Você está na página 1de 11

Young People Are Driving Much Less (But Not For The Reasons You Think)

One of the most interesting trends we've seen among young people is one of the most
worrying for automakers: Generation Y's lack of interest in cars.
It's been noted in countries around the globe, and we've spent a lot of time discussing
the matter here at The Car Connection. The general consensus seems to be that Gen Y
(roughly, those age 18-34) is more interested in gadgets than gears. In fact, young
people told GM that driving is frustrating because it cuts into time that could be spent
texting.
The explanation for young folks' lack of interest in cars is all over the map. Some people
have argued that vehicles need to put social media front and center so that Gen Y will
feel connected (a notion that keeps Ray LaHood up at night).
It's led some automakers to build cars that directly target young people, with elements
and designs that are the direct result of focused conversations with Generation Y. (We
saw that sort of thing on display at January's Detroit Auto Show, with the Chevrolet Code
130R and Tru 140S concepts. )
The trend has caused others to throw up their hands and point to economic data
indicating that young people are un- and under-employed. Until Gen Y finds some
degree of economic stability, they're not likely to return to showrooms, letting their
parents and grandparents control the market.
But new data from the Frontier Group throws some fairly cold water in the face of those
arguments.
In a new study entitled, "Transportation and the New Generation", the Frontier Group
looked at driving trends in America from 1970 to 2011. They found that since World War
II, the number of miles driven by Americans had steadily increased, until we were
averaging just over 10,000 miles per year.
But around 2004, that figure shifted into reverse. By last year, we were driving 6% fewer
miles than in 2004, and among Generation Y the figure was even more pronounced. In
fact, between 2001 and 2009, young people reduced their driving to just 7,900 miles
per year -- a dip of 23%.
SO, LIKE, WHAT'S THE DEAL?
It would be easy to look at that figure and think, "Well, duh. In 2009, we were in the
depths of the Great Recession. Of course young people weren't traveling much. Where
would they have gone?"
But it's not that simple.
For starters, the decline in driving began in 2001, years before the Great Recession. So
it would seem to be part of some larger, generational shift.
Also, during that same period, young people's use of bikes and mass transit shot up
dramatically. By 2009, Gen Y was taking 24% more bike trips and using public
transportation 40% more often. Even walking was up 16%.
Most interestingly, those figures were even higher among young people from affluent
households. For those living in homes with incomes over $70,000, walking increased
37%, public transit usage jumped 100%, and biking surged 122%.
In other words: young people haven't stopped traveling, they've just stopped driving.
WHY THE CHANGE?
The Frontier Group cites a number of possible reasons for the shift in transportation
habits. Some of those include:
Technology like social media and text-messaging, which reduce the need for face-to-face
interaction.
Graduated driving laws, which make it harder for young people to acquire their licenses.
The high cost of gas, which is offputting to folks at the beginning of their careers (and
the low end of their earning potential).
Location, because many young people choose to live in urban areas where alternative
means of transportation are abundant and efficient.
Eco-friendliness, which causes many in Gen Y to seek greener ways of getting around.
Of course, it bears mentioning that the Frontier Group is "a think tank, producing ideas
and research to promote a cleaner environment and a fairer and more democratic
society", which seems like the sort of organization that would be interested in producing
a study that shows "greenifying" trends like this. To the Group's credit, though, it cites a
range of sources, from the Federal Highway Administration to the National Association of
Realtors.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/energy/2013/12/131217-four-theories-why-
teens-drive-less-today/
SundayReview | NEWS ANALYSIS
The End of Car Culture
By ELISABETH ROSENTHALJUNE 29, 2013
Teenagers in the parking lot of an A&W drive-in in Hutchinson, Kan., in 1959.CreditCarl
Iwasaki/Time & Life Pictures Getty Images
PRESIDENT OBAMAS ambitious goals to curb the United States greenhouse gas
emissions, unveiled last week, will get a fortuitous assist from an incipient shift in
American behavior: recent studies suggest that Americans are buying fewer cars, driving
less and getting fewer licenses as each year goes by.
That has left researchers pondering a fundamental question: Has America passed peak
driving?
The United States, with its broad expanses and suburban ideals, had long been one of the
worlds prime car cultures. It is the birthplace of the Model T; the home of Detroit; the
place where Wilson Pickett immortalized Mustang Sally and the Beach Boys, Little
Deuce Coupe.
But Americas love affair with its vehicles seems to be cooling. When adjusted for
population growth, the number of miles driven in the United States peaked in 2005 and
dropped steadily thereafter, according to an analysis by Doug Short of Advisor
Perspectives, an investment research company. As of April 2013, the number of miles
driven per person was nearly 9 percent below the peak and equal to where the country was
in January 1995. Part of the explanation certainly lies in the recession, because cash-
strapped Americans could not afford new cars, and the unemployed werent going to work
anyway. But by many measures the decrease in driving preceded the downturn and
appears to be persisting now that recovery is under way. The next few years will be telling.
What most intrigues me is that rates of car ownership per household and per person
started to come down two to three years before the downturn, said Michael Sivak, who
studies the trend and who is a research professor at the University of Michigans
Transportation Research Institute. I think that means something more fundamental is
going on.
If the pattern persists and many sociologists believe it will it will have beneficial
implications for carbon emissions and the environment, since transportation is the second
largest source of Americas emissions, just behind power plants. But it could have negative
implications for the car industry. Indeed, companies like Ford and Mercedes are already
rebranding themselves mobility companies with a broader product range beyond the
personal vehicle.
Different things are converging which suggest that we are witnessing a long-term cultural
shift, said Mimi Sheller, a sociology professor at Drexel University and director of its
Mobilities Research and Policy Center. She cites various factors: the Internet makes
telecommuting possible and allows people to feel more connected without driving to meet
friends. The renewal of center cities has made the suburbs less appealing and has drawn
empty nesters back in. Likewise the rise in cellphones and car-pooling apps has facilitated
more flexible commuting arrangements, including the evolution of shared van services for
getting to work.
With all these changes, people who stopped car commuting as a result of the recession
may find less reason to resume the habit.
On top of that, city, state and federal policies that for more than half a century encouraged
suburbanization and car use from mortgage lending to road building are gradually
being diluted or reversed. They created what I call a culture of
automobility, and arguably in the last 5 to 10 years that is dying out, Ms.
Sheller said.

Source: Michael Sivak and Brandon Schoettle, University of


Michigan CreditThe New York Times
New Yorks new bike-sharing program and its skyrocketing
bridge and tunnel tolls reflect those new priorities, as do a
proliferation of car-sharing programs across the nation.
Demographic shifts in the driving population suggest that the
trend may accelerate. There has been a large drop in the
percentage of 16- to 39-year-olds getting a license, while older
people are likely to retain their licenses as they age, Mr. Sivaks
research has found.
He and I have similar observations about our children. Mine (19
and 21) have not bothered to get a drivers license, even though they both
live in places where one could come in handy. They are
interested, but its not a priority. They organize their summer
jobs and social life around where they can walk or take public transportation or
car- pool with friends.
Mr. Sivaks son lives in San Francisco and has a car but takes Bay Area Rapid
Transit, when he can, even though that often takes longer than driving.
When I was in my 20s and 30s, Mr. Sivak said, I was curious
about what kind of car people drove, but young people dont
really care. A car is just a means of getting from A to B when
BART doesnt work.
A study last year found that driving by young people decreased
23 percent between 2001 and 2009. The millennials dont
value cars and car ownership, they value technology they
care about what kinds of devices you own, Ms. Sheller said. The
percentage of young drivers is inversely related to the
availability of the Internet, Mr. Sivaks research has found. Why
spend an hour driving to work when you could take the bus or train and be
online?
From 2007 to 2011, the age group most likely to buy a car shifted from the
35 to 44 group to the 55 to 64 group, he found.
Whether members of the millennial generation will start buying more cars
once they have kids to take to soccer practice and school plays
remains an open question. But such projections have important
business implications, even if car buyers are merely older or
buying fewer cars in a lifetime rather than rejecting car culture
outright.
At the Mobile World Congress last year in Barcelona, Spain, Bill
Ford, executive chairman of the Ford Motor Company, laid out
a business plan for a world in which personal vehicle ownership is impractical or
undesirable. He proposed partnering with the telecommunications industry to create cities
in which pedestrian, bicycle, private cars, commercial and public transportation traffic
are woven into a connected network to save time, conserve resources, lower emissions and
improve safety.
While President Obamas efforts to reduce emissions will benefit from Americans reduced
interest in driving, Chinas leaders will have no such luck: there, personal car ownership is
growing by more than 10 percent annually.
Elisabeth Rosenthal is a reporter who covers environment and health for The New York Times.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/30/sunday-review/the-end-of-car-culture.html?_r=0
Young driver statistics
Start Navigation [Current Level]
The basics

Driving conditions

Young driver statistics

Learner Driver Resources

Drive Smart

The P Drivers Project


End Navigation [Current Level]

More than 350 young drivers aged 18 25 have been killed in Victoria in the last 10 years
representing one in four or
25% of drivers killed in
Victoria in this period.

In 2015, 22% of drivers


killed were aged
between 18 and 25
years, with this age
group only representing
around 13% of Victorian
licence holders.

Of the 27 young drivers


killed in 2015:

78% were males

63% were killed on country roads

56% were killed in single vehicle crashes

67% were killed in crashes that occurred during high alcohol times

67% of deaths occurred on 100km/h signposted roads

Note: High alcohol times are those times of the day and week when casualty crashes are ten times
more likely to involve alcohol than casualty crashes at other times.
http://www.tac.vic.gov.au/road-safety/learning-to-drive/young-driver-statistics
Driving instructor
Driving instructors teach people to develop the skills and knowledge they need to pass
their driving test.

Salary:18,000 to 30,000average per year

Hours:Variableper week
1. Entry requirements
2. Skills required
3. What you'll do
4. Salary
5. Working hours, patterns and environment
6. Career path and progression
1. Entry requirements
You need to become an approved driving instructor (ADI) before you can start to teach.
You'll need to pass a 'standards check' every 4 years to carry on working as an
instructor.
2. Skills required
You'll need:
excellent driving skills, road safety knowledge and enthusiasm for driving
the ability to give clear instructions
the ability to adapt your teaching style to suit each learner
the ability to react quickly and safely to any problems
3. What you'll do
You'll:
assess each learner's driving knowledge and ability
plan a series of lessons to get them ready for their driving test
You'll teach your clients:
to use vehicle controls with confidence
the correct approach to road safety
to manoeuvre, turn, reverse and park safely
about driving laws and the Highway Code
how to deal with emergency situations
about basic vehicle checks
You could also give night or motorway driving lessons to people who have passed their
test.
4. Salary
Starter: 18,000 to 20,000
Experienced: 25,000
Highly Experienced: 30,000 or more
You'll charge between 18 to 30 an hour.
You may be self-employed or work through a franchise. You'll pay a weekly fee of 200
to 300 to a franchise, but this will cover the use of a car and all costs apart from fuel.
If you work for yourself, you'll need a dual-control car.
5. Working hours, patterns and environment
You can set your own hours, but should be prepared to work evenings and weekends.
You'll spend most of your time in the car. Lessons typically last between 1 and 2 hours.
6. Career path and progression
With experience and training you could move into specialist areas like training disabled
drivers or those driving passenger carrying vehicles, large goods vehicles (LGV) or
emergency services vehicles.
If you're highly experienced, you could become a driving examiner.
Last updated: 10 October 2016
https://nationalcareersservice.direct.gov.uk/job-profiles/driving-instructor
Young Drivers at Work
The RoSPA Young Driver's At Work project was a two year project run between
2008 and 2010. The project was conducted with support from the
Department for Transport's road safety partnership grant and with the help
of a working group including the DfT, DSA, Buckinghamshire and
Lancashire County Councils, Birmingham City Council, Roadsafe, and
Tesco.com.
The project has since been awarded a Prince Michael International Road Safety Award.
This online toolkit includes an Activity Guide (PDF 356kb), Facilitator's Notes (PDF
628kb) and Workshop Slides (PPT 1.34Mb) which will equip you with the information you
need to run one of the workshops yourself, and to understand the concepts behind it.

Project overview
The first phase was a research project. The scope was to get a better understanding of
the risks faced, and created, by young (17-24 years) drivers at work, including:

the views of employers on how well the present system of driver training and
testing prepares young people for the sort of driving they do for work

whether employers would recognise and make use of a 'driving for work
qualification' when recruiting or managing young staff who drive as part of their
job, and

if so, what should be included in such a qualification or training programme.


The results were published in a report in March 2009. Based on this research RoSPA
developed a Young Drivers at Work Workshop. The aims of the workshop are to:

Improve the attitudes and behaviour of young at-work drivers

Inform the development of organisations' road risk policies

Facilitate the consultation of the whole organisation about work-related road


safety policies and gauge how well they are followed
http://www.rospa.com/road-safety/advice/young-drivers/young-drivers-at-work/
Young Driver Safety
Young and novice drivers are more likely to be involved in road accidents than more
experienced drivers. They are more likely to be involved in high-speed accidents,
accidents in the dark, accidents when overtaking and when negotiating bends. They are
also more likely than experienced drivers to be at fault for accidents.
Pre-Drivers
Many different types of pre-driver education schemes have been developed in an
attempt to instill positive attitudes to safe driving and road safety in general in young
people before they are old enough to drive.
Pre-Driver Education and Training Policy Paper

January 2012
RoSPA's "Pre-driver Education and Training Policy Paper" aims to assess the evidence of
the effectiveness (or otherwise) of pre-driver education schemes and to highlight good
practice in the design and delivery of such interventions.
The full paper is available to download: Pre-Driver Education and Training (PDF 226kb)

Summary
To learn to drive in the UK, a person must have a provisional driving licence, which can
only be obtained from 17 years of age. However, young people develop their attitudes
to driving long before they reach this age. Consequently, many different types of pre-
driver education schemes have been developed in an attempt to instill positive attitudes
to safe driving and road safety in general in young people before they are old enough to
drive. However, these schemes vary widely:

They target different age groups

They are delivered in different ways


They include differing content

Some include actual practical driving in a car off road; others do not
Concern has been expressed that some pre-driver education programmes may actually
increase young drivers' risk by enabling them to pass the driving test (when they are old
enough) with fewer professional lessons or less private practice. They may even
encourage young people to drive before they are legally able to do so. Conversely, it is
argued that such programmes improve the knowledge and attitudes of young people
before they become drivers, and mean that less time has to be devoted to the
mechanics of car control and more time on the more important aspects of driving, such
as hazard perception, when they become learner drivers.
There is relatively little evaluation of the effectiveness of pre-driver education
interventions, and most of the evaluations that have been conducted conclude there is
little evidence that they are effective. This is partly because it is unrealistic to expect a
short term, small scale, possibly one-off, intervention, that is often delivered years
before the participants are likely to be driving, to change their driving behaviour. There
are far too many other factors that affect the participants' crash risk to be able to
separately identify the effects of the pre-driver intervention.
However, there is some evidence that pre-driver education can improve some aspects of
young peoples' attitudes to driving. However, these improvements are probably short-
lived and liable to be swamped by other influences, such as peer pressure. Refresher
interventions that seek to reinforce the original road safety education messages may
help to sustain the attitude improvements.
A DfT literature review of pre-driver education, a separate DfT review of how children
and young people's attitudes to driving develop as they grow older and RoSPA's "10
Principles for Effective Safety Education" all provide useful guidance for the design,
content and delivery of pre-driver interventions. Based on these guides, RoSPA believes
that the following principles will improve the likelihood of pre-driver education being
effective:

Incorporate into a Spiral Curriculum

Set Clear and Realistic Aims and Objectives

Be Specific

Be Positive

Focus on Higher Level Factors Rather Than Vehicle Handling Skills

Refresh Periodically

Involve Parents

Evaluate
Pre-Driver Education and Training Policy Paper
January 2012
RoSPA's "Pre-driver Education and Training Policy Paper" aims to assess the evidence of
the effectiveness (or otherwise) of pre-driver education schemes and to highlight good
practice in the design and delivery of such interventions.

The full paper is available to download: Pre-Driver Education and Training (PDF 226kb)

Summary
To learn to drive in the UK, a person must have a provisional driving licence, which can
only be obtained from 17 years of age. However, young people develop their attitudes
to driving long before they reach this age. Consequently, many different types of pre-
driver education schemes have been developed in an attempt to instill positive attitudes
to safe driving and road safety in general in young people before they are old enough to
drive. However, these schemes vary widely:
They target different age groups
They are delivered in different ways
They include differing content
Some include actual practical driving in a car off road; others do not
Concern has been expressed that some pre-driver education programmes may actually
increase young drivers' risk by enabling them to pass the driving test (when they are old
enough) with fewer professional lessons or less private practice. They may even
encourage young people to drive before they are legally able to do so. Conversely, it is
argued that such programmes improve the knowledge and attitudes of young people
before they become drivers, and mean that less time has to be devoted to the
mechanics of car control and more time on the more important aspects of driving, such
as hazard perception, when they become learner drivers.
There is relatively little evaluation of the effectiveness of pre-driver education
interventions, and most of the evaluations that have been conducted conclude there is
little evidence that they are effective. This is partly because it is unrealistic to expect a
short term, small scale, possibly one-off, intervention, that is often delivered years
before the participants are likely to be driving, to change their driving behaviour. There
are far too many other factors that affect the participants' crash risk to be able to
separately identify the effects of the pre-driver intervention.
However, there is some evidence that pre-driver education can improve some aspects of
young peoples' attitudes to driving. However, these improvements are probably short-
lived and liable to be swamped by other influences, such as peer pressure. Refresher
interventions that seek to reinforce the original road safety education messages may
help to sustain the attitude improvements.
A DfT literature review of pre-driver education, a separate DfT review of how children
and young people's attitudes to driving develop as they grow older and RoSPA's "10
Principles for Effective Safety Education" all provide useful guidance for the design,
content and delivery of pre-driver interventions. Based on these guides, RoSPA believes
that the following principles will improve the likelihood of pre-driver education being
effective:
Incorporate into a Spiral Curriculum
Set Clear and Realistic Aims and Objectives
Be Specific
Be Positive
Focus on Higher Level Factors Rather Than Vehicle Handling Skills
Refresh Periodically
Involve Parents
Evaluate
RoSPA's Young Drivers Campaign

Improving the safety of young drivers is a key campaign issue for RoSPA.
Young and novice drivers are more likely to be involved in road accidents than more
experienced drivers. They are more likely to be involved in accidents at high-speed, in
the dark, when overtaking and when negotiating bends. They are also more likely than
experienced drivers to be at fault for collisions.
...there is a number of reasons why young drivers are among the most vulnerable on the
roads.
There is a number of reasons why young drivers are among the most vulnerable on the
roads. Lack of experience is one of the main reasons, but attitude can also come into
play. Younger drivers, especially men, tend to be over-confident and are more likely to
drive in risky ways such as too fast, too close to the vehicle in front and by overtaking
dangerously.
Young drivers often have excellent vehicle control skills and fast reactions. But, they are
poor at identifying potential hazards and assessing risk, and tend to overestimate their
ability to avoid hazards and accidents. It can take new drivers up to two seconds longer
to react to hazardous situations than more experienced drivers.
Peer pressure can also play a role, with young drivers, especially men, who carry friends
being more likely to crash.
RoSPA seeks to improve the safety of young drivers by contributing to the formation of
policies at a national level, conducting research, and developing practical assessments
and training courses for young drivers.
An example of how RoSPA contributes to the formation of national policy came in 2008
when the road safety department submitted a comprehensive response to the Driving
Standards Agency's Learning to Drive consultation, which was launched to bring about
fundamental reforms to learner training, the driving test and post-test training.
RoSPA had long called for changes to the system through which learner drivers are
trained and tested and the consultation provided a key opportunity to state its proposals
formally.
Increasing the amount of driving experience a learner has (through professional and
private practice); helping parents to provide more, and more effective, private practice;
encouraging post-test training; and conducting further research into the feasibility of a
graduated driver licensing system were RoSPA's main proposals.
...RoSPA has long called for changes to the system through which learner drivers are
trained and tested.
Kevin Clinton, RoSPA head of road safety, said: "We need young drivers to gain more
experience while they are learning, so encouraging them to spend extra hours behind
the wheel in a variety of driving situations would have major benefits. It is known that
crash rates fall when this happens. As well as experience, we have to address issues
such as attitude, hazard perception and peer pressure.
"Britain has a good road safety record, but with a high number of young motorists being
killed on our roads, it is time for more action."
In the research sphere, RoSPA linked two key issues - young drivers and at-work drivers -
when it launched its Young Drivers at Work project which was funded by the Department
for Transport.
More than 60 per cent of employers who took part in a study conducted for the project
said that the learner driver training and testing process did not adequately prepare 17-
24-year-olds for the challenges of at-work driving. More than half of those surveyed said
they would like to see a post-test driving for work qualification introduced.
Based on the survey findings, RoSPA has developed workshops for young drivers who
drive for work.
Nick Lloyd, RoSPA road safety manager, said: "It is clear that further support is needed
for young drivers at work, and employers have indicated they prefer face-to-face
workshops as a way of giving that support.
...Britain has a good road safety record, but with a high number of young motorists
being killed on our roads, it is time for more action.
"The Driving for Work workshops have been developed to go some way towards bridging
the clear skills and training gap highlighted in our report."
http://www.rospa.com/campaigns-fundraising/current/young-drivers/
United Kingdom 17 (16 for mopeds and agricultural tractors) Minimum driving age
Argentina 17 (with parental approval), 18 (rest), 21 (commercial vehicle) Minimum
driving age
ARGENTINA: REGIONAL LEADER IN TRAFFIC DEATHS
International News - January 2010
BUENOS AIRES - Traffic accidents in Argentina have been claiming an average of 20 lives
a day over the past decade, making it the top country in Latin America for these
tragedies. They are also the main cause of death among people under 35, but in spite of
this there are no official plans to end the slaughter on the roads.
"The worst thing is that in spite of the statistics, there is no state policy to tackle the
problem, and so we have no national executive authority in charge of road safety, nor a
programme, nor a budget for it," Eduardo Bertotti, the director of the private Institute of
Road Safety and Education (ISEV), told IPS.
"The political powers-that-be are not concerned about it, and we think this is a serious
cultural problem within the state and among our citizens," the expert said. Countries like
Chile, Colombia and Costa Rica at least have government institutions to fight it, he said.
News reports of traffic accidents have become so familiar in Argentina that instead of
causing concern they have become the norm. Every day there are reports of buses that
have turned over, multiple crashes on highways, pedestrians and cyclists knocked
down, and car drivers or motorcyclists being killed or injured because they were not
wearing safety belts or helmets.
Argentina has a national traffic law but it is more honoured in the breach than the
observance, and there is no effective system of penalties for offenders. "The main cause
of accidental death in this country is speeding," said Alberto Silveira of the non-
governmental organisation Luchemos por la Vida (Lets Fight for Life).
A study by the organisation concluded that two million of the seven million vehicles in
the country ran a red light at least once a day in 2002. Nowadays that figure is twice as
high, with the addition of 400,000 bus drivers (with passengers) a day ignoring red
lights.
Mara Cristina Isoba, an expert with Luchemos por la Vida, said that the lack of
infrastructure on roads and highways, the absence of traffic safety policies, and risk-
taking behaviour contribute to the vast majority of accidents, independently of the
number of vehicles on the streets.
Monitoring done by the organisation indicates that the number of people killed in road
accidents has remained at a fairly constant level over the past 10 years. In 1997 there
were 8,123 fatalities; the next year the death toll was 7,579 and this continued virtually
unchanged until 2006, when 7,557 people were killed, of whom 1,200 were under 15.
A spate of serious accidents has prompted the government of Nstor Kirchner to declare
2007 "Road Safety Year" and oblige all public administration documents to carry the
slogan as a letterhead. But they are only words, and another increase in the number of
deaths on the road is expected by the end of this year.

"Paradoxically, this year will be one of the worst in terms of (road accident) results,"
Bertotti said.
The national ombudsmans office, which has worked with associations concerned with
road safety and accidents, launched an initiative in 2006 calling on the state to declare
a road safety emergency, create a national authority in charge of the issue, and
implement an accident prevention plan.
Nearly half a million people supported the proposal, but no programme has yet been
established.
ISEV said that mortality is already up by nearly seven percent in the first quarter of this
year compared to the same period last year, and serious injuries are up by nearly 40
percent. Some 120,000 people are injured in accidents every year.
Research carried out by Bertotti found that Argentina has the highest mortality rate
from traffic accidents in Latin America, followed by Mexico, Brazil and Uruguay.
Meanwhile, Luchemos por la Vida reported that Argentina also has the highest number
of road deaths per million vehicles.
The statistics are from 2001 but they indicate that, for every million cars, 129 people
died in Sweden from traffic accidents, 181 in the Netherlands, 196 in the United States,
211 in Spain and 1,058 in Argentina. "Some people think that there are more accidents
because there are more cars, but that is not the case: other factors are responsible,"
said Isoba.
The expert pointed out that in Argentina, most of the people killed on the road are
pedestrians who cross streets outside the crossing lane, do not wait for the lights, or
wait on the street instead of on the sidewalk.
Many accidents also occur when pedestrians walk along streets or highways.
Traffic accidents are the main cause of death among young people, and the third cause
of death throughout the population, after heart disease and cancer. The road will
continue to claim victims at a voracious rate until preventive measures are taken.
Article by Marcela Valente, IPS
http://www.alertdriving.com/home/fleet-alert-magazine/international/argentina-regional-
leader-traffic-deaths