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Prepared for: curtis dove

Test Date: February 23, 2017

Personal Interest Areas | Details on Interest Areas | CareerMatch | Methodology

Interest Area Clustering

The hexagonal chart below (sometimes called a polar, radar or spider chart) depicts your
score for each of the six interest area clusters. According to Hollands theory, the interest
areas closest to each other on the hexagon, have the most characteristics in common. The
interest areas that are furthest apart (i.e., opposites on the hexagon), have the least in
common. John Holland believed that most people exhibit a tendency toward one or two
primary areas of interest, and that career satisfaction and success is highly correlated to
whether or not those interests are satisfied in ones work. People tend to thrive in work
environments that are supportive of their core personal interests and by being around others
who share those same basic interests.

Definitions of All Six Interest Areas

Dr. Holland defines six interest types: realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising, and
conventional. The characteristics of each are described below:

Realistic
People with Realistic interests like work activities that include practical, hands-on problems
and solutions. They enjoy dealing with plants, animals, and real-world materials, like wood,
tools, and machinery. They enjoy outside work. Often people with Realistic interests do not
like occupations that mainly involve doing paperwork or working closely with others.

Investigative
People with Investigative interests like work activities that have to do with ideas and thinking
more than with physical activity. They like to search for facts and figure out problems mentally
rather than to persuade or lead people.

Artistic
People with Artistic interests like work activities that deal with the artistic side of things, such
as forms, designs, and patterns. They like self-expression in their work. They prefer settings
where work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

Social
People with Social interests like work activities that assist others and promote learning and
personal development. They prefer to communicate more than to work with objects,
machines, or data. They like to teach, to give advice, to help, or otherwise be of service to
people.

Enterprising
People with Enterprising interests like work activities that have to do with starting up and
carrying out projects, especially business ventures. They like persuading and leading people
and making decisions. They like taking risks for profit. These people prefer action rather than
thought.

Conventional
People with Conventional interests like work activities that follow set procedures and routines.
They prefer working with data and detail more than with ideas. They prefer work in which
there are precise standards rather than work in which you have to judge things by yourself.
These people like working where the lines of authority are clear.

Interest Area Scores

How do your scores compare to other people? The charts below depict your score for each
interest area compared with that of the general U.S. Adult Population, Male and Female.

Statistical Notes: The center line in the bar represents the national average by gender; the
width of the bar represents (plus or minus) one standard deviation from the mean; roughly
68% of the population will fit within the distribution represented by each bar.

Your Score U.S. Adult Male Average U.S. Adult Female Average

Realistic
U.S. Male Average
U.S. Female Average
Your Score (6)

0 5 10 15 20 25

Investigative
U.S. Male Average
U.S. Female Average
Your Score (14)

0 5 10 15 20 25

Artistic
U.S. Male Average
U.S. Female Average
Your Score (19)

0 5 10 15 20 25

Social
U.S. Male Average
U.S. Female Average
Your Score (10)

0 5 10 15 20 25

Enterprising
U.S. Male Average
U.S. Female Average
Your Score (15)

0 5 10 15 20 25

Conventional
U.S. Male Average
U.S. Female Average
Your Score (11)
0 5 10 15 20 25

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Source: MyPlan.com, LLC, 2016; includes information from the O*NET 20.3 database, 2016. O*NET is a trademark of
the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

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