Você está na página 1de 9

Lab: Yes, It DOES Matter

Purpose: To explore the 3 states of matter and some of their physical characteristics.
Notes will be completed in your WSQ slides for each station - each station should be a new slide.
Title each slide according to the station.
TARGET:
Define matter and the three main states it exists in.
General Procedures:
1. At each station complete the following:
a. Read the learning targets.
b. Complete the activity by following the procedures.
c. Respond to the question, if listed, using data from the activity and your prior knowledge.
After viewing the videos, you may expand on your response.
d. Use BLUE colored font throughout this document to help you/me see your typed work.
e. View the videos that are linked for each station. As you view/listen to the video add a few
notes in the section of each station. You may use bullet points to list the key concepts
from each video. Return to the question at the end of the activity and see if there is
anything you could add to expand on your response.
f. Return to the LEARNING TARGETS after completing each station and check if you have
reached a level of understanding indicating that you have mastered each target.
2. Submit the URL for your work in the Google Form listed in this weeks agenda. Put your copy into
your Science Hapara folder - in the Matter Unit folder.

STATION #1: Solids


1. Read the LEARNING TARGETS:
a. Define a solid
b. Calculate the density of a solid
c. Explain density
2. Complete the data table below.
Data Table
Material

Iron (Fe)

Physical
Characteristics
and Properties

Mass
Measure to the
nearest 0.1g

Black, cube,
smooth,

127.9 g

Brass

gold, shiny, cube,

137.4 g

Nylon

Whitish, cube, 6
sides, hard,
opaque

18.2 g

Light colored,
wood, brown,
striped, cube,
hard

11.4 g

Oak

Volume
LxWxH
Show work
15.625 cm^3

15.625 cm ^3

Density
D= m / V
Show Work
8.2 g/cm^3
8.8 g/ cm^3

15.625 cm^3

1.1648 g/ cm^3

15.625 cm^3

0.73 g/cm^3

3. Question: Based on your calculations. what can you determine about the density of substances and
their relationship to volume. (Hint: What did you notice about the volume for these 4 materials?)
The volumes were the same so m
ass had a bigger impact
4. View these videos to help you. Take notes on the video in your WSQ slides; title the slides per
the video:
Video - Solids
Video - Physical and Chemical Properties and Changes

STATION #2: Density of Liquids


1. Read the LEARNING TARGETS:
a. Define a liquid same volume different shape
b. Calculate the density of a liquid mass/ volume
2. Complete the following procedures:
a. Measure the mass of the 50 ml graduated cylinder marked water.
b. Add 50ml of water to the graduated cylinder.
c. Measure the mass of 50 ml of liquid in the cylinder to the nearest 0.1g (the two together).
d. Subtract the mass of the cylinder. Subtracting these will give you the mass of the liquid
only. Measure to the nearest 0.1g.
e. Calculate the density of the liquid using the formula for density (D = m/v).
f. Complete the data table for water.
g. Repeat procedures a - f for the other liquids listed in the data table. Each cylinder may
have a different mass so check the cylinder for its starting mass.
h. Return all solutions to their beakers.
i. Rinse all graduated cylinders with water. NO SOAP!
Data Table
Material

Physical
Properties
of the liquid

Mass of
cylinder to
the nearest
0.1g

Mass of
cylinder and
liquid to the
nearest 0.1g

Mass of
liquid to the
nearest 0.1g

Clear,

32.7 g

81.3 g

48.6 g

50 ml

.97 g/ml

Saltwater
Solution

Clear,
transparent,
bubbles init

32.7 g

86.7 g

54.1 g

50 ml

1.082 g/ml

Sugar
Water
Solution

Clear, looks
like water

32.7 g

84.5 g

51.8 g

50 ml

1.04 g/ml

Copper
Chloride
solution

Blue,
transparent

32.8 g

89.4 g

56.6 g

50 ml

1.13 g/ml

Water

Volume of
the liquid
to the
nearest 0.1
ml

Density of
the liquid
to the
nearest 0.01
g/ml

3. Question: What can you conclude about the density of solution when a solute like sugar, salt, or
copper chloride has been dissolved in it? (HINT: Compare water (solvent) to the others
(solutions).
a. The density increase when you add solutes
4. View these videos to help you. Take notes on the video in your WSQ slides; title the slides per
the video:
Video - Liquids
Video - Physical and Chemical Properties and Changes
A liquids atoms are close together, but they move around

STATION #3 (Part 1): Gases


1. Read the LEARNING TARGETS:
a. Define a gas
b. Calculate the density of a gas
c. Explain density
2. Complete the following procedures:
a. Measure the mass of the empty balloon. __1.5_ g
b. Measure the mass of an air filled balloon. __2_ g
c. Calculate the mass of the air inside the balloon by
subtracting the measurement from step a from step
b.
_.5__ g
d. Measure the circumference of the balloon with the tape measure to the nearest 0.1cm.
You will need to wrap a cloth measuring tape around the widest part of the balloon.
__70.9_cm
e. Calculate the volume of the balloon by following these simple steps.
i.
Begin by calculating the radius of the balloon:
radius (r) = circumference of a circle / 2
= 3.142
radius (r) of the balloon = _11.29__ cm
ii.

Volume of a sphere(Balloon) = (4 x x r) / 3
Volume of the balloon = ___6028.4_____ cm3

f. Calculate the density of the air in the ballon: D= m / V Set up your equation below. Use
proper units for your final calculation.
Density of the air in the balloon = __0.0000829___

STATION #3 (Part 2): Changes in volume of a gas due to pressure


3. Read the LEARNING TARGETS:
a. Define a gas

b. Calculate the density of a gas


c. Explain density
4. Complete the following:
a. Draw the gas particles movements inside an inflated balloon.

b. Put a small amount of pressure on the inflated balloon. Do you feel some of the air inside it
move? YES or NO
c. As you continue to add a small amount of pressure to the inflated balloon, do you see areas
of the balloons wall becoming thinner; feeling as though it is about to burst? YES or NO
d. Review the image below that shows how the pressure of gas changes from the inflated
balloon to the deflated balloon using arrows inside and outside of the balloon.

e. Draw the balloon after most the air has pushed out of the balloon.

5. Use the diagram above to complete the following. Note: The number of gas particles do not
change in any of the diagram.
a. What happens to the volume as the pressure is increased? T
he water volume go down
6. Question: Based on the diagram above, Write your version of Boyles Law: How does pressure
affect the airs volume?
a. When pressure goes up, volume go down
7. View this video to help you. Take notes on the video in your WSQ slides; title the slides per the
video:
Video - Gases

STATION 4: Liquid Solutions and Boiling Point Temperatures


CAUTION: beakers and hot plate may be hot.
1. Read the LEARNING TARGETS:
a. Define a solute, solvent and solution
b. Identify how a solute changes the physical properties of a liquid
2. Observe the 3 beakers:
a. Beaer 1: Water
b. Beaker 2 = salt solution (In order to make the salt
solution, a certain amount of salt (solid) was
added to water (liquid) and the contents were
stirred until the salt dissolved. See image to the
right.)
c. Beaker 3 = copper chloride solution

d. (In order to make the copper chloride solution, a certain amount of copper chloride (solid)
was added to the water (liquid) and the contents were stirred until the copper chloride
dissolved.

e. Complete the table:

Beaker Contents

Solute

Solvent

Water

Solution

Water

Saltwater

Salt

Water

Salt water (Sodium


Chloride Solution)

Copper Chloride
Solution

Copper chloride power

Water

Copper Chloride
Solution

3. Based on the boiling point temperatures of the three substances what can you conclude about the
boiling point temperature when a solute is dissolved in a solvent to make a solution? In other words,
discuss how the boiling temperature was different for both the salt solution and the copper solution in
comparison to the water.
Type of Liquid

Water

Salt Water Solution

Copper Chloride
Solution

Temperature C

100 C

102 C

993 C

3. Question: Based on the boiling point temperatures of the three substances what can you conclude
about the boiling point temperature when a solute is dissolved in a solvent to make a solution? In
other words, discuss how the boiling temperature was different for both the salt solution and the
copper solution in comparison to the water.
a. The moe of the solid the hotter the water will have to be
4. View this video to help you. Take notes:
Video - Solutes, Solvents, and Solutions
Take notes on the video in your WSQ slides; title the slides per the video:

Station 5: The Change in Volume of a Gas due to change in Temperature or


Pressure
1. Read the LEARNING TARGET:
a. Identify how volume changes due to changes in temperature and pressure
2. Define volume: __how big something is (how much space it takes up)
a. (w x l x h)_
3. Complete the following procedures:
a. You need a funnel, a bowl, cup of ice, an empty water bottle, a beaker of hot water and a
beaker of ice water.
b. Measure the temperature of the hot water and the cold water using the digital
thermometer. Please record the temperatures in Celsius.
i.
Hot water: _____90.14____
ii.
Cold water: ___3,2_____
c. Take the cap off of a water bottle and insert the funnel.
d. Carefully fill the water bottle half full with hot water and cap it.
e. Place the ice cubes in the bowl and pour the cold water into the bowl.
f. Place the water bottle in the bowl of ice water.
g. Observe what happens. Listen for a pop and observe the water bottle itself. This should
take about 90 seconds.
h. Remove the bottle from the hot water and remove the cap on the bottle.
i. Carefully pour out the hot water and LEAVE the ice water in the bowl.
j. View the video : Crush a Water Bottle: Is that what happened for you?

4. Question: What happens to the bottle and why? See diagram below to help you.
Temperature

HOT to COLD

COLD to HOT

Did volume increase or


decrease?

decreased

increased

Crushed bottle

Big bottle

How do you know? Why?

.
5. Question: What happens to the bottle and why? See diagram below to help you.

6. In both parts of the diagram, the number of gas particles remain the same.
a. What is happening to the volume as the temperature is increased?
i.
Volume go up.
b. What is happening to the movement of the gas particles as the temperature is increased?
i.
Movement go up
7. Question: Based on the diagram above, Write your version of Charless Law: How does
temperature affect the volume and movement of gas?
a. When temperature goes up, Volume go up.
8. View this video to help you. Take notes on the video in your WSQ slides
Video - Gases - May be a repeat from station 3, but pay attention to Boyles Law and Charless

STATION #6 (Part 1): Conservation of Mass


1. Read the LEARNING TARGET:
a. Describe conservation of mass
2. Complete the following procedures:
a. Measure the mass of each item listed in the data table below to the nearest 0.1g.
Item
Mass
(0.1g)

Glass 400ml beaker


139.1

Rubber stopper
24.6

Chemical scooper
13.0

Test Tube Holder


14.5

b. Calculate the sum mass of all the objects by adding the 4 measurements together.
Total mass of the 4 objects = __191.2___ g
c.

Gently place all the items into the glass 400 ml beaker and place it on the digital scale.
Record the mass to the nearest 0.1g.
Total mass of the 4 objects = ___191.1____ g

3. Question: Compare the two total masses and determine if the Conservation of Mass was observed.
(The digital scale is only accurate to 0.1g so your totals could be off by 0.5g
a. When we added each object the sum more.

STATION #6 (Part 2): Conservation of Mass


4. Read the LEARNING TARGET:
a. Describe conservation of mass
5. Complete the following procedures:
a. Measure the mass of a 100 ml graduated cylinder to the nearest 0.1g.
b. Fill the graduated cylinder with 100 ml of water.

___40.7_ g

c.
d.
e.
f.

Measure the mass of the 100 ml of water and the graduated cylinder.
139.9_ g
Subtract step a from step c to get the mass of the water.
_99.2_ g
Measure the mass of a 250 ml beaker to the nearest 0.1g.
_93.7_ g
Using a spatula/chemical scooper measure out 4.0g of salt on a weighing dish. Dont forget
to zero out the weighing dish before adding salt to it.
g. Pour the 100 ml of water into the beaker.
h. Pour the 4.0g of salt into the beaker and mix it using a stirring rod.
i. Measure the mass of the salt solution you have made: beaker, water, and dissolved salt to
the nearest 0.1g. _196.7_ g
j. Add the mass of water calculated in step d to the mass of the salt (4.0 g), to the mass of
the beaker (step e) , the beaker, and salt together. _ g
6. Question: Compare the mass in step i to step j. What do you notice about these two masses?
Salt is the _solvent__ in the saltwater solution.
Water is the _solute___ is the saltwater solution.
Based on the two activities at this lab station was the concept of Conservation of Mass
observed? Explain.
7. View the video below to help you:
Video - Conservation of Mass - Take notes on the video in your WSQ slides