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UNIVERSIDAD POLITCNICA SALESIANA

INGENIERA ELECTRNICA
REDES DE COMPUTADORAS I
Nombre: Zurita Mrquez Diana Estefana
Nivel: Sptimo Grupo 2
Chapter 10 - Selecting Technologies and Devices for Campus
Networks

Physical network design involves the selection of LAN and WAN technologies for campus and enterprise
Network designs.During this phase of the top-down network design process, choices are made regarding
cabling, physical and data link layer protocols, and internetworking devices (such as switches, routers, and
wireless access points).

LAN Cabling

Cabling

Plant Design

Topologies

The importance of
developing a good
cabling
infrastructure
should not
be discounted.

Companies such
as AT&T, IBM,
(DEC), HewlettPackard,
and Northern
Telecoml

Whereas other
components of a
network design
generally
have a lifetime of
a few years before
the technology
changes, the
cabling
infrastructure
often must last
for many years.

Types of
Cables

LAN

Ethernet

Ethernet

Technologies

Basics

Technology
Choices

These
companies
published
cabling
specifications
and guidelines
for developing
A centralized cabling
scheme terminates most
or all of the cable runs in
one area of the design
environment. A star
topology is an example
of a centralized system.

A distributed cabling scheme terminates cable runs


throughout the design environment.
Ring, bus, and mesh topologies are Examples of
Distributed systems .

Campus network
implementations use
three major types of
cables:

*Shielded copper,
including shielded
twisted-pair (STP),
coaxial (coax), and
twinaxial
(twinax) cables
* Unshielded copper
(typically UTP) cables
* Fiber-optic cables

STP cabling was


widely used in
Token Ring
networks. Coax
cable was popular
in the early days
of LANs.

Fiber-optic cabling
should be used for
vertical and
horizontal wiring
between
telecommunications
closets
and
between
buildings.

Fiber-optic cabling is
not affected by
crosstalk, noise, and
electromagnetic
interference,
so it has the highest
capacity of the three
types of cables.

LAN
technologies
vary in how
well they can
meet
scalability,
availability,
manageability,
adaptability,
affordability,
and
other
technical
goals.

Ethernet is a
physical and data
link layer standard
for the transmission
of frames on a
LAN.

An Ethernet LAN
that is accurately
provisioned to meet
bandwidth
requirements and
outfitted with highquality components,
including NICs,
cables, and
internetworking
devices, can meet
even the most
stringent demands
for availability.

Ethernet is a scalable
technology that has
adapted to increasing
capacity requirements.

The following options for


implementing Ethernet
networks are available:

-Half- and full-duplex Ethernet


-100-Mbps Ethernet
-1000-Mbps (1-Gbps or Gigabit)
Ethernet
-10-Gbps Ethernet
-Metro Ethernet
-Long-Reach Ethernet (LRE)
-Cisco EtherChannel

The choice of an Ethernet technology


for the access layer depends on the
location and
size of user communities, bandwidth
and QoS requirements for
applications, broadcast

Selecting Internetworking
Devices for a Campus
Network Design

Building-

Campus-

Cabling

Cabling

Topologies

Topologie

Half-Duplex
and Full-Duplex
Ethernet

100-Mbps

Gigabit

Ethernet

Ethernet

10-Gbps Ethernet

s
At this point in the network
design process, you have
developed a network topology
and
should have an idea of which
segments will be
interconnected

In most cases, the choice will be


between a switch and a router.
Hubs and bridges are generally
no longer used, although hubs
are sometimes placed in a
network to facilitate tapping
into a network for protocol
analysis, and bridges are still
sometimes used in wireless
networks.

Within a
building,
either a
centralized or
distributed
architecture
can be used,
depending
on the size of
the building.

The cabling
that
connects
buildings is
exposed to
more
physical
hazards
than the
cabling
within

A centralized
scheme offers
good
manageability but
does not scale

Many LAN technologies


make an
assumption that
workstations are no more
than 100 meters (m) from a
telecommunications
closet where hubs or
switches reside.

An important design rule


for half-duplex Ethernet is
that the round-trip
propagation
delay in one collision
domain must not exceed
the time it takes a sender
to transmit 512
bits, which is 51.2
microseconds for 10-Mbps
Ethernet.

A point-to-point
Ethernet link
supports
simultaneous
transmitting and
receiving, which is
called full-duplex
Ethernet

100-Mbps
Ethernet, also
known as Fast
Ethernet

Gigabit Ethernet
was originally
defined in the IEEE
802.3z standard

is similar to
the older 10Mbps Ethernet
standard,
which is one of
the
reasons it is
popular.

Gigabit Ethernet is
most appropriate
for building and
campus-backbone
networks. It can
act as a trunk
network,
aggregating traffic
from up to ten 100Mbps Ethernet
segments.

10-Gbps
Ethernet differs in
some important
ways from the
other Ethernet
implementations,
but it
is also remarkably
similar to the
other
implementations.

10-Gbps Ethernet
supports fullduplex
transmission over
fiber-optic or
copper cabling.