 it is clear that Ramesh was guilty of causing grievous hurt by
throwing acid on Nimisha the damage is grave and beyond full repair. Physical,
emotional and mental damage aside there is a lot of monetary damage which Nimisha
and her family have suffered because of this attack. Nimisha has already undergone 6
surgeries which have cost the family over six and a half lakhs Rupees (6,50,000/-), the
doctors have stated that there will be need for 10-15 more surgeries and further ongoing
treatment. Nimisha has also lost her left eye and has permanent scars on her hands and

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face. Nimisha's father has lost his job because of extended leave for Nimisha's treatment.
Nimisha's father also has 2 younger daughters to support. The damage and distress caused
to Nimisha and her family is beyond measure and repair.
3. Although no amount of compensation will bring Nimisha's life back to as it was before the
attack, however it is her right under Sec 326A to get compensation from Ramesh to meet her
medical expenditure. The appellant submits to this hon'ble court to order the respondent to
three and a half lakhs Rupees (3,50,000/-) as compensation to Nimisha, immediately for her
medical treatment.
4. The appellant also submits to this hon'ble court to order the state authorities to pay the
compensation to Nimisha which she is entitled to under S357A (2) CrPC same was
ordered by the HC. Sec 357A (2) CrPC states that
Whenever a recommendation is made by the Court for compensation, the District Legal Service Authority or
the State Legal Service Authority, as the case may be, shall decide the quantum of compensation to be awarded
under the scheme referred to in sub-section (1).'

5.

As stated in the judgment by this hon'ble court by hon'ble Justice RM Lodha in the case, Laxmi Vs.
Union Of India & others[9]- That the current compensation package of all states and UTs
ranging between Rs 5,000 and Rs 1.5 lakh is inadequate to meet costs of treatment and
rehabilitation. The judgment also reiterated that Rs. 1 lakh of the compensation must be paid
by the authorities within 15 days of the attack being reported. The judgment says

It cannot be overlooked that acid attack victims need to undergo a series of plastic
surgeries and other corrective treatment. With regard to this, the solicitor general
suggested that the compensation amount to be paid by states to acid attack victims must
be enhanced to at least Rs 3 lakh, The balance of Rs 2 lakh shall be paid by the state
or Union Territory concerned as expeditiously as possible and positively within two
months of the incident.
6. Keeping this hon'ble court's judgment as reference apparent submits that the court may order
the state government to pay compensation to Nimisha immediately in addition to the
compensation to be paid by Ramesh under sec 326A IPC

ISSUE 4
Permission should be given to add the charge under Sec 366 IPC

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1. It is humbly submitted to this court that permission may be granted to add the charge
under Sec 366 IPC against Ramesh. Sec 366 IPC deals with kidnapping, abducting or
inducing women to compel her marriage. As per Sec 366 IPC Rameshs plan and actions
clearly had the intention to forcefully marry Nimisha against her will with coercion.
2. This honble Court has the power to add or alter any charge at any time before judgment
is pronounced under sec 216 CrPC.

[9]

Laxmi Vs. Union Of India & others

Section 366 IPC states that:


Kidnapping, abducting or inducing woman to compel her marriage, etc.-- Whoever kidnaps or
abducts any woman with intent that she may be compelled, or knowing it to be likely that she will be
compelled, to marry any person against her will, or in order that she may be forced or seduced to
illicit intercourse, or knowing it to be likely that she will be forced or seduced to illicit intercourse,
shall be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to ten years,
and shall also be liable to fine; and whoever, by means of criminal intimidation as defined in this
Code or of abuse of authority or any other method of compulsion, induces any woman to go from any
place with intent that she may be, or knowing that it is likely that she will be, forced or seduced to
illicit intercourse with another person shall also be punishable as aforesaid.

3. In the given case, it is proven beyond doubt that Ramesh wanted to abduct Nimisha and
marry her forcefully. On 24th March Ramesh along with Mahesh executed this plan and found
Nimisha alone and attempted an abduction. This clearly proves that the intention to abduct was very
much present. This incident will come under the ambit of Sec 366 as a case of abduction as Nimisha
happened to be eighteen years, whereas kidnapping applies to only minors.
4. This honble court held in the case of Khalil-Ur-Rahman and Hazarika v State of Assam that once
the necessary intention of the accused is established the offence is complete, whether or not the
accused succeeded in effecting his purpose, and whether or not in the event the woman consented to
the marriage or the illicit intercourse.[10]
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5. The given situation is strikingly similar to cases cited - though accused did not successfully
abducted Nimisha and compel her to marry against her wishes but accused must be charged under
Sec 366 IPC as the intention was clear. The intention of the accused is the basis and the graveness of
an offence under this section. The violation, the intention and the conduct of the accused determine
the offence. The only bear upon the intent which the accused kidnapped or abducted the woman, and
the intent of the accused is the vital question for determining the case. Intention is a matter of
inference from the circumstances of the case and the subsequent conduct of the accused after
abduction has taken place.

[10]

Khalil-Ur-Rahman, (1933) 11Rang. 213, Moniram Hazarika v State of Assam, (2004) 5 SCC 120; 2004 Cr LJ 2553.

6. In order to constitute offence of abduction a person must be carried off illegally by force or
deception that is to compel a person by force or deceitful means to induce to go from one place
to another as judged in the case of Rajinder v state of Maharashtra. [11]
7. To constitute the offence under section 366, it is necessary for the prosecution to prove that
the accused induced the complainant woman or compelled by force to go from any place that
such inducement was by deceitful means, that such abduction took place with the intent that
complainant will be compelled to marry. [12]
8. Knowledge on the part of the accused at the time of abduction or kidnapping that the woman
would be compelled to marry against her will is sufficient to constitute an offence under this
section. [13]
9. It is humbly submitted before the honble Supreme Court of India to add a new charge under
Sec 366 IPC in the trial of this case. As Ramesh had an intention and knowledge along with
Mahesh to abduct Nimisha and forcefully take her to the temple for marrying her without the
information to her parents.
10. This clearly shows that Ramesh used force to compel her to accompany him to the temple
where he wanted to marry her. This proves beyond doubt that Ramesh has committed the offence
under Sec 366 IPC, the same has been overlooked by the competent authority which framed the
initial charges as well as the honble Sessions Court and honble HC.

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[11]

Rajinder v state of Maharashtra


Ratanlal & Dhirajlals Law of Crimes, A commentary on The Indian Penal Code, 1860 26th edition, Pg 2020
[13]
(1953-54) 6 SauLR 329(333)(DB).
[12]

Prayer
Wherefore in the light of the issues raised, argument advanced, reasons given and Authorities
cited, this honble court may be pleased to:

Pronounce Ramesh as guilty under Sec 326 r/w Sec 34 and Sec 354D IPC and
sentence him to life imprisonment.
Enhance the compensation to be paid by the accused under Sec 326A IPC to the
victim to Rupees three lakh fifty thousand along with the compensation to be paid
by the State Government under Sec 357A CrPC.
To grant permission to add charge under Sec 366 IPC.
To pass any other order which the Hon'ble Court may deem fit in the light of
Justice, Equity and Good Conscience.
For this Act of kindness, the respondent shall forever humbly pray.
All of which is respectfully submitted.

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Place: Delhi
TEAM NO:
Date : 27/03/16
C
OUNCIL OF RESPONDENT

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