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Merchant Of Venice

Project By Zouman Hashim, Syed Abdullah


and Abdussalam Boujettif:

Act I, scene i:
Antonio is a merchant of venice, he
complains to his friends, Salarino and
Solanio, that he is really sad and really
doesnt know why. Antonio has send out
several trade ships to various harbours.
Antonio is scared that the risky way of
transporting might sink his entire
investment. Solanio then says that you
must find love but Antonio ignores him.

The three men meet Bassanio, Antonios


relative, walking with his two friends,
Lorenzo and Gratiano. Salarino and
Solanio say farewell and depart. Antonio
asks Bassanio to tell him about his secret
love, Bassanio admits that although he

already owes Antonio money from before,


he has fallen in love with Portia, a rich girl
from Belmont and hopes to marry her. In
order to woo Portia, Bassanio says he
needs to borrow more money from
Antonio. Antonio replies that he cannot
give Bassanio another loan because he
has already invested all his money.

Act I, scene ii:


At Belmont, Portia complains to Nerissa,
that she is tired of the world because her
dead fathers will says, she cannot marry a
man of his choice. Instead, Portias various
suitors must choose between three
caskets which are gold, silver and lead.
One of the caskets has a picture of her
portrait. The man who guesses correctly
will win Portias hand in marriage, but
those who guess incorrectly must swear
never to marry anyone. The suitors who
have come to guess are a Neapolitan

prince, a Palatine count, a French


nobleman, an English baron, a Scottish
lord and the nephew of the duke of
Saxony. Portia criticizes many of their
hilarious faults. Some of the suitors leave
without even attempting to guess because
they fear of the penalty for guessing
wrong. This fact relieves Portia, then she
remembers Bassanio, who has visited
before. A servant enters to tell Portia that
the prince of Morocco will arrive soon,
Portia is not happy at all to hear the news.

Act I, scene iii:


Shylock is a Jewish moneylender, he
agrees to loan Bassanio three thousand
ducats for three months. Bassanio assures
Shylock that Antonio will guarantee the
loan, but Shylock is doubtful because
Antonios wealth is currently invested in
business that may fail. In the end,
however, Shylock decides that Antonios

guarantee of the loan will be sufficient


assurance, and asks to speak with him.
When Antonio arrives, Shylock confesses
his hatred for him. Antonio makes it clear
to Shylock that he is not in the habit of
borrowing or lending money but has
decided to make an exception on behalf of
his friend Bassanio.

As he calculates the interest on Bassanios


loan, Shylock remembers the many times
that Antonio has cursed him, calling him a
misbeliever, cut-throat, dog and spit
upon his Jewish gaberdine. Antonio
responds that he is likely to do so again,
and insists that Shylock lend him the
money as an enemy. Shylock offers to
make the loan without interest. Instead,
he suggests that Antonio give a pound of
his own flesh if the loan is not repaid in
time. Bassanio warns Antonio against
entering such an agreement, but Antonio
assures him that he will have no trouble

repaying the debt, as his ships will soon


bring him wealth that far exceeds the
value of the loan.