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PA Environment Digest

An Update On Environmental Issues In Pennsylvania


Edited By: David E. Hess, Crisci Associates

Winner Of PA Association of Environmental Educators


Business Partner Of The Year Award

PA Environment Digest Daily Blog Twitter Feed

Issue #664 Harrisburg, PA March 20, 2017

Proposed Trump Cuts To State Grants Will Cripple DEP, Cause Drastic Fee Increases

President Trump released his proposed budget blueprint Thursday


which confirmed earlier reports of substantial cuts to EPA grants given
to states to administer federal programs, eliminating the Chesapeake
Bay and Great Lakes Restoration Programs and discretionary
abandoned mine reclamation funding.
While the 53-page blueprint lacks the detail of a complete
budget, it outlines the initial positions taken by the Trump
Administration on the budget.
The state Department of Environmental Protection receives 30
percent of its funding from the federal government to pay for programs
DEPs administers for the federal government.
The funding is critical to supporting air quality, water quality,
safe drinking water, storage tank, hazardous waste regulation and cleanup, surface mine
regulation, mine reclamation and other programs.
These potential federal funding cuts come on top of a 40 percent cut in state General
Fund support for DEP over the last 14 years and a now 25 percent cut in its staff.
The cuts proposed in the Trump budget would cripple DEPs key environmental
programs, especially since they are occurring on top of the state cuts.
DEP has had no choice but to raise permit review fees to make up for lost state revenue in
the past. It may not have any choice but to further increase fees on local governments and
businesses to make up for this new loss of federal revenue if these programs are to survive.
Here is a quick rundown on the kinds of cuts and funding changes made in Trumps
proposed budget--
EPA Budget
The Presidents 2018 Budget requests $5.7 billion for the Environmental Protection
Agency, a cut of $2.6 billion, or 31 percent, from the 2017 annualized CR level.
The EPA cuts include (in the words of the Trump budget document)--
-- Cuts Program Grants To States Up To 44 Percent: Supports Categorical Grants with $597
million, a $482 million reduction below 2017 annualized CR levels. These lower levels are in
line with the broader strategy of streamlining environmental protection. This funding level
eliminates or substantially reduces Federal investment in State environmental activities that go
beyond EPAs statutory requirements.
-- Eliminates Chesapeake Bay, Great Lakes Cleanup: Eliminates funding for special regional
efforts such as the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, the Chesapeake Bay, and other geographic
programs. These geographic program eliminations are $427 million lower than the 2017
annualized CR levels. The Budget returns the responsibility for funding local environmental
efforts and programs to State and local entities, allowing EPA to focus on its highest national
priorities.
-- Cuts Superfund: Reins in Superfund administrative costs and emphasizes ef ciency efforts by
funding the Hazardous Substance Superfund Account at $762 million, $330 million below the
2017 annualized CR level. The agency would prioritize the use of existing settlement funds to
clean up hazardous waste sites and look for ways to remove some of the barriers that have
delayed the programs ability to return sites to the community.
-- Cuts Enforcement: Avoids duplication by concentrating EPAs enforcement of
environmental protection violations on programs that are not delegated to States, while providing
oversight to maintain consistency and assistance across State, local, and tribal programs. This
reduces EPAs Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance budget to $419 million, which
is $129 million below the 2017 annualized CR level.
-- Cuts Research: Better targets EPAs Office of Research and Development (ORD) at a level
of approximately $250 million, which would result in a savings of $233 million from the 2017
annualized CR level. ORD would prioritize activities that support decision-making related to
core environmental statutory requirements, as opposed to extramural activities, such as providing
STAR grants.
-- Eliminates Energy Star, 49 Other EPA Programs: Eliminates more than 50 EPA programs,
saving an additional $347 million compared to the 2017 annualized CR level. Lower priority and
poorly performing programs and grants are not funded, nor are duplicative functions that can be
absorbed into other programs or that are State and local responsibilities. Examples of
eliminations in addition to those previously mentioned include: Energy Star; Targeted Airshed
Grants; the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; and infrastructure assistance to Alaska
Native Villages and the Mexico Border.
-- Cuts Climate Programs: Discontinues funding for the Clean Power Plan, international
climate change programs, climate change research and partnership programs, and related
effortssaving over $100 million for the American taxpayer compared to 2017 annualized CR
levels. Consistent with the Presidents America First Energy Plan, the Budget reorients EPAs air
program to protect the air we breathe without unduly burdening the American economy.
-- Water Infrastructure: The Budget includes $2.3 billion for the State Revolving Funds, a $4
million increase over the 2017 annualized CR level. The Budget also provides $20 million for
the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act program, equal to the funding provided in
the 2017 annualized CR. This credit subsidy could potentially support $1 billion in direct Federal
loans.
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Cuts/funding in the U.S. Department of Agriculture budget include (in the words of the
Trump budget document)--
-- Eliminates Rural Water/Wastewater Funding: Eliminates the duplicative Water and
Wastewater loan and grant program, a savings of $498 million from the 2017 annualized CR
level. Rural communities can be served by private sector financing or other Federal investments
in rural water infrastructure, such as the Environmental Protection Agencys State Revolving
Funds.
-- Wildfire Suppression: Fully funds wildland re preparedness and suppression activities at
$2.4 billion, 100 percent of the 10-year average for suppression operations, to ensure the
resources necessary to protect life and property.
U.S. Dept. of the Interior
Cuts in the U.S. Department of the Interior budget include (in the words of the Trump
budget document)--
-- Eliminates Discretionary Abandoned Mine Reclamation Grants: Eliminates unnecessary,
lower priority, or duplicative programs, including discretionary Abandoned Mine Land grants
that overlap with existing mandatory grants, National Heritage Areas that are more appropriately
funded locally, and National Wildlife Refuge fund payments to local governments that are
duplicative of other payment programs.
Click Here to review a copy of the budget blueprint released by President Trump.
NewsClips:
Trumps EPA Cuts Would Endanger Pennsylvanians, DEP Chief Says
McKelvey: Trumps Budget Puts Your Water, Health At Risk
Trump EPA Cuts Could Have Bigger Trickle-Down Impact On PA, NJ
Trump Budget Kills Chesapeake Funds, Disbelief Follows
Gov. Wolf, Casey Criticize, Toomey Lauds Trump Budget Plan
Allegheny Front: How Big Cuts At EPA Will Impact PA
GASP: Cuts To EPA Will Significantly Impact Southwestern PA
Trumps First Budget To Include Deep Cuts For EPA, Energy, Domestic Programs
Trumps Budget Takes A Sledgehammer To The EPA
Trumps Scorched Earth EPA Budget Draws Swift Reactions
Trump Proposes Budget To Hobble EPA
Trumps Budget Would Cut EPA Funding By 31%, Eliminate Waterway Cleanup Programs
Trump Proposes Dramatic Cuts To EPA Funding
Trump Bid To Axe Chesapeake Bay Restoration Funding Draws Fire
Trump Budget Would Eliminate Funding For Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Trumps Budget Would Torpedo Investments In Climate Change, Clean Energy
Trump Seeks To Ax Appalachia Economic Programs Causing Worry In Coal Country
With EPA Cuts, States Would Lose Help In Emergencies
AP: Winners, Losers In Trumps First Budget
AP: Republicans Join Democrats Against Trumps Great Lakes Cuts
Here Are The Federal Agencies, Programs Trump Wants To Eliminate
People Sending EPA Cookies And Thank-You Cards
Op-Ed: Underfunded State Environmental Programs Quickly Becoming An Epidemic
Op-Ed: Keeping PA Clean When EPA Goes AWOL
Editorial: State Must Do Its Part To Correct Its Own Underfunding Of DEP
Allegheny Front: How Big Cuts At EPA Will Impact PA
Lehigh Municipalities Eye Solution To Share $300M Bill For Sewer Repairs
Delaware County Uses Drilling Impact Fees For Darby Creek Trail
Op-Ed: Preserving Farmland, Open Space Worthwhile Investment
AP: PA Republican Lawmakers Sobering To Huge Budget Deficit
Wolfs Fight To Offer Early Retirement To 2,000 State Workers
Wolfs Pension Tactic Has Mixed Record
Casey Asks Trump For $50M For Mon River Locks & Dams
U.S. Park Service Closes 2 Locations In Philadelphia Ahead Of Cuts
Related Stories:
StateImpact: DEP: Federal Budget Cuts Will Have Immediate, Devastating Effect In PA
Sen. Yudichak: Proposed Federal Budget Cuts Will Challenge Right To Clean Air, Water
CBF On Proposed Elimination Of Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay Program
ECOS: Presidents Proposed EPA Budget Cuts Will Adversely Affect State Environmental
Agencies
[Posted: March 16, 2017]

StateImpact: DEP: Federal Budget Cuts Will Have Immediate, Devastating Effect In PA

StateImpacts Marie Cusick reported Thursday Acting DEP Secretary


Patrick McDonnell sent a letter to EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt
saying the cuts to funding proposed by the Trump administration will
have an immediate and devastating effect in Pennsylvania.
The [proposed] 30 percent cut in federal funding would
significant reduce popular, successful, bipartisan programs that protect
public health and the environment, and lead to economic
development, said McDonnell.
As examples, he pointed to cuts in the Safe Drinking Water,
Water Quality, Brownfields, Air Quality and Radon education efforts as having a direct impact
on public health, cut the number of inspections, lengthen permit review times and inhibit future
economic development.
With respect to the elimination of all funding for the Chesapeake Bay Program,
McDonnell said the move would abandon farmers, because much-needed support could no
longer be offered.
McDonnell also expressed his disappointment at recent statements by Pruitt calling into
question the scientific consensus on climate change.
It is beyond disappointing that the nations top environmental official would call into
question the overwhelming scientific consensus and undermine progress of this critical subject.
Pennsylvania has already experienced a long-term warming of nearly two degrees over
the past century, and this trend is expected to accelerate. By 2050, Pennsylvania is predicted to
be an average of 5.4 degrees F warmer than it was in 2000.
In the face of this reality, foot dragging and hand wringing is not an option, we need
decisive action.
DEP relies of federal funds for 30 percent of its budget.
These potential federal funding cuts come on top of a 40 percent cut in state General
Fund support for DEP over the last 14 years and a now 25 percent cut in its staff.
The cuts proposed in the Trump budget would cripple DEPs key environmental
programs, especially since they are occurring on top of the state cuts.
DEP has had no choice but to raise permit review fees to make up for lost state revenue in
the past. It may not have any choice but to further increase fees on local governments and
businesses to make up for this new loss of federal revenue if these programs are to survive.
Text Of Letter
The text of the McDonnells letter to EPA follows--
Dear Administrator Pruitt:
I am writing to express my concern about the impacts of substantial cuts to the
Environmental Protection (EPA) on the citizens and business of Pennsylvania.
Slashing the EPA budget-- including a potential 30 percent reduction in the funding we
use to carry out responsibilities under federal environmental laws-- would have an immediate
and devastating effect on my states ability to ensure that Pennsylvanias air is safe to breathe,
our water is safe to drink, and our economy prospers.
Put simply, cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency singal the Trump
administrations disregard for its responsibility to protect the health and safety of American
citizens.
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) relies on federal
funding to administer a variety of mandated programs which protect the safety of coal miners,
address lead contamination, prevent air pollution which contributes to respiratory diseases, and
redevelop contaminated industrial sites.
Over the last decade, DEP has worked to further its mission, even as constrained state
and federal budgets have allowed for fewer inspections and created significant permitting
backlogs.
A 30 percent cut in federal funding would significantly reduce popular, successful,
bipartisan programs that project public health and the environment, and lead to economic
development. Cutting these programs will:
-- Risk Safe Water. In the Safe Drinking Water program, these cuts would mean at least 30
percent fewer inspections at the Commonwealths 8,500 public water systems, hampering our
ability to detect contaminants like lead, water-borne pathogens, and putting Pennsylvanias 10.7
million water customers at risk.
-- Diminish Local Water Quality. The proposed cuts to the federally funded portion of the
Clean Water Bureau budget would mean cutting at least 850 inspections from the 6,144
inspections that ensure that sewage plants, industrial wastewater discharges, and construction
sites are not threatening the water quality of Pennsylvanians downstream. Reductions in federal
funds will also lengthen permit issuance timelines, hampering important economic development
projects in Pennsylvania.
-- Abandon Farmers. Pennsylvanias Chesapeake Bay program-- which you recently
acknowledged as a model of federal/state partnerships, and is starting to show real results in
curbing pollution to the Bay-- would see funding completely eliminated. This program would no
longer be able to provide much-needed support to Pennsylvania small farmers and local
governments to improve their local water quality.
-- Stifle Job Creation. Pennsylvanias Brownfields program cleans up contaminated properties
for redevelopment, promoting economic development and preserving green space. Since 1995,
almost 5,000 brownfields have been cleaned up, leading to almost 100,000 jobs created or
retained. A 30 percent cut to this program could inhibit brownfields from being returned to
productive use for new and expanding business and industry in Pennsylvania.
-- Allow Harmful Pollutants To Poison. A 30 percent or more cut to the Bureau of Air Quality
would limit air monitoring for harmful pollutants such as volatile organic compounds, mercury,
and particulate matter, and have a negative impact on the timeline for review of air quality
permits which companies need in order to start operations or expand.
-- Expose Children To Radon Gas. Proposed cuts included the complete elimination of
funding to help protect residents from radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the
United States. Pennsylvania has one of the most serious radon problems in the country and the
proposed cuts would result in the elimination of public education efforts and distribution of free
radon test kits for new parents.
-- Suppress Environmental Justice. Proposed budget cuts would eliminate the EPAs Office of
Environmental Justice, which exists to ensure that Americans, regardless of race, color, national
origin, or income, have meaningful involvement in the development, implementation, and
enforcement of environmental laws and policies. Closing this program shows a startling
disrespect for minority and economically disadvantaged Americans.
These budget cuts do not reduce any of the responsibilities that DEP has to the people of
Pennsylvania, but does decrease the resources available to fulfill those responsibilities. These
cuts, if enacted, would harm businesses seeking permits, and harm residents clean water, air,
and land.
In addition, I would like to address your recent comments regarding climate change.
It is beyond disappointing that the nations top environmental official would call into
question the overwhelming scientific consensus and undermine progress of this critical subject.
The changing climate is the most significant environmental and social threat facing the
world, and emissions from the United States are a significant cause.
Pennsylvania has already experienced a long-term warming of nearly two degrees over
the past century, and this trend is expected to accelerate. By 2050, Pennsylvania is predicted to
be an average of 5.4 degrees F warmer than it was in 2000.
In the face of this reality, foot dragging and hand wringing is not an option, we need
decisive action.
I urge you to take seriously your responsibility to provide leadership in the effort to
reduce greenhouse gas emissions-- not to spread doubt and falsehoods about the existence of the
problem.
Pennsylvania has benefited from a long partnership with the federal government to
address environmental concerns, which has resulted in great improvements to the health, quality
of life, and economic prosperity of Pennsylvania residents.
Over its nearly 50-year history, the agency you seem intent on hobbling helped save the
bald eagle from extinction by regulating pesticides, reduced corrosive and toxic acid rain, helped
protect the ozone layer, and curtailed tailpipe emissions which contribute to smog.
In recent weeks, youve spoken of solutions that come from federal-state relationships.
We urge the Trump administration not to turn its back on those very federal-state partnerships
that have produced these many benefits.
We hope to continue to work with EPA to protect Pennsylvanias public health and
support economic prosperity.
Thank you for your consideration of our joint responsibilities.
Respectfully,
Patrick McDonnell
Acting Secretary
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
A copy of the letter is available online.
NewsClips:
Trumps EPA Cuts Would Endanger Pennsylvanians, DEP Chief Says
McKelvey: Trumps Budget Puts Your Water, Health At Risk
Trump EPA Cuts Could Have Bigger Trickle-Down Impact On PA, NJ
Trump Budget Kills Chesapeake Funds, Disbelief Follows
Gov. Wolf, Casey Criticize, Toomey Lauds Trump Budget Plan
Allegheny Front: How Big Cuts At EPA Will Impact PA
GASP: Cuts To EPA Will Significantly Impact Southwestern PA
Trumps First Budget To Include Deep Cuts For EPA, Energy, Domestic Programs
Trumps Budget Takes A Sledgehammer To The EPA
Trumps Scorched Earth EPA Budget Draws Swift Reactions
Trump Proposes Budget To Hobble EPA
Trumps Budget Would Cut EPA Funding By 31%, Eliminate Waterway Cleanup Programs
Trump Proposes Dramatic Cuts To EPA Funding
Trump Bid To Axe Chesapeake Bay Restoration Funding Draws Fire
Trump Budget Would Eliminate Funding For Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Trumps Budget Would Torpedo Investments In Climate Change, Clean Energy
Trump Seeks To Ax Appalachia Economic Programs Causing Worry In Coal Country
With EPA Cuts, States Would Lose Help In Emergencies
AP: Winners, Losers In Trumps First Budget
AP: Republicans Join Democrats Against Trumps Great Lakes Cuts
Here Are The Federal Agencies, Programs Trump Wants To Eliminate
People Sending EPA Cookies And Thank-You Cards
Op-Ed: Underfunded State Environmental Programs Quickly Becoming An Epidemic
Op-Ed: Keeping PA Clean When EPA Goes AWOL
Editorial: State Must Do Its Part To Correct Its Own Underfunding Of DEP
Allegheny Front: How Big Cuts At EPA Will Impact PA
Lehigh Municipalities Eye Solution To Share $300M Bill For Sewer Repairs
Delaware County Uses Drilling Impact Fees For Darby Creek Trail
Op-Ed: Preserving Farmland, Open Space Worthwhile Investment
AP: PA Republican Lawmakers Sobering To Huge Budget Deficit
Wolfs Fight To Offer Early Retirement To 2,000 State Workers
Wolfs Pension Tactic Has Mixed Record
Casey Asks Trump For $50M For Mon River Locks & Dams
U.S. Park Service Closes 2 Locations In Philadelphia Ahead Of Cuts
Related Stories:
Proposed Trump Budget Cuts To State Program Grants Will Cripple DEP, Cause Drastic Fee
Increases
Sen. Yudichak: Proposed Federal Budget Cuts Will Challenge Right To Clean Air, Water
CBF On Proposed Elimination Of Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay Program
ECOS: Presidents Proposed EPA Budget Cuts Will Adversely Affect State Environmental
Agencies
[Posted: March 16, 2017]
Sen. Yudichak: Proposed Federal Budget Cuts Will Challenge Right To Clean Air, Water

Sen. John T. Yudichak (D-Luzerne), Minority Chair of the Senate


Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, Friday issued the
following statement in response to President Trumps proposed cuts to the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency--
"Every Pennsylvanians fundamental right to clean air and water will be
seriously challenged if the proposed thirty percent cut to the EPA passes
the U.S. Congress.
The EPA is a critical funding partner for the Pennsylvania Department of
Environmental Protection. EPA helps us inspect safe drinking water
systems, monitor air pollution, and reclaim abandoned mine lands through
innovative partnerships with groups like the Earth Conservancy.
"Protecting the environment is not only a public safety issue, it's a jobs issue for
Pennsylvania companies who interact with DEP to advance economic development projects
throughout the Commonwealth."
[Note: No statements are yet available from the other Senate and House Environmental
Committee Chairs.]
Related Stories:
Proposed Trump Budget Cuts To State Program Grants Will Cripple DEP, Cause Drastic Fee
Increases
StateImpact: DEP: Federal Budget Cuts Will Have Immediate, Devastating Effect In PA
CBF On Proposed Elimination Of Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay Program
ECOS: Presidents Proposed EPA Budget Cuts Will Adversely Affect State Environmental
Agencies
[Posted: March 17, 2017]

CBF On Proposed Elimination Of Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay Program

Chesapeake Bay Foundation President William C. Baker issued


the following statement concerning President Trumps proposed
budget, which eliminates funding for the Chesapeake Bay
Program.
Since the first Bay Agreement in 1983, EPA has been the lead
federal partner with the states in the work to reduce pollution to
the Chesapeake Bay.
In the last eight years, the states and EPA accelerated their
efforts to achieve specific, science-based pollution reduction
targets by 2025.
All six states and the District of Columbia agreed, and developed their own plans to
achieve the necessary pollution reductions. In addition each jurisdiction developed two-year
milestones to help track progress.
The result has been an accelerated recovery with water clarity and underwater grasses
increasing, and the dead zone decreasing.
After the first Chesapeake Bay Agreement was signed in 1983, Ronald Reagan said in his
1984 State of the Union Address: Though this is a time of budget constraints, I have requested
for EPA one of the largest percentage budget increases of any agency. We will begin the long,
necessary effort to clean up a productive recreational area and a special national resourcethe
Chesapeake Bay.
On February 28, President Trump spoke to Congress and said: My administration wants
to work with members in both parties topromote clean air and clean water[emphasis
added].
This just makes no sense. We are in disbelief. The EPAs role in this clean up is nothing
less than fundamental. Its not just important, it is critical.
Eliminating the EPA Bay Program will slam the door on the Bays nascent recovery, a
recovery which is still very fragile.
Thanks to an unprecedented partnership among elected officials, citizens and
communities across our region, we are decades into a Chesapeake Bay cleanup plan that is
restoring our waters and enjoys strong bipartisan support. Eliminating funding for EPAs Bay
Program derails these efforts and directly undermines all that has been accomplished. For all of
us who care about a restored Bay, healthy crabs and oysters, and healthy local economies, the
Trump Administrations budget is a clarion call to stand up and fight to save the Bay.
There is the very real chance that if this budget were implemented, the Bay will revert to
a national disgrace with deteriorating water quality, unhealthy fish and shell fish, and water
borne diseases that pose a real threat to human health. Compare that to its current trajectory a
Bay teaming with healthy fish oysters and crabs; a Bay safe for children to swim in; a national
model of a federal/state partnership heralded worldwide.
Clean water is not a luxury, it is a right that no American should have to fight to
achieve.
By implementing the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint, the benefits nature provides to
us will increase in value by more than $22 billion. And we reap those added benefits every year.
At the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, we will fight with every fiber in our bodies to see
that Congress rejects this Bay budget and maintains a program that has achieved so much and is
poised to save one of the worlds greatest natural resources.
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA webpage. Click Here to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). Click Here for a copy of CBF-PAs most recent newsletter.
Visit DEPs Chesapeake Bay Office webpage for more in how Pennsylvania is meeting
its obligations under the Bay Program.
NewsClips:
Trump Bid To Axe Chesapeake Bay Restoration Funding Draws Fire
Trump Budget Kills Chesapeake Funds, Disbelief Follows
Trump Budget Would Eliminate Funding For Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Related Stories:
Proposed Trump Budget Cuts To State Program Grants Will Cripple DEP, Cause Drastic Fee
Increases
Sen. Yudichak: Proposed Federal Budget Cuts Will Challenge Right To Clean Air, Water
StateImpact: DEP: Federal Budget Cuts Will Have Immediate, Devastating Effect In PA
ECOS: Presidents Proposed EPA Budget Cuts Will Adversely Affect State Environmental
Agencies
[Posted: March 16, 2017]

50 State Environmental Agencies Group: EPA Cuts Will Adversely Affect States

The White Houses dramatic cuts proposed Thursday to the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency, if enacted, affect grants that support an average of 27 percent of state environmental
agency budgets (EABs), according to the Environmental Council of the States.
While EPAs overall budget is reduced 31 percent, the proposed FY18 reduction of $482
million is a 44.5 percent cut to state Categorical Grants from the $1.082 billion annualized FY17
level.
The Superfund proposed FY18 reduction of $330 million is a 30 percent cut from the
$1.092 billion annualized FY17 level. The proposed FY18 reduction of $233 million is a 48
percent cut to the EPA Office of Research and Development from the $483 million annualized
FY17 level.
Wednesday, ECOS released its Green Report - Status of State Environmental Agency
Budgets, FY2013- 15, showing that average federal funding to state EABs already has
experienced a decline.
Frankly, language in the Presidents budget blueprint that EPA would primarily support
States and Tribes in their important role protecting air, land, and water in the 21st Century is
wholly inconsistent with the Categorical Grant cuts, says ECOS Executive Director & General
Counsel Alexandra Dunn. States need these federal funds to carry out their critical functions of
advancing human health and protecting the environment, and to issue permits that keep local
economies moving. States operate 96 percent of federally delegated and authorized
environmental programs and manage funds to implement environmental regulations and are an
important link to the local regulated community and local governments.
We appreciate that the important state revolving loan funds are proposed for a less than
one percent increase, and not a decrease, said ECOS President John Linc Stine, Commissioner
of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. However, the cuts to the core state programmatic
grants are untenable. States welcome renewed confidence in our work and ability to protect
human health and the environment. However, as ECOS report shows, the federal government
supports this function at an average of 27 percent. A cut of nearly 45 percent while state
legislatures are in session is frankly unworkable.
ECOS March 15 report analyzed budget information from 46 state environmental
agencies, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, finding state EABs increased 7 percent over
three years, with the average state EAB being $203 million over three years.
The report looks at three primary funding sources state EAB general fund support,
federal government funding, and fees and other funding. The findings over three years are that:
state EAB general fund support increased by $335 million (35 percent); federal government
funding support to state EABs decreased by $64 million (3 percent); and fee and other fund
support the largest major funding source for state EABs grew by $403 million (10 percent).
ECOS is the national nonprofit, nonpartisan association of state and territorial
environmental commissioners. For more information, visit the ECOS website.
NewsClips:
Trumps EPA Cuts Would Endanger Pennsylvanians, DEP Chief Says
McKelvey: Trumps Budget Puts Your Water, Health At Risk
Trump EPA Cuts Could Have Bigger Trickle-Down Impact On PA, NJ
Trump Budget Kills Chesapeake Funds, Disbelief Follows
Gov. Wolf, Casey Criticize, Toomey Lauds Trump Budget Plan
Allegheny Front: How Big Cuts At EPA Will Impact PA
GASP: Cuts To EPA Will Significantly Impact Southwestern PA
Trumps First Budget To Include Deep Cuts For EPA, Energy, Domestic Programs
Trumps Budget Takes A Sledgehammer To The EPA
Trumps Scorched Earth EPA Budget Draws Swift Reactions
Trump Proposes Budget To Hobble EPA
Trumps Budget Would Cut EPA Funding By 31%, Eliminate Waterway Cleanup Programs
Trump Proposes Dramatic Cuts To EPA Funding
Trump Budget Would Eliminate Funding For Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Trumps Budget Would Torpedo Investments In Climate Change, Clean Energy
Trump Seeks To Ax Appalachia Economic Programs Causing Worry In Coal Country
With EPA Cuts, States Would Lose Help In Emergencies
AP: Winners, Losers In Trumps First Budget
AP: Republicans Join Democrats Against Trumps Great Lakes Cuts
Here Are The Federal Agencies, Programs Trump Wants To Eliminate
People Sending EPA Cookies And Thank-You Cards
Op-Ed: Underfunded State Environmental Programs Quickly Becoming An Epidemic
Op-Ed: Keeping PA Clean When EPA Goes AWOL
Editorial: State Must Do Its Part To Correct Its Own Underfunding Of DEP
Allegheny Front: How Big Cuts At EPA Will Impact PA
Lehigh Municipalities Eye Solution To Share $300M Bill For Sewer Repairs
Delaware County Uses Drilling Impact Fees For Darby Creek Trail
Op-Ed: Preserving Farmland, Open Space Worthwhile Investment
AP: PA Republican Lawmakers Sobering To Huge Budget Deficit
Wolfs Fight To Offer Early Retirement To 2,000 State Workers
Wolfs Pension Tactic Has Mixed Record
Casey Asks Trump For $50M For Mon River Locks & Dams
U.S. Park Service Closes 2 Locations In Philadelphia Ahead Of Cuts
Related Stories:
Proposed Trump Budget Cuts To State Program Grants Will Cripple DEP, Cause Drastic Fee
Increases
StateImpact: DEP: Federal Budget Cuts Will Have Immediate, Devastating Effect In PA
Sen. Yudichak: Proposed Federal Budget Cuts Will Challenge Right To Clean Air, Water
CBF On Proposed Elimination Of Federal Funding For Chesapeake Bay Program
[Posted: March 16, 2017]

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Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Govs Schedule/ Bills Introduced

Here are the Senate and House Calendars and Committee meetings showing bills of interest as
well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars

House (March 20): <> Click Here for full House Bill Calendar.

Senate (March 20): Senate Bill 50 (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) further providing for notice of
flood history in home sales disclosures (sponsor summary) . <> Click Here for full Senate Bill
Calendar.

Committee Meeting Agendas This Week

House: the State Government Committee meets to consider House Bill 410 (Warner-R-
Fayette) establishing a Performance-Based Budget Board and performance-based budgeting
process (sponsor summary); the Local Government Committee meets to consider House Bill
266 (Harper-R-Montgomery) making changes to the state Construction Code Appeals Board
(sponsor summary); the Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee meets to
consider House Resolution 84 (Ryan-R-Lebanon) congratulating the PA National Guards
environmental office on winning first place in the Sustainability Team in the 2016 Army
National Guard Environmental Awards Contest (sponsor summary). <> Click Here for full
House Committee Schedule.

Senate: <> Click Here for full Senate Committee Schedule.

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

Here are links to key Standing Committees in the House and Senate and the bills pending in
each--

House
Appropriations
Education
Environmental Resources and Energy
Consumer Affairs
Gaming Oversight
Human Services
Judiciary
Liquor Control
Transportation
Links for all other Standing House Committees

Senate
Appropriations
Environmental Resources and Energy
Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure
Community, Economic and Recreational Development
Education
Judiciary
Law and Justice
Public Health and Welfare
Transportation
Links for all other Standing Senate Committees

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--
Senate
March 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 29
April 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26
May 8, 9, 10, 22, 23, 24
June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

House
March 20, 21, & 22.
April 3, 4, 5 , 18, 19, 24, 25, & 26.
May 8, 9, 10, 22, 23, & 24.
June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, & 30

Governors Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. Click Here to view Gov. Wolfs Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

Senate/House Bills Moving

The following bills of interest saw action this week in the House and Senate--

House

State Construction Code: House Bill 298 (Delozier-R-Cumberland) creating a building code
official trainee program (sponsor summary), House Bill 177 (Pickett-R-Susquehanna) exempting
maple sugar houses from the state construction code (sponsor summary) and House Bill 162
(Maloney-R-Barks) requiring the publication of Pennsylvania specific code manuals (sponsor
summary) were referred to the House Appropriations Committee.

Porter Tunnel Mine Disaster: House Resolution 74 ( Tobash-R-Schuylkill) a resolution


recognizing the 40th anniversary of the Porter Tunnel Mine Disaster on March 1, 1977 was
adopted by the House.

News From The Capitol

Senate, House Lawmakers Announce Formation Of First Nuclear Energy Caucus

Senators Ryan Aument (R-Lancaster) and John Yudichak


(D-Luzerne) along with Representatives Becky Corbin
(R-Chester) and Rob Matzie (D-Allegheny) Thursday
announced the formation of a bipartisan, bicameral
caucus of General Assembly to focus on nuclear energy
issues.
This is the first nuclear caucus in a state legislature in the
United States.
This caucus will give members of the General Assembly an opportunity to become more
educated about nuclear energys economic and environmental value and provide another voice in
other important discussions, including electric power reliability, affordability and safety, said
Sen. Aument.
Pennsylvania is home to five nuclear stations, making it the second largest nuclear
capacity state in America. The electricity produced from Pennsylvanias nuclear sources
represents nearly 37 percent of the Commonwealths total power production, helping make the
state the second largest producer of electricity in the nation and the top net exporter of electricity.
Given our states prominence in energy production, it is important that lawmakers focus
on an inclusive energy policy that promotes and respects the contribution that each resource
offers, said Sen. Yudichak. The Nuclear Energy Caucus, like the other energy caucuses in the
General Assembly, is a great place to advance the many unique attributes that nuclear power
sources offer in balancing the overall energy mix.
The lawmakers said that nuclear power is considered one of the cleanest, safest, most
reliable and affordable sources of electricity today. They cited the performance of the plants as a
baseload generating resource as well as the economic benefits they produce locally and statewide
as examples of each stations value.
Rep. Matzie noted that Pennsylvanias nuclear plants each year contribute approximately
$2.3 billion to the states gross domestic product and support more than 15,600 direct and
secondary full time jobs.
He added that the plants have an annual payroll of $360 million and produce
approximately $81 million in tax revenue from induced economic activity. The nuclear energy
industry also purchases more than $1.8 billion of materials, services and fuel from more than
4,150 companies in Pennsylvania.
Pennsylvania truly is the keystone state of electric power production, and the nuclear
sources are one of the powerhouses that contribute to our economy, said Rep. Matzie. Within
their host communities and across the entire state, the nuclear power sector is generating much
more than electricity - it is producing economic growth through employment at the plants,
indirect employment through vendors and contracted labor, as well as civil and philanthropic
engagement and the taxes paid by the industrys workforce and businesses.
Rep. Corbin said that in addition to the economic benefits, she is pleased to promote an
energy source that is Americas largest source of carbon-free electricity, noting that no other
electric power producer that is available 24 hours per day, 7 days a week generates as much
emission-free electricity as nuclear energy.
Energy policy is inextricably linked to helping us meet environmental goals, said Rep.
Corbin. Nuclear power production is leading the way in helping us achieve the simultaneous
goals of having a safe, reliable and economic baseload generating source that also provides 63
percent of all carbon-free electricity in the United States, and over 90 percent of Pennsylvanias
carbon-free electricity.
Average annual CO2 emissions would be about 52 tons greater if the states nuclear
stations were decommissioned, she noted.
Rep. Corbin offered that nuclear stations also help avoid other substantial emissions,
including sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.
Having a robust and balanced energy portfolio that includes nuclear energy helps us
manage the many challenges we have in meeting environmental goals for other emitting
sources, said Rep. Corbin. This is just another added benefit from these resources, which work
alongside other electric power producers, to the benefit of the bulk power system, consumers,
and the overall economy.
Our collective goal is to have a continuing, ongoing dialogue about Pennsylvanias
nuclear energy assets, said Sen. Aument. Certainly, as we look around the country, there is
little doubt that nuclear energy sources like many other resources are struggling.
The Senator cited that since 2013, five nuclear stations have ceased power production and
begun decommissioning, with another seven plants already announced that they plan to close by
2019, in addition to two other plants planning to shutter four more reactors by 2025.
All of these events, coupled with Pennsylvanias status as a top nuclear power producer,
invite us to a timely discussion on the important role that nuclear power plays in the
Commonwealths economy and environment, said Sen. Aument. I, along with the co-chairs of
this caucus, look forward to working on policies that promote all of Pennsylvanias energy
resources, including nuclear energy.
There are currently 67 members of the Nuclear Energy Caucus. The first meeting of the
Nuclear Energy Caucus is scheduled for March 22.
(Photo: Three Mile Island, Dauphin County.)
NewsClips:
PSEG (NJ): Without Subsidies Nuclear Plants Could Go Dark
PJM Monitor: State Power Plant Subsidies Threaten The Foundations Of Power Markets
Westinghouse Electric Announces Management Changes
Related Stories:
New Report On Economic, Carbon Emissions Benefits Of PAs 5 Nuclear Power Plants
Exelon, Illinois OK Bill To Keep Nuclear Plants Open, Expand Renewables, Energy Efficiency
New York PSC Approves 50% Clean Energy Standard, Nuclear Subsidies
Is Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant Next For Early Shutdown?
[Posted: March 16, 2017]

News From Around The State

Op-Ed: We Need To Recognize The Many Faces Making Up The Chesapeake Bay
Watershed

By Caitlyn Johnstone, Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay & Jim Edward, Chair, EPA
Chesapeake Bay Programs Diversity Workgroup

In an effort to create a better environment for everyone,


the conservation world takes a vital step: including
everyone.
The Chesapeake Bay, the largest of more than 100
U.S. estuaries, is a trove of biodiversity. The Bays
watershed stretches from New York to Virginia and
boasts more than 3,600 species of plants and animals,
11,684 miles of shoreline and 150 major rivers and
streams, giving it the highest land-to-water ratio of any coastal water body in the world.
Its people are just as varied as the natural environment. Along with the natural assets so
loved by all, the watershed is home to a vibrant community of 18 million people and a bustling
economy valued at more than a trillion dollars.
Crowded cities, suburbs and forests are as plentiful in the watershed as its rural
communities, wide open spaces and fishing villages.
Why, then, in the collective effort to protect both the natural world and livelihoods, are
some people taking on a challenge so decidedly homogenous?
The national initiative Green 2.0, released a report in 2014, calls attention to the green
ceiling, wherein environmental organizations and agencies showed a racial composition that
hovers 1216 percent nationwide for people of color.
The demographics of the U.S. population, in contrast, is closer to 38 percent. The reasons
for the disparity, as well as the actions needed to address it, are many.
Now, in 2017, environmental organizations are taking steps to better reflect the
population they support, as well as to understand that the term diversity goes far beyond race.
Discrimination is, unfortunately, a fact. While many would like to claim theyve grown
beyond such prejudices, discrimination is still a factor that affects hiring and promotional
decisions within organizations.
Many organizations are tackling issues of discrimination head on by first admitting it
exists by doing so, they are then able to take action to correct it. Much harder for
organizations to pin down and admit are the issues of unconscious bias and insular recruiting.
In the matter of hiring, unconscious bias is a factor for both the interviewer and the
prospective employee. When differences in the workplace are apparent culture, economic
status, race or experiential background common ground and comfort is difficult to come by.
Chante Coleman, field director for the Choose Clean Water Coalition, said comfort and
inclusion are paramount to efforts of diversity: Inclusion isI am comfortable sharing my
biggest and best ideas at any moment. [The] broader piece is Im part of the decision-making
process, my thoughts and input actually matter.
The comfort factor affects many aspects of environmental work, from making a
connection and building engagement with communities to the struggle to forge ahead in an
organization.
The influence of unconscious bias means pathways are most frequently formed among
similar groups. Once those connections are established, organizations continue to reach out only
to each other for everything from projects to staff vacancies.
You only know what you know, explained Sacoby Wilson, assistant professor at the
Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health and an authority on environmental justice.
You do business with what youre comfortable with.
When that familiarity does not exist at the outset, connections are difficult to form and
maintain.
Diversity engagement for environmental groups is more than social justice. Quite simply,
the practical reasons of influence and effectiveness are as much an impetus as the desire to do
what is right.
Where do we get our power? From the people, Coleman said. Our communities are
becoming more diverse, and we will be leaving out a significant portion of the population if we
dont engage in diversity.
Jim Edward, chair of the Chesapeake Bay Program Diversity Workgroup, points out: If
we want to accomplish environmental goals for the program, we have to engage the entire
population in the watershed. If were not engaging 40 percent of the population, were not
going to get it done.
A key element of the drive for change is missing when other populations are excluded.
In every poll, said Ramon Palencia-Calvo, Latino Outreach Director for the Maryland
League of Conservation Voters, the Latino community is most on board with environmental
policies philosophically.
In efforts to address urban stormwater runoff, no community is so negatively affected by
the issue nor so positively affected by its improvement as the population of inner cities.
Communities that have a cultural tie to the environment or are deeply affected by an adverse
environment have more invested in its vitality.
Jorge Bogantes Montero is a stewardship specialist with the Anacostia Watershed Society
and a man with an intimate understanding of what it means to have engagement with diverse
communities, regardless of perceived inclusion or assumed background.
You have to be bicultural, reallyhaving bilingual and bicultural people helps a lot to
convey the message. He emphasized that being bicultural is not incumbent on ones skin color
or background, and addressed income differences in the same vein.
Being [of the same culture] is not enough. If you are upper [socioeconomic] class and
speaking to lower [socioeconomic] class and dont take that into consideration, you will not be
effective.
The question of diversity is nuanced and far-reaching, and a lack of it is a barrier.
We need a diversity of ideas around the table to become more effective, Coleman
stated. Hiring from underrepresented communities in the watershed and being open to candidates
with a nontraditional education or work experience will further innovate environmental efforts.
It is good to have people from different lived experiences and backgrounds, Wilson
said. Have a prismatic approach to solving problems. We all have our own biased assumptions.
Multidimensional people mean multidimensional approaches to solving problems.
If diversity has such a multidimensional definition, how can environmentalists take hold
of intentional change?
Listen to the needs and the stories of any community, Montero said. Be open-minded
and be able to listen. Listen. The skill of listening, of being a culturally competent and an
effective communicator, is high on the list of desired qualities to have in new employees.
Organizations can take steps in the way they recruit staff with culturally capable
individuals.
Choose Clean Water, along with the Chesapeake Bay Funders Network, is looking to
make those changes from within their comprehensive Diversity Equity and Inclusion Plan. In its
development, these organizations embrace the need to listen by starting with self-reflective
questions:
In our governance structure, do we have a diversity piece? Hiring are we posting
where diverse audiences will see it? Do our programs reflect diversity? Are we listening to a
community to understand their needs? After weve listened, are we designing programs to meet
those needs?
Efforts will lead to change when organizations are intentional about diversity.
[In response to a call for action] people respond, we dont have the resources,
Palencia-Calvo stated. Well, you dont have the resources because you dont make this a
priority. He is very clear on this point: There is a lack of leadership commitment to mandate
diversity, yet change will not happen without an update to policies. [With] an intentional start
from managementothers will follow through.
The Chesapeake Bay Program, the partnership leader in environmental efforts for the
watershed, is making those changes starting with identifying how far there is to go.
In the summer of 2016, the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay conducted a self-identifying
diversity profile assessment of Chesapeake Bay Program staff and their partners. Participants
answered voluntarily and anonymously to questions regarding diversity and their placement in
Chesapeake Bay Program leadership.
The results show that the Chesapeake Bay Program is well below the national
demographics for racial diversity.
Eighty-four percent of respondents identified as white, with 13 percent identifying as
nonwhite.
Coleman, whose organization is a champion of diversity efforts, applauded baseline
establishment and the posting of data as paramount to confronting the status quo. Collecting
diversity data is huge! She said passionately. It has to be included in our policies.
With a strategy marked by transparency and actionable steps, the Bay Program is pushing
to acknowledge and then improve those numbers before the next scheduled assessment in 2019.
Its Diversity Workgroup, established in 2016 under the Stewardship Goal Team, put on a
large workshop in November at Baltimores Masonville Cove that covered networking and
candid problem-solving.
The Bay Program is revising its grant guidance and using an environmental justice
screening tool to assist grass-roots community groups and better target project funding. A new,
full-time diversity staffer puts action behind the motion, and a specific diversity indicator is now
part of the Bay Program mission.
Progress on this and other indicators is found at ChesapeakeProgress.com, a Bay
Program-supported website designed for an accessible and transparent tracking of Chesapeake
efforts.
By tracking progress and improving the inclusion of diverse populations in
environmental decision making, the diversity outcome will help lead to positive changes in other
indicators with an infusion of new perspectives at all levels of engagement.
Diversity, especially in the Bays multifaceted watershed, is a powerful movement.
When [environmental groups] build across bridges, Wilson said, we build a more robust
environmental movement. It is powerful to understandhow to build across difference and have
common ground to address problems.
The most successful restorations are those within a community that take ownership and
continues to maintain it over time that goes for the people of the community as much as the
fauna, water, land and flora.
(Photo: Jorge Bogantes Montero of the Anacostia Watershed Society.)
For more information:
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
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NewsClips:
Trumps EPA Cuts Would Endanger Pennsylvanians, DEP Chief Says
McKelvey: Trumps Budget Puts Your Water, Health At Risk
Trump EPA Cuts Could Have Bigger Trickle-Down Impact On PA, NJ
Trump Budget Kills Chesapeake Funds, Disbelief Follows
Op-Ed: We Need To Recognize The Many Faces That Make Up The Chesapeake Bay Watershed

(Reprinted from the March 14 Chesapeake Bay Journal.)


[Posted: March 15, 2017]

Forests For The Chesapeake Bay March Newsletter Is Now Available

The March 13 edition of the Forests for the Chesapeake Bay


Program is now available featuring articles on--
-- Forest Issues In The News
-- Upcoming Webinars And Forest-Related Events In
Pennsylvania And Other Bay States
-- Forest Trivia
-- Click Here to sign up for your own copy.
For more information on the program, initiatives, funding opportunities and upcoming
events, visit the Forests for the Chesapeake Bay Program website.
NewsClips:
Philadelphia Says Farewell To Last Remaining Grove Of English Elms In The Country
Maple Festivals Offer Sweetest Taste Of Spring
Beware: Ticks Survive Through Warm Winter
[Posted: March 13, 2017]

Potter County Implementing Source Water Protection Plan

Potter County takes the protection of their public


drinking water very seriously. They were the
first county in Pennsylvania to have approved
source water protection plans for all of the public
water supplies in the county.
They formed the Triple Divide Watershed
Coalition to bring together the county water
supplies to communicate, seek grant funding, and improve overall efficiencies. Through the
entire process county government leaders and agencies have been at the table cooperating with
the common goal of protecting the countys water resources.
Source Water Protection Plans create hydro geologically-defined Source Water
Protection Zones that can be used to protect water.
The Potter County Triple Divide Coalition, along with other Public Water Supply
Coalitions in North Central Pennsylvania, is seeking to raise the awareness and importance of
these protection zones.
They recently joined together to ask the PA Department of Environmental Protection to
incorporate these zones into the Departments internal permitting software.
The purpose is not to deny all permits in a Source Water Protection Zone, but rather to
flag permits in these zones for extra consideration, and to develop and recommend Best
Management Practices be used as appropriate in these sensitive public drinking water source
areas.
Tioga and Potter County are also the first counties in the state to implement an
emergency management 911 call system, so that water operators are notified of any spills or
accidents that occur in a source water protection zone.
Locally, Potter County has just passed a change to their Potter County Subdivision and
Land Development Ordinance.
The change states, if a project is proposed in a Source Water Protection Zone, the
individual public water supply will be asked to respond to this question, Does the proposed
development provide adequate protective measures from contamination of the water source?
This process seeks to open communication between the applicant, the public water
supply, and the planning office. This communication will identify, as a priority, the importance
of protecting the public water supply sources in the community.
Potter County holds the headwaters for the Allegheny, Susquehanna, and Genesee Rivers
in Pennsylvania. The leaders in the county recognize the importance of protecting water
resources, have created and are implementing their source water protection plans, and the entire
state of Pennsylvania will benefit because of their efforts.
Visit DEPs Source Water Assessment and Protection webpage for more information on
source water protection.
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh Water Authority: No Clear Leadership Hierarchy
Pittsburgh Water Authority Director To Stay For $225K
Pittsburgh Water Authority Direct To Stay For Up To A Year
Pittsburgh Authority Says Sulfur Smell In Water Not Harmful
Op-Ed: Fix Pittsburgh Authority Water System Now
Lead Found At Colfax Elementary In Springdale Prompts Bottled Water Use

(Written By: James Clark, Extension Educator, and reprinted from the March 13 edition of
Watershed Winds newsletter by Penn State Extension. Click Here to sign up for your own
copy.)
[Posted: March 13, 2017]

March 13 Watershed Winds Newsletter Now Available From Penn State Extension

The March 13 edition of Watershed Winds newsletter is now available from Penn State
Extension featuring articles on--
-- Conference Report Sees Farmers Playing Key Role In Meeting Water Quality Goals
-- Find Out How Early Spring Is Arriving In Your Neighborhood
-- Watershed-Friendly Deicing
-- DCNR Announces Improvements To PA Groundwater Water Well Information System
-- House DEP Budget Hearing: Safe Drinking Water, Permitting, Pipelines, Chesapeake Bay
-- Potter County Is Implementing Their Source Water Protection Plan
-- Click Here to sign up for your own copy.
[Posted: March 13, 2017]

Stroud Water Research Center UpStream Newsletter Now Available

The latest edition of the UpStream newsletter is


now available from the Stroud Water Research
Center in Chester County featuring articles on--
-- DNA Tool Helps Scientists Identify Bacteria
In Streams
-- Strouds David Bressler Connects Citizens To
Science
-- Schools, Scouts: Register Now For Summer And Fall Student Education Programs
-- Education Staff Lead Presentations, Winning Canoe At NAAEE
-- Check Here For Upcoming Events
-- Click Here to sign up for your own copy.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the Stroud Water
Research Center website, Like them on Facebook, Follow on Twitter, include them in your
Circle on Google+ and visit their YouTube Channel.
[Posted: March 17, 2017]

PA Assn. For Sustainable Agriculture Accepting Presentation Proposals For 2018


Conference

The PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture is now


accepting presentation proposals for its 2018 conference to be
held in State College February 7 to 10. The deadline for
proposals is June 30.
PASA invites innovative, instructive, and enthusiastic
presenters to share their knowledge of and expertise in the best
practices and strategies to promote profitable farms in
producing healthy food for all people while respecting the
natural environment at the 27th Annual Farming for the Future
Conference.
The conference seeks to:
-- Provide training and education that will promote the environmental, economic, and social
well-being of farms, the food system, and the environment.
-- Serve as an outlet for sharing cutting edge research and science-based solutions, as well as aid
the preservation and passing on of traditional farming knowledge and heritage.
-- Be a venue where people, businesses, and organizations from across the sustainable agriculture
movement can come together to make meaningful connections and establish fruitful
relationships.
-- Welcome all folks who participate in the sustainable agriculture movement without
championing a single method or philosophy of production.
Click Here for all the details on how to submit a proposal.
NewsClips:
Farmers Keeping Close Watch On Fruit Crops, Weather
Op-Ed: Meet The New Face Of Farming In Perry County
Op-Ed: Preserving Farmland, Open Space Worthwhile Investment
[Posted: March 15, 2017]

PUC Highlights Impact Of Safe Drinking Water During National Fix A Leak Week

The Public Utility Commission Thursday


highlighted the importance of safe drinking
water, along with the role of water efficiency
and conservation efforts, in conjunction with
National Fix a Leak Week, which runs from
March 20-26.
As part of the annual Fix a Leak campaign,
families across the country are encouraged to
check their fixtures for leaks and consider the
community and economic impact of wasted water.
A little leak really does make a big difference. Annually, more than 1 trillion gallons of
water leaks from U.S. homes enough water to supply every family in Pennsylvania for almost a
full year, said Commissioner Robert F. Powelson. Common leaks include running toilets due
to worn flappers, dripping faucets, and leaking showerheads all easily correctable and fixing
these leaks can save homeowners about 10 percent on their water bills.
According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, an estimated 10 percent of all
homes have leaks that waste 90 gallons or more per day, and the average household leaks can
account for more than 10,000 gallons of water wasted every year.
Nationwide, leaks account for more than 1 trillion gallons of lost water per year equal
to the annual household water use of more than 11 million homes.
As part of Fix a Leak Week, Pennsylvanians are encouraged to identify and fix leaks
around their homes. The PUC and EPA offer the following tips:
-- Common types of leaks found in the home include worn toilet flappers, dripping faucets and
other leaking valves.
-- Fixing easily corrected household leaks can help save about 10 percent on water bills.
-- Check your water meter before and after a two-hour period when no water is being used. If the
meter does not read exactly the same, you probably have a leak.
-- A drop of food coloring added to the toilet tank is a quick and easy way to identify possible
leaks. If the color shows up in the bowl within 10 minutes without flushing, you have a leak. Be
sure to flush immediately after this experiment to avoid staining the tank.
-- A leaky faucet that drips at the rate of one drip per second can waste more than 3,000 gallons
per year enough water for 180 showers.
More tips for finding leaks and saving water are available on the EPAs WaterSense
website.
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh Water Authority: No Clear Leadership Hierarchy
Pittsburgh Water Authority Director To Stay For $225K
Pittsburgh Water Authority Direct To Stay For Up To A Year
Pittsburgh Authority Says Sulfur Smell In Water Not Harmful
Op-Ed: Fix Pittsburgh Authority Water System Now
Lead Found At Colfax Elementary In Springdale Prompts Bottled Water Use
[Posted: March 16, 2017]

SBA: Final Month To Apply For Working Capital Loans From 2016 Flash Flooding In PA

The U.S. Small Business Administration Friday reminded small businesses, small agricultural
cooperatives, small aquaculture businesses and most private nonprofit organizations in
Pennsylvania of the deadline to submit disaster loan applications for economic injury caused by
the flash flooding on June 17, 2016.
Businesses that suffered economic losses as a result of the disaster and want to apply for
low-interest loans from the SBA are urged to do so before the April 19, 2017 deadline, said
Frank Skaggs, director of SBA Field Operations Center East in Atlanta.
Low-interest disaster loans are available in the following counties: Fayette, Greene,
Somerset, Washington and Westmoreland in Pennsylvania; Garrett in Maryland; and
Monongalia and Preston in West Virginia.
Working capital disaster loans up to $2 million are available at 4 percent for small
businesses, and 2.625 percent for private nonprofit organizations with terms up to 30 years. The
loans are intended to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable, and other expenses that could
have been paid had the disaster not occurred. To be considered for this assistance, eligible
entities need to apply by the deadline.
Survivors may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBAs
secure website.
Businesses may also obtain information and loan applications by calling the SBAs
Customer Service Center at 1-800-659-2955 (1-800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing),
or by emailing: disastercustomerservice@sba.gov. Loan applications can also be downloaded.
Completed applications should be mailed to: U.S. Small Business Administration,
Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155.
The deadline to return economic injury applications is April 19, 2017.
NewsClip:
State, Pittsburgh Suburbs Join Forces To Tackle Flooding
[Posted: March 17, 2017]

Stony Creek Anglers to Kick Off Schuylkill Scrub March 25 in Norristown

Locals will kick off the three-month Schuylkill Scrub


by cleaning up Norristowns Stony Creek in
Montgomery County on March 25, from 8 a.m. to
noon. Volunteers are needed.
The Schuylkill Action Network leads the Schuylkill
Scrub to connect people with river cleanups and foster
new ones. Events span the Schuylkill River Valley
from March 1 to May 31.
This will be the Stony Creek Anglers 31st annual cleanup, said Mike Sherman, the
clubs nursery manager. All are welcome to come out for a great day of improving our
community. Well also be stocking the creek with trout.
Virginia Vassalotti of the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary has helped to expand the
Schuylkill Scrub since 2015. One way she has done this is by partnering with environmental
groups. These range from the Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy in Schwenksville to Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful.
Anyone who leads a cleanup can take advantage of free trash bags, gloves, and vests,
said Vassalotti. Also, free or discounted trash disposal is available during Pick It Up PA Days,
or April 18 to May 8.
Visit the Schuylkill Scrub website to join or create a river cleanup. The public can also
use this website to suggest places that need to be cleaned up.
Approximately 2 million people get their drinking water from the Schuylkill River, its
creeks, and streams. Its waters are home to over 40 species of fish, many of them popular with
anglers. And it is renowned for rowing, including the largest collegiate and high school regattas
in America.
The Schuylkill Action Network protects and restores Schuylkill waters through
partnerships. It does this by collaborating with organizations, businesses, and governments. To
join, please contact Virginia Vassalotti. She can be reached at the Partnership for the Delaware
Estuary by calling (800) 445-4935, extension 121.
Sign up now for the 2017 Great American Cleanup of PA and set up your own cleanup
and beautification event through May 31.
NewsClips:
Great American Cleanup Of PA Underway
Volunteers Needed For Statewide Cleanup, Beautification Effort
Eries Spring Cleanup Program Starts April 2
[Posted: March 13, 2017]

Group Against Smog & Pollution Summer Air Quality Camp For Students In Pittsburgh

The Pittsburgh-based Group Against Smog and Pollution


will hold a Summer Air Quality Camp for students age 10 to
13 on June 26-30 at the Environmental Charter School in
Regent Square Pittsburgh.
This week-long camp provides an in-depth look at air
quality issues in Southwest Pennsylvania and includes field
trips, nature explorations, air monitoring, science experience
and much more.
The deadline for registration is June 16. 20 spots are available. The cost for the day camp
is $150 per student. Scholarships are available to those who qualify.
Click Here for all the details.
NewsClips:
Trout In This York Classroom Are Growing
Wake Up To Sounds Of Nature From Carnegie Museums New App
[Posted: March 13, 2017]
Run For Clean Air Earth Day Celebration April 9 In Philadelphia

The Clean Air Council will hold its annual Run For Clean Air
Earth Day Celebration on April 9 in Philadelphia.
Register by March 31 to be part of the 5K, 10K or Kids
Fun Run or the 3K Walk as well as enjoy other Earth Day
activities.
The event is being supported by Toyota, a leader in
hybrid technology, clean air and environmental sustainability.
To register and for all the details, visit the Run For
Clean Air webpage.
NewsClips:
Is Deep Decarbonization The Key To Solving PAs Air Pollution?
Connecticut To Sue EPA Over PAs Brunner Island Power Plant
Crable: Connecticut To Sue EPA Over Pollution From Brunner Island Power Plant
[Posted: March 15, 2017]

PennTAP Facility Operations Workshop On Energy Efficiency Rescheduled To March 27

The PA Technical Assistance Program (PennTAP)


and the Department of Environmental Protection
have rescheduled the Facility Operations Workshop
on Energy Efficiency for March 27 at the Penn Stater
Hotel & Conference Center in State College.
The workshop had been scheduled for March
14.
The purpose of the workshop is to educate
building operators, facility engineers, energy managers, and service personnel (e.g. HVAC
technicians) in commercial buildings about how to find and fix energy-wasting practices, while
at the same time potentially extending the life of equipment and improving the comfort of
building occupants.
The workshop will include Building Re-tuning (BRT) and Building Operator Certificate
(BOC) tracks.
Building Re-tuning (BRT) is a systematic process to identify and correct building
operational problems that lead to energy waste. It is implemented at no or low cost other than the
labor required to perform the re-tuning process.
The BRT track at the workshop will include a blend of classroom training, and building
walk-throughs, looking at the building envelope, HVAC, and lighting at various Penn State
University campus buildings.
The Building Operator Certificate (BOC) track of this workshop is designed to provide
up-to-date information on the latest tools, trends, and best practices for building operators. BOC
maintenance points will be earned at the session.
The target participants for this workshop is medium-sized facilities from local
government, colleges, and K-12 school facilities located throughout Pennsylvania.
The workshop cost is offset with support from DEPs PA State Energy Plan funding from
the United States Department of Energy.
The deadline for registration is March 22.
For all the details and to sign up, visit the Facility Operations Workshop on Energy
Efficiency webpage.
NewsClips:
Trump Announces Challenge To Obama-Era Fuel Standards
Here Are The Federal Agencies, Programs Trump Wants To Eliminate (Energy Star)
[Posted: March 17, 2017]

DEP Makes Changes To Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates For Electric Vehicles

The Department of Environmental Protection


announced Saturday it has revised the Alternative Fuel
Vehicle Rebates available for battery and plug-in
electric vehicles. (formal notice)
Beginning March 18, there will be a three-tier
rebate system for these vehicle types.
-- $1,750 rebate for BEV and PHEV with a battery
capacity greater than or equal to 20 kWh;
-- $1,000 rebate for BEV and PHEV with a battery
capacity between 10 kWh and 20 kWh; and
-- $750 rebate for BEV and PHEV with a battery
capacity less than 10 kWh.
There are a limited number of rebates available at $1,750. The Program offered will be
reassessed upon payment of the first 250 rebates at $1,750 or June 30, 2017, whichever occurs
first.
There are no changes in rebate amounts for compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum
gas, hydrogen, fuel cell or electric motorcycle, scooters, ATVs or low speed electric vehicles.
Beginning March 18, all alternative fuel vehicle rebates will be submitted online using
the eGrants system.
More information will be published on DEPs Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates webpage.
(Photo: Weis Markets Tesla electric vehicle charging station at the Union Deposit Road store in
Harrisburg.)
[Posted: March 17, 2017]

DEP Acting Secretary To Speak At Globalcon Energy Conference In Philadelphia March


23

Acting Secretary Patrick McDonnell will be a featured speaker on


the New Challenges and Opportunities: Whats Happening In
Energy Policy At The Federal and State Levels panel at the
Globalcon Energy, Power & Facility Management Strategies and
Technologies Conference in Philadelphia.
Big changes in energy policy are happening in Washington
DC and in the states. You need to know how these changes will impact your business in the
future at the federal and state levels.
This interactive session features a discussion of changes in Administration policy on
energy; what can we expect from the new U.S. Secretary of Energy and the energy committees
on Capitol Hill; and what are some of the exciting new programs happening at the state level?
Acting Secretary McDonnell will focus on several ongoing initiatives of Pennsylvania
DEP related to energy efficiency and alternative energy, including a Department of Energy grant
for Finding Pennsylvanias Solar Future, electric and other alternative fueled vehicle
deployments, combined heat and power and microgrid projects, and energy efficiency programs
for small businesses and manufacturers.
Lots of new players and inside information on what is likely to happen or not happen
-- in energy policy will be discussed by the presenters.
The other presenters include Rob Altenburg, Director of PennFutures Energy Center and
Tyson Slocum, Director of Public Citizens Energy Program.
The Conference is being held on March 22 and 23 at the Philadelphia Convention Center
Hall E.
Click Here for all the details on the Conference.
[Posted: March 13, 2017]

Act 129 Energy Efficiency Law Fueling PAs Energy Economy: 62,000+ Jobs And
Counting

A recent U.S. Department of Energy report shows a


significant increase in energy jobs in Pennsylvania
spurred by Act 129, the states energy efficiency
policy. According to the DOE report, Pennsylvania is
home to 62,431 people employed in energy efficiency.
Act 129 helped all Pennsylvanians save
money, from residential customers to large
manufacturers. Since the program was enacted in
2008, electric customers have enjoyed a combined total of $4.2 billion in benefits.
The numbers speak for themselves, said Julian Boggs, Policy Director for the Keystone
Energy Efficiency Alliance, a 50-member Pennsylvania trade association. Act 129 is an
example of smart policy that has created local jobs that cant be outsourced, while helping
businesses and residents save money.
The benefits of energy efficiency for Pennsylvanias local economy, including job
creation, were on display Monday in Pittsburgh.
The Sheet Metal, Air, Rail & Transportation Workers Local 12 union and the Western
PA Chapter of Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association hosted
legislators and business leaders at a facility that trains workers for jobs in the energy efficiency
economy.
The event featured a tour of the SMART Local 12 Training Center, where apprentices
engage in hands-on training to learn the skills necessary for jobs in energy efficiency throughout
western Pennsylvania. Bob Greiner of Local 12 and SMART kicked off the event with remarks,
and stated,
SMACNA President John Raught followed with a statement, SMACNA sees energy
efficiency as a growth industry that has the potential of providing thousands of high paying jobs
throughout the Commonwealth.
Doug Poundstone, Operations Manager at Ductmate Industries added, Ductmate has
always believed that energy-efficiency and sustainability are vital components to successful
building design and function. Thats why our products are designed and engineered to provide
superior quality and maximum efficiency; to deliver maximum performance for the contractor
installing the product, for the building owner using the product, and for the people and places
affected by the manufacturing and usage of our products.
The tour was attended by Senators Jay Costa (D-Allegheny), Camera Bartolotta
(R-Washington) and Elder Vogel (R-Beaver) as well as representatives from Rep. Frank
Dermodys (D-Allegheny) office.
Attendees learned firsthand how strong energy efficiency policy has spurred local job
creation and job training across Pennsylvania in every county, while helping Pennsylvania
businesses save money.
McKamish Commercial Construction, the firm responsible for the PNC Tower, one of the
most energy-efficient LEED certified buildings in North America explained how the buildings
design and products used help save PNC on energy costs.
In addition to job creation and energy savings for Pennsylvania customers, Act 129 has
helped global companies with a base of operations and manufacturing in the state to keep their
costs low and bottom line growing.
"Policies like Act 129 keep energy costs low and more predictable over the long-term,
said Tim Lacey, Global Business Director for Dow Building & Construction. By eliminating
energy waste, we reduce Pennsylvanias need to generate additional power from more expensive
alternatives. Lower energy costs allow us to continue to invest throughout the U.S. supporting
more local jobs. Lets keep investing in what works.
Energy efficiency is powering Pennsylvanias economy! The Public Utility
Commissions reports show that Act 129 energy efficiency programs are creating jobs and
saving customers and businesses money, said Larry Myers, an engineer with Schneider Electric.
Our state needs to keep investing in successful policies like Act 129 to ensure Pennsylvania
remains a leader in competitive, global manufacturing.
A copy of the DOE report is available online. Visit the Public Utility Commissions Act
129 webpage for more information. Click Here for a copy of the most recent utility company
reports on their Act 129 accomplishments.
NewsClips:
Trump Announces Challenge To Obama-Era Fuel Standards
Here Are The Federal Agencies, Programs Trump Wants To Eliminate (Energy Star)
[Posted: March 13, 2017]

PennEast Pipeline Awards Nearly $130,000 In STEM Education Grants In PA, NJ

PennEast Pipeline Company Wednesday announced its


first class of PennEast Powering STEM Grant
recipients, who will receive nearly $130,000 to advance
the study of Science, Technology, Engineering and
Mathematics (STEM) in their local communities and within the footprint of the proposed
PennEast Pipeline.
PennEast was very happy with the overwhelmingly positive response we received to our
Powering STEM Grant Program, demonstrating schools and educators across the region
acknowledge our bright economic future thanks to abundant energy supplies, said Pam Witmer
of PennEast Pipeline Company. From Wilkes-Barre, Pa., to Chatham, NJ, PennEast is excited
to work with our STEM grant recipients to prepare individuals, young and old, to take advantage
of the many opportunities affordable energy is delivering.
Organizations receiving PennEast Powering STEM Grants include New Jerseys Harvest
Family Success Center, as well as Pennsylvanias Bethlehem Area School District, Lacawac
Sanctuary Environmental Education Center, and the United Way of Bucks County.
PennEasts STEM Grant will expose our community to a host of innovative and
inspiring STEM programs, said Penni Trionfo, volunteer and resource coordinator for Harvest
Family Success Center. Many of the families we serve are low-income, and many of them dont
have access to STEM curriculum or arent aware of the career opportunities related to STEM.
PennEasts generosity will have an enormous impact on low-income families in our area and
enable us to increase interest in STEM higher education and careers.
In Pennsylvania, Bethlehem Area School District applied for a PennEast Powering STEM
Grant to expand engineering courses through Project Lead the Way to its STEM curriculum.
Bethlehem Area School District is proud to offer Project Lead The Ways Engineering
program the best of its kind to our students, explained Jodi Frankelli of Bethlehem Area
School District. Thanks to PennEasts generous Powering STEM Grant, we will be able to
bolster the program and fund the costs of supplies and materials for roughly 40 students
engineering projects. With PennEasts support, we can continue to prepare students to be
innovative and productive leaders in science, engineering and math and to make meaningful
contributions to society.
Craig Lukatch of Lacawac Sanctuary Environmental Education Center explained
PennEasts grant will support the Education Centers Pathways in Ecological Research program.
Lacawac Sanctuary Environmental Education Center is grateful for PennEasts
continued support and their ongoing commitment to environmental stewardship and education,
said Lukatch. The Pathways in Ecological Research (PiER) program promotes women in STEM
and science careers, as well as in leadership positions. The program focuses on mentoring a
diverse group of high-achieving female high school students, and PennEasts grant will help us
serve approximately 100 students. We couldnt be more thankful for PennEasts assistance.
In Bucks County, Pa., PennEasts Powering STEM Grant will support the United Way of
Bucks Countys 2017 #girlSTEM Conference.
The 2017 #girlSTEM Conference is funded entirely through grants and sponsorships,
and wouldnt be possible without the support of companies like PennEast, said Katie Matarazzo
of the United Way of Bucks County. For most girls, the Conference is their first opportunity to
visit a university and interact with professional women. PennEasts Powering STEM Grant will
enable the more than 800 girls attending from across Bucks County to experience a full day of
STEM workshops we couldnt be more thankful.
Additional PennEast Powering STEM Grant recipients include:
-- Allentown Central Catholic High School;
-- Cybersonics Technology Team (Palisades High School, Kintnersville, Pa.);
-- Governors STEM Scholars (New Jersey);
-- Lehigh Career & Technical Institute;
-- Lehigh Valley Zoological Society;
-- Minsi Trails Council, Boy Scouts of America Organization (Lehigh Valley, Pa.);
-- Moore Elementary (Bath, Pa.);
-- Roosevelt Elementary School (Allentown, Pa.);
-- Wilkes University; and
-- Wilkes-Barre Area School District.
For more information on the PennEast Powering STEM Grant Program webpage.
NewsClips:
AP: Spectra Energy To By PSEGs Stake In $1.2B PennEast Pipeline
Mariner East 2 Pipeline Critics Say Any Leak Could Be Catastrophic
Activists: See Something Wrong In Building Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline? Say Something
Mariner East 2 Pipelines Proceed, As Challenges Continue
Op-Ed: Why Its Essential That PA Build Mariner East 2 Pipeline
Sunoco Rejects Twps Mariner East 1 Pipeline Complaint To PUC
Federal Judge Rejects Permits Challenge To Constitution Pipeline
[Posted: March 15, 2017]

183 Groups From 4 States Tell Delaware River Basin Commission To Enact Fracking Ban

Wednesday 183 organizations representing hundreds of thousands of members and the four
states whose waters flow to the Delaware River submitted a letter to the Delaware River Basin
Commission voting members the Governors of Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and
Delaware and the federal representative, the Army Corps of Engineers - calling for a permanent
ban on fracking in the Watershed.
Almost 400 people demonstrated at the DRBCs public meeting last month in reaction to
news that the DRBC staff has been working behind the scenes with Department of
Environmental Protection to develop natural gas drilling regulations, which, if enacted, would
lift the seven year moratorium on drilling in the Delaware River Basin.
The groups are insisting that the mountains of scientific evidence, the data about water
contamination from fracking, and the fracking ban in New York State provide more than enough
reason for the Commissioners to enact a ban instead.
The rollback of federal environmental regulations and authority under the Trump
Administrations policies is an important concern since President Trump is represented on the
DRBC by the Army Corps of Engineers, who holds the fifth vote to the four Governors.
"Delaware has nothing to gain and everything to lose from allowing fracking in our
watershed" said Stephanie Herron, Volunteer and Outreach Coordinator at the Delaware Sierra
Club. "That's why we're calling on Governor Carney and the other DRBC Commissioners to
protect Delawareans drinking water and health by permanently banning the dirty and dangerous
drilling process in the Delaware River Basin."
It is time to remove the fracking guillotine hanging over the heads of our watershed and
residents and that could drop at any time with just a few weeks notice and the vote of just 5
people. Now is the time to give permanent protection and peace of mind to all those who rely
upon and appreciate the Delaware River watershed said Maya van Rossum, the Delaware
Riverkeeper.
"The Delaware River Basin is the drinking water source for millions of people. Peer
reviewed scientific study shows us that fracking is inherently contaminating of water supplies.
Fracking cannot be done anywhere water. Period. It needs to be banned in the Delaware River
Basin and we will not stop until a complete ban is enacted," said Josh Fox, Director, GASLAND.
Its now time, in fact past time, to turn the temporary moratorium on fracking around the
Delaware River and its tributaries into a permanent ban. DRBCs 2010 decision to protect these
outstanding natural resource waters, the drinking water supply of 17 million people, was wise
then and with all weve learned since it would be still wiser to take the next step now. The
science is clear, fracking and protecting water are incompatible, thats why New York has acted
to ban fracking. DRBC must follow suit and get back out ahead of the curve, said David
Pringle, NJ Campaign Director of Clean Water Action which has members in all 4 states in the
watershed.
The Delaware River Valley is a national treasure and its being threatened by fracking.
We need the DRBC to make the fracking ban permanent to protect this environmentally sensitive
region and the drinking water for 17 million people, said Jeff Tittel, Director of the New Jersey
Sierra Club. You have designated these areas as Special Protection Water Areas and you must
give the River the special protection it deserves!
The Commissioners need look no farther than the shale fields of Pennsylvania, the only
state in the basin that has exposed its communities to the ravages of fracking, to see why a
permanent ban is warranted. During the years since the moratorium was established in 2010,
weve seen frackings profound environmental, public health, and safety impacts in PA at the
same time that weve seen huge, scalable advances in renewable, sustainable solutions. A ban is
a no-brainer, said Karen Feridun, Founder, Berks Gas Truth.
The Delaware River Basin is one of the most important ecological and cultural regions
in the entire nation. We cannot afford to expose it to the dangers of fracking, which could forever
destroy the drinking water source for millions of people across five states. Instead of relying on
dangerous fossil fuels of the past, we must turn to renewables and efficiency to power our
future, said Rob Friedman, Natural Resources Defense Council.
New York State banned high volume fracking because of the overwhelming scientific
evidence of its threatsespecially those to public health. The Delaware River Basin
Commission must do the same. This is the only course to protect our water, air, health and
communitiesits one that Pennsylvanias Governor Tom Wolf supports, one that New Yorks
Governor Cuomo has implemented, and we urge all of the commissioners to follow their lead,
said Wes Gillingham, Program Director, Catskill Mountainkeeper.
The Delaware River Valley shouldnt have the specter of fracking hanging over our
watershed. More than 5 years ago, the DRBC rejected fracking regulations and maintained the
temporary moratorium on fracking. In the age of Trump, its imperative for the DRBC to
institute a permanent fracking ban on one of the most harmful industrial activities facing our vast
drinking water network in the Delaware River watershed. Its time for the DRBC to take a clear
stand for our drinking water and oppose fracking, said Doug OMalley, Director, Environment
New Jerseys Director.
The 183 organizations that signed this letter are telling the DRBC Commissioners that
the moratorium they put in place has protected the River so far and now that we have abundant
incontrovertible evidence to prove fracking cannot be done safely, it is their responsibility to
enact a permanent ban to provide this Wild and Scenic River and the water supply for 17 million
people the protection that is necessary, said Tracy Carluccio, Deputy Director, Delaware
Riverkeeper Network.
Click Here for a copy of the joint letter.
NewsClips:
Battle Re-Emerging Over Gas Drilling In Delaware Watershed
DRBC Still Weighing Gas Drilling Rules, But No Decision On The Horizon
183 Environmental Groups: Ban Fracking Along Delaware River
AP: Marylands GOP Governor Joins Dems For Ban On Fracking
[Posted: March 15, 2017]

DCNR Accepting Applications For Volunteer Fire Company Wildfire Fighting Grants

Gov. Tom Wolf Monday announced applications are


being accepted for federal grants to help Pennsylvanias
rural communities better guard against the threat of fires
in forested, undeveloped, and unprotected areas.
Applications are due May 18.
The value of these grants is accentuated when
we look back at the tragedy of Tennessees wildfires late
last year, and Pennsylvanias wildfire last April that
burned for almost two weeks across more than 8,000
acres on the Pike-Monroe county line, Gov. Wolf said.
Well-trained, well-equipped volunteers in rural areas often are the front line of defense in these
types of wildfires. These men and women deserve the very best training and equipment, and
these grants help them obtain both.
In 2016, $571,202 was awarded to 142 volunteer fire companies serving rural areas and
communities where forest and brush fires are common.
The grant program, offered through the Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources, and paid through federal grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest
Service, has awarded more than $12 million since it began in 1982.
Local firefighting forces in rural areas or communities with fewer than 10,000 residents
qualify for the aid, which is used for training and equipment purchases directly related to fighting
brush and forest fires.
In reviewing applications, DCNR will place priority on those requests seeking funds for
projects that include the purchase of wildfire suppression equipment and protective clothing and
gear, said DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn. These are the items the smaller fire
companies often need most.
Grants also may be used for purchasing mobile or portable radios, installing dry hydrants,
wildfire prevention and mitigation work and training wildfire fighters, or converting and
maintaining federal excess vehicles. These vehicles are presented to the local departments
exhibiting the greatest needs and those that commit to outfitting them for fire suppression.
Aid is granted on a cost-share basis. Grants for any project during a fiscal year cannot
exceed 50 percent of the actual expenditures of local, public and private nonprofit organizations
in the agreement.
The maximum grant that will be considered from any fire company in 2017 is $7,500.
To expedite application and decision-making processes, DCNR is accepting only online
applications.
For all the details and to apply, visit DCNRs Volunteer Fire Assistance Grant Program
webpage. Questions should be directed to DCNRs Division of Forest Fire Protection at
717-787-2925; or send email to: ra-ffp@state.pa.us.
[Posted: March 13, 2017]

Manada Conservancys Spring Native Plant Sale April 29 In Dauphin County

The Manada Conservancy will hold its 17th Annual Spring


Native Plant Sale on April 29 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at
the Boro Park, Poplar Avenue and Water Street in
Hummelstown, Dauphin County.
Conservancy members can take advantage of a
Member Appreciation Breakfast compliments of The Healthy
Living Kitchen in Hummelstown and receive a 10 percent
discount on plant purchases.
Click Here for all the details. Click Here to shop
online for pre-sale orders to be picked up the day of the sale.
[Posted: March 13, 2017]

Game Commission: Hunters Harvested Over 333,250 Deer In The 2016-17 Season

The Game Commission reported Monday Pennsylvanias


buck harvest increased 9 percent, and the overall deer harvest
was up 6 percent, in the 2016-17 seasons, which closed in
January.
Hunters harvested an estimated 333,254 deer in
2016-17 an increase of about 6 percent compared to the
2015-16 harvest of 315,813.
Of those, 149,460 were antlered deer an increase of
about 9 percent compared to the previous license year, when
an estimated 137,580 bucks were taken. Its the largest harvest
of antlered deer since 2002.
Hunters also harvested an estimated 183,794 antlerless deer in 2016-17, which represents
an about 3 percent increase compared to the 178,233 antlerless deer taken in 2015-16.
Bowhunters accounted for nearly 33 percent of the overall deer harvest, taking 109,250
deer (59,550 bucks and 49,700 does) with archery tackle. Meanwhile, 20,409 deer (1,350 bucks
and 19,059 does) were harvested during muzzleloader seasons.
The percentage of older bucks in the harvest remained high, with 56 percent of bucks
taken by Pennsylvania hunters during the 2016-17 deer seasons being 2 years old or older. In
2015-16, 59 percent of bucks in the harvest were 2 years old or older.
Game Commission Executive Director R. Matthew Hough congratulated deer hunters on
their successes afield during the 2016-17 seasons.
This has been quite a year for Pennsylvania deer hunting, Hough said. Not only was
there an increased deer harvest and a significantly higher buck harvest, I saw hundreds of photos
from hunters who took their buck-of-a-lifetime this past season. Among them was a hunter
whose Clearfield County harvest shattered the state record for nontypical bucks taken with
archery tackle.
To all of those hunters, and to everybody who made memories afield during the 2016-17
deer seasons, congratulations, Hough said. I couldnt be happier for you and wish you the best
of luck in the 2017-18 seasons, when hundreds more bucks-of-a-lifetime will be taken.
Harvest estimates are based on more than 24,000 deer checked by Game Commission
personnel and more than 100,000 harvest reports submitted by successful hunters. Because some
harvests go unreported, estimates provide a more accurate picture of hunter success.
The antlerless harvest included about 64 percent adult females, about 20 percent button
bucks and about 16 percent doe fawns. The rates are similar to long-term averages.
Agency staff currently is working to develop 2017-18 antlerless deer license allocation
recommendations, which will be considered at the March 28 meeting of the Board of Game
Commissioners.
Wayne Laroche, Game Commission Bureau of Wildlife Management director, said that
in addition to harvest data, staff will be looking at deer health measures, forest regeneration and
deer-human conflicts for each WMU as antlerless allocations are considered for 2017-18.
Click Here for a more detailed report.
NewsClips:
Crable: Buck Harvest In PA Highest Since 2002, Up 11.2% In Lancaster County
AP: Game Commission: Largest Antlered Deer Harvest Posted Since 2002
PA Deer Hunters Had A Very Good Year
[Posted: March 13, 2017]

Hanover Eagles, Rachels Falcons Hunker Down Against Snowstorm To Protect Eggs

Wildlife watchers this week had a ringside seat to the


determination of nature during Tuesdays Winter Storm Stella.
The Game Commission/DCNR Eaglecam showed the pair
of eagles near Hanover protecting their eggs from the late-winter
snowstorm. Click Here to watch live any time.
The DEP/Game Commission peregrine falcon cam at the
Rachel Carson Building in Harrisburg found the falcons doing the
same thing for their eggs. Click Here to watch a time-lapse video
of the falcon protecting the eggs as snow slowly builds up. Click
Here to watch live.
Well see a little later in the nesting season if they were
successful.
NewsClip:
Nesting Bald Eagles Weather Winter Storm In Hanover
[Posted: March 14, 2017]
Help Wanted: 23 Groups Seek Delaware River Watershed Fellows 18-24 Years Old

The William Penn Foundation has provided financial


support to hire 23 young people for a 12-week summer
Delaware River Watershed Fellowship at environmental
centers in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware.
The deadline for applications is March 24.
Fellows 18 to 24 years olds will serve
throughout the Delaware River Watershed, assisting in
environmental programming, recreation activities on the
trail and waterways, habitat enhancement projects and
community outreach and engagement.
Each of the 23 environmental centers is accepting
applications for its own Delaware River Watershed Fellow.
The groups in Pennsylvania include: Bartrams Garden, Philadelphia; Bristol Marsh
Heritage Conservancy, Bucks County; Berks Nature, Berks County; Cobbs Creek Community
Environmental Education Center, Philadelphia; Audubon Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Fairmount
Water Works, Philadelphia; Independence Seaport Museum, Philadelphia; John Heinz National
Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum, Philadelphia; John James Audubon Center At Mill Grove,
Montgomery County; Lehigh Gap Nature Center, Lehigh County; Pocono Environmental
Education Center, Pike County; Schuylkill River Heritage Area, Montgomery County; The
Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, Philadelphia; and Tookany/Tacony-Frankford
Watershed Partnership, Philadelphia.
Click Here for all the details and links to how to apply to each of the 23 groups
participating in the program.
NewsClips:
Battle Re-Emerging Over Gas Drilling In Delaware Watershed
DRBC Still Weighing Gas Drilling Rules, But No Decision On The Horizon
183 Environmental Groups: Ban Fracking Along Delaware River
Delaware RiverKeeper March 17 RiverWatch Video Report
[Posted: March 16, 2017]

DEP Invitation To Bid On Mine Reclamation Project In Clearfield County

The Department of Environmental Protection published notice in the March 19 PA Bulletin of an


invitation to bid on a 24 acre mine reclamation project in Clearfield County. A pre-proposal
meeting is scheduled for March 30. Only proposals from those in attendance will be considered
for this contract. (PA Bulletin, page 1695)
The Department of Environmental Protection has available a current list of
Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Acid Mine Drainage, Surface Mine Reclamation, Cleaning Out
and Plugging Oil and Gas Wells, Waterways Engineering (Concrete Dams/Concrete Lined
Channels, Walls and Box Culverts, etc.), Hazardous Site Remediation, Removal and Disposal of
Underground Storage Tanks, and Wetland Restoration projects available for bidding. Click Here
for the list.
The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources has a current list of bid
proposals for construction projects in State Parks and State Forests available online. Click Here
for the list.
NewsClip:
Old Forge Borehole Drains Mines For 50 Years
[Posted: March 17, 2017]

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW means new from last week. [Agenda Not Posted] means not posted within 2 weeks
of the advisory committee meeting. Go to the online Calendar webpage for updates.

Note: DEP published its 2017 schedule of advisory committee and board meeting in the
December 17 PA Bulletin, page 7896.

March 18-- PA Resources Council Allegheny County Backyard Composting Workshop.


Blueberry Hill Park. 10:30 to Noon.

March 18-- Trout Unlimited Pipeline Construction Monitoring Training Workshop. Carbon
County.

March 18-- Brodhead Watershed Association Get Outdoors Poconos Bruce Lake Natural Area
Hike. Wayne County.

March 20-- NEW. House Appropriations Committee meets to consider House Bill 162
(Maloney-R-Barks) requiring the publication of Pennsylvania specific code manuals (sponsor
summary), House Bill 177 (Pickett-R-Susquehanna) exempting maple sugar houses from the
state construction code (sponsor summary), House Bill 298 (Delozier-R-Cumberland) creating a
building code official trainee program (sponsor summary). Room 140 Main Capitol. Off the
Floor.

March 20-- NEW. Senate Game and Fisheries Committee hearing on annual reports from the
Game and Fish and Boat Commissions. Room 8E-B East Wing. 10:30. Click Here to watch the
hearing live online.

March 20-- Environmental Issues Forum, Joint Conservation Committee to hear a presentation
from representatives of the Anthracite Region Independent Power Plant Association. Room 8E-A
East Wing. Noon. (Click Here for more information.)

March 21-- NEW. House State Government Committee meets to consider House Bill 410
(Warner-R-Fayette) establishing a Performance-Based Budget Board and performance-based
budgeting process (sponsor summary). [Note: The Senate passed its version of
performance-based budgeting-- Senate Bill 181 (Mensch-R-Montgomery) on February 6 that
went to the House Appropriations Committee.] Room B-31 Main Capitol. Off the Floor.

March 21-- Agenda Posted. Environmental Quality Board meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, Environmental Quality Board, 400 Market Street,
Harrisburg, PA 17101, 717-772-3277, edinger@pa.gov.
-- Proposed Rule To Control VOCs From Industrial Cleaning Solvents, Aerospace
Manufacturing and Additional RACT Requirements for Major Sources of VOCs and Nitrogen
Oxides
-- Rulemaking Petition to consider upgrade to Marsh Creek, A tributary to Brandywine Creek in
Chester County, to Exceptional Value.
-- Click Here for copies of available handouts

March 21-- Agenda Posted. DEP Citizens Advisory Council meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00 DEP Contact: Katie Hetherington Cunfer, Citizens Advisory Council, P. O. Box
8459, Harrisburg, PA 17105-8459, 717-705-2693, khethering@pa.gov. Click Here to join the
meeting via Webex.
-- Update on DEPs Safe Drinking Water Program
-- Presentation on Chesapeake Bay-PA In The Balance Conference Report
-- Click Here for a copy of DEPs Monthly Report to the Council
-- Click Here for copies of available handouts

March 22-- NEW. House Local Government Committee meets to consider House Bill 266
(Harper-R-Montgomery) making changes to the state Construction Code Appeals Board (sponsor
summary). Room 205 Ryan Building. 10:30.

March 22-- NEW. House Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee meets to
consider House Resolution 84 (Ryan-R-Lebanon) congratulating the PA National Guards
environmental office on winning first place in the Sustainability Team in the 2016 Army
National Guard Environmental Awards Contest (sponsor summary). Room B-31 Main Capitol.
Off the Floor.

March 22-- DCNR Conservation and Natural Resources Advisory Council meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building, Harrisburg. 10:00. DCNR Contact: Gretchen Leslie 717-772-9084 or
send email to: gleslie@pa.gov. (formal notice)

March 22-- PA Resources Council Allegheny County Backyard Composting Workshop. Phipps
Garden Center, 7:00 to 8:30 p.m.

March 23-- Agenda Posted. DEP Sewage Advisory Committee (On-lot Systems) meeting.
Room 105 Rachel Carson Building, Harrisburg. 10:30. DEP Contact: Brian Schlauderaff,
bschlauder@pa.gov or 717-772-5620.

March 23-- PA Resources Council Rain Barrel Workshop. Morton Borough Hall, 500 Highland
Ave., Morton, Delaware County. 6:30 p.m.

March 23-- NEW. Globalcon Energy Conference. Philadelphia.

March 23-24-- Westmoreland County Conservation District 2017 Engineers Workshop. Fred
Rogers Center, a LEED Gold Certified building at St. Vincent College, Latrobe.

March 24-25-- Penn State Forest Landowners Conference. Altoona.

March 25-- Fish and Boat Commission Mentored Youth Trout Days.

March 25-- NEW. Schuylkill Scrub Stony Creek Anglers Cleanup. Montgomery County.

March 26-29-- Registration Open. PA Recreation & Park Society 2017 Annual Conference.
Hershey Lodge and Convention Center.

March 27-- NEW. PennTAP Facility Operations Workshop On Energy Efficiency. State
College.

March 28-- Environmental Quality Board hearing on proposed regulation repealing the
low-RVP gasoline requirement in the Pittsburgh Region. DEP Southwest Regional Office,
Conference Rooms A & B, 400 Waterfront Drive, Pittsburgh. 1:00.

March 29-- DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building, Harrisburg. 9:30. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson, diawilson@pa.gov or 717-787-3730.
(formal notice)

March 29-- Environmental Quality Board hearing on proposed regulation repealing the
low-RVP gasoline requirement in the Pittsburgh Region. DEP Southeast Regional Office,
Delaware & Schuylkill Conference Rooms, 2 East Main Street, Norristown. 1:00.

March 30-- Environmental Quality Board hearing on proposed regulation repealing the
low-RVP gasoline requirement in the Pittsburgh Region. DEP Headquarters Building, Room
105 Rachel Carson Building, Harrisburg. 1:00.

March 30-- NEW. DEP Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board Regulatory, Legislative and
Technical Committee meeting. 14th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building,
Harrisburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Daniel Snowden, 717-783-8846 or send email to:
dsnowden@pa.gov. (formal notice)

March 31-- Foundation For Sustainable Forests Woods & Waters Film Series. Selected Short
Films - Chasing Water, A Forest Year and more! Scot Cinema, Pogue Student Center, 405
Scotland Rd., Edinboro. 7:00 p.m.

April 1-- Penn State Extension, DCNR Woods In Your Backyard Workshop. Penn State
Wilkes-Barre, Lehman, Luzerne County. 9 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

April 4-- Center for Watershed Protection 2017 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference.
Online and regional hub locations closest to PA: Temple Universitys Ambler Campus, 580
Meetinghouse Road, Ambler, Montgomery County [register here] or in Baltimore [register here].

April 5-7-- PA Assn. of Environmental Professionals 32nd Annual Conference. State College.

April 6-- DEP Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board meeting. 4th Floor Training Room,
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Daniel Snowden, dsnowden@pa.gov or
717-787-5103. (formal notice)

April 6-- DEP Radiation Protection Advisory Committee meeting. 14th Floor Conference Room,
Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Joseph Melnic, jmelnic@pa.gov or 717-783-9730.

April 7-- PennFuture, National Wildlife Federation 3rd Annual Celebrating Women In
Conservation Awards. Keystone College, Evans Hall, in La Plume, Lackawanna County. 6:30.

April 8-- PA Resources Council Rain Barrel Workshop. Fern Park, Allegheny County. 10:30
a.m. to Noon.

April 8-- Penn State Extension, DCNR Woods In Your Backyard Workshop. Penn State Beaver,
SUB Lodge, Monaca, Beaver County. 9 a.m. 4 p.m.

April 8-- Fish and Boat Commission Mentored Youth Trout Days.

April 9-- NEW. Clean Air Council Run For Clean Air Earth Day Celebration. Philadelphia.

April 11-- PA Resources Council Rain Barrel Workshop. North Park-Rose Barn, Allegheny
County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

April 12-- DEP State Board for Certification of Water and Wastewater Systems Operators
meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Cheri
Sansoni, Bureau of Safe Drinking Water, Operator Certification, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg,
PA 17101, 717-772-5158, csansoni@pa.gov.

April 12-- DEP Technical Advisory Committee on Diesel-Powered Equipment (Deep Mining)
meeting. DEP New Stanton Office, 131 Broadview Road, New Stanton. 10:00. DEP Contact:
Peggy Scheloske, mscheloske@pa.gov or 724-404-3143.

April 12-- PA Resources Council Rain Barrel Workshop. Phipps Garden Center, Allegheny
County. 7:00 to 8:30 p.m.

April 12-- PA Chamber Environmental Conference & Trade Show. Best Western Premier Eden
Resort & Suites, Lancaster.
April 13-- DEP Oil And Gas Technical Advisory Board meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Kurt Klapkowski, 717-783-9438 or send email to:
kklapkowsk@pa.gov. Click Here to participate via WebEx. (formal notice)

April 13-- Society of Women Environmental Professionals - Capital Chapter Annual


Conference. Central Penn Colleges Conference Center, Summerdale, Cumberland County.

April 18-- Environmental Quality Board meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00.
DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, Environmental Quality Board, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA
17101, 717-772-3277, edinger@pa.gov.

April 18-- DEP Citizens Advisory Council meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.
DEP Contact: Katie Hetherington Cunfer, Citizens Advisory Council, P. O. Box 8459,
Harrisburg, PA 17105-8459, 717-705-2693, khethering@pa.gov.

April 18-- NEW. DEP Mine Families First Response and Communication Advisory Council
meeting. DEP New Stanton Office, Fayette Room, 131 Broadview Road, New Stanton. 10:00.
DEP Contact: Allison Gaida, 724-404-3147 or send email to: agaida@pa.gov. (formal notice)

April 18-- PA Resources Council Rain Barrel Workshop. Lauri Ann West Community Center,
Allegheny County. 7:00 to 8:30 p.m.

April 19-- DEP public meeting/hearing on proposed Air Quality Plan Approval for an
emergency generator at a Transco natural gas pipeline compressor station in Mifflin Township,
Lycoming County. Salladasburg Elementary School, 3490 State Route 287, Jersey Shore.
6:00-- meeting, 7:15-- hearing. Contact: Muhammad Zaman, DEP Williamsport Office,
570-327-3648. (formal notice PA Bulletin page 1536)

April 20-- DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building, Harrisburg. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, kdalal@pa.gov or 717-772-3436.

April 20-- CANCELED. DEP Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board meeting. 4th Floor
Training Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Daniel Snowden,
dsnowden@pa.gov or 717-787-5103. (formal notice)

April 20-- PA Resources Council Rain Barrel Workshop. South Park-Buffalo Inn, Allegheny
County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

April 21-22-- PEC, KPB Pinchot State Forest Earth Day Tree Planting. Luzerne County.

April 22-- PA Resources Council Rain Barrel Workshop. Ross Township Community Center,
Allegheny County. Noon to 1:30 p.m.

April 22-23-- Friends of Allegheny Wilderness Hickory Creek Wilderness Trail Stewardship
Days. Warren County.

April 25-27-- PA Section American Water Works Association Annual Conference. The
Hershey Lodge, Hershey.

April 26-- DEP Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee meeting. 12th Floor
Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Nancy Herb, nherb@pa.gov
or 717-783-9269.

April 27-- DEP Agricultural Advisory Board meeting. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909
Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 9:00. DEP Contact: Jay Braund, jbraund@pa.gov or 717-772-5636.

April 27-- PA Resources Council Rain Barrel Workshop. Boyce Park-Activity Center,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

April 29-- NEW. Manada Conservancys Spring Native Plant Sale. Hummelstown, Dauphin
County.

May 3-- House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee informational meeting on the forest
products industry. University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, 300 Campus Drive, Bradford. 9:00.

May 3-- Registration Open. Pennsylvania Groundwater Symposium. Ramada Inn Conference
Center, State College.

May 4-- DEP Small Water Systems Technical Assistance Center Board meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Dawn Hissner, dhissner@pa.gov or 717-772-2189.
(formal notice)

May 4-6-- Registration Open. PA Land Trust Association Land Conservation Conference &
Environmental Advisory Council Network Conference. Lancaster.

May 6-- PA Resources Council Allegheny County Backyard Composting Workshop. Ross Twp.
Community Center, Noon to 1:30 p.m.

May 6-- Delaware Highlands Conservancy. Dinner & Live, Silent Auctions. Silver Birches
Waterfront in Hawley, Pike County.

May 9-- DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Mark Brojakowski, mbrojakows@pa.gov or 717-772-3429.
(formal notice)

May 9-- PA Resources Council Allegheny County Backyard Composting Workshop. Carnegie
Municipal Building, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

May 10-- DEP Aggregate Advisory Board meeting. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909
Elmerton Ave, Harrisburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Daniel E. Snowden, dsnowden@pa.gov or
717-787-5103.

May 10-- DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building, Harrisburg. 9:30. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson, diawilson@pa.gov or 717-787-3730.

May 10-- PA Resources Council Allegheny County Backyard Composting Workshop. Fern
Hollow, 7:00 to 8:30 p.m.

May 16-- Primary Election Day.

May 16-- PA Resources Council Allegheny County Backyard Composting Workshop. North
Park-Rose Barn, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

May 17-- Environmental Quality Board meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. DEP
Contact: Laura Edinger, Environmental Quality Board, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA
17101, 717-772-3277, edinger@pa.gov.

May 17-- DEP Citizens Advisory Council meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.
DEP Contact: Katie Hetherington Cunfer, Citizens Advisory Council, P. O. Box 8459,
Harrisburg, PA 17105-8459, 717-705-2693, khethering@pa.gov.

May 18-- CANCELED. DEP Oil And Gas Technical Advisory Board meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Kurt Klapkowski, 717-783-9438 or send email to:
kklapkowsk@pa.gov. (formal notice)

May 18-- PA Resources Council Allegheny County Backyard Composting Workshop. Boyce
Park-Activity Center, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

May 19-21-- PA Outdoor Writers Association Spring Conference. Harrisburg/Hershey Holiday


Inn Grantville, Dauphin County. Click Here for more information.

May 20-- Foundation For Sustainable Forests Loving The Land Through Working Forests
Annual Conference. Mercer County.

May 20-- PA Resources Council Allegheny County Backyard Composting Workshop. Lauri
ann West Community Center, 10:30 to Noon

May 20-- PA Parks & Forests Foundation. Highmark Walk For A Healthy Community.
Harrisburg Area Community College, Harrisburg.

May 24-- PA Green & Healthy Schools Partnership. PA Green & Healthy Schools Forum with
PA Envirothon. University of Pittsburgh Campus-Johnstown .

May 24-- PA Resources Council Allegheny County Backyard Composting Workshop. South
Park-Buffalo Inn, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

June 1-- PA Resources Council Rain Barrel Workshop. Phipps Garden Center, Allegheny
County. 7:00 to 8:30 p.m.

June 7-- DEP Coastal Zone Advisory Committee meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room,
Rachel Carson Building. 9:30. DEP Contact: Stacey Box, 717-772-5622 or send email to:
sbox@pa.gov.

June 7-- DEP Laboratory Accreditation Advisory Committee meeting. Room 206, Bureau of
Laboratories Building, 2575 Interstate Drive, Harrisburg. 9:00. DEP Contact: Aaren Alger,
aaalger@pa.gov or 717-346-7200.

June 7-- DCNR PA Trails Advisory Committee Public Forum. Murrysville Community Center,
3091 Carson Ave, Murrysville, Westmoreland County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

June 8-- PA Resources Council Allegheny County Backyard Composting Workshop. Phipps
Garden Center, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

June 18-23-- Registration Open. Rivers Conservation & Fly Fishing Youth Camp. Messiah
College, Grantham, Cumberland County.

June 21-22-- PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conference. Best Western Plus Genetti Hotel
and Conference Center, Wilkes-Barre. Click Here for more information.

September 21-- DEP Recycling Fund Advisory Committee/Solid Waste Advisory Committee
joint meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry,
lahenry@pa.gov or 717-772-5713.

September 23-26-- Statewide Greenways & Trails Summit. DoubleTree Hotel in Reading,
Berks County.

October 4-- DEP Low-Level Radioactive Waste Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Rich Janati, rjanati@pa.gov or 717-787-2147.

February 7-10-- NEW. PA Association For Sustainable Agriculture Annual Conference. State
College.

Visit DEPs Public Participation Center for public participation opportunities. Click Here to sign
up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.

Sign Up For DEPs eNotice: Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. Click Here to sign up.
Check the PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEPs eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update - DEP webpage
February 2017 DEP Regulatory Agenda - PA Bulletin, Page 740

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEPs eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (Feb. 2017) - DEP webpage

Other DEP Proposals For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEPs eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized - DEP webpage

DEP Facebook Page DEP Twitter Feed DEP YouTube Channel

Click Here for links to DEPs Advisory Committee webpages.

DEP Calendar of Events DCNR Calendar of Events

Note: The Environmental Education Workshop Calendar is no longer available from the PA
Center for Environmental Education because funding for the Center was eliminated in the FY
2011-12 state budget. The PCEE website was also shutdown, but some content was moved to
the PA Association of Environmental Educators' website.

Senate Committee Schedule House Committee Schedule

You can watch the Senate Floor Session and House Floor Session live online.

Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle

Grants & Awards


This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. NEW means new from last week.

March 20-- National Wildlife Federation Photo Contest


March 25-- NEW. Delaware River Watershed Fellowships 18-24 Year Olds
March 24-- CFA Solar Generating Equipment Loans
March 24-- PA American Water Stream Of Learning Scholarship Program
March 24-- Game Commission Seedlings For Schools Program
March 24-- Chesapeake Bay Foundation Save The Bay Photo Contest
March 26-- CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal & Wind Funding
March 26-- CFA Solar Energy Program
March 26-- CFA High Performance Building Program
March 27-- PA American Water Environmental Grant Program
March 27-- PA Wilds Centers Champions Of The Wilds Award
March 30-- Delaware Highlands Conservancy College Scholarships
March 30-- Stonycreek Conemaugh River Project Student Scholarship
March 31-- PA American Water Protect Our Watersheds Student Art Contest
March 31-- DEP Host Municipality Waste Inspector Program Grants
March 31-- PPL Foundation Education, Workforce & Community Revitalization Grants
March 31-- Schuylkill Student Street Art Contest
April 3-- NRCS Conservation Innovation Grants
April 12-- DCNR Community Conservation Partnership Grants Close
April 15-- DCNR Environmental Careers Summer Camp
April 15-- Philadelphia Sustainable Business Tax Credit
April 17- Schuylkill River Restoration Fund Land Transaction Grants
April 19-- SBA Economic Damage Disaster Loans In 5 Southwest Counties
April 21-- NRCS Regional Conservation Partnership Program Grants
April 30-- Northeast PA Audubon Society College Scholarship
May 3-- PennVEST Water Infrastructure Funding
May 9-- National Fish & Wildlife Foundation Chesapeake Bay Grants
May 12-- CFA Solar Generating Equipment Loans
May 12-- CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal & Wind Funding
May 12-- CFA Solar Energy Program
May 12-- CFA High Performance Building Program
May 18-- NEW. DCNR Volunteer Fire Company Wildfire Fighting Grants
May 26-- PennAg Industries College Scholarships
May 31-- CFA Act 13 Water-Related, Recreation Grants
May 31-- Abandoned Mine Land Programs Assn. College Scholarship
June 1-- DEP Vehicle Fleet Owner Alternative Fuels Technical Assistance Program
June 2-- Great American Cleanup Of PA Video Contest
June 30-- Susquehanna Greenways Partnership 2017 Photo Contest
July 14-- CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal & Wind Funding
July 14-- CFA Solar Energy Program
July 14-- CFA High Performance Building Program
August 18-- SBA Flood Disaster Economic Injury Assistance In Northcentral PA
September 5-- SBA Disaster Assistance Nonprofit Economic Injury NC PA
September 7-- PA Parks & Forests Foundation Thru The Seasons Photo Contest
September 15-- CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal & Wind Funding
September 15-- CFA Solar Energy Program
September 15-- CFA High Performance Building Program
October 31-- PA Resources Council Lens On Litter Photo Contest

-- Visit the DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.

-- Visit the DCNR Apply for Grants webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog, Twitter Feed and add us to your Google+ Circle.

Crable: What Snow-Covered PA Looks Like From Space


Federal Policy
Trumps EPA Cuts Would Endanger Pennsylvanians, DEP Chief Says
McKelvey: Trumps Budget Puts Your Water, Health At Risk
Trump EPA Cuts Could Have Bigger Trickle-Down Impact On PA, NJ
Trump Budget Kills Chesapeake Funds, Disbelief Follows
Gov. Wolf, Casey Criticize, Toomey Lauds Trump Budget Plan
Allegheny Front: How Big Cuts At EPA Will Impact PA
GASP: Cuts To EPA Will Significantly Impact Southwestern PA
Trumps First Budget To Include Deep Cuts For EPA, Energy, Domestic Programs
Trumps Budget Takes A Sledgehammer To The EPA
Trumps Scorched Earth EPA Budget Draws Swift Reactions
Trump Proposes Budget To Hobble EPA
Trumps Budget Would Cut EPA Funding By 31%, Eliminate Waterway Cleanup Programs
Trump Proposes Dramatic Cuts To EPA Funding
Trump Bid To Axe Chesapeake Bay Restoration Funding Draws Fire
Trump Budget Would Eliminate Funding For Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Trumps Budget Would Torpedo Investments In Climate Change, Clean Energy
Trump Seeks To Ax Appalachia Economic Programs Causing Worry In Coal Country
With EPA Cuts, States Would Lose Help In Emergencies
AP: Winners, Losers In Trumps First Budget
AP: Republicans Join Democrats Against Trumps Great Lakes Cuts
Here Are The Federal Agencies, Programs Trump Wants To Eliminate
People Sending EPA Cookies And Thank-You Cards
Costello, Fitzpatrick, Meehan Sign Onto Climate Change Resolution
Trumps Defense Secretary Calls Climate Change A National Security Risk
EPA To Reconsider Chemical Plant Safety/Terrorism Rule
Trump Signs Another Executive Order To Cut Government Waste
Coal Industry Urges Trump To Protect Fossil Fuel Research
Op-Ed: Urge Toomey, Casey To Oppose Rollback Of Methane Rule Covering Federal Lands
Casey Asks Trump For $50M For Mon River Locks & Dams
U.S. Park Service Closes 2 Locations In Philadelphia Ahead Of Cuts
Trump Announces Challenge To Obama-Era Fuel Standards
Air
Is Deep Decarbonization The Key To Solving PAs Air Pollution?
Connecticut To Sue EPA Over PAs Brunner Island Power Plant
Crable: Connecticut To Sue EPA Over Pollution From Brunner Island Power Plant
Budget
Trumps EPA Cuts Would Endanger Pennsylvanians, DEP Chief Says
McKelvey: Trumps Budget Puts Your Water, Health At Risk
Trump EPA Cuts Could Have Bigger Trickle-Down Impact On PA, NJ
Trump Budget Kills Chesapeake Funds, Disbelief Follows
Gov. Wolf, Casey Criticize, Toomey Lauds Trump Budget Plan
Allegheny Front: How Big Cuts At EPA Will Impact PA
GASP: Cuts To EPA Will Significantly Impact Southwestern PA
Trumps First Budget To Include Deep Cuts For EPA, Energy, Domestic Programs
Trumps Budget Takes A Sledgehammer To The EPA
Trumps Scorched Earth EPA Budget Draws Swift Reactions
Trump Proposes Budget To Hobble EPA
Trumps Budget Would Cut EPA Funding By 31%, Eliminate Waterway Cleanup Programs
Trump Proposes Dramatic Cuts To EPA Funding
Trump Bid To Axe Chesapeake Bay Restoration Funding Draws Fire
Trump Budget Would Eliminate Funding For Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Trumps Budget Would Torpedo Investments In Climate Change, Clean Energy
Trump Seeks To Ax Appalachia Economic Programs Causing Worry In Coal Country
With EPA Cuts, States Would Lose Help In Emergencies
AP: Winners, Losers In Trumps First Budget
AP: Republicans Join Democrats Against Trumps Great Lakes Cuts
Here Are The Federal Agencies, Programs Trump Wants To Eliminate
People Sending EPA Cookies And Thank-You Cards
Op-Ed: Underfunded State Environmental Programs Quickly Becoming An Epidemic
Op-Ed: Keeping PA Clean When EPA Goes AWOL
Editorial: State Must Do Its Part To Correct Its Own Underfunding Of DEP
Allegheny Front: How Big Cuts At EPA Will Impact PA
Lehigh Municipalities Eye Solution To Share $300M Bill For Sewer Repairs
Delaware County Uses Drilling Impact Fees For Darby Creek Trail
Op-Ed: Preserving Farmland, Open Space Worthwhile Investment
AP: PA Republican Lawmakers Sobering To Huge Budget Deficit
Wolfs Fight To Offer Early Retirement To 2,000 State Workers
Wolfs Pension Tactic Has Mixed Record
Casey Asks Trump For $50M For Mon River Locks & Dams
U.S. Park Service Closes 2 Locations In Philadelphia Ahead Of Cuts
Beautification
Editorial: Philly Flower Show, Public Gardens Also Sprout Jobs
Chesapeake Bay
Trumps EPA Cuts Would Endanger Pennsylvanians, DEP Chief Says
McKelvey: Trumps Budget Puts Your Water, Health At Risk
Trump EPA Cuts Could Have Bigger Trickle-Down Impact On PA, NJ
Trump Bid To Axe Chesapeake Bay Restoration Funding Draws Fire
Trump Budget Kills Chesapeake Funds, Disbelief Follows
Op-Ed: We Need To Recognize The Many Faces That Make Up The Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
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Climate
PEC Pittsburgh Conference Envisions Deep Carbon Cuts
PEC Climate Conference To Bring Top Energy Experts To Pittsburgh
Is Deep Decarbonization The Key To Solving PAs Air Pollution?
Op-Ed: To Tax Or Not To Tax Carbon
Cutting Greenhouse Gas Emissions Could Cost Trillions
Farmers Keeping Close Watch On Fruit Crops, Weather
Costello, Fitzpatrick, Meehan Sign Onto Climate Change Resolution
Trumps Defense Secretary Calls Climate Change A National Security Risk
Trump Announces Challenge To Obama-Era Fuel Standards
Op-Ed: Urge Toomey, Casey To Oppose Rollback Of Methane Rule Covering Federal Lands
IEA Finds CO2 Emissions Flat For 3rd Straight Year Even As Economy Grows
Coal Mining
DEP Staffer Behind Contested Mining Permit Had Worked For Coal Company
New Mines Bank On Need For Metallurgical Coal
Coal Industry Urges Trump To Protect Fossil Fuel Research
Delaware River
Battle Re-Emerging Over Gas Drilling In Delaware Watershed
DRBC Still Weighing Gas Drilling Rules, But No Decision On The Horizon
183 Environmental Groups: Ban Fracking Along Delaware River
Delaware RiverKeeper March 17 RiverWatch Video Report
Drinking Water
Pittsburgh Water Authority: No Clear Leadership Hierarchy
Pittsburgh Water Authority Director To Stay For $225K
Pittsburgh Water Authority Direct To Stay For Up To A Year
Pittsburgh Authority Says Sulfur Smell In Water Not Harmful
Op-Ed: Fix Pittsburgh Authority Water System Now
Lead Found At Colfax Elementary In Springdale Prompts Bottled Water Use
Economic Development
Doing Business With Shells Ethane Plant
Editorial: Philly Flower Show, Public Gardens Also Sprout Jobs
Education
Trout In This York Classroom Are Growing
Wake Up To Sounds Of Nature From Carnegie Museums New App
Energy
PUC Explores How Much Poor Families Should Pay For Heat
Connecticut To Sue EPA Over PAs Brunner Island Power Plant
Invenergy Sought State Officials Support For Jessup Gas Power Plant
PSEG (NJ): Without Subsidies Nuclear Plants Could Go Dark
PJM Monitor: State Power Plant Subsidies Threaten The Foundations Of Power Markets
Westinghouse Electric Announces Management Changes
November Target Date For Decision On Philly Gas Works Rates
Editorial: Big Radioactive Pigs Overrun Fukushima Site
Energy Conservation
Trump Announces Challenge To Obama-Era Fuel Standards
Farming
Farmers Keeping Close Watch On Fruit Crops, Weather
Op-Ed: Meet The New Face Of Farming In Perry County
Op-Ed: Preserving Farmland, Open Space Worthwhile Investment
Flooding
State, Pittsburgh Suburbs Join Forces To Tackle Flooding
Forests
Philadelphia Says Farewell To Last Remaining Grove Of English Elms In The Country
Maple Festivals Offer Sweetest Taste Of Spring
Beware: Ticks Survive Through Warm Winter
Lake Erie
AP: Republicans Join Democrats Against Trumps Great Lakes Cuts
Land Conservation
Allegheny Land Trust Adds New Life To Dead Mans Hollow Conservation Area
Op-Ed: Preserving Farmland, Open Space Worthwhile Investment
Littering/Illegal Dumping
Great American Cleanup Of PA Underway
Volunteers Needed For Statewide Cleanup, Beautification Effort
Eries Spring Cleanup Program Starts April 2
Mine Reclamation
Old Forge Borehole Drains Mines For 50 Years
Oil & Gas
Battle Re-Emerging Over Gas Drilling In Delaware Watershed
DRBC Still Weighing Gas Drilling Rules, But No Decision On The Horizon
183 Environmental Groups: Ban Fracking Along Delaware River
Invenergy Sought State Officials Support For Jessup Gas Power Plant
Apex Energy Closer To 7 New Gas Well Pads In Penn Twp
AP: Marylands GOP Governor Joins Dems For Ban On Fracking
Doing Business With Shells Ethane Plant
Safety Official Wants Ethanol Rail Cars Replaced Faster
Low Oil Prices Weigh On Pittsburgh-Area Gasoline
Delta Reaffirms Commitment To Trainer Oil Refinery
Op-Ed: Urge Toomey, Casey To Oppose Rollback Of Methane Rule Covering Federal Lands
Pipeline
Mariner East 2 Pipeline Critics Say Any Leak Could Be Catastrophic
Activists: See Something Wrong In Building Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline? Say Something
Mariner East 2 Pipelines Proceed, As Challenges Continue
Op-Ed: Why Its Essential That PA Build Mariner East 2 Pipeline
Sunoco Rejects Twps Mariner East 1 Pipeline Complaint To PUC
AP: Spectra Energy To By PSEGs Stake In $1.2B PennEast Pipeline
Federal Judge Rejects Permits Challenge To Constitution Pipeline
Radiation Protection
Editorial: Big Radioactive Pigs Overrun Fukushima Site
Recreation
ONeill: Who Keeps River Trails Tidy? Super Volunteers
AP: Friends Of Beltzville State Park Lead Restoration Of 165-Year-Old Bridge
Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
New Rail Trail Bridges To Be Installed In Cumberland County
Delaware County Uses Drilling Impact Fees For Darby Creek Trail
Snowstorm Breathes New Life Into Ski Season
U.S. Park Service Closes 2 Locations In Philadelphia Ahead Of Cuts
Recycling/Waste
Sludge-Conversation Plant Company Hosting Tour, Forum In Lehigh Valley
Renewable Energy
Ambitious Solar Project Powers Up In Homewood
Taxpayers Line Up For Money From Bankrupt Pittsburgh Battery Maker
Editorial: Battery Maker Goes Bust, Winner-Picking Failure
Septic Systems
Many Erie County Small Flow Sewage Systems Malfunction
Stormwater
Stormwater Pollution Fix To Cost Allegheny Twp Up To $50K
Water Resources
Casey Asks Trump For $50M For Mon River Locks & Dams
Wastewater Facilities
Lehigh Municipalities Eye Solution To Share $300M Bill For Sewer Repairs
Watershed Protection
Trumps EPA Cuts Would Endanger Pennsylvanians, DEP Chief Says
McKelvey: Trumps Budget Puts Your Water, Health At Risk
Trump EPA Cuts Could Have Bigger Trickle-Down Impact On PA, NJ
Trump Budget Kills Chesapeake Funds, Disbelief Follows
Stormwater Pollution Fix To Cost Allegheny Twp Up To $50K
Trout In This York Classroom Are Growing
Delaware RiverKeeper March 17 RiverWatch Video Report
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
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Wildlife
Crable: Buck Harvest In PA Highest Since 2002, Up 11.2% In Lancaster County
AP: Game Commission: Largest Antlered Deer Harvest Posted Since 2002
PA Deer Hunters Had A Very Good Year
Trout In This York Classroom Are Growing
Crable: Conestoga HS Students Help Trout Find Lancaster County Streams
Nesting Bald Eagles Weather Winter Storm In Hanover
Hayes: State Wildlife Action Plan Sets Conservation Blueprint
West Nile/Zika Virus
Zika Virus Still A Threat PA Officials Remind Travelers
Beware: Ticks Survive Through Warm Winter

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Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

The DEP Board of coal Mine Safety published notice in the March 18 PA Bulletin of proposed
regulation changes relating to sensitive ground fault protection for public comment.

Pennsylvania Bulletin - March 18, 2017

Sign Up For DEPs eNotice: Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. Click Here to sign up.

Check the PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEPs eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update - DEP webpage
February 2017 DEP Regulatory Agenda - PA Bulletin, Page 740

Technical Guidance & Permits


Note: DEP published 54 pages of public notices related to proposed and final permit and
approval/disapproval actions in the March 18 PA Bulletin - pages 1641 to 1695.

The Department of Environmental Protection published notice in the March 18 PA Bulletin


rescinding obsolete technical guidance related procedures for conducting stream cause/effect
surveys.

DEP published notice in the March 18 PA Bulletin of changes to companies certified to conduct
radon-related activities (page 1694).

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEPs eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (Feb. 2017) - DEP webpage

Other DEP Proposals For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEPs eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized - DEP webpage

Visit DEPs Public Participation Center for public participation opportunities. Click Here to sign
up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.

DEP Facebook Page DEP Twitter Feed DEP YouTube Channel

Click Here for links to DEPs Advisory Committee webpages.

DEP Calendar of Events DCNR Calendar of Events

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CLICK HERE to Print The Entire PA Environment Digest.

Stories Invited

Send your stories, photos and links to videos about your project, environmental issues or
programs for publication in the PA Environment Digest to: DHess@CrisciAssociates.com.

PA Environment Digest is edited by David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department


of Environmental Protection, and is published as a service of Crisci Associates, a
Harrisburg-based government and public affairs firm whose clients include Fortune 500
companies and nonprofit organizations.

Did you know you can search 10 years of back issues of the PA Environment Digest on dozens
of topics, by county and on any keyword you choose? Just click on the search page.

PA Environment Digest weekly was the winner of the PA Association of Environmental


Educators' 2009 Business Partner of the Year Award.

Supporting Member PA Outdoor Writers Assn./PA Trout Unlimited

PA Environment Digest is a supporting member of the Pennsylvania Outdoor Writers


Association, Pennsylvania Council Trout Unlimited and the Doc Fritchey Chapter Trout
Unlimited.