t h e c a t o i n s t i t u t e c a p i t a l c a m p a i g n

THE

liberating

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K e n & F r ay da levy liberty garden
With a view of the Washington Convention Center, the Roof Garden will be located on the new seventh floor addition to the Institute’s headquarters. The Garden will be an outdoor venue to host intimate receptions, staff gatherings, and presentations for approximately 100 people. In addition, the Garden will feature a majestic Ostermiller Golden Eagle Bronze overlooking Massachusetts Avenue donated by the Kammerer Foundation in the spirit of its founder R. Michael Kammerer Jr.

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n its more than three decades of existence the Cato Institute has never undertaken as ambitious a program as the $50 million capital campaign

it launched in 2010. Our theme of “Liberating the Future” reflects the concerns of the Institute’s Board of Directors that our heritage of liberty is under assault as never before. Powerful forces seek to put America on a dangerous path that will lead to less freedom, less prosperity, and greatly restricted opportunities for the next and future generations. These are challenging times for friends of freedom; but amid crisis, there are also signs of opportunity. Abroad, the powerful forces globalization has unleashed have brought increased economic and political freedom to tens of millions. And at home, Americans demonstrate a growing resistance to regimentation that frustrates latter-day planners and “progressives.” An energized freedom movement is at hand. No organization is more committed than Cato to the principles of freedom that made America a beacon for the world—a cause for optimism and opportunity in a world of widespread misery and suffering. We will not stand idly by and see that heritage destroyed, its blessings denied to our children and grandchildren. We aim to redouble our efforts to defend and promote liberty through the ambitious program we are calling “Liberating the Future.”

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new program areas

“ Given
freedom, the American people will flourish. Given the Cato Institute, the American people will, in time, secure freedom.
— george
F. w i l l

t

he expansion of Cato’s headquarters won’t simply provide the Institute with better facilities: crucially, it will allow us to add much-needed manpower so

that we can join the battle in issue areas we currently don’t have the staff to address. The heart of our campaign for Liberating the Future is the addition of new scholars. For over three decades, Cato has built up a well-deserved reputation for sound analysis and incorruptible integrity. Cato’s high profile is due to the political independence of the Institute, the finely-honed communications skills of its policy staff, and the intellectual strength of its policy work. The impressive stable of Nobel laureates and leading academics who work closely with the Institute demands attention and respect—even from a biased media.

And yet, much more can be done—needs to be done—to capitalize on the platform we have. Remarkably, in a time when threats to liberty are increasing all across the policy spectrum, Cato does not have a single analyst devoted full time to environmental policy. Nor do we currently have the space or the budget to hire scholars who focus exclusively on drug policy—where opportunities for reform abound—or labor and employment regulation—where threats to freedom and dynamism loom. And while 27,000 new pages are added every year to the Federal Register, Cato has only one fulltime regulatory scholar. That’s simply not enough. To keep the ideas of the American Revolution alive and relevant for the next generation, Cato needs to bring new scholars on board—highly skilled analysts who can provide timely responses to opponents, warn of the dangers of new laws and regulations, and point to opportunities for pro-freedom reforms. What follows are some of the issue areas where Cato plans to shift the terms of debate as we carry the fight for liberty into the 21st century.

labor and employment poliCy studies: Proclaiming their devotion to

“change,” powerful forces in Washington now seek to bolster public employee unionism, arrest the decline of private sector unions, and expand the reach of our anachronistic labor laws, designed in the early 20th century for an industrial order that no longer exists. Meanwhile, enhanced prosecution of employment discrimination laws is imposing staggering new costs on employees and employers.

A Cato research program devoted to Labor and Employment Studies will expose the hidden costs of outmoded labor regulations, make the case against new laws that would hamstring our dynamic labor markets, and shift the debate toward a new appreciation of flexible, market-oriented workforce policies.

a n e x pa n d e d F. a . h a y e K auditorium
Key to Cato’s expansion is revamping and enlarging the

money and banKing: History has shown that predictable, stable currency

F. A. Hayek Auditorium. The new Hayek Auditorium will be able to better accommodate conference attendees with an increased capacity of 210 seats, more comfortable seating, and an expanded pre-function area to welcome visitors and event

is the bedrock on which entrepreneurial creativity and economic dynamism rest. As capital markets become more sophisticated, they are simultaneously more essential to the functioning of a complex economy and more vulnerable to a political class that reflexively seeks to control that which it doesn’t understand. A Cato research program on Money and Banking would bring aboard analysts devoted to critiquing Fed policy, securities regulation, insurance regulation, and international monetary policy. In a time of new regulatory threats, Cato needs new analysts who can explain the value of free flows of capital and the burdens imposed on markets by counterproductive regulation.

guests. In addition, the F. A. Hayek Auditorium will offer the latest in conference telecommunications technology as well as improved facilities to better allow members of the press and their camera crews to broadcast the Institute’s activities.

riChard and sue ann masson poliCy Center
The Policy Center will be a redesign of the Institute’s current F. A. Hayek Auditorium. This new facility will be a stateof-the-art classroom with seating for up to 60 people. It will be an ideal venue for intern seminars and student programs, scholar lecture series, visiting dignitaries, overflow space for large conferences, and informal forums and meetings. With the expansion of our policy program, the Policy Center will be able to accommodate all of our scholars, analysts, and research assistants in our monthly policy staff meetings.

regulatory aFFairs speCialists: Today, there is no greater impedi-

ment to American prosperity than the immense body of regulations chronicled in the Federal Register. While the Washington policy debate focuses on the federal budget, the off-budget costs of regulatory mandates too often get overlooked. Federal environmental, safety and health, and economic regulations touch virtually every area of American life, and the costs they impose are staggering—in some estimates surpassing the toll taken by the federal income tax. But our burgeoning regulatory state threatens far more than our prosperity. It’s also a serious threat to the rule of law. Remarkable as it is to contemplate, the fact is, most of the actual “law” in this country—the rules that citizens have to follow, at pain of fine or imprisonment—is generated by unelected administrative agencies, using broad authority unconstitutionally delegated by Congress. The result is a regulatory code that’s literally unknowable, and that brings with it an enormous concentration of unaccountable power. Cato needs to bring additional scholars on board to expose these hidden costs, and the threats they represent to American self-government.

environmental studies: Cato has done valuable work in the areas

of natural resource regulation and climate change policy, fighting off efforts at

price controls, debunking the bad science surrounding renewable energy schemes, and demonstrating that the case for alarm regarding climate change is grossly overstated. But environmental policy is increasingly becoming the central regulatory battleground, and we cannot play the role we need to play in that fight without new analysts who can cover areas such as clean air regulations, endangered species, and “sustainable development.”

“ There is no
institution that, person for person,dollar for dollar, idea for idea, has been even close to the CatoInstitute in advancing fundamental principles.
— FrederiCK
w. s m i t h

an expanded Center For Constitutional studies: Surveying

the American scene early in our history, Alexis de Tocqueville wrote that "scarcely any political question arises in the United States that is not resolved, sooner or later, into a judicial question." But even Tocqueville could not have imagined how those judicial questions would multiply over the next two centuries. As government has grown to regulate nearly every aspect of American life, it’s essential that our courts play their intended role as “the bulwark of our liberties,” in Madison’s phrase. Cato established its Center for Constitutional Studies in 1989 to examine the courts’ work critically, in light of America’s first principles as set forth in our founding documents, and to lay the intellectual groundwork for restoring firm limits to government power. But, in part because of law’s growing complexity, the Center’s limited staff cannot give a number of important subjects the coverage they deserve. A larger staff would allow the Center to better address government overreaching in telecommunications, medicine, financial markets, family relations, education, immigration, trade, intellectual property, and more. As many Americans are coming to recognize, restoring a constitutional culture is more urgent now than ever before—and Cato’s Center for Constitutional Studies has a vital role to play in that restoration.

Ceo, Fedex Corp.

CommuniCations Freedom: A free people and a free society require

media free from government control. Yet self-styled champions of the “public interest” are mounting frontal assaults and indirect attacks on Americans’ freedom of speech. Campaign-finance restrictionists are fighting to curtail participation in electoral debate through limits on fundraising for broadcast ads; others seek a revitalized Fairness Doctrine, which will chill talk radio and other forms of political speech. A Cato project on Communications Freedom will seek to wall off the internet from the

“Anyone
who fights for the future,lives in it today.
— ay n
rand

anti-speech regulatory system currently governing other media and work to hem in the FEC and the FCCs’ power, with the ultimate goal of shuttering the agencies entirely.

government transparenCy: Information technology has delivered

change, openness, and efficiency in sector after sector of American society—yet government remains one of the last bastions of closed management and poor accountability. A burgeoning new movement for government transparency promises to change that, and Cato scholars should be at the forefront. A Cato research program devoted to Government Transparency will promote Freedom of Information Act reform, checks on government surveillance, and exposure of all government processes on the Internet through freely accessible databases. With the decline of formal media like newspapers (which have so often been captured by pro-government partisans), the future of government oversight belongs to individuals and groups who recognize that corruption thrives in a culture of secrecy. While Cato continues to defend formal, constitutional limits on government, its Project on Government Transparency will complement that effort by fostering the information infrastructure that strengthens informal checks on government power.

adjunCt sCholars and visiting Fellows program: Cato plans to

intensify its efforts to recruit leading thinkers to affiliate with us as Cato Fellows, strengthening the Institute’s reputation as the institutional center of the classical liberal vision, which transcends the current, stale divide between left and right. To integrate these scholars’ work into the Institute’s output, we will disseminate their academic work in formats accessible to policymakers, journalists, and the general public—significantly increasing, at minimal expense the amount of top-quality empirical research that Cato injects into the ongoing policy debate. A key part of this effort will be the creation of a Visiting Fellows program. Catoaffiliated academics on sabbatical will be able to work at the Institute for a semester or year, focusing not only on their own research projects but also serving as in-house experts and promoters of Cato’s mission during their tenure here.

budgeting For the “Common deFense”: Over the last decade, the

george m. yeager ConFerenCe Center
Made possible through the generosity of longtime Cato Club 200 member George Yeager, the Yeager Conference Center will be a new facility in the Institute’s expanded headquarters. The Center will accommodate approximately

Pentagon’s budget has grown by nearly 50 percent, even excluding the costs of our two ongoing wars. Today, America accounts for almost half of the world’s military spending, despite the lack of any conventional threat or genuine superpower competitor. A defense budget that actually aimed at defense would make real cuts, shedding our outdated, Cold War–era military commitments, and adopting a force structure appropriate for the foreign policy of a constitutional republic. Bringing aboard additional experienced scholars to examine existing and proposed weapons systems and defense policies will help Cato build the intellectual case and political will for “right-sizing” one of the largest items in our outsized federal budget.

bioethiCs studies: If the 20th century was the century of physics, the 21st

200 people for sit-down lunches and will have the capability to transform into three separate lecture halls for smaller conference venues.

will be the century of biology—and of biotechnology. Congress and regulatory agencies will be asked to make decisions on issues ranging from human cloning and stemcell research to genetic engineering, organ transplants, assisted suicide, and genetically altered food and plants. Anti-market crusaders, vested interests, and some religious activists will seek to influence debate and policymaking on all of those issues. Cato

m e lv y n j ay K u s h n e r l i b r a ry
With the expansion, Cato will offer its scholars and visitors a leading classical liberal library in Washington, D.C. The library will feature the Roy A. Childs Jr. Collection of books and papers on economics, philosophy, and history. In addition, the Library will provide advanced research technologies, reference works, papers, and other tools for public policy study. It will serve as an essential resource and working space for the Institute.

policy work in Bioethics will focus on ensuring that those crucial matters aren’t decided solely by pro-regulation forces.

sCienCe and risK studies: Expenditures on risks that are tiny or

chimerical reduce health by slowing economic growth, the driving force behind longer and healthier lives. The public debate often suffers from an insufficient appreciation of those tradeoffs. A Cato research program in Science and Risk Studies will meet that need by exposing questionable science, examining the use and misuse of statistical analysis by regulatory bodies, shedding light on the opportunity costs associated with government risk assessment decisions, and identifying new nonpolitical bodies better suited to making risk assessments. The program’s overarching goal will be to explore ways to move risk decisionmaking out of the government and into the market.

international studies sCholars: Every region of the world has seen

an increase in economic and other freedoms during the current era of globalization. The policies that lead to prosperity and a free society are not a mystery, but successful implementation of those policies differs from country to country, and sound analysis aimed at enhancing human liberty calls for scholars with regional expertise. For instance, China’s emergence as a global economic power is one of the most consequential geopolitical developments of the past 30 years—and liberty’s future depends

on China’s becoming a peaceful, market-oriented society undergirded by the rule of law. The addition of a full-time China scholar will greatly help Cato aid that transition. Moreover, other regional scholars devoted to Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Middle East can help elevate Cato’s unique perspective on development issues—one that recognizes the poisonous, kleptocrat-empowering consequences of foreign aid and the benefits of free and open economies—to the central place it deserves in the debate over policy toward the developing world.

drug poliCy studies/penal Code reForm: The United States locks up

more people per capita than any other country in the world—a huge percentage of them nonviolent drug offenders. America’s Drug War has caused untold damage to life, liberty, and property. Yet today the prospects for drug policy reform look better than they have for decades. In recent years, 15 states have legalized medical marijuana, and recent polling data shows the public’s increasing receptiveness toward decriminalization. Cato’s existing Project on Criminal Justice could help capitalize on those trends by hiring new analysts devoted to drug policy and federal penal code reform.

the young leaders program: Liberating the future depends upon convinc-

ing the next generation of the importance of limited government, peace, and free enterprise. Friends of liberty face some serious challenges on that front: collectivist bias in academia remains rampant, and polls show that younger voters are substantially more likely to support universal health care, labor unions, and federal education spending. Cato needs to step up its efforts to identify and develop young classical liberal talent. Our intensive educational internship program is designed to cultivate the next generation of pro-freedom opinion leaders by selecting talented young people and giving them the intellectual ammunition and communications skills they need to make the case for a free society. With additional resources and new facilities, Cato plans to expand that program. We will also extend the reach of our youth-oriented website, Catooncampus.org; continue to work closely with Students for Liberty; and help students across the globe connect with other like-minded individuals who want to explore the ideas of liberty not often presented by their teachers and professors.

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deas have consequences, and the idea of liberty has changed the course of civilization. None of the worthy concerns that attract philanthropic support can ever be

fully and effectively addressed without sustaining the engines of wealth, creativity, and personal fulfillment that follow from economic and social freedom. Nothing we have achieved in this world would have been possible without the social and economic liberties afforded by sacrifices from past generations. Nothing that we hope our children and grandchildren will achieve is possible without commitment from the present generation. Simply put, liberty is the necessary prerequisite for the betterment of mankind. For liberty to survive and expand in the 21st century, however, its proponents must emulate the spirit our forefathers demonstrated when they pledged nothing less than their “lives, fortunes, and sacred honor” to the cause of freedom more than two centuries ago. The Cato Institute takes its name from Cato’s Letters, a series of pamphlets that circulated widely in the American colonies in the middle of the 18th century. Historians credit Cato’s Letters with providing the philosophical underpinning that helped make the American Revolution possible. As Thomas Jefferson wrote to John Adams in 1815: “What do we mean by the Revolution? The War? That was no part of the Revolution: it was only an effect and consequence of it. The Revolution was in the minds of the people, and this was effected, from 1760 to 1775, in the course of fifteen years before a drop of blood was shed at Lexington.” It was, Jefferson said, the public debate—in the colonial legislatures, in “the pamphlets, the newspapers in all the colonies”—through which “public opinion was enlightened and informed” about the blessings of liberty and the dangers of power—that was the real American revolution. Cato’s campaign for Liberating the Future will carry on that revolution, ensuring that the libertarian ideals of the American Founding prevail in the 21st century. We invite you to join us in this noble campaign.

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