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LESSON 1:

Loving Family

I.

Introduction:

  • A. Story: An Adaption from V. Suhomlinsky’s “The Seven DaughtersThere was a mother (show picture*) who had seven daughters (show them the pictures and have them count with you). (Suggestion: Make stick puppets by cutting the pictures out, and then pasting them on sticks)

One day, the mother went to visit her relatives who lived in a far, far place. The mother left home for quite a long time. While their mother was away, the seven

daughters felt really sad. They missed mother…very, very much.

When their mother finally came back, her seven daughters started to say how much

they loved their mother.

‘I love you as big as this ball,’ said the first. (Show first daughter and the ball.)

I love you as big as a table,’ said the second. (Show second daughter and the table.) ‘I love you as big as my room,’ said the third. (Show third daughter and the room.) ‘I love you as big as our house,’ said the fourth. (Show fourth daughter and the

house.)

‘I love you as big as a ship,’ said the fifth. (Show fifth daughter and the ship.) ‘I love you as big as the ocean,’ said the sixth. (Show sixth daughter and the ocean.) When the seventh daughter’s turn to speak came, she just walked towards her mother, hugged her, kissed her cheek, and asked, ‘Mom, would you like me to do something for you?’

  • B. Activity:

Have the children arrange the pictures of the ball, the table, the room, the house, the ship, and the ocean from the smallest to the biggest one.

*Pictures available on the pages after Reminder/s to the LG Leader.

II.

Memory Verse:

“…Love one another.” – John 13:34a

III.

Key Points:

  • A. Questions for Discussion:

    • 1. Among the first six daughters, who loved their mother the most? (Refer back to the game.) What about the seventh daughter? Did she say how much she loved their mother? Does that mean she doesn’t love their mother? What did she do when she saw their mother? So, what do you think: Did the seventh daughter love her mother? Why or why not?

  • 2. In the story, the seventh daughter did not say how much she loved her mother. Instead, she just “walked towards her, hugged her, kissed her and…’asked what she could do’ for her.” “Do you think what she did is better than what her sisters said? Why or why not?

B.

Lesson:

Loving your family not only means telling them how much you love them, but also doing things for them, like:

IV.

  • - giving Mom and Dad a hug and a kiss,

  • - listening quietly to Mom and Dad,

  • - obeying Mom and Dad,

  • - playing with your brother/sister,

  • - sharing your toys with your brother/sister.

Activity:

Put a check (

2. In the story, the seventh daughter did not say how much she loved her mother.

) in the box if the picture illustrates scenes that show love to one’s family and

a cross (x) if the picture illustrates scenes that do not show love to one’s family.

2. In the story, the seventh daughter did not say how much she loved her mother.
2. In the story, the seventh daughter did not say how much she loved her mother.
2. In the story, the seventh daughter did not say how much she loved her mother.
2. In the story, the seventh daughter did not say how much she loved her mother.
2. In the story, the seventh daughter did not say how much she loved her mother.
2. In the story, the seventh daughter did not say how much she loved her mother.
  • V. Reminder/s to the LG Leader: Remember, for kids this age, there are NO right or wrong answers. Always acknowledge the ‘point’ behind every child’s answer. Teach what IS right – NOT by pointing out what is wrong but, instead, by putting EMPHASIS on the beauty of what IS right. Try to always make it a point that the right answer to a question comes from the kids themselves. It is tempting to just go ahead and provide the right answer. But, if you want to be effective, instead, tirelessly provide hints and keep steering the discussion until a kid in your group ‘gets’ the point/ answer you want to hear. Lessons are more effective to them if the realizations come from them, instead of from you. Always end the discussion with a one-liner prayer body excluding the closer, of course (Not too long, pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeease. Remember how short the attention spans of three- to-five-year-olds are). Here’s a sample:

“Father God, thank You for my family. Help me show them how much I love them.

In Jesus’ name, Amen.”

MATERIALS

MATERIALS Mother

Mother

Daughter 1 Daughter 2

Daughter 1

Daughter 1 Daughter 2

Daughter 2

Daughter 3 Daughter 4

Daughter 3

Daughter 3 Daughter 4

Daughter 4

Daughter 5 Daughter 6

Daughter 5

Daughter 5 Daughter 6

Daughter 6

Daughter 7

Daughter 7