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A PROFIT OPTIMIZATION FOR HACIENDA MACALAUAN

INCORPORATED

Research Paper
Presented to the Faculty of
College of Arts and Sciences
Laguna State Polytechnic University
Main Campus
Sta. Cruz, Laguna

In Partial Fulfillment of the


Requirements for the Degree of
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

ADRIMAR A. ADRIANO
JANUARY 2016

APPROVAL SHEET

DEDICATION

This product of hard work is wholeheartedly and inspiringly dedicated to my


parents, siblings, friends, mentors, church mates, batch mates,
relatives, and to my special someone;
above all, to our Almighty God.
AAA

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The researcher would like to express his deepest thanks to all which
and who gave unselfish support, help, and guidance for the completion of this
research work:
Laguna State Polytechnic University, for offering the course of BS
Mathematics where the researcher belongs;
Nestor

M.

De

Vera

Ph.

D.,

University

President,

for

the

encouragement and support to the students;


Roberto C. Miranda Ed. D., Campus Director, for directing the rules
and regulations of the school;
Mario C. Passion Ed. D., Vice President for Academic Affairs, for his
diligence in converting also the campus;
Celeste C. Marquez M. S. P., Research Chairman and Associate Dean
of College of Arts and Sciences, for her continuous support, guidance,
suggestions, and encouragement for preparing this research until it were
finished;
Ellaine L. Ching, Technical expert of the manuscript, for giving his
time in checking this work patiently and for his insightful comments, advice
and ideas;
Ma. Cezanne D. Dimaculangan, his English Critic, who gave time and
expertise in making his work error free in terms of grammar;

Elymar A. Pascual, his Subject Specialist Expert, panel members who


extended his knowledge in giving comments and suggestions from pre-oral to
final defense that improved this work;
Victor A. Estalilla, M.A.T. and Dr. Merilyn P. Juacalla, as the
research adviser, for sharing their knowledge about Linear Programming, for
their patience, advice, motivations and for their untiring support that became
part for the completion of this work;
Kristle May B. Cabrega, Jan Kurt F. Serrano, Phoebe Patrice C.
Suria, Mary Joy C. Ramirez, Raenie Joy R. Balderama, Rose Ann G.
Dayapera, Rubylean V. Dandan, Aivie K. Bangajo, Jed Oriel U.
Camangon, Mary Ann O. Viterbo, Glydel P. Pereja, Ella Mae D. Mardoquio
his classmates, batch mates and friends who encouraged his to continue his
journey in this thesis, kept reminding her to move forward and not to give up,
and most of all for their prayers;
BS Mathematics IV, his classmates and thesis batch mates, for their
support and giving suggestions to improve this work;
Rodolfo A. Adriano, his father, Lourdes A. Adriano, his mother
Adrian A. Adriano his brother, Jelyn A. Adriano and Adrilyn A. Adriano,
his sister and Necita Z. Aquino, his auntie, who are always there to inspire
him, for giving him financial, and moral support, , for always giving him love
that inspired him to finish this work and most especially for their prayers;
and last but definitely not the least, to the great Lord, Jesus Christ, for

the wisdom and knowledge, protection, provision, strength, motivations,


guidance, and hope He gave to him.
AAA

ABSTRACT

The main purpose of this study is to determine the optimal number of


Whole Milk 1 Liter, Non Fat Milk 1 Liter, Non Fat Milk 200ml, Choco Milk 1
Liter, Choco Milk 200ml, Yogurt Strawberry, Yogurt Blueberry, Yogurt Nata,
Yogurt Mango and Yogurt Pineapple in a month in order to maximize the net
profit subject to resources, labor and production cost constraints. This study
sought to find the answer for the following questions: 1.) What is the optimal
number of Whole Milk 1Liter to be produced within a month? 2.) What is the
optimal number of Non Fat Milk 1Liter and Non Fat Milk 200ml to be produced
within a month? 3.) What is the optimal number of Choco Milk 1Liter and
Choco Milk 200ml to be produced within a month? 4.) What is the optimal
number of Live Yogurt Strawberry, Live Yogurt Blueberry, Live Yogurt Nata,
Live Yogurt Mango, and Live Yogurt Pineapple to be produced within a
month? 5.) What is the maximum cost of income?
In the end, it was found that through the mathematical model used in
this study, the optimal number of Whole Milk 1 Liter should be, Non Fat Milk 1
Liter should be, Non Fat Milk 200ml should be, Choco Milk 1 Liter should be,
Choco Milk 200ml should be, Yogurt Strawberry should be, Yogurt Blueberry
should be, Yogurt Nata should be, Yogurt Mango should be and Yogurt
Pineapple should be, the amount of income is Php.

The researcher used Linear Programming to model this study.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Preliminaries

Page

TITLE PAGE..................................................................................................i
APPROVAL SHEET......................................................................................ii
DEDICATION...............................................................................................iii
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS...........................................................................iv
ABSTRACT.................................................................................................vi
TABLE OF CONTENTS..............................................................................vii
LIST OF TABLES.........................................................................................x
CHAPTER
1

THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND


Introduction............................................................................................1
Background of the Study.......................................................................2
Theoretical Framework.........................................................................3
Statement of the Problem.....................................................................4
Assumptions..........................................................................................5
Significance of the Study.......................................................................5
Scope and Delimitations.......................................................................6
Definition of Terms.................................................................................6

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES


Related Literature...................................................................................8
Related Literature...................................................................................8

METHODOLOGY
Research Design.................................................................................14
Research Procedure...........................................................................14
Research Instrument...........................................................................14
Mathematical Formulation...................................................................15

PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS, AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA


Preliminary Data..................................................................................17
The Farm Plantation............................................................................17
The Model...........................................................................................17
The Objective Function.......................................................................18
The Constraints...................................................................................18
The Complete Mathematical Model....................................................20

SUMMARY, FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS


Summary.............................................................................................23
Findings...............................................................................................24
Conclusion...........................................................................................24

10

Recommendations..............................................................................25
BIBLIOGRAPHY
A. Books.............................................................................................26
B. Journals.........................................................................................26
C. Unpublished Materials...................................................................26
APPENDICES
A. Letter of Request...........................................................................27
B. Final Computation..........................................................................31
C. Answer Report of Final Computation.............................................32
D. Sensitivity Report of Final Computation........................................33
E. Limit Report of Final Computation.................................................33
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.............................................................................57
CURRICULUM VITAE.................................................................................61

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LIST OF TABLES
Table
1 Preliminary Data..............................................................................17
2 Linear Programming Matrix.............................................................19
3 Final Solution...................................................................................21

CHAPTER 1

THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND

This chapter includes the introduction, background of the study,


theoretical framework, statement of the problem, assumptions, significance of
the study, scope and limitation and definition of terms.

Introduction
Linear programming (LP) is a tool for solving optimization problems.
George Dantzig developed an efficient method, the simplex algorithm, for
solving linear programming problems (also called LP). Since the development
of the simplex algorithm, LP has been used to solve optimization problems in
industries as diverse as banking, education, forestry, petroleum, and trucking.
In a survey of Fortune 500 firms, 85% of the respondents said they had used
linear programming. According to Kantorovich (1939) as cited by Dantzig
(1965), there are two ways of increasing the efficiency of the work of a shop,
an enterprise, or a whole branch of industry. One way is by various
improvements in technology; that is, new attachments for individual
machines, changes in technological processes, and the discovery of new,
better kinds of raw materials. The other way-thus far much less used-is
improvement in the organization of planning and production. Here are
included, for instance, such questions as the distribution of work among
individual machines of the enterprise or among mechanisms, the correct
distribution of orders among enterprises, the correct distribution of different

kinds of raw materials, fuel, and other factors.


In a profit optimization problem, when there are a number of activities
to be performed, alternative ways of doing them, and limited resources or
facilities for performing each activity in the most effective way, the
management is faced with the problem of how best to combine these
activities and resources in an optimal manner so that the overall efficiency is
maximized. The objective function may be profit, cost, production capacity or
any other measure of effectiveness which is to be obtained in the best
possible or optimal manner. The constraints may be imposed by different
resources such as market demand, production process and equipment
storage capacity, raw material available, and so on. They further posit that
programming implies planning and by linearity is meant a mathematical
expression in which the expressions among the variables are linear.

Background of the Study


Linear programming is a methodology within the realm of systems
analysis which can find a combination of subsystems with maximum profits or
minimum costs given a set of simultaneous equations in which some
variables are constrained. Dairy scientists commonly use this technique to
calculate least-cost nutritionally balanced dairy rations, both with and without
matrix generators. The use of a matrix generator allows one to use the
computational power of linear programming without understanding the

arithmetic of the calculations or the complexities of setting up the data


tableau. The interactive program developed with the dairy systems project
uses a matrix generator and specifies a farm organization which will maximize
profit for 1 yr given upper limits on barn capacities, labor, and land.
Manufacturing planning and control entails the acquisition and
allocation of limited resources to production activities so as to satisfy
customer demand over a specified time horizon. As such, planning and
control problems are inherently optimization problems, where the objective is
to develop a plan that meets demand at minimum cost or that fills the demand
that maximizes profit. The underlying optimization problem will vary due to
differences in the manufacturing and market context. In this study it focuses
on optimization models for production planning for discrete-parts, batch
manufacturing environments. It do not cover detailed scheduling or
sequencing models (e. g., Graves, 1981), nor address production planning for
continuous processes (e. g., Shapiro, 1993). We consider only discrete-time
models, and do not include continuous-time models such as developed by
Hackman and Leachman (1989).
This study intended to provide an overview of applicable optimization
models for Hacienda Macalauan; which present the most generic formulations
and briefly describe how these models are solved. There is an enormous
range of problem contexts and model formulations, as well as solution
methods. We make no effort to be exhaustive in the treatment herein. Rather,

we have made choices of what to include based on personal judgment and


preferences.
Hacienda Macalauan Incorporated (HMI), being a company that
produces and sell dairy products with restaurant chains, coffee shops,
schools and hotels as their primary customers, has specific production plan
for its products but they are looking for much effective production plan.
Although there is an existing production plan that determines the amount of
products to produce, there are still looking for substantial study as to where
this decision is based. The products have different shelf-lives with 6 days at
the most for the milks and 10 days at the most for the yogurt and any unsold
items at the end of the week is disposed as garbage.

Theoretical Framework
There are several ways to solve a production planning problem. The
most direct of these is extracting all possible solutions and computing the
associated cost of each.
Production planning has expanded with the aim of covering all factors
involved in the problem. As Dantzig (1965) puts it, production planning, also
known as the production smoothing problem is concerned with the problems
of scheduling its production over the number of future time periods, with the
total time span being considered called the planning horizon. The
information available to the planner consists of the following:

(1) Number of units of each product to be required in each of the future


periods (i.e., sales forecast, customers order);
(2) Number of units of each product in inventory at the start of the first period.
(3) Additional constraints such as minimum or maximum inventory levels at
the end of any period or minimum level of production or service.
(4) Cost information on each product (i.e., unit cost, storage cost, penalty
cost)
Linear Programming
During WWII Army began to formulate certain linear optimization
problem. Their solutions were called plans or programs. Subsequently, many
other problems, particularly economic, were found to have a similar
mathematical formulation. Such problems are called linear programming
problems or linear programs.
LP problems differs from general variety in that a mathematical model
or description of the problem can be stated, using relationships which are
called straight line or linear. Mathematically, these relationships are of the
form a1x1 + a2x2 +...+ ajxj...+ anxn = a0 where ajs are the known coefficients and
xjs, the unknown variables.
The complete mathematical statement includes set of simultaneous
linear equations which represent the conditions of the problem and linear
functions which expresses the objectives of the problem.
Mathematically, LP deals with nonnegative solutions to undetermined

systems of linear equation.


Every LPP has either:
1. No solutions in terms of nonnegative values of the variables.
2. A nonnegative solution that yields an infinite value to the objectives
function.
3. A nonnegative solution that yields a finite value to the objective function.

Statement of the Problem


The following are the question to be answered in this research:
1. What is the optimal number of Whole Milk 1Liter to be produced within a
month?
2. What is the optimal number of Non Fat Milk 1Liter Non Fat Milk 200ml to be
produced within a month?
3. What is the optimal number of Choco Milk 1L and Choco Milk 200ml to be
produced within a month?
4. What is the optimal number Live Yogurt Strawberry to be produced within a
month?
5. What is the optimal number Live Yogurt Blueberry to be produced within a
month?

6. What is the optimal number of Live Yogurt Nata to be produced within a


month?
7. What is the optimal number of Live Yogurt Mango to be produced within a
month?
8. What is the optimal number of Live Yogurt Pineapple to be produced within
a month?
9. What is the maximum cost of income?

Assumptions
The study aimed to:
1. formulate a mathematical model that will yield an optimal production policy
that satisfies the product demand
2. minimize the production and inventory cost and determine the optimal
production plan specifying the number of units of each product to be obtained
from each production source in each future time periods.
3. determine the optimal number of milk, cheese, yogurt and cream to be
produce within a month.

Significance of the Study


This study aimed to contribute benefits to the following:
Mr. Eduardo J. Soriano (the owner of Hacienda Macaluan, Inc.)
This study provides HMI a way to maximize its income by producing
the optimal quantity without risking the patronage and loyalty of its
consumers.
Same Business Industry
This study can also be useful to other businesses of the same type and
setup as the HMI in order to increase work efficiency and business
performance.
The Researcher
This study would give the researcher correct conclusion by the use of
the information gathered for the completion of this research.
Future Researcher
The result of this study will be very useful to the future researchers as

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they would use the same study about making a production plan.

Scope and Limitation of the Study


This study only focused on the formulation of a better mathematical
model that suits HMI. The products that were subjected to the study are just
Whole Milk, Choco Milk, Non Fat Milk, and Live Yogurt. The analysis was
based from the record of sales from June 2015-September 2015 in order to
have much accurate result. The packing types that were considered for the
Choco milk and Non Fat Milk are 200 ml pouch and 1Liter pouch and for
Whole Milk, 1Liter was considered while 90g were considered for yogurt.
It was assumed that season would not affect the yield of the farm,
outbreak of diseases and natural calamities would not occur and the model
formulated was within a month.

Definition of Terms
Constraints. A mathematical expression that combine the variables to
express limit on the possible solutions.
Linear programming. A mathematical technique for finding optimal
solutions to problems that can be expressed using linear equations and
inequalities.
Net- profit. The actual profit after working expenses not included in

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the calculation of gross profit have been paid.


Farm Plantation. In this study, it is a large farm and used as a subject
for this study where Linear Programming was applied to determine the
optimal allocation of its resources.
Dairyman. A man who manages or works in a dairy farm.

Chapter 2

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AD STUDIES

This chapter presents the review of related literature and review of


related studies that may have some significance to the current study and offer
direction in the conductance of the study.
Related Literature
On Linear Programming
The mathematical programming as a method chooses between farm
enterprises on the basis of determined objective function considering a set of
fixed farm constraints, thus representing the preferences of the farm (Zgajnar
et al., 2007). Optimisation is commonly used approach to solve problems of
production planning in the sense of optimal resource allocation given the

12

changing conditions that farms face. Based on the type of the research
problem and basic assumptions, the models could be grouped into
deterministic and probabilistic or stochastic (Strauss et al, 2008). When all
required information is supposed to be known with certainty, the model is
deterministic supposing there is no risk (variability) and the decision-making is
done under complete certainty (Lee and Olson, 2006). Additionally, the theory
distinguishes between positive and normative models, wherein normative
models are designed to show what the optimal economic result should be
(Howitt, 2005).
Linear programming (LP) is the most often used mathematical
programming method, even due to its simplified linear and normative nature,
it shows quite accurately what the farmers do or how their behaviour changes
if the production conditions change (Hazell and Norton, 1986). The LP has
been introduced by Dantzig in 1947 (Lee and Olson, 2006) and since then it
has been successfully used in finding an optimal production plan in different
areas, most often with an objective function for maximizing the total gross
margin or net income. LP has been already proven as useful method in farm
production planning (Scarpari M.S. and Beauclair E.G.F, 2010; Alabdulkader
A.M. et al, 2012; Kebede E. and Gan J., 1999; Majewski E. and Was A.,
2005) , whereas Boehlje and Eidman (1984) stressed that this method can be
applied to all resource allocation problem the farmer is faced with. It also
proved to be more applicable for solving complex problems than other more

13

simple methods as budgeting and marginal analysis.


The linear programming is a mathematical procedure utilising the
simplex algorithm which aims to find the optimal combination of farm
enterprises under maximisation or minimisation of the linear objective function
(Kay et al., 2008). LP models require clear definition of farm activities,
resource requirements and specific constraints such as market and policy
constraints (Hazell and Norton, 1986). It gives solution that is combination of
activities which maximize the value of the objective function (gross margin or
net revenue) within a predetermined list of opportunities and constraints (land,
labour and capital) (Turner and Taylor, 1998).Managerial ability can be used
to explain variability amongst farms that operate in similar environments
(Rougoor, Trip, Renkema, 1998). The term managerial ability entails how a
manager uses the resources available to them to make decisions in order to
achieve their specified goals. Farm performance differences may be due to
different skills and personality traits among farm managers. Farm managers
that have a drive to succeed, are highly motivated, intelligent and have a lot of
dairy farm experience are expected to perform better than those that do not.
However, in order for a farmer with favorable personality traits and many skills
and experiences to be successful it is necessary that they are also skilled at
decision-making. There are many stochastic elements that cause uncertainty
in dairy farm performance. Thus, managers have the difficult task of making
decisions in order to achieve an outcome that is unpredictable and risky.

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Thus, even managers with the right qualities to be successful often fail due to
uncontrollable circumstances.
Efficiency relates to the overall productivity of the dairy farm (Lund &
Hill, 1979). In order to measure efficiency, it is necessary to take into account
all inputs that determine an output. It is critical to analyze efficiency in this
manner because using a measurement that does not take into account all
inputs of production will give a biased result.
Efficient dairy farms often have lower costs of production than
inefficient dairy farms (Mosheim & Lovell, 2009). However, there have been
results in studies that show that efficiency only increases with cow numbers to
a certain point, and then increasing herd size actually leads to a decrease in
efficiency. It has also been shown that long-run average costs sometimes
portray a typical U-shaped graph (Alvarez & Arias, 2003). This means that at
a certain size, farms become less efficient and costs rise. In the past studies
have been conducted that have concluded that this inefficiency can be
overcome by an increase in managerial ability.
A study conducted by Tauer and Mishra (2006) analyzed the factors
that account for inefficiency on dairy farms. They were interested in seeing
what role managerial ability played in reducing inefficiency on dairy farms.
The researchers hypothesized that when a farm adopts a new technology but
does not increase efficiency that it is caused by poor management. Tauer and
Mishra discovered that herd size and farmer age were associated with

15

increased costs of production and hence decreased efficiency. This coincides


with the belief that farms become inefficient after hitting a certain herd size
because managerial ability is fixed.
Alvarez and Arias (2003) discovered that there is a negative correlation
between managerial ability and average cost. Thus, as farms increase in size,
there will be a point when they will experience increased costs and will need
to increase managerial ability in order to combat this increase. The article
concludes that dairy farms can experience efficiency at any size as long as
there is a sufficient increase in managerial ability in order to counteract the
increasing average costs. This study confirmed the opinion that managerial
ability is related to efficiency. Successful farms have an appropriate amount of
managerial ability relative to their herd size.
Dairy farmers can improve their managerial ability by attending higher
levels of education, attending seminars to continue learning after school, and
utilizing veterinarians, nutritionists, consultants, and extension agents to help
to continue to improve their farm. Sometimes when increasing herd size, it is
necessary to add another manager. This will allow both managers to
specialize in areas they excel at causing the dairy to be run efficiently.
Related Studies
Linear Optimization Model that Maximizes the Value of Farm Products
Linear programming technique is relevant in optimization of resource
allocation and achieving efficiency in production planning particularly in

16

achieving increased agricultural productivity. The efficient utilization of


resources and the optimal combination of enterprises in the food sub-sector is
of paramount importance (Igwe et al, 2011).
Many studies have been conducted in different farming systems in
different countries to optimize farm plans using LP. Nedunchezhian and
Thirunavukkarasu (2007) developed an LP model to optimize farm plans in
different farming systems in Orathanadu block of the Thanjavur district in
Tamil Nadu. The income increase in the optimal plans was 223.5 per cent for
large scale farmers, 192.7 per cent for small farmers, 180.1 per cent for
marginal farmers and 116 per cent for landless households.
Ibrahim and Omotesho (2011) in their study determined an optimal
enterprise combination for vegetable production in north central Nigeria. Their
optimal plan achieved 88 per cent of the goals considered. Scarpari et al
(2010) developed an optimized planning model for sugarcane farming using
an LP tool. Their results support their planning model as a very useful tool for
sugarcane management. Mohamad and Said (2011) developed an LP crop
mix model for a finite-time planning horizon. The objective of their model was
the maximization of total returns.
Dey and Mukhopadhyay (2010) formulated an LP model to find the
optimum allocation of resources. The net return earned from the optimal plan
was found to exceed the net return obtained from existing allocation of
resources by 43 per cent. Abdelaziz et al (2010) applied LP to optimize the

17

cropping pattern in North Darfur State, Sudan. The models gave a cropping
pattern different from the farmers production plan. The solution gave a
profitable objective function while the farmers plan gained them a loss.
An LP model was formulated by Kaur et al (2010) to suggest the
optimal cropping pattern for maximizing net returns and to ensure significant
savings of groundwater use in Punjab. The optimal production plan increased
returns by 4 per percent along with groundwater savings of 26.55 per cent.
Bamiro et al (2012) actualized by LP model the optimal cassava based
combination. The resulting crop combinations resulted in increased gross
margin.
In modeling the economic aspects of the farm, we assume that the
farmer simply seeks to maximize income (Hazel & Norton, 1986). However, in
reality, the production options open to a farmer may be restricted by the need
to observe sound husbandry practices such as crop rotations (Hazel &
Norton, 1986). Crop rotations are important for pest and disease control and
maintaining soil fertility (Hazel & Norton, 1986). In this study, a linear
programming model that incorporates crop rotation requirements is developed
for a rural farmer in Bindura, Zimbabwe

18

CHAPTER 3

METHODOLOGY

This chapter consists of the research design, research procedure,


research instrument, and the mathematical formulation that were used by the
researcher to finish this study.
Research Design
There was a need of forecasting the sales of each of the product in
order to determine the demand requirements for each of the product of
Hacienda Macalauan Incorporated (HMI) in Calauan, Laguna.This model will
be very useful in this kind of case.
Research Procedure
The topic for this study was approved by the panellists of the

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department. After having approved, the researcher had found a subject where
he applied the model for his study. He was allowed by the farm owner to
gather data needed for the completion of this study. After all the data were
collected, the researcher started on modelling the problem.
Research Instrument
An interview with the plant manager will be conducted to acquire
additional information such as production sources, production schedule,
demand and sales strategy of the company, and information regarding the
clients. Each of the products has different shelf lives; therefore the analysis
for the data was defined in a daily basis.
Excel Solver
The researcher will use the Excel Solver to solve linear problems in
forecasting the probable sales of each of the product.
B.

Model Formulation
An optimization problem can be represented in the following way:

Given: a function f : A

R from some set A to the numbers Sought: an

element x0 in A such that f(x0) f(x) for all x in A ("minimization") or such that
f(x0) f(x) for all x in A ("maximization").
Typically, A is some subset of the Euclidean space Rn, often specified
by a set of constraints, equalities or inequalities that the members of A have
to satisfy. The domain A of f is called the search space or the choice set,
while the elements of A are called candidate solutions or feasible solutions.

20

The function f is called, variously, an objective function, a loss function


or cost function (minimization), indirect utility function (minimization), a utility
function (maximization), a fitness function (maximization), or, in certain fields,
an energy function, or energy functional. A feasible solution that minimizes
(or maximizes, if that is the goal) the objective function is called an optimal
solution.
By convention, the standard form of an optimization problem is stated
in terms of minimization. Generally, unless both the objective function and
the feasible region are convex in a minimization problem, there may be
several local minima, where a local minimum x* is defined as a point for
which there exists some > 0 so that for all x such that

the expression

holds; that is to say, on some region around x * all of the function values are
greater than or equal to the value at that point. Local maxima are defined
similarly.
A large number of algorithms proposed for solving non-convex
problems including the majority of commercially available solvers are not
capable of making a distinction between local optimal solutions and rigorous
optimal solutions, and will treat the former as actual solutions to the original

21

problem. The branch of applied mathematics and numerical analysis that is


concerned with the development of deterministic algorithms that are capable
of guaranteeing convergence in finite time to the actual optimal solution of a
non-convex problem is called global optimization.

22

Chapter 4

PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS, AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA


This chapter shows that variables were properly defined. The
objectives were identified and the constraints were set up.
Table 1
Preliminary Data

Products
Whole Milk
1Liter
Non Fat Milk
1Liter
Non Fat Milk
200ml
Choco Milk
1Liter
Choco Milk
200ml
Live Yogurt
Strawberry
Live Yogurt
Blueberry
Live Yogurt
Nata
Live Yogurt
Mango
Live Yogurt
Pineapple

Demand

Labor and
Production
Cost

Net Profit

Resources
Available

3508

378864

94716

3800

1949

194900

48725

2400

7780

178940

31120

8000

3807

380700

95175

4000

226807

5216561

907228

48000

2902

55718.4

13929.6

1900

2667

51206.4

12801.6

1700

2491

47827.2

11956.8

1500

1895

36384

9096

1400

1778

34137.6

8534.4

1200

23

The Dairy Farm Plantation


The daily demands for the last four months of year 2015 were obtained
from the records of HMI. The study focused on the 10 most sold products and
records showed that the item with the highest demand from June to
September was the Chocolate Milk (200 ml pouch)
The daily demands for each product were summarized in Tables 1-10
of Appendix A. These data were used to forecast the demand sales of the
company for the whole month of February
.
THE MODEL
The decision variables are:
1= the number of Whole Milk 1 Liter
x be produceda month

2= the number of Non Fat Milk 1 Liter


x be produced a month

3=the number of Non Fat Milk 200 ml


x be produced a month
4= the number of Choco Milk 1 Liter
x be produceda month
5= the number of Choco Milk 200 ml
x be produceda month
6= thenumber of Live Yogurt Strawberry
x be produceda month
7= thenumber of Live Yogurt Blueberry
x be produced a month

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8= thenumber of Live Yogurt Nata


x be produceda month
9= thenumber ofLive Yogurt Mango
x be produceda month
10= the number ofLiveYogurt Pineapple
x be produced a month

THE OBJECTIVE FUNCTION

Max Z ( Net Profit )=( 27 ) ( x 1 ) + ( 25 100 ) ( x2 ) + ( 4 ) ( x 3 ) + ( 25 ) ( x 4 ) + ( 4 ) ( x 5 ) + ( 4.8 19.20 ) ( x 6 ) + ( 4.8 ) ( x 7


The decision coefficient is obtained by data gathered from the existing
record of the said farm.

THE CONSTRAINTS:

RESOURCES

() ( x 1 ) +( ) ( x 2) +() ( x 3 ) + ( 1 ) ( x 4 ) +() ( x 5 ) +() ( x6 ) +() ( x 7 ) + ( 19.20 ) ( x 8 ) + ( 19.20 ) ( x 9 ) + ( 19.20, P h oebe Patrice C


LABOR AND PRODUCTION COST
The current expenditures for labor and production is Php..
Labor and Production cost constraints is summarized as;

( 108 ) ( x1 ) + ( 100 ) ( x 2 ) + ( 23 ) ( x 3 ) + ( 100 ) ( x 4 ) + ( 23 ) ( x 5 )+ ( 19.20 ) ( x 6 ) + (19.20 ) ( x 7 ) + ( 19.20 ) ( x 8 ) + ( 19.20 ) ( x 9 )+ (

99

95

90

70

70

RHS

300

135 80

8200

Milk 200mlNo. ofStrawberry


Choco No. of Blueberry
Yogurt No. of Yogurt
NataNo. of Yogurt
MangoNo. ofPineapple
Yogurt No. of Yogurt

25

TABLE 2

Linear Programming Matrix

8340 100 100 100 100 100 100

The table above presents the initial data that had been placed in the

Subjected to:
Yogurt PineappleStorage Capacity of

MangoProduction Level of Yogurt

Yogurt NataStorage Capacity of

Yogurt BlueberryStorage Capacity of

Yogurt StrawberryStorage Capacity of

Choco Milk200mlStorage Capacity of

Choco Milk 1LStorage Capacity of

Fat Milk 200mlStorage Capacity of Non

Fat Milk 1LStorage Capacity of Non

Whole Milk1LStorage Capacity of

130

70

280

130

Milk1LNo. of Whole
Milk 1LNo. ofMilk
Non200ml
Fat No. of NonMilk
Fat 1LNo. of Choco

26

spread sheet which was the Microsoft excel solver.

THE COMPLETE MATHEMATICAL MODEL

Max Z ( Net Profit )=( 108 ) ( x 1 ) + ( 100 ) ( x 2 ) + ( 23 ) ( x 3 ) + ( 100 ) ( x 4 ) + ( 23 ) ( x 5 ) + ( 19.20 ) ( x 6 ) + ( 19.20 ) ( x

27

Chapter 5

SUMMARY, FINDINGS, CONCLUSION, AND RECOMMENDATIONS


This chapter consists of the summary, findings, conclusion drawn
from the study and recommendation for the future researchers.
Summary
This research entitled A Profit Optimization for Hacienda Macalauan
Incorporated made use of Linear Programming model. The subject of the
study was the demand of products to be produced for cheese, milks and
yogurt for the whole month of November. The study sought to answer the
following questions: 1.) What is the optimal number of Whole Milk 1Liter to be
produced within a month? 2.) What is the optimal number of Non Fat Milk
1Liter and Non Fat Milk 200ml to be produced within a month? 3.) What is the
optimal number of Choco Milk 1Liter and Choco Milk 200ml to be produced
within a month? 4.) What is the optimal number of Live Yogurt Strawberry,
Live Yogurt Blueberry, Live Yogurt Nata, Live Yogurt Mango, and Live Yogurt
Pineapple to be produced within a month? 5.) What is the maximum cost of
income?

28

The program used for this study was the Microsoft Excel solver (2007)
and Microsoft Word (2007).

Findings
The following findings were obtained based on the data that were analyzed:

1. Trough the mathematical model used, the optimal number of Whole


Milk 1Liter to be produced should be NUMBER pieces
2. The number of Non Fat Milk 1Liter to be produced should be NUMBER
pieces.
3. The number of Non Fat Milk 200ml to be produced should be
NUMBER pieces.
4. The number of Choco Milk 1Liter to be produced should be NUMBER
pieces.
5. The number of Choco Milk 200ml to be produced should be NUMBER
pieces.
6. The number of Live Yogurt Strawberry to be produced should be
NUMBER pieces
7. The number of Live Yogurt Blueberry to be produced should be
NUMBER pieces.

29

8. The number of Live Yogurt Nata to be produced should be NUMBER


pieces
9. The number of Live Yogurt Mango

to be produced should be

NUMBER pieces
10. The number of Live Yogurt Pineapple to be produced should be
NUMBER pieces
11. The total amount of income is MoneyPhp.
Conclusions;
The following conclusions were obtained based on the findings of the
study:
1. Through the Mathematical model used in this study, the optimal
numbers of Whole Milk 1Liter to be produced were determined.
2. Through the mathematical model used in this study, the optimal
numbers of Non Fat Milk 1Liter and Non Fat Milk 200ml to be produced
were determined.
3. Through the mathematical model used in this study, the optimal
numbers of Choco Milk 1Liter and Choco Milk 200ml to be produced
were determined.
4. Through the mathematical model used in this study, the optimal
numbers of Live Yogurt Strawberry, Live Yogurt Blueberry, Live Yogurt
Nata, Live Yogurt Mango, and Live Yogurt Pineapple to be produced
were determined.

30

5. Through the mathematical model used in this study, the total amount of
income was determined.

Recommendations
Based on the findings and conclusions taken from the study, the
following recommendations are given:
1. A closer and better forecast can be obtained if there were more data
available in the company, if the sales from the last two months or more
years were given instead of four months.
2. The model has been more efficient and effective if all the products are
considered and maximization of the storage capacity of the plant was
included in the study.
3. Other researchers may also use another kind of software for solving
the optimal allocation of resources and determining the optimal number
of products should be sold in order to maximize the net profit.
4. As the study showed that in order to formulate the mathematical model
of the allocation of resources problem, the objectives must be
determined.
5. Future researchers should have a follow up study on determining the
additional land, labor and capital of a farm using linear programming to
make the model better.

31

Bibliography
A. Books
Dantzig, George B., Introduction to LINEAR PROGRAMMING and
Extension
Hillier F. S. and Lieberman G. S. (2005). Introduction to Operation Research
(8th Edition) New York: Mc Graw-Hill.
Johnson, L. A. and W. R. Smythe, (1996). Introduction to Linear
Programming with Application. Prentice Hall, Inc. England Cliffs, New Jersey.
Taha, H. A. (2003). Operation Research: An Inroduction (7th Edition).
Singapore Pearson Education. (Asia) Pte Ltd
Dent, J.B., S.R. Harrison and K.B. Woodford (1986). Farm Planning with
Linear Programming: Concept and Practice, Butterworths, Sydney.
Lewis, Catherine,Linear Programming: Theory and Applications.
B. Unpublished Materials
Dalangin, A. D. and M.C. Gonzalez (2007). Inventory Analysis of a Dairy
Producing Cooperative Unpublished Undergraduate Special Problem,
University of the Philippines-Los Banos, College Laguna.

32

APPENDIX A
LETTER OF REQUEST
Laguna State Polytechnic University
Main Campus
Santa Cruz, Laguna
Greetings!
I am ADRIMAR AQUINO ADRIANO a graduating student of Laguna State
Polytechnic University taking up Bachelor of Science in Mathematics. I am in
the process of preparing my thesis as a requirement for graduation. As a part
of our academic requirement, I would like to conduct a research study entitled
Profit Optimization for Hacienda Macalauan Incorporated.
In view of the above, I am requesting permission to be my client for my
research study. This is for research purposes only; therefore rest assured that
all of the information will be treated confidentially.
Hoping and praying of your esteemed consideration of this humble request.
Thank you very much, more power and God Bless.
Very truly yours,
________________
Adrimar A. Adriano
Student Researcher
Noted by:
_________________
Dr, Merilyn P. Jucalla
Thesis Adviser

33

APPENDIX B
List of
Table 1. Daily
Whole Milk
to Sept. 2015

DAY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

JUN
19
0
39
25
29
29
45
23
23
29
24
25
43
47
34
20
22
32
26
24
30
13
27
0
62
30
35
30
18
19

JUL
35
36
13
35
32
17
28
38
29
21
33
27
11
22
42
38
34
28
38
13
27
36
24
28
47
37
15
27
67
55

AUG
29
31
0
37
30
30
35
34
131
18
33
24
36
21
16
33
17
20
28
46
0
5
53
18
20
0
31
19
34
31

SEPT
25
29
25
33
30
21
31
30
85
23
28
29
27
29
33
32
26
28
30
22
22
26
33
22
36
28
25
28
33
24

Demands
Sales for P&B
(1L) from Jun.

34

DAY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

JUN
0
0
13
5
36
21
3
3
13
7
12
13
5
13
12
4
21
14
14
18
4
14
29
18
23
17
38
29
10
27

JUL
20
28
10
25
19
0
16
26
17
10
20
15
3
16
17
11
21
6
13
1
22
29
15
22
23
9
0
25
22
19

AUG
18
6
0
4
37
21
9
37
13
5
16
33
1
0
49
5
4
7
6
25
0
0
17
0
25
66
19
10
67
6

SEPT
15
9
37
18
23
39
3
21
13
20
16
23
11
32
13
16
43
9
13
11
16
4
8
13
15
23
15
16
16
16

Table 2. Daily Sales for P&B Non


Fat Milk (1L) from Jun. to Sept.
2015

35

DAY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

JUN
0
0
50
0
90
0
10
0
80
10
50
50
250
289
116
0
20
180
20
25
80
0
280
0
280
70
160
30
0
200

JUL
150
0
150
234
174
0
30
200
60
0
150
150
0
0
235
60
0
204
125
0
100
132
0
150
100
111
0
145
152
70

AUG
50
0
0
110
30
0
0
110
50
0
0
30
110
273
100
60
0
30
50
60
0
40
50
0
0
80
20
10
84
0

SEPT
62
60
61
59
55
58
51
48
41
46
45
42
38
40
43
41
40
37
38
35
32
30
27
29
26
29
27
25
25
21

Table 3. Daily Sales for P&B


Non Fat Milk (200ml) from Jun.
to Sept. 2015

36

DAY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

JUN
0
0
5
3
6
13
3
0
1
0
7
2
11
5
18
1
3
9
15
1
8
11
11
0
0
5
22
15
2
27

JUL
6
14
6
18
6
1
12
6
8
13
13
20
0
12
34
8
2
5
15
2
25
12
5
2405
10
3
0
22
19
16

AUG
4
1
0
0
28
15
0
21
4
4
12
0
0
0
60
6
0
3
1
20
0
0
9
0
10
25
16
8
50
1

SEPT
39
38
36
35
33
31
29
27
25
23
20
18
16
13
10
8
5
1
2
5
9
13
16
21
30
30
30
29
29
29

Table 4. Daily Sales for P&B


Choco Milk (1L) from Jun. to
Sept. 2015

37

DAY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

JUN
0
0
70
2150
1350
1100
645
0
1230
530
3100
1200
255
3675
3100
0
1650
3985
2180
390
1750
400
3440
0
4770
2295
8470
1300
0
4640

JUL
5750
660
2550
7300
9410
0
1480
6600
1735
150
3780
3900
0
2160
6400
1020
1350
5448
1750
0
3000
2573
2360
100
610
3191
0
3140
3850
4186

AUG
515
1840
0
3710
1450
1400
803
2850
1570
0
2244
1584
2100
993
3850
850
0
2900
3668
2240
0
0
2550
0
1150
2780
3132
1050
2125
835

SEPT
1276
1314
1240
1206
1280
1411
1407
1369
1446
1419
1355
1370
1391
1328
1308
1384
1345
1311
1369
1348
1315
1321
1318
1312
1254
1204
1211
1155
1159
1182

Table 5. Daily Sales for P&B


Choco Milk (200ml) from Jun.
to Sept. 2015

38

DAY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

JUN
0
0
22
10
18
80
88
0
0
3
30
11
30
29
24
0
25
19
10
33
12
0
30
0
44
18
83
44
0
26

JUL
25
32
12
55
30
0
10
32
20
17
23
27
0
5
0
37
17
19
35
0
16
20
28
24
30
46
0
40
21
10

AUG
51
40
0
20
30
87
27
29
50
0
55
17
50
20
56
32
0
45
15
38
0
10
35
0
10
10
0
24
23
35

SEPT
26
26
25
25
25
25
26
27
27
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
25
25
25
25
25
26
26
26

Table 6. Daily Sales for P&B


Live Yogurt Strawberry from Jun.
to Sept. 2015

39

Table 7.
for P&B Live
Blueberry
Sept. 2015

DAY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

JUN
0
0
18
9
26
80
74
0
0
3
20
11
34
25
24
0
15
19
10
34
26
0
20
0
58
21
69
20
0
16

JUL
15
38
17
55
42
0
7
27
18
17
23
31
20
15
0
37
15
25
30
0
20
30
35
10
30
40
0
40
21
0

AUG
46
20
0
20
19
54
41
28
29
25
5
25
36
0
53
25
0
20
15
28
0
0
41
10
41
10
20
9
32
0

SEPT
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23

Daily Sales
Yogurt
from Jun. to

40

DAY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

JUN
0
0
17
0
17
40
25
0
0
17
15
11
28
25
15
0
20
12
10
30
22
0
24
0
24
10
59
22
0
16

JUL
5
21
29
40
38
0
15
37
28
18
20
51
0
5
0
39
54
25
11
12
10
45
21
2
29
24
0
60
29
27

AUG
38
16
0
10
42
25
20
42
20
15
40
10
53
17
46
1
0
5
10
50
0
0
31
0
14
10
13
32
25
26

SEPT
25
24
24
24
24
25
25
24
25
25
24
24
25
25
24
24
24
24
24
25
24
24
24
24
24
24
23
23
24
24
Sept. 2015

Table 8. Daily Sales for P&B


Live Yogurt Nata from Jun. to

41

DAY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

JUN
0
0
10
8
15
40
29
0
0
10
30
1
34
34
15
0
20
32
10
20
12
0
30
41
0
49
22
0
0
26

JUL
25
21
23
50
29
0
15
51
20
10
21
29
0
7
0
34
21
25
18
0
10
16
27
2
15
42
10
20
10
24

AUG
39
17
0
10
55
12
20
22
22
0
30
10
38
12
26
7
0
10
10
25
0
5
22
0
10
0
10
14
22
31

SEPT
13
13
13
12
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
11
11
11
11
10
10
10
10
10
9

Table 9. Daily Sales for P&B Live Yogurt Mango from Jun. to Sept. 2015

42

DAY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

JUN
0
0
10
0
10
30
31
0
0
0
15
11
18
29
9
0
10
21
10
10
15
0
20
0
26
10
29
29
0
10

JUL
5
24
24
40
17
0
11
31
10
12
23
32
0
5
0
34
10
10
5
0
32
26
20
2
27
15
0
30
12
2

AUG
28
15
0
10
36
30
54
12
11
0
30
10
39
0
36
5
0
10
10
10
0
5
31
0
10
10
9
15
12
29

SEPT
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16

Table 10. Daily Sales for P&B Live Yogurt Pineapple from Jun. to Sept. 2015

43

APPENDIX C
FINAL COMPUTATION

44

APPENDIX D
Answer Report of Final Computation

45

Target Cell (Max)


Cell
$L$
3

Name
income Total

Original
Value

Final
Value

171875

171875

Original
Value
2305.1345
97
2007.6978
74

Final
Value
2305.1345
97
2007.6978
74

0
2007.6978
74

0
2007.6978
74

0
385.47800
72
385.47800
72
385.47800
72
385.47800
72
385.47800
72

0
385.47800
72
385.47800
72
385.47800
72
385.47800
72
385.47800
72

Adjustable Cells
Cell
$B$
2
$C$
2
$D$
2
$E$
2
$F$
2
$G$
2
$H$
2
$I$
2
$J$
2
$K$
2

Name
no. of Whole Milk 1L
no. of Non Fat Milk 1L
no. of Non Fat Milk 200ml
no. of Choco Milk 1L
no. of Choco Milk 200ml
no. of Yogurt Strawberry
no. of Yogurt Blueberry
no. of Yogurt Nata
no. of Yogurt Mango
no. of Yogurt Pineapple

46

APPENDIX E
Sensitivity Report of the Final Computation

Adjustable Cells
Cell
$B$
2
$C$
2
$D$
2
$E$
2
$F$
2
$G$
2
$H$
2

Name
no. of Whole Milk 1L
no. of Non Fat Milk 1L
no. of Non Fat Milk 200ml
no. of Choco Milk 1L
no. of Choco Milk 200ml
no. of Yogurt Strawberry
no. of Yogurt Blueberry

$I$2

no. of Yogurt Nata

$J$2
$K$
2

no. of Yogurt Mango


no. of Yogurt Pineapple

Final
Value
2305.134
597
2007.697
874
0
2007.697
874
0
385.4780
072
385.4780
072
385.4780
072
385.4780
072
385.4780
072

Reduced
Gradient
0
0
1.750013
351
0
1.750013
351
0
0
0
0
0

Constraints
Final
Cell
$L$
5
$L$
7
$L$
8
$L$

Name
production and labor cost
Total
Whole Milk 1L Total
Non Fat Milk 1L Total
Non Fat Milk 200ml Total

Value
687500
2305.134
597
2007.697
874
0

Lagrange
Multiplie
r
0.25
0
0
0

47

Cell
$L$
3

Cell
$B$
2
$C$
2
$D$
2Low
er
$E$
2Limi
t
$F$
2 0
$G$
2 0
$H$
2 0
$I$
2 0
$J$
2 0
$K$
2 0
0
0
0
0

9 Target
Value
$L$ Name
Choco Milk 1L Total
10
income
$L$ Total
Choco Milk 200ml171875
Total
11
$L$
Yogurt Strawberry Total
12Adjustable
$L$
Yogurt Blueberry Total
Name
Value
13
2305.134
$L$
Yogurt Nata Total
no. of Whole Milk 1L
597
14
no. of Non Fat Milk
2007.697
$L$
Yogurt Mango Total
1L
874
15
no. of Non Fat Milk
$L$
Yogurt Pineapple
Target
Upper Total
Targ0
200ml
16
et
2007.697
Limit
Resu
no.Result
of Choco Milk 1L
874
lt
no. of Choco Milk
109636.3
2305.134
1718
200ml
0
659
597
75
no. of Yogurt
385.4780
121682.5
2007.697 1718
Strawberry
072
531
874
75
no. of Yogurt
385.4780
171875
0
1718
Blueberry
072
75
385.4780
121682.5
2007.697
1718
no. of Yogurt Nata
072
531
874
75
385.4780
171875
0 1718
no. of
Yogurt Mango
072
75
no. of Yogurt
385.4780
170024.7
385.4780
1718
Pineapple
072
056
072
75
170024.7
385.4780 1718
056
072
75
170024.7
385.4780 1718
056
072
75
170024.7
385.4780 1718
056
072
75
170024.7
385.4780 1718
056
072
75

2007.697
874
0
346.9302
065
346.9302
065
346.9302
065
346.9302
065
346.9302
065

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

APPENDIX F
Limit Report of Final
Computation

48

ENDA MACALAUAN INCORPORATED A PROFIT OPTIMIZATIO N FOR

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

49

Linear
Programming

1)
What is the optimal
number of Whole
Milk 1 Liter to be
produced?

Statement of the Mathematical


Problem
Treatment
Trough the
mathematical model
used, the optimal
number of Whole Milk 1
Liter is pieces.

Findings

-tionsRecommenda

Through the
Other researchers
Mathematical model
may also use
used in this study, the
another kind of
optimal numbers of
software for solving
Whole Milk 1Liter to be
the optimal
produced were
allocation of
determined.
resources and
determining the
optimal number of
products should be
sold in order to
maximize the net
profit.

Conclusions

50

Conclusions
Findings

As the study showed


that in order to
formulate the
mathematical model
of the allocation of
resources problem,
the objectives must
be determined.

-tionsRecommenda
Conclusions-tionsRecommenda

Trough the
Through
Trough
the the
Future
researchers
Through
the
mathematical model mathematical
mathematical
model
model
should
have
amodel
follow
mathematical
1)
2)
used, the optimal
usedthe
in this
study, the
used,
optimal
study
on the
used up
in this
study,
What are the
What are thenumber of Choco Milk
number
of Choco
Milk
number
of Non
Fat Milk
determining
theMilk
number
of
Non
Fat
optimal numbers of optimal numbers
of and Choco Milk1Liter
1Liter
1Liter
and
Choco Milk
to be
produced
additional
1Liter andland,
Non labor
Fat
Choco Milk 1Liter
Non Fat Milk 1Liter
200 ml is pieces. should
200 be
ml to
be produced
pieces
and
and
capital
of
a
farm
200ml
to
be
produced
and Chcoco Mik
and Non Fat Milk
determined.
for Nonwere
Fat Milk
200 ml
using
linear
was
determined.
200 ml to be
200ml to be
is pieces.
programming
to
produced?
produced?
make the model
better.
Linear
Linear
Programming
Programming

Statement of the Mathematical


Statement of the Mathematical
Findings
Problem
Treatment
Problem
Treatment

51

Conclusions

Statement of the
Problem

Mathematical
Treatment

Linear
Programming

Aside from using the


idle part of the land
2)
of a farm plantation What are the optimal
in maximizing the numbers of Yogurt
income of a farm, Strawberry, Yogurt
other ways of
Blueberry, Yogurt
maximizing the
Nata, Yogurt Mango
indicated objectives
and Yogurt
may be used in
Pineapple to be
future studies
produced?

-tionsRecommenda

Conclusions

Trough the
Through the
mathematical model
mathematical model
used the optimal
used in this study, the
number of Yogurt
number of Yogurt
Strawberry, Yogurt
Strawberry, Yogurt
Blueberry, Yogurt Nata,
Blueberry, Yogurt Nata,
Yogurt Mango and
Yogurt Mango and
Yogurt Pineapple is
Yogurt Pineapple to be
pieces.
produced were
determined.

Findings

Future researchers
should have a follow
up study on
determining the
additional land, labor
and capital of a farm
using linear
programming to
make the model
better.

-tionsRecommenda

52

53

CURRICULUM VITAE

ADRIMAR AQUINO ADRIANO


Address: Brgy. San Isidro,Pagsanjan,Laguna
Contact number: 0916-854-3503
Email Address: adrimaraquino@yahoo.com

Personal Information
Date of birth:
Place of birth:
Age:
Sex:
Citizenship:
Civil Status:

January 12, 1996


Pagsanjan, Laguna
20
Male
Filipino
Single

Educational Background
Tertiary Level:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS


Laguna State Polytechnic University
Sta. Cruz Main Campus, Sta. Cruz, Laguna
A.Y. 2013-present
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS
Southern Luzon State University
Lucban, Quezon Province
A.Y. 2012-2013

Secondary Level:

Pagsanjan National High School


Pagsanjan, Laguna
S.Y. 2008 2012

Elementary Level:

Francisco Benitez Memorial School


Pagsanjan, Laguna
S.Y. 2002-2008

54

Recent Training/Seminars Attended


Participant:

Mobius Action: Mathematical Techniques and Technology


Southern Luzon State University
Main Campus, Lucban, Quezon
October 02, 2013

Participant:

Pre-departure Seminar Towards the Working


World: Its Opportunities, Challenges and
Constructive Adaptation
Riceland Pagsanjan Resort and
Restaurant, Pagsanjan, Laguna
September 04, 2014

Participant:

Square off 101: the Mathematics Debate


Laguna State Polytechnic University
Main Campus, Santa Cruz, Laguna
September 16, 2014

Participant:

Statistical Workshop and Seminar


Laguna State Polytechnic University
Main Campus, Santa Cruz, Laguna
September 24, 2014

Trainee:

On-the-Job Training
LandBank of the Philippines-Sta Cruz Capitol Branch
P. Guevarra St., Brgy. I, Sta. Cruz, Laguna
April 6-May 13, 2014

55