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Gujarat Co-operative Milk Marketing Federation Limited

ANALYSIS ON EFFECTIVENSS OF DMS & SFA SOFTWARE AMONG AMULS


DISTRIBUTORS
SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS
OF THE DEGREE OF POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN MANAGEMENT
CHANDRAGUPT INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT
PATNA
BY
[KUNDAN KUMAR]
[22/07/2016]

CHANDRAGUPT INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT PATNA


SYNOPSIS

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In this Summer Internship, we have carried out a project for dairy co-operative, AMUL in
eastern India (Patna) that has developed a successful model using Technology for doing
business in large emerging economic country like India. It has been primarily responsible,
through its innovative practices to become worlds largest producer of milk and other dairy
products and to reach the end user to cater a better service to them on time when there is
demand in the market.
This project includes understanding and analysis of Management Information System of
FMCG Industry and how they carried out the solution for system vulnerability and how it
will help in increment in business dealing in day to day running market. It also includes the
complete distribution network system to cater the end user consumer.
This project basically focus on the monitoring the distributors and salesmen and try to find
out the potential reason due to which distributors are not using the Management Information
System properly , due to which the parent company AMUL is not able to know whether
the distributors are doing their work properly or not and also there is no real time updation
of data due to which there is no demand supply fulfillment sometime which causes company
growth a hindrance.
In the emerging economy like India a different industrial sectors may be at different stages of
development. In some of the sectors all the environmental characteristics faced may not hold.
However, a subset of strategies followed by AMUL-GMCMMF ltd. would still be very
useful. Thus, firms that are contemplating addressing large underdeveloped markets or have
an intention of taking the advantages of extensive but marginal supplier base would still
benefit.

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DECLARATION

This is to certify that this report entitled [ANALYSIS ON EFFECTIVENESS OF


DMS & SFA SOFTWARE AMONG AMUL DISTRIBUTORS ] submitted by
[KUNDAN KUMAR ] to Chandragupt Institute of Management Patna, as

requirement for the award of the Post Graduate Diploma in Management, is a


bonafide record of research work carried out by him/her under our supervision. The
contents of this report, in full or in parts, have not been submitted to any other
Institute or University for the award of any degree or diploma.

(Name of the organizational mentor)

------------------------------ (Sign)

(Name of the faculty mentor)

------------------------------- (Sign)

Date: ___________________

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I take this opportunity to express my gratitude and sincere thanks to MR. Rebti Raman,
branch manager (Sales), GCMMF, Patna. Their continuous support and mentorship helped
me in greater understanding of the business and provided new insights into the project.
I would also like to thank Prof. Dr V Mukunda das my project guide for the summer
internship, who gave his valuable suggestions whenever sought during the course of the
project.
I would also like to thank all those GCMMF employees whom I met but who could not find a
separate mention but have helped me directly/indirectly
Last but not the least I am grateful to CIMP for providing me with an opportunity and
platform for putting the theory that we learned as a part of our curriculum, into practice.

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CONTENT
CHAPTER -1 INTRODUCTION
1.1 Industry Overview 7-9
1.1.1 production and consumption . 10
1.2 GCMMF- Amul overview 11-13
1.3 Amul story.. 14-17
1.4 Amul and the excellence.. 18-19
CHAPTER-2 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY . 20-21
CHAPTER- 3 UNDERSTANDING AMUL DMS & SFA .. 22
3.1 About DMS & SFA.. 23
3.2 Features of DMS & SFA . 24-25
3.3 Benefit of DMS. 26
3.4 Challenges . 27
3.5 Customized system 28-29
CHAPTER- 4 SECONDARY & FIELD OBSERVATION FIDINGS .. 30
4.1 Need for the software 31
4.2 Benefit of the software.. 31
4.3 Capabilities of the software 32
4.4 Flow chart of DMS & SFA 33
4.5 Information level of DMS & SFA 34-36
CHAPTER-5 Analysis of Primary data
5.1 Details of distributors using DMS. 37-47
5.2 Major problem faced by the distributors while using DMS & SFA software 48
5.3 Specific distributors wise analysis of salesmen.. 49-53
5.4 Salesmen wise Interpretation ... 54- 58
CHAPTER 6 CONCLUSION AND SUGGESTIONS. 59
6.1 Conclusions .. 59
6.2 Suggestions ... 60- 63

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REFERENCES
ANNEXURE 1
ANNEXURE 2

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CHAPTER 1- INTRODUCTION
1.1 INDUSTRY OVERVIEW
India is the worlds largest producer of dairy products by volume, accounting for more than
13% of worlds total milk production, and it also had world largest dairy herd. As the country
consumes almost all of its own milk production, India was neither an active importer nor an
exporter of dairy products prior to year 2000. However since the implementation of
Operation Flood Program, the situation changed significantly and imports of dairy products
reduced to very small quantities. From 2001, India has become a net exporter of dairy
products and after 2003 Indias dairy import has dipped while exports have increased at a fast
rate. Yet the countrys share in global dairy trade still remains at minor levels of 0.3 and 0.4
percent for exporters and importers respectively. This is due to direct consumption of liquid
milk by the producer households as well as the demand for processed dairy products that has
increased with the growth of income levels, which we have left little dairy surpluses for
export. Nevertheless, India consistently exports specialty products such as casein for food
processing or pharmaceuticals. The Indian dairy sector is also different from other dairy
producing countries as India places its emphasis on both cattle and buffalo milk. In 2010, the
government and National Dairy Development have drawn up a National Dairy Plan (NDP)
that proposes to nearly double Indias milk production by 2020. This plan will endeavor to
increase the countrys milk productivity, improve access to quality feeds and improve farmer
access to the organized market. These goals will be achieved through activities that focus on
increasing cooperative membership and growing the network of milk collection facilities
throughout India.
Despite its huge production volume, India nevertheless faces a milk supply gap due to
increasing demand from a growing middle class population. Estimation suggests that Indian
dairy production is growing at a rate of 4 % per year, yet consumer demand is growing at

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approximately double the rate. Apart from rapidly increasing demand for milk and dairy
products, other reasons such as the increased cattle feed cost and low availability of dairy
farm labor in the rural areas have also resulted in increase in the cost of production. On the
other hand, the strong pressure from European Markets to open up its market as well as
proposed free trade agreement with Australia and New Zealand may also put Indias dairy
sector in the risk of being jeopardizes. In order to maintain the development of dairy industry,
focus needs to be placed on several areas. First cost of production has to be reduced through
increasing productivity of animals, improve animal health care and breeding facilities and
management of dairy animals. Second, Indian dairy industry needs to further develop proper
dairy production, processing and marketing infrastructure, which is capable of meeting
international quality requirements. India is the worlds largest producer of dairy producer of
dairy products by volume and has the worlds largest dairy herd. The industry accounts for
around 17% of worlds total milk production with an anticipated milk production of 128
million ton, and is also worlds largest consumer of dairy products, almost all of its own milk
production. Dairying has been regardless as one of the activities that could contribute to
alleviating the poverty and unemployment especially in the drought prone and rain fed areas.
Milk production in India has developed significantly in the past few decades from a low
volume of 17 million ton in 1951 to 128 million ton in 2012. Currently, the Indian dairy
market is growing at an annual rate of 7%. Demand supply gap has become imminent in this
due to changing in consumption habits, dynamic demographic patterns and rapid urbanization
of rural India. This means that there is an urgent need for the growth rate of the dairy sector
to match the rapidly growing Indian economy.

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KEY STATISTICS FOR INDIAS DAIRY INDUSTRY


Particulars

statistics

Annual milk production 2014-15

146.3 million ton

Annual export volume

70790 ton

Share of world dairy production

18.5 %

Number of milk producers cooperative


unions
Number of local dairy cooperatives

170

Per capita consumption

322gm/day

Estimated percentage of dairy farmers in


organized sector
% of dairy produce consumed by
unorganized sector

30 %

15

70 %

In 2014, around half of Indias total dairy import by volume consists of butter and other dairy
derived fats, followed by lactose and milk powder. Import of milk and milk products is
permitted without any quantitative limitations, although tariff rate quotas apply and import
permits are required. On the other hand, in terms of exports, milk powders and baby food
constituted more than 40 % of Indias total exports by volume, followed by case in, milk and
cream, butter and other fats and other processed dairy products. Almost all of Indias dairy
exports are meant for Asian and African countries. In Asia, neighboring countries in South
Asia and Middle East are main buyers. Despite many efforts, India had not been able to
breach the European markets, while the market in South America remains untapped. Export
figures clearly illustrates that the Indian dairy export is still developing and surpluses are
neither systemic nor consistent. However, there future outlook for export of Indian dairy
products is rather positive, as indigenous milk products and desserts are becoming popular
with the ethnic population spread all over the world and there is a strong likelihood that the
export demand for these products will grow.

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1.1.1PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION


The Indian dairy sector is different from other dairy producing countries as India places its
emphasis on both cattle and buffalo milk. Out of all bovine population in India, 40 percent
are indigenous cows, 46 percent are buffaloes and 14 percent are imported European or North
American cattle crossbreeds. Out of the nations total milk production, about 55 percent
comes from buffaloes and the remains from dairy cows. Traditionally, buffalo milk has been
preferred for its high milk fat content. However as the organized sector procures more milk,
dairy cattle become more popular due to their increased yields and shorter dry periods. Milk
production India show upward trend, it increased from 55.6 million tons in 1991-1992 to 128
million tons in 2011-2012 with per capita availability of 322 grams per day in 2011- 2012
which increased from 178 grams per day in year 1991-1992. Despite of huge production
volume, India nevertheless faces a milk supply gap due to increasing demand from a growing
middle class population. Estimation suggests that Indian dairy production is growing at a rate
of about four percent per year, yet consumer demand is growing at approximately double that
rate. In response to increasing strong demand for milk products, the Indian dairy industry is
growing its milk production in several years. For example, dairy farmers have responded to
increasing dairy product prices by increasing herd sizes. In addition, those farmers working
directly with buyers from the organized sectors generally have access to modern extension
services, which provides support for the dairy farmers to improve management, feeding,
fertility and veterinary care. Many of these extension services provides offer artificially
insemination services that aims to further improving yields with new dairy cattle genetics.
Artificial insemination services are expected to grow in the future, as the government of India
continues to develop protocols for imported genetics products. Finally, commercial dairies
are also continuing with strengthening their presence in India.

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1.2 GCMMF AMUL Overview


Name of the Company
Limited(GCMMF)

Gujarat Co-operative Milk Marketing Federation

Head Office

Amul Dairy Road, Anand 388 001, Gujarat

Depots

45

Brand Name

Amul

Zonal Office

Ahmedabad, Mumbai, New Delhi, Kolkata, Chennai, Guwahati

Form of Organization

Co Operative

Website

http://www.amul.com/

Gujarat Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation Ltd. (GCMMF), is India's largest food
product marketing organization with annual turnover (2014-15)20,733 crore. Its daily milk
procurement is approx. 13 million lit per day from 16914 village milk cooperative
societies,17 member unions covering 24 districts, and 3.18 million milk producer
members.
It is the Apex organization of the Dairy Cooperatives of Gujarat, popularly known as
'AMUL',which aims to provide remunerative returns to the farmers and also serve the
interest of consumers by providing quality products which are good value for money. Its
success has not only been emulated in India but serves as a model for rest of the World. It
operates through 48 Sales Offices and has a dealer network of 5000 dealers and 10 lakh
retailers, one of the largest such networks in India. Its product range comprises milk, milk
powder, health beverages, ghee, butter, cheese, Pizza cheese, Ice-cream, Paneer, chocolates,
and traditional Indian sweets,etc. GCMMF is India's largest exporter of Dairy Products. It has
been accorded a "Trading House"status. Many of our products are available in USA, Gulf
Countries, Singapore, The Philippines,Japan, China and Australia. GCMMF has received the
APEDA Award from Government of India.

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A dairy cooperative, AMUL (Anand Milk Union Limited) GCMMF (Gujarat Cooperative
Milk Marketing Federation) Limited In western India which has developed a successful
model for doing business in large emerging economy. It has been primarily responsible,
throughout its innovative practices, for India to become worlds largest producer of milk.
Many of largest emerging economies have underdeveloped markets and fragmented supply
bases. Market failures for many of these small producers are high. On other hand, the size of
both, markets and the suppliers is large. As a result, firms that identify appropriate business
strategies that take into account these characteristics are more likely to succeed in these
markets.
The following are some key messages from AMULs success

Firms in these environments need to simultaneously develop markets and suppliers to


synchronize demand and supply planning.

Develop or become a part of network of producers to obtain scale economies.

Focus on operational effectiveness to achieve cost leadership to enable low price


strategy.

Central focus to bring the diverse element together and a long term approach are
required.

In emerging economies different industrial sectors may be at different stages of development.


In some of the sectors all of above environmental characteristics faced may not hold.
However, a subset of strategies followed by AMUL would still be very useful. Thus, firms
that are contemplating addressing large underdeveloped markets or have an intention of
taking advantages of extensive but marginal supplier base would still be benefitted

for

Excellence in Dairy Product Exports for the last 13 years. For the year 2009-10, GCMMF has

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been awarded "Golden Trophy" for its outstanding export performance and contribution in
dairy products sector by APEDA.
For its consistent adherence to quality, customer focus and dependability, GCMMF has
received numerous awards and accolades over the years. It received the Rajiv Gandhi
National Quality Award in1999 in Best of All Category. In 2002 GCMMF bagged India's
Most Respected Company Award instituted by Business World. In 2003, it was awarded the
The IMC Ramkrishna Bajaj National Quality Award - 2003 for adopting noteworthy quality
management practices for logistics and procurement. GCMMF is the first and only Indian
organization to win topmost International Dairy Federation Marketing Award for probiotic
ice cream launch in 2007. The Amul brand is not only a product, but also a movement. It is in
one way, the representation of the economic freedom of farmers. It has given farmers the
courage to dream, to hope, to live.
Year of Establishment

1973

Members
No. of Producer Members

17 District Cooperative Milk Producers'


Unions
3.18 Million

No. of Village Societies

16,914

Total Milk handling capacity per day

16.8 Million liters per day

Milk Collection (2014-15)

4.66 billion liters

Milk collection (Daily Average 2014-15)

12.7 million liters

Cattle feed manufacturing Capacity

5890 Mts. per day

Sales Turnover -(2014-15)

20,733 crore

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1.3 AMUL STORY

The Kaira District Cooperative Milk Producers Union Limited was established on December
14, 1946 as a response to exploitation of marginal milk producers in the city of Anand by
traders or agents of existing diaries. Producers had to travel long distances to deliver milk to
the only dairy, the Polson dairy in Anand often milk went sour, especially in the summer
season, as producers had to physically carry milk in individual containers. These agents
decided the prices and the off take from farmers by seasons. Milk is commodity that has to be
collected twice a day from each cow and buffalo. In winter, the producer was either left with
surplus unsold milk or had to sell it at very low prices. Moreover, the government at that time
had given monopoly to the Polson dairy, which was well known butter brand in the country
around that time, to collect milk from Anand and supply to Bombay city in turn, which was
around 400 Kilometers away from there. India ranked nowhere amongst milk producing
countries in the world in 1946
The producers of Kaira district took advice of nationalist leaders, Mr. Sardar Vallabhbhai
Patel (later became the first Home Minister of Free India) and Mr. Morarji Desai (later
became the Prime Minister of India). They advised the farmers to form a cooperative and
supply directly to the Bombay milk schemes instead of selling it to Polson dairy. Thus the
Kaira district cooperative was established to collect and process milk in the district of Kaira.
Milk collection was decentralized, as most producers were marginal farmers who would
deliver 1-2 liters of milk per day. Village level cooperative was established to organize the
marginal milk producers in each of these villages. The first modern dairy of the Kaira Union
was established at Anand, which popularly came to be known as AMUL dairy after its brand
name. The new plant had the capacity to pasteurize 3,00,000 pounds of milk per day,
manufacture 10,000 pounds of butter per day, 12,500 pounds of milk powder per day and
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1,200 pounds of casein per day. Indigenous R&D (Research and Development) and
technology development at the cooperative had led to the successful production of skimmed
milk powder from buffalo milk, the first time on a commercial scale anywhere in the world.
The foundations of a modern dairy industry in India had just been lad as India had one of the
largest buffalo populations in the world.

In the year 2000, the dairy industry in India and particularly in the State of Gujarat looks very
different. India has emerged as the largest milk producing country in the World.
COUNTRY

Milk
production
(million tones)
1961
2.10

1991
8.46

2000
8.50

CANADA

8.32

8.20

8.10

EUROPE

13.40

21.30

21.43

USA

57.02

73.08

76.01

AUTRALIA

6.28

10.49

11.17

NEWZEALAND
INDIA

5.22
20.38

10.88
78.90

12.23
81.08

JAPAN

Gujarat emerges as the most successful state in terms of milk and milk product production
through its cooperative dairy movement. The Kaira district cooperative milk producers union
limited, Anand becomes the focal point of dairy development in the entire region and AMUL
emerges as one of the most recognized brands in India, ahead of many international brands.
Starting with a single shared plant at Anand and two village cooperative societies for milk
procurement, the dairy cooperative movement in the state of Gujarat had evolved into a
network of 2.12 million milk producers (called farmers) who are organized in 10,411 milk
collection independent cooperatives (called village societies). These village societies (VS)

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supply milk to thirteen independent dairy cooperatives (called unions). AMUL is one such
union. Milk and milk products from those unions are marketed by a common marketing
organization called federation. His common marketing organization is known as Gujarat
Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation Limited (GCMMF). It is the marketing entity for the
products of all unions in the state of Gujarat. GCMMF has 42 regional centers in India, serves
over 5, 00,000 retail outlets and exports more than 15 countries. All these organization are
independent legal entities yet loosely tied together with a common destiny. GCMMF was
ranked amongst the top ten FMCG (Fast Moving Consumer Goods) firms in the country
while AMUL was rated the second most recognized brands in India amongst all Indian and
MNC (Multi-National Corporations) offerings.

Interestingly, the Gujarat movement spread all over the India and similar structure was
replicated. Two national organizations, The National Dairy Development Board (NDDB) and
National Cooperative Dairy Federation of India (NCDFI) were established to coordinate the
dairy activities through cooperatives in all the states of the country. The former (NDDB)
provides financing for development while latter (NCDFI) manages a national milk grid and
coordinates the deficit and surplus of the milk and milk powders across the states of the India.
In early 90s, AMUL was asked by the Government of Sri Lanka to establish a dairy on
similar lines in Sri Lanka, while Polson dairy folded up in 1960s, the cooperatives are faced
with new competition in liberalizing India from Multi-National Corporations (MNCs) that
brought in new and improved product portfolio, international network and immense financial
support. The cooperatives face new challenges that test the robustness of their approach and
their commitments to the movement and a new style of management thinking.

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Today, AMUL is a symbol of many things such as,

A promise to member farmers who are assured a guaranteed purchase of all the milk
that they have produced at pre-determined prices.

High quality products sold at reasonable price to consumers.

Developing and coordinating a vast cooperative network.

Making strong business propositions out of serving large number of small and
Marginal suppliers.

Triumph of indigenous technology.

Marketing savvy of farmers organization.

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1.4 AMUL and the excellence

The AMUL experience has attracted considerable interest from the development community
predominantly anthropologists, development and agriculture economists and political
scientists. Key areas of their enquiry have been the role of AMUL in reducing social and
economic inequality in the regions of cooperative, the sociology of cooperation, interface of
dairy cooperative and the rural power structures, relation of the State and cooperative and the
role of government in its growth. Surprisingly, AMUL has successfully managed to exercise
its independence from the government unlike other cooperatives in India. AMULs journey
towards excellence is marked by some critical understandings of the business environment in
large emerging economies like India where markets have to be developed by combining
efficiency related initiatives with increasing the base of marginal suppliers and consumers.
The essence of AMULs efforts were as follows

It combined market and social development in an emerging economy. It recognized


the inter linkage between various environments that governed the lives of marginal
milk farmers and the unmet needs of consumers. It also changed the supply chain
paradigm in order to reduce the cost to consumer while increasing the return to the
suppliers.

It realized that in order to achieve their objectives, it had to benefit a large number of
people both suppliers and consumers. While large scale had the danger of failure
due to poor control and required more resources, it also had an advantage of creating
a momentum that would be necessary to bring more people into the fold and thereby
help more suppliers and consumers.

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It also realized that its goal could only be achieved in the long run and this required
developing the values in people and processes that were robust, replicable and
transparent.

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CHAPTER 2: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

OBJECTIVES OF STUDY
To analyze the present pattern of DMS and SFA use.
To identify the barriers related to usage of DMS and SFA users.
To give suggestions for improving the usage of DMS and SFA.
STUDY OF RESEARCH PROBLEM
Statement of the problem
What are the barriers in the use of DMS at distributor level and SFA at salesmen level
in Patna?
What Patna Depot should do to increase the use of DMS and SFA in Patna region.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY:
Research Objective: The research objective is to find reasons for difference in usage of
DMS&SFA.
Research Design: Descriptive research and In-depth interview.
Data sources & Type:

SECONDARY

Website

Amul office

PRIMARY

Questionnaire semi structured.

The data sources used are both primary and secondary. Secondary data we get from the
website of Amul and Amul office. Primary information was achieved by conducting survey
with the help of questionnaire. Questionnaire was semi structured; it consists of both open
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and close ended questions. In semi-structured, there are set questions, but responses from
participants are qualitative and may vary but everyone gets asked the same questions.
Research Tool: The main process of data collection was through filling of questionnaire. The
questionnaire (semi structured) consists of both open and closed ended questions as well
interval questions where the respondent has to give points according to the 5 point Likert
scale.
Sample size: The sample size taken here is of 6 distributers & 10 salesmen.

TYPE

UNIVERSE

SAMPLE

DISTRIBUTORS

10

SALESMEN

25

10

Sample selection: multistage sampling.

Stage 1- distributors

Stage 2 - salesmen

purposive (keeping in mind spatial location)

All salesmen attached to the distributors.

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CHAPTER3- UNDERSTANDING AMUL DMS & SFA

Gujarat Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation Limited (GCMMF) selects Botree


Software for Distribution Management Solution and Sales Force Automation
Gujarat Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation Ltd. (GCMMF) a leading food product
marketing organization is going to automate their distribution to get more visibility in the
secondary sales, stock, claims, scheme spend, channels, beat, salesmen productivity,
salesmen coverage and distributor service level.
3.1 About DMS & SFA
DMS (Distributor manangement system) is a common application for Distributors known as
Distribution Management System. DMS is used to carry-out routine business processes of a
distributor like Billing, Purchases, Collections, Claims etc.
SFA (Sales Force Automation) is for WD (Wholesale Distributor) Salesman for order
booking on mobile / tablets using android based mobile application. WD salesman takes beatwise retailer-wise orders from retailers directly on mobile and send back to Distributor for
further processing from market. Also salesman can have access to additional information
such as product-wise stock, scheme details, MRP and sales price, sales returns and
collections.
DMS and SFA are beneficial to WDs. They can automate purchase booking, sales invoicing
& scheme processing, claim management. It will also replace manual retailer order booking
on paper by order booking using mobile application on mobile device.

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Selected data from DMS and SFA are transferred to DMS console for further analysis.
Console is also accessed for retailer approval, purchase order processing and claim approval.
Selected reports are also accessible on mobile using android based mobile application SOA
for our sales team from FFRs / TSIs to BM level and for WD. Amul Cart application for
Retailer Order Booking is also developed primarily for taking orders directly from key
retailers such as APOs, Scooping parlours and key outlets. GCMMF has engaged M/s Botree
Software International Pvt Ltd for providing DMS & SFA applications and services for
implementation, maintenance and support.

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3.2-FEATURES OF DISTRIBUTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DMS) and SALES


FORCE AUTOMATION (SFA)
Timely and Direct Multiple-Point Stock Management
The distribution management software (DMS) consolidates stock-keeping records across
various stock points. Numbers get updated real-time, giving accurate analytics of stocks at
various distribution points. Orders can be placed for the distributors based on the
requirements. This is how DMS simplifies the entire stock keeping processes for the
business.
Manage Stock Orders
It opens-up an innovative way of managing the supply network. Distributor can directly issue
new stock orders to the server site through DMS. The ease of issuing orders and procuring
new stock means that the product could never be unavailable or over-stocked.
Manage and Maintain the Supply Chains
DMS leads towards multi-level understanding of supply chain. The updates give you the
latest stock availability at various check points including distributors. Through updating the
stocks at retail channels, it helps in ensuring the availability of enough products at the
retailers level.

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Concise Target Planning


The DMS analytics cumulates the entire inventory flow data into a single dashboard report.
An accurate inventory sales in the previous quarter, helps to predict an accurate inventory
demand for the upcoming quarter. This data helps to plan manufacturing process and raw
materials procurement in the upcoming quarter as well.
Accurate Performance Tracking

SFA comes with powerful sales tools to accurately manage on-field sales activities and track
the performance of each sales executive through SFA analytics. The SFA data aggregation
gives a comprehensive outlook about contribution of each sale executive. It can also readily
review Target vs. Performance reports for each executive and outlet.
Track Your Retail Outlet Performance
The SFA software tracks the performance of each retail outlet. It can recognize the factors
that drive strong sales performance, allowing to adapt similar features along the retail chain.
The process also enables to identify and promote the potential of each retail outlet.

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3.3- BENEFITS OF DMS

Standardization of WDs business operations


Automatic purchase receipt & price updation
Effective inventory-based selling
Operation visibility
Increased time for field operations using SFA
Improved customer service
Real-time information capture
Informed Decision making
Access to Valuable Retailers Master Data
Visibility on WD Stock and Sales
Measurement of efficacy of Sales Promotion schemes
Effective Claim management
Efficient Product placements

3.4-CHALLENGES

Lack of visibility of performing product & outlet at granular level for achieving right
product at the right time at the right outlet.

Channel management is not strong owing to shelf space loss at the retailer level

Push method to achieve only Sell-in numbers and sales loss and margin loss for the
Distributor as less concentration on Sell-Through

Too much of work on excel with late and less accurate data, which brings down
agility to decide on time
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Target vs Actual non alignment with overall Sales Operation Plan

Schemes introduced by the company not working for the right outlet or SKUs

Distributors using their own processes to conduct sales creating heterogeneous


activities and no commonality to ensure better sales and process.

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3.5-CUSTOMISED SYSTEM

Problem with traditional system-

The main problems of system are data redundancy and inconsistency, program-data
dependence, inflexibility, poor data security, and an inability to share data among application.
For example, HR functional area might have a personal master file, a payroll file, a medical
insurance file, a pension file, a mailing list file, and so forth until tens, perhaps hundreds, of
files and programs existed. So the organization is saddled with hundreds of programs and
applications that are difficult to maintain and manage.

Data redundancy and inconsistency-

Data redundancy is the presence of duplicate data in multiple data files so that the same data
are store in more than place or location. It occurs when different groups in an organization
independently collect the same price of data and store it independently of each other. It
wastes the storage resources and also leads to data inconsistency where the same attribute
may have different values.

Data dependency-

It refers to the coupling of data stored in files and the specific programs required to update
and maintain those files such that changes in programs requires changes to the data. In DMS
data is dependent on the basis of products variant of Amul products, if there is any change in
the product then there is need to change in data of DMS. Such changes could cost million of
dollars to implement properly.

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Lack of flexibility-

A traditional file system can deliver routine scheduled reports after extensive programming
efforts, but it cannot deliver ad hoc reports or respond to unanticipated information
requirements in a timely fashion. The information required by ad hoc requests is somewhere
in the system but may be too expensive to retrieve. Several programmers might have to work
for weeks to put together the required data items in a new file.

Poor security

Because there is little control or management of data, access to and dissemination of


information may be out of control. Management may have no way of knowing who is
accessing or even making changes to the organizations data.

Lack of data sharing and availability

Because pieces of information in different files and different parts of the organization cannot
be related to one another, it is virtually impossible for information to be shared or accessed in
a timely manner. Information cannot flow freely across different parts of the organization. If
users find different value of the same piece of information in two different systems, they may
not want use these systems because they cannot trust the accuracy of their data.

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29

CHAPTER 4: SECONDARY & FIELD OBSERVATION FINDINGS

PRESENT PATTERN OF DMS AND SFA

NEED

BENEFITS

CAPABILITIES

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30

4.1-NEED FOR THE SOFTWARE

Lack of visibility of performing product & outlet at granular level for achieving right
product at the right time at the right outlet.

Channel management is not strong owing to shelf space loss at the retailer level.

Cumbersome data entry process.

Schemes introduced by the company not working for the right outlet.

4.2-BENEFITS OF THE SOFTWARE

Higher sales productivity.


Reduced excess inventory at distributors end .
Reduced stock out.
Increased efficiency of distributors by improving their ROI.

4.3-CAPABILITIES OF THE SOFTWARE

MASTER DATA MANAGEMENT

Create & maintain master data

Maintain Product & Pricing catalogues

Salesman, retailer and route management

INVENTORY MANAGEMENT

Track every single movement of inventory from/to supply chain partners

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31

Visibility of the inventory across the network

Visibility of saleable and damaged stock

Maintain stock in multiple locations across distribution branches

CLAIM MANAGEMENT

Automatic claim generation for key processes like price discounts, promotions

Manual claim generation for specific expenses like logistics, salesmen on field
expenses

Flexible workflow for company approval (Sales, trade marketing & finance)

SALES FORCE PRODUCTIVITY

Set targets for distributors.

Track performance at retailer/route/salesman/distributor/company sales force


levels

Automatic breakdown of targets till retailer level based on past sales


performance.

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32

4.4- FLOW CHART OF DMS AND SFA

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33

4.5-INFORMATION LEVEL OF DMS AND SFA

Strategic Intelligence

Tactical Information
sharing, creation, manage
ment control
Operational Document
Management

The above figure shows the Information level of DMS. DMS follows a hierarchical
information structures to represent the entities. A record may have multiple records
subordinate to it, which in turn may have multiple records subordinate to them. In DMS
branch manager records can have several distributors records, but a distributor can
have only one branch manager. Each distributor is described by a single record.The upper
level involve with strategic intelligence, means this level keeps the records of all the
distributors and sales and aware of every activity done by DMS. It also involves in strategic
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34

planning, organizing, staffing and recording, which help in decision making. It gathers
strategic information which is used to help plan the objectives of the DMS.
The middle level involves in tactical information sharing, creation, management control
means it share the information to upper level and control the process if something going
wrong. This level can also prepare short term plan. It gathers tactical information from the
market about DMS whether it is working or distributors are using continuously or not.
The lower level is operational document management hierarchical structure this work is done
by the distributors. They gather operational information which is used in make sure that
specific operational tasks are carried out as planned.
So there are basically three information level involve in DMS:
(1) Strategic information: Used to help plan the objectives of the business as a whole and
to measure how well those objectives are being achieved. Examples of strategic
information include:

profitability of each part of the business

size, growth and competitive structure of the markets in which a business operates

investments made by the organization and the returns from those investments

(2) Tactical Information: This is used to decide how the resources of the business should be
employed. Examples include:

Information about business productivity

Profit and cash flow forecasts in the short terms

Pricing information from the markets


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35

(3) Operational Information: This information is used to make sure that specific operational
tasks are carried out as planned/intended (i.e. things are done properly). For example, a
production manager will want information about the extent and results of quality control
checks

that

are

being

carried

out

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36

in

the

manufacturing

process.

CHAPTER 5: ANALYSIS OF PRIMARY DATA

5.1-DETAILS OF DISTRIBUTORS USING DMS

TYPE OF OWNERSHIP

FIGURE 1: TYPE OF OWNERSHIP

INTERPRETATION - From the above figure shown it depicts that most of the
distributorship are in a proprieter form whereas in a sample of six respondents only one
respondent was found to be working in a partnership.

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37

CHANGE IN MONTHLY SALE BEFORE AND AFTER IMPLEMENTATION OF


DMS

SALES TURNOVER

70

80
70
60

50

50

32 36

40

20 22

30
20

15 20

28 30

27 32

raj shree

Maa sheela
enterprises

10
0

A.N
Vikas
Ram traders Khanna
Enterprises enterprises
enterprises
Before

After

FIGURE 2 - CHANGE IN MONTHLY SALE BEFORE AND AFTER IMPLEMENTATION OF DMS

INTERPRETATION
Form the above figure we can illustrate that there is a substantial increase in the sales after
incorporation of DMS into the business. Since it increases the efficiency on the sales ground
and also optimise the work process , it enables more sales in a lesser time frame.

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38

DISTRIBUTORSHIP DURATION OF AMUL

Distributorship of Amul
2.5

1.5

6- 10 years

11- 15 years

0.5

1-5 years

above 15 years

FIGURE 3- DISTRIBUTORSHIP OF AMUL

RAM TRADERS and A.N. ENTERPRISES have taken distributorship In last 1-5
years.
MAA SHEELA is having the distributoship from 6-10 years .
VIKASH ENTERPRISES is having distribuotrship from 11-15 years .
RAJSHREE and KHANNA STORES is having distributorship from above 16 years.

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39

USER OF DMS

DMS USER
Series1
7
6
5
4
3

2
1
0

0
YES

NO
FIGURE 4- USER OF DMS

INTERPREATATION- Out of the 6 respondents it was fasinating to note that all 6 of


them were using DMS, but the awareness about the functioning of the DMS were known to
few of them only.

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40

MANAGING RECORD BEFORE IMPLEMENTATION OF DMS

Before Implementation of DMS


7
6
5
4
3
Series1
2
1
0

on paper

softcopy in customized
excel
software

other

FIGURE 5 MANAGING RECORD BEFORE IMPLEMENTATION OF DMS.

INTERPRETATION- Before implementation of DMS all of the respondents (distributors)


revealed that record management for the business purpose was done through customized
software brought from third party vendor.

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41

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CUSTOMIZED SOFTWARE AND DMS


When they have been asked what kind of difference distributors see , the reply which we got
were -:

Ease in billing process.

Easy in Data sharing.

Awareness of scheme.

Automatic billing

Ease in billing process- As in early days of manual processing data used ot be feed upon
customized software manually which generally used ot take more time than as of now and
also there used to a chances of wrong data entry into the system software ,whereas
deployment of DMS had made it easy and more of accurate while feeding of the data into the
system software which in return helps In increasing hthe efficiency and also helps in reducing
the manual labor work.
Awareness of scheme- Awareness of scheme was also an important factor which used to
make difference between both of the software, as now distributors can easliy check for any
such schemes on DMS as earlier they have to call to the office to know any such
information .
Ease in data sharing Due to the deployment of DMS it is possible to share data from
office to distributor point within fraction of seconds and without any obstruction in the
transportation of the message from one end to other , hence it helps in keeping distributors
updated round the clock if there is any changes In the management side.

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42

SINCE WHEN DMS IS BEING USED BY DISTRIBUTORS

SINCE WHEN DMS IS BEING USED BY DISTRIBUTORS


3.5
3

3
2.5
2
1.5
1
0.5
0

0-6 month

7-12 month

13-19 month

20- 24 month

FIGURE 6- SINCE WHEN DMS IS BEING USED BY DISTRIBUTORS

INTERPRETATION- From the figure 6 it can be noted that atmost 50% of the total
sample size is using DMS from last 2 years , whereas other 50% is using from last 7 months
1 year. It is quite interesting to note that those distributors using DMS from 1 year is having
more sales than the distributors using the same software from past 2 years . That signifies that
somewhere somehow those distributors using it the software from last 2 years is not able to
capitalized on the software process.

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43

SALEMAN USING DMS

SALESMEN USING DMS


YES

NO

17%

83%

FIGURE 7 SALEMEN USING DMS

INTERPREATATION - From the above figure 7 it can be illustrated that about 83% of
distributors having salesmen uses DMS , while 17 %
thmeselves for their management purpose .

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44

of the distributors use DMS

HAVE YOU BEEN PROVIDED PROPER TRAINING TO THE SALESMAN

Training To The Salesmen


Series1
7
6
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
yes

no

FIGURE -8 training provided to the salesmen

OUTCOME It has found that all of the 6 salesmen were been provided proper training

INTERPRETATION- All 6 of the salesmen were trained by the company for the efficient
and smooth use of DMS.

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45

HOW SOFTWARE IS BENEFITING YOU

Benefit Of Software
Series1
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0

time saving

ease in ordering

billing

receiving
purchase

FIGURE 9 benefit of software

OUT COME All the 6 distributors choose time saving option.

INTERPRETATION- It has been found that DMS helps in time saving in various aspect
like report making, printed billing/ automatic invoicing .
Time saving in which sense :

Automatic report generation.


Printed invoice.
Claim management

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46

AWARENESS REGARDING THE FEATURES OF DMS

YES

NO

17%

83%

FIGURE 10- awareness regarding features of DMS

OUTCOME - Out of the total of 6 samples interacted with, 83 % of them were not aware
of DMS features due to which they were not able to use it efficiently and effectively . Which
in result decrease the optimization of their day to day work.
Whereas 17 % of the respondents were quite aware about the DMS feature due to which they
were able to tap more of opportunities than of the 83 % who are not aware of DMS features.

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47

5.2- MAJOR PROBLEMS FACED BY THE DISTRIBUOTRS WHILE USING DMS &
SFA SOFTWARE

DMS

Bill of retailer if paid, no modification can be done , 3 day automatic delivery process,
no editing function after delivery process.

When loading sheet is generated, sale price of each product is not shown
individually.

While synchronizing there can be loss of data if there is no internet connection.

SFA

When order is placed the unit is in crates while the distributor requirement is in
pieces.

Lack of awareness of new product leads to decrease in sale.

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48

5.3 SPECIFIC DISTRIBUTORWISE ANALYSIS OF SALESMEN

SALES FORCE AUTOMATION(SFA)

USER

NON USER

NO. OF
SAMPLE - 10

40%
60%

Figure 11- SFA user

OUTCOME - 60 % of the sample use SFA whereas 40 % of the respondents was not aware
of using SFA for their market purpose.

INTERPRETATION-

Out of 10 sample size, while 6 of them were well versed with the

technology called SFA while 4 of them were still unaware of the utilization of the SFA for
the betterment of the business process.

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49

NON USER SALESMEN WILLING TO LEARN SFA

would you like to know about SFA


5
4
3
2
1
0
YES

NO

FIGURE 12 non user salesmen willing to learn SFA

INTERPRETATION- From the above figure we can infer that the non users of SFA are
willing to know about the SFA, as they are showing interest in learning the technology.

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50

MOBILE FACILITY PROVIDED TO THE SALESMEN

Does distributor provide mobile facility

20%

YES
NO
80%

FIGURE-13 mobile facility provided to the salesmen

INTERPRETATION- The above figure shows that out of 10 salesmen 2 of the them dont have cell
phone , which otherwise would be provided by the distributors while remaining 8 have cell phones
provided by their distributor. So, it can be concluded that for smooth working, salesmen should be
acquainted with the cell phones.

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51

MEDIUM OF ORDER BOOKING

ORDER BOOKING
on note book

on SFA

40%

60%

INTERPRETATION- Above figure shows that out of 10 salesmen, 60 % were using SFA
while rest40 % was taking order manually i.e. they were non user of SFA.

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52

RETAILERS COVER IN A DAY (PER SALESMEN)

SFA
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

35
25

user

non user

FIGURE 11- Retailers cover by per salesmen

INTERPRETATION- From the figure 11 it is inferred that salesmen having SFA software
covers 35 retailers in a day, while the non user are covering only 25 retailers in a day. It is
quite clear that it is more beneficial to use SFA software as it is generating more business as
compared to the non user of SFA.

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53

5.4-SALESMEN WISE INTERPRETATION


DISTRIBUTORS AGENCY- RAJSHREE ENTERPRISES
DISTRIBUTORS NAME R K SAHU

NAME-

R.K SAHU

Manish kumar

AGE

45

20

USER OF SFA -

NO

NO

Reason

Dont want to upgrade himself with

New in this field

the technology
Suggestions

As he is aware of SFA but find easy

As he is new to the market his

in taking order in notebook

duty is only to deliver the product


to the retailer

Problem with SFA

No issues

No issues

Training needed

Yes

Yes

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54

DISTRIBUTOR AGENCY - VIKASH ENTERPRISES


DISTRIBUTOR NAME Raj Kishore agarwal

NAME-

B.S KHANNA

BADRUDIN

AGE

60

56

USER OF SFA -

NO

NO

REASON

Distributor doesnt provide him cell

Distributor doesnt provide them

phone, & they are also. Not aware of cell phone & they are also Not
technology.
Suggestions

aware of technology.

Need to provide training. As first they Need to provide training. As first


take order on notebook and in the they take order on notebook and in
evening they enter into SFA.

Problem with SFA

the evening they enter into SFA.

As they were not aware of SFA , they As they were not aware of SFA ,
dont know any kind of problem

they dont know any kind of


problem

TRAINING NEEDED

Yes

Yes

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55

DISTRIBUTOR AGENCY -

MAA SHEELA ENTERPRISES

DISTRIBUTOR NAME SANJAY KUMAR

NAME-

Vijay Prasad

Vikash kumar

Madhukar

AGE

58

22

45

USER OF SFA -

Yes

Yes

Yes

Reasons

N/A

N/A

N/A

Suggestions

Knows properly how to use As he was new in this Knows properly how to
the SFA

field , training was given use SFA.


by their own staff how to
use the SFA .

Problem With SFA

No issues

No issues

No issues

Training needed

Yes

Yes

Yes

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56

DISTRIBUTOR AGENCY - KHANNA ENTERPRISES


DISTRIBUTOR NAME Daulat Ram Khanna
NAME-

Surendra kumar

Ganauria

AGE

41

53

USER OF SFA -

Yes

Yes

Reason

N/A

N/A

Suggestions

As the person was aware of SFA but not As the person was aware of
a frequent user

SFA functionality

Problem with SFA

Lack of proper training

N/A

Training needed

YES

NO

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57

DISTRIBUTOR AGENCY - RAM TRADERS


DISTRIBUTOR NAME Sri Krishna Agarwal

NAME-

Valmiki

AGE

28

USER OF SFA -

Yes

REASON

N/A

Suggestions

He has full knowledge of how to use SFA , which we test by cross


questioning

PROBLEM WITH SFA

No issues

TRAINING NEEDED

NO

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58

CHAPTER 6: CONCLUSIONS AND SUGGESTIONS


6.1-CONCLUSIONS

Techniques and methods used for order booking in DMS are time-taking.

Distributors dont feel more convenient in using latest technology within their
business structure.

One of the distributors is having fewer salesmen.

The distributors having sole proprietorship have greater sale turnover.

Lack of awareness among the distributors regarding usage of DMS.

DMS benefitted the distributors, as there was no negative feedback on usage of DMS
for the business.

Almost 40 % of the respondents are still not able to use SFA, which also counts for
big market share for business purpose

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59

6.2-SUGGESTIONS

The level of awareness about various function tools is very low in the case of DMS &
SFA.

4 days training is needed for salesman & distributors.

Evaluation of employee is needed.

Software should be made more user friendly.

Bonus pack schemes can be used more effectively than free gifts and incentive.

RAJSHREE need to add more salesmen, as the distributor himself is handling


salesmen job.

VIKASH ENTERPRISES need to provide cell phone to their salesmen with the
proper training.

A.N. ENTERPRISES need to take order through SFA rather through phone calls.

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60

ADD EMPLOYEES
Add employee with an employee management portal, distributor needs to add new employees
into their system and assign duties to them within an integrated structure. Each employee
profile stores information such as their designation, reporting authority, employee zone, etc.
SET-UP EMPLOYEE ZONES
Create custom employee zones and their private hierarchies, and categorize them based on
parameters like geographical location, number of retailers etc. Optimally divide their work
load across the teams and obtain a macro view of their sales territory and distribution
network.
SET PERFORMANCE TARGETS
Assign custom performance targets and track the employees progress with a unified bulletin
board view. Review and remark on live work updates and compare their achievements with
the present targets, leading to greater sales.
UPDATE OFFERS IN REAL-TIME
Inform salesmen on product offers and rates with the cloud-enabled product management
tools. Promotions, exclusive offers and schemes need to be updated on the mobile SFA app in
real-time, exponentially increasing the chances of acquiring more orders from the retailer
side.
CREATE BEAT PLANS
Easily review a sales employees distributors and retailers, and create daily beat plans by
allocating an optimal number of customer visits in a single transit. Recorded beat plans will

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help in displaying the location, suggested routes, time, and the agenda of the meeting to the
employee.
REAL-TIME LOCATION TRACKING
Remotely track the real-time GPS position of each field employee, and verify their current
location with the allocated beat plan. Make sure that the field team is punctual and are
systematically meeting with their assigned retailers.
FOLLOW-UP ON PENDING PAYMENTS
With the aid of the SFA tracking software, automatically schedule follow-ups with their
customers for pending and credit payments. Create custom alerts for intimating their retailer
about their payment backlogs.
AUTOMATED RESPONSES
Always keep the retailers in the loop by automatically notifying and reminding them about
their order, delivery and payment details.
DAILY SALES REPORTS (DSR)
With SFA sales management tools, break-down and analyze the sales process to extract
information about their daily turnover, team and individual performances and distribution
performance. Right from total calls planned vs. calls made, retailer meetings set vs. actual
visits, orders placed, to stock delivered, track their daily sales activities in real-time.
ORDER AND INVENTORY REPORTS
Distributors need to from a unified dashboard, view each orders status placed, approved,
delivered and sort them on a daily, weekly or monthly basis. Track the progress of each of
their orders and update the stock levels as soon as an order is fulfilled.

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CAMPAIGN REPORTS
Distributors need to Integrate the marketing campaigns with the DMS and SFA software
and get comprehensive reports on each campaigns performance, with metrics like retailer
converted, product marketing cost, product performance, channel partner performances, etc.

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REFERENCES

http://www.amul.com/
http://www.nddb.org/
http://www.slidshare.com/
http://www.thefarmsite.com/
http://www.scribd.com/doc/21031281/
http://www.ibef.org/download/FMCG50112.pdf
http://www.managementparadise.com/forums/42792-post3.html
http://ncqm.com/newpdfs2/NCQM-Newsletter-Mar-June2011issue.pdf
http://dspace.iimk.ac.in/bitstream/2259/381/1/103-110.pdf
http://www.coolavenues.com/know/mktg/competitive-strategies-4.php
http://www.isb.edu/isbinsight/Insight_June07/Rural%20Supply%20Chain%205.html
http://www.themarketers.in/from-reach-to-consumption-the-indian-fmcg-challenge
http://www.isb.edu/isbinsight/Insight_June07/Rural%20Supply%20Chain.html
http://time.dufe.edu.cn/wencong/supplychain/006.pdf
http://www.iamwire.com/2011/08/online-fmcg-cpg-retailing
%E2%80%93it%E2%80%99schallenges-and-opportunities
http://www.kapturecrm.com/fmcg-employee-management

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ANNEXURE 1

Questionnaire For Distributors


Basic Information
Name: Mr./Mrs./Ms. ----------------------------------------

Phone No.: ------------------

Age: ------------Address: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Type of Distributors Ownership


1.
2.
3.
4.

Proprietor
Partnership
Private Ltd.
Others

Education:
1. Graduate
2. Post Graduate
3. Non-Graduate
Monthly sales:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Up to Rs. 20 Lakh
Rs. 21 Lakh to Rs. 30 Lakh
Rs.31 Lakh to Rs. 40 Lakh
Above Rs. 40 Lakh

1. How long have you been distributor of AMUL?


1) 1 year -5 year
2) 6-10 year
3) 11-15 year
4) More than 16 year
2. Are you using DMS Software?
1. Yes
2. No (answer from 3-5)
3. How do you manage your inventory?

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65

1) On paper
2) Softcopy in system ( excel or other software )
3) Use customized software
( name :_______________________________)
4) Others :_______________________________)
4. How do you record Retailers demand?
1)
2)
3)
4)

On paper
Through call
Through mail
Others :________________________________)

5. Why dont you use DMS software?


1)
2)
3)
4)
5)

Due to high purchasing cost.


Dont see any benefit in using it.
Dont have technical infrastructure to use it.
Security issues.
Others.

6. How were you managing your records before implementation of DMS?


1)
2)
3)
4)

On paper
Softcopy in system ( excel or other software )
Use customized software( name:______________________________
Others :_______________________________

7. How long have you been using DMS?


1)
2)
3)
4)

0-6 months
7-12 months
13-19 months
20-24 months

8. Do you have salesman using DMS?


1) Yes
2) No
9. How many salesmen do you have for using DMS?
1)
2)
3)
4)

0-4
5-8
9-12
Above 13
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66

10. Do you provide proper training to your salesmen for using DMS?
1) Yes

2) No

11. What benefits you are getting by using this software?


1)
2)
3)
4)
5)

Time saving
ease in ordering
Billing
Receiving purchase
Others: ___________________

12. Have you paid for this software?


1) Yes

2) No

13. How much amount you have paid?


1) 1000-5000
2) 6000-10000
3) Above 10000
14. How satisfied are you with this softwares ease of use?
5) Extremely satisfied
4) Very satisfied
3) Somewhat satisfied
2) Not so satisfied
1) Not at all satisfied
15. How satisfied are you with the functions of this software?
5) Extremely satisfied
4) Very satisfied
3) somewhat satisfied
2) Not so satisfied
1) Not at all satisfied
16. How tax report folder helps you?
1) Provide details about monthly purchase and sale tax.
2) Uploading tax.
3) Others :_______________________

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67

17. How often you inform Botree helpdesk if any invoices are pending in core stocky?
1)
2)
3)
4)

Weekly
Monthly
Yearly
Other

18. How often you look for scheme reports, for monitoring claimable scheme?
1) Weekly
2) Monthly
3) Yearly
4) Other
19. Do you use month end report before placing new month order?
1) Yes
2) No
20. How often you check bulletin board?
1)
2)
3)
4)

Weekly
Monthly
Yearly
Never

21. What are the major problems that you are facing in using DMS software?

22. How effective is the delivery gap after using this software and before using this
software?

23. Do you have any thoughts on how to improve this software?

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68

ANNEXURE 2

SALESMAN QUESTIONNAIRE

Agency name
______________________________________________
Sales person name-_______________________________________________
AgeContact number-

1. How you start your day?


1) Reporting to office
2) Directly going into market
3) Others

2. Are you aware of SFA?


1) Yes
2) No
If No respond to Q3
If yes respond to Q5
3. Would you like to know about SFA (explain the main features of SFA, if answer is yes)
1) Yes
2) No

4. Would you now like to use SFA?


1. Yes
2. No

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69

5. Have you been given proper training to use SFA?


1) Yes
2) No (If No respond to Q6)
6. Would you like to receive training on SFA?
1 Yes (If yes respond to Q7)
2 No

(If No respond to Q8)

7. Where would you like to receive training?


1 Company
2 Distributors
3 Through a computer firm
4 Any other
8. Does distributor provide you mobile & internet facility?
1) YES
2) NO ( how you manage )
9. If Yes, how does the facility help in day to day operation ( open- ended Post coding)

If No How do you manage day to day work ?


___________________________________________________________________________
___

10. What you do in market?


1)
2)
3)
4)
5)

Clear pending bills


Take order
Deliver previous order
Merchandising
Others :__________________

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70

11. How you book order?


1) Make a note in notebook.
2) Use SFA software.
If you dont use SFA, what problem you face while booking order ?

___________________________________________________________________________

12. How many retailer you cover in a day?


1)
2)
3)
4)

1-20
21-30
31-40
More than 40

13. What kind of problem you face in market?

14. Do you have any thought or suggestion to be done in this. Please specify any
particular feature you would like to be included?

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