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ANGLICAN LIFE

NEWSPAPER OF THE THREE ANGLICAN DIOCESES IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

A Section of the AnglicAn JournAl

June, 2017

Guadalupe

Your Life Has Meaning

1 ANGLICAN LIFE NEWSPAPER OF THE THREE ANGLICAN DIOCESES IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR A Section of
Photo Emily F. Rowe
Photo Emily F. Rowe

Bishop John Watton

Central Newfoundland

If you are willing, make a pilgrimage to YouTube and search for Gretchen Peters’ “Guadalupe.” It’s a song written by Tom Russell around 2003. Russell was in Mexico City for Christmas. He was between relationships and longing to be free of the self-pity that was being amplified by the unkind pressures of the Christmas season. H e f o u n d h i m s e l f a t a

C h r i s t m a s M a s s i n t h e Cathedral and wrote these words:

My heart pounded along with the 200-year-old pump organ; sadness, doubt, self -pity and fear drained from my body with every hair- raising crescendo of the ancient Latin hymns. I was not rediscovering religion so much as digging deeper into an understanding of the raw face of passionate belief - even if it wasn’t my own

Image: Mary Virgin of Guadalupe, © Bernardo Ramonfaur / shuttertock.com

personal belief. It was their belief and their story. Passion is passion. It counteracts the poison.

We live in a time where science, psychology, and philosophy no longer bow to the literal explanations and demands of Christendom, and this forms a powerful culture of refusing us the comfort of appreciating what we have—the certainty that life has meaning—and

insists on denigrating faith in relationships with God. Tom Russell discovered

how the power of tradition is able to instil a sense of The Holy that flows Upward and Outward from the depth of an opened, wounded heart, rather than something that flows inward from an outward, culturally controlled source. How many times have we heard similar stories of people finding a Holy and Life-giving presence in places that they had given up on long ago? How powerful the words

of Jesus, and the Love of God, when the Spirit breaks through the culture and bulwarks of our religion to embrace the wounded—as they are, and where they are! I often wonder if the Church of our time will actively and earnestly seek a sacred balance: between Tradition and Understanding (that not everyone gets it!); between Liturgical practice and flexibility; between proclamation and hands-on involvement in the lives of our

communities. I pray that we do, so that when God sends people to us, their hearts will echo the chorus from the song Guadalupe. Perhaps then, after the mysteries of our gathered love has touched weary pilgrims, they will tarry with our communities in fresh hope of healing and meaning.

“But who am I to doubt these mysteries Cured in centuries of blood and candle smoke

I am the least of all your pilgrims here But I am most in need of hope”

I am bold enough to suggest that God is still calling us to show the world that the connection between heaven and earth, although obscured by the painful realities of human life and weakness, remains unbroken. If only we would approach weekly worship as pilgrims with a full expectation that our longing

for God will be satisfied there. If only we would lower our barriers and expectations to answer His call to be true friends with one another, and with the broken of our society. Thanks be to God for the mystery through which Jesus offers both solace and challenge in His friendship. Shall we not open our hearts to receive it?

Help For Those In Need Submitted with photograph by Lisa Brown The First and Second Year
Help For Those In Need
Submitted with photograph by
Lisa Brown
The First and Second Year
Confirmation Classes of St.
James Church in Port aux
Basques were each given
$5.00 and they had to come
up with a project to increase
this amount in three weeks.
This was done to fulfil the
“Stewardship Project” part of
their confirmation class. In
this short time, the children
collected over $900.00. Their
projects included the selling
of cupcakes, tickets on a
gift basket and on a video
game. The two classes met on
April 6th to decide where their
monies would be distributed.
Gifts were purchased from the
“Gifts for Mission” catalogue,
and a donation was made to
the “Mercy Ships”. The classes
also decided to purchase a
bicycle ambulance through
PWRDF. The children put a lot
of work into their projects and
felt a great deal of pride to be
able to help others in need.

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

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JUNE 2017

ANGLICAN LIFE in Newfoundland and Labrador is the newspaper of the Anglican Church of Canada in the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. A co- operative effort of the three Dioceses in Newfoundland and Labrador, it is publishes ten issues each year with an independent editorial policy.

Anglican Life is a section of the Anglican Journal

Editor:

Mrs. Emily F. Rowe

  • 3 Carpasian Rd.

St. John’s, NL A1C 3T9 Email: anglicanlifeNL@gmail.com

Advertising Rates and other information may be obtained from:

Bishop Donald Young

  • 34 Fraser Road, Gander, NL, A1V 2E8

Phone: (709) 256-7701

Email: jointcommittee@nfld.net

Paid Subscription Rates:

Newfoundland and Labrador: $15.00 Outside the province: $20.00 International: $25.00

New subscriptions, cancellations, & changes of address should be sent to:

Circulation The Anglican Journal (attn. Bev Murphy)

  • 80 Hayden Street, Toronto, ON, M4Y 3G2

(416) 924-9192 (O) (416) 925-8811 (fax)

Email: circulation@national.anglican.ca

Each parish is responsible for maintaining its own

subscription list: please notify your parish office of any changes. Changes sent to parish offices may take months to take effect. Send your updated information

to Circulation at the Anglican Journal (above) or to Don Young at 34 Fraser Road, Gander NL A1V 2E8.

Letters to the Editor:

Send to the Editor by email or post. Anglican Life does not publish letters from anonymous writers. Letters should not exceed 300 words, are subject to editing, and are published at the discretion of the editor.

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These policies were adopted by the Anglican Life Committee.

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2 JUNE 2017 ANGLICAN LIFE in Newfoundland and Labrador is the newspaper of the Anglican Church
2 JUNE 2017 ANGLICAN LIFE in Newfoundland and Labrador is the newspaper of the Anglican Church

8392 Guest Meals and Counting!

St. John the Evangelist, Corner Brook

Article and photographs by The Rev’d Roberta Woodman

Every Monday, volunteers meet at the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist in Corner Brook, NL to prepare the hall and kitchen for a delicious meal—a free meal! The Open Door was born on April 28, 2014, and since then more than 8000 meals have been served by over 3600 volunteers! It is an amazing outreach ministry in which volunteers from all the Anglican churches surrounding the Bay of Islands participate in providing food, toiletries, time, talent, and treasure. Nathan (a four year old) has been making a cake with his mother on a weekly basis for the past eight months, and donating it to The Open Door. It is a delight to have young children like Nathan, Amy, and Jake, as well as older youth volunteering and learning what it means to reach out beyond ourselves. Along with the local area, the Parishes of

Bonne Bay North and Bonne

Bay South participated in a

reverse Advent Calendar in 2016, in which they were challenged to provide supplies for The Open Door, and they gave an awesome contribution to this ministry. Volunteers make soup, chili, or stew, and give of their time to set up, serve, and clean up. Lunch also includes juice, milk, tea/coffee, dinner rolls and desserts. Local businesses as well as parishioners continue to make donations. Along with lunch, a gift bag, which contains fruit, a nutrition bar, and a hygiene product, is provided to anyone who would like to have one. In October, we receive donations of new, or nearly new, winter coats and boots which we distribute over a four week period. In December, we distribute stockings which are filled with hats, mitts/gloves, socks, and other goodies. For two years ,we provided a hot turkey dinner before Christmas; however, in 2017

2 JUNE 2017 ANGLICAN LIFE in Newfoundland and Labrador is the newspaper of the Anglican Church

Nathan and a cake that he and his mother have baked for Open Door.

the dinner was served in the middle of January. While enjoying a healthy meal and fellowship, piano music adds to the atmosphere as we serve all our guests with dignity and respect. Why? Why bother? The Open Door came into being as a result of discerning God’s call to the Humber Deanery as to how to grow the church. There was recognition that we, as the church in this area, were being called to move outside our buildings to be the Church where the Church is needed. In the Corner Brook region in particular, like many larger centres, we are faced with homelessness, poverty, the working poor, and those who are lonely and in need of fellowship. Not only has this ministry provided opportunities for many people to gather, be fed and nourished, it has also provided those who serve with an overwhelming sense of “being the Church,” and enabling us to break down the barriers of walls that separate us.

Matthew 25: 35-36 says:

“For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was sick and you took care of me, I was in prison and you visited me.” The Fourth Mark of Mission calls us to respond to human need by loving service! We will respond as long as there is a need! Thanks be to God as His Grace is sufficient!

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

JUNE 2017

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Spring Arrives

   
Pillows Bring Comfort to

Pillows Bring Comfort to

St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay

Article and photograph by The Rev’d Gerry Hayes

Cancer Patients
 

Cancer Patients

Article and photograph by Linda Kendell

The ladies of Holy Trinity Church, in Codroy, were very busy this year making pillows

April 16th, 2017, and were blessed by the Rev’d Harold Harvey. They were later taken

thanks to all who made them, and may God bless all those who receive them.

The robin, a welcome spring visitor to the Church of St. Nicholas, Torbay

to give to cancer patients. The completed pillows were taken to church on Easter Sunday,

to the hospital in Corner Brook, where they will be distributed to mastectomy patients. Many

Deacon Gerry Hayes captured this beautiful photo of a spring robin as it sang a song of joy, sitting on the railing of the patio deck at the rear of St. Nicholas’s Church hall, overlooking our cemetery and the beautiful view of Torbay Harbour.

remove the thorns from Jesus’ crown, and it was the robin that was permitted to stand guard. This heroic bravery allowed a splash of blood to stain its breast red, and this stain is still proudly worn today by cock robin. Also, the robin can be found in every

 

Annual St. Patrick’s Day Supper

The robin red breast as

churchyard, but will only be

Submitted by

been the subject of legend

seen once it calls to you; once

Dale Decker

been the subject of legend seen once it calls to you; once Dale Decker

sing the year dot, quite literally. With the coming of Jesus Christ comes the legend of “Robin Redbreast.” It is said that in our Lord’s hour of need, it was a robin that tried to

seen, its unique character will become familiar to you as this sacred bird will visit you often and provide reassurance for a new beginning.

Approximately 65 people attended the annual St. Partrick’s Day supper and bake sale at St. Matthew’s Anglican Church, Rocky Harbour.

Clarification from May’s Anglican Life: Last month, an article was published about a

 

“Christmas Eve Selfie,”but unfortunately, the location of that Christmas anticipation was not included in the article. It was sent in from Port Saunders. My apologies to all of you who have been wondering where that picture was taken, and a special apology to the people who were in the picture.

 

Emily F. Rowe, Editor, Anglican Life

 
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d
Spring Arrives Pillows Bring Comfort to St. Nicholas’ Church, Torbay Article and photograph by The Rev’d

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

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JUNE 2017

4 JUNE 2017 The Ven. Gerald Westcott Columnist Valerie and I recently attended a Father Richard

The Ven. Gerald Westcott Columnist

Valerie and I recently attended a Father Richard Rohr conference on the Trinity in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Father Richard is a Roman Catholic, modern day mystic and popular spiritual teacher, whose influence reaches across denominations and faith traditions. Over the years that I have been reading his books, he has helped articulate spiritual experiences for me that I have intuitively known to be true, but haven’t yet put words to. His latest book “The Divine Dance: The Trinity and your Transformation,” is very readable and is what the conference we attended was built around. Another speaker at the conference, who is also a mystic and modern teacher of the Christian Wisdom tradition, was the The Rev’d Cynthia Bourgeault. Cynthia

The Divine Dance

is an Episcopal priest, spiritual teacher, and author. Two of her latest books that have been resonating with me are: “The Heart of Centering Prayer:

Nondual Christianity in Theory and Practice”; and “The Holy Trinity and the Law of Three:

Discovering the Radical Truth

at the Heart of Christianity.”

What Richard can put in more popular language, Cynthia can

put in current theological and scientific research language. Cynthia is simply a brilliant theologian and teacher of Christian meditation. Being a fan of both Rohr and Bourgeault, I was drawn to the conference was to meet both of these inspirational teachers of the Christian contemplative tradition. There was a third conference speaker of which I had no real interest in. Paul Young is the author of the popular novel “The Shack.” The book was used in our parish reading group at one point, but I never did read it. Because he was going to be one of the speakers at the conference, and the movie “The Shack” was released, I thought I should at least see the movie, as it might tell me more about him and why he was invited to speak at this conference on the Trinity.

A c k n o w l e d g i n g y e t another ego wound in having pre-judged Paul Young as a conference speaker, I am so thankful that I did watch the movie and that he was a presenter. Young calls himself a “recovering evangelical.” He comes from a Christian mission background that was fundamentalistic. He grew up with an abusive missionary father, and a God that was judging and punitive. The Shack is a story that reflects the healing of his past, and his coming to know the healing flow of the life of the Trinity. Rohr spoke about popular and understandable Trinitarian theology. Bourgeault spoke more to the intellect in current theological and scientific research and conversations about the Trinity. Young spoke to the emotions and the healing truth of entering more deeply into the flow of the life of the Trinity. Each of the speakers brought different and diverse perspectives to the same Trinitarian truth that is in the DNA of the cosmos, and is also our deepest identity, made in the loving, relational image of God. Jesus calls us to follow him into this eternal truth.

The Interior Shack

On this path

we are

Inherited pain in every human consciousness,

of descent, only freely embarked, we are

reconciled with our past, re-connected to our present,

passed on,

never alone nor outside

washed clean of our hurt,

fathers to sons, mothers to daughters.

the flow

forgiving all that God forgives,

Blinded to joy by an unhealed past, by an unhealed present,

of Papa’s encouraging Love, of Jesus’ human Wisdom, of Spirit’s renewing Guidance,

Learning

a new creation of love rises out of the Shack, born

25 March 2017

to the interior Shack Papa invites us

of our dance with Life.

to trust,

of the Trinity, sent into the world.

to face our demons, the roots of our pain.

opening to letting go, consenting to Unknowing,

by G. Westcott

4 JUNE 2017 The Ven. Gerald Westcott Columnist Valerie and I recently attended a Father Richard

125th Anniversary for St. Margaret’s Church

Change Islands Church Plans Weekend of Celebrations

Article by Emily F. Rowe With information and photograph submitted by

Suzanne Porter and from

www.changeislands.ca

The Anglican Church that currently is in use on Change Islands is about to celebrate an exciting anniversary. St. Margaret’s Anglican Church will be holding special events to mark its 125th year this summer, and you’re all invited! First opened for worship on June 16th, 1892, St. Margaret’s is the oldest Anglican church that is still is use on Change Islands. Evidence of an older church on the north end of the island exists, but that building is no longer there. A Bible is on display at St. Margaret’s that was given to this older congregation, whose church was called St. James the Apostle, by the Bishop of Newfoundland on August 23rd, 1853. St. Margaret’s was built by Mr Blacker, and its fist priest was the Rev’d G. S. Chamberline. It was decided that the church should be named after St. Margaret of Scotland. She was born in exile in the Kingdom of Hungary, and returned to England with her family only to flee for their lives to the Kingdom of Scotland shortly thereafter. She was known for her piety and for her devotion to the poor, even washing the feet of the poor in imitation of Christ. She died on November 16th, 1093. The weekend of July 14th

to 16th will mark the 125th anniversary of St. Margaret’s Anglican Church, and the celebrations will begin on Friday with a meet and greet wine and cheese buffet. This will take place from 5:00-7:00, and will be followed by a sing- along at 7:30. On Saturday, July 15th, there will be a supper at 5:00 at the Change Islands Community Centre, ticket for which can be bough any time after June 16th. A motorcade through town with a parade to St. Margaret’s from the Community Centre will mark the culmination of the weekend’s events, and a church service will take place at 11:00, with Bishop John Watton in attendance. After this, a luncheon will take place back in the Change Islands Community Centre. Please reserve these dates if you would like to attend any of these celebrations. For more information, and to inquire about tickets for the supper on Saturday night, please contact Suzanne Porter via email at: fancyporter@ gmail.com or by telephone at (709) 621-4541. You can also contact Edith Burt at (709) 621- 5271. Come and help us to celebrate this important time in our church!

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

JUNE 2017

5

News From The Parish of Margaree - Fox Roost

Articles and photographs by Karen Simon

Confirmation Class The Confirmation Class at St. Augustine’s church in Margaree - Fox Roost met with
Confirmation Class
The Confirmation Class at St. Augustine’s church in Margaree - Fox Roost met with clergy and
family for a social.
Pictured above (clockwise, from bottom left): Allie Tobin, Emma Osmond, the Rev’d MaryRose,
Shirley Osmond, Sharon Billard, Krista Northcott, Bradly Northcott, Trina Hatcher, and Noah Hatcher.

Choir Visits Long-term Care Unit

JUNE 2017 5 News From The Parish of Margaree - Fox Roost Articles and photographs by

The Choir from St Augustine’s in Margaree - Fox Roost visited the Long Term Care Unit at the Dr. Charles L. LeGrow Health Centre in Port aux Basques to take part in a church service on April 5th, 2017. The residents and members of St. Augustine’s enjoyed their afternoon of worship

JUNE 2017 5 News From The Parish of Margaree - Fox Roost Articles and photographs by
JUNE 2017 5 News From The Parish of Margaree - Fox Roost Articles and photographs by

Cynthia Haines-Turner Columnist

Question: Where can you send your kids to learn how to live in community, how to cooperate with others, where they can gets lots of wholesome activity and fresh air, where they can be guided by dedicated volunteers all while having the time of their lives and making lifelong friends? Oh, and at less than the cost of day care? Answer:

Church camps. It’s June. June heralds the end of the school year and the beginning of summer. For most parents, it’s also a time of trying to figure out how to keep their kids occupied during the summer months. There will be activities organized by many towns, and depending on where you live, other possibilities will be available.

Church Camps–Important Formation For Our Most Precious Resource

However, few will provide kids with an experience equal to that of Church camping. There are the tangible activities that Camp provides— sports, swimming, canoeing, crafts, healthy meals, and lots

and lots of fresh air. Oh and a

week of being unplugged— without electronics and

phones—when was they last time your kids had that opportunity? There are the intangibles— at Camp you are in a cabin with between 7 and 11 other people, and for that week, you have to learn to get along. Some of their cabin mates will be friends, others will be people

Photo www.acwcanada.com
Photo www.acwcanada.com

The Chapel at Kildevil Camp, Lomond, NL

they just met, and some will be people they would never choose to be with. Rarely in the lives of young people today do they find themselves in that situation and have to learn to cooperate, make space and room for one another, be considerate, put themselves aside for a moment and think of the other person, regardless of how they feel about them. It’s a learning curve, a skill that has to be developed and one that will hold them in good stead throughout their lives. A Camp is staffed with volunteers, both young and old, who have chosen to give up their week to be with them—

it’s a role model that they see in groups and clubs to which they belong and one that is reinforced at Camp—“you are important, you are valuable and making sure you have a good week is my goal”—this is a powerful message for kids at any stage of their lives. Add to all that rituals old and new that provide a connection to past and future campers— camp songs, a morning flag

break, and evening chapel.

While Church camps are run by the respective churches,

they are increasingly non- denominational, at least that has been my experience at Killdevil, where I volunteered for over 30 years. I have watched kids develop and blossom over a brief period of time; I have seen the best in them shine through. It’s not just one particular aspect of

the week that accomplishes this, but the whole of the experience as the various elements come together to help them develop in “mind, body and spirit.” What more could you ask for these our children and arguably our most precious resource!

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anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

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JUNE 2017

News From PWRDF

Power in Partnerships

Submitted with photographs by Mona Edwards PWRDF Representative, Diocese of Western Newfoundland

Partnership: a relationship between individuals or groups that is characterized by mutual cooperation and responsibility, as for the achievement of a specified goal. (yourdictionary. com). PWRDF operates on a partnership basis. In 2016, over one million people in 16 countries benefitted from PWRDF projects, some of which included vaccinating children in Mozambique, providing assistance in Haiti after Hurricane Matthew, refugee support, and much more. This is all possible because of our partners: each person who gives his/her time, talent, and treasures. During the 2015/16 fiscal year, beneficiaries received a range of support in the areas of preventive health care; maternal, newborn and child health care; reproductive health care; family planning; malaria prevention and treatment; food security, agricultural training and inputs; access to clean water; delivery of food parcels; micro- finance loans; TB and HIV/AIDS education and care. Because PWRDF works with both church and community groups in the recipients’ own countries, we are given a better understanding of the local needs. For example, we partnered with the Cuban Council of Churches and learned from them which tools and resources were required on an ongoing basis. In May 2016, I was blessed to be part of a 50 member “Justice Camp” delegation to Cuba (25 Canadians and 25

Cubans), thanks to PWRDF and the partnerships of the Anglican

Diocese of Niagara and the

Episcopal Church of Cuba. The accomplishments that were made because of mutual goals, respect, and communication were obvious. One project in particular involved having water filtration systems placed strategically throughout the city of Mantansas, making clean drinking water easily accessible to all (see photo— filtration system in church entrance open to the public

on downtown busy street). Another project involved church run farms, where crops are given to needy people, while the rest are sold to raise funds for community projects. These farms also provide employment opportunities for locals, and this empowers them (see photo—our social justice immersion team visiting a church run farm). To learn more about PWRDF’s partners in mission, visit PWRDF.org

6 JUNE 2017 News From PWRDF Power in Partnerships Submitted with photographs by Mona Edwards PWRDF

Water filtration systems like the one on the left make it possible for many people to get east access to clean drinking water. This helps to save many lives, and drastically improves the lives of the people in the area.

6 JUNE 2017 News From PWRDF Power in Partnerships Submitted with photographs by Mona Edwards PWRDF

Pictured above, the group of volunteers in the field of a church- run farm in Cuba. The capacity to grow food, to be employed, and to raise funds by selling the crops not needed by those in poverty enables locals to take great pride in what they do.

6 JUNE 2017 News From PWRDF Power in Partnerships Submitted with photographs by Mona Edwards PWRDF
6 JUNE 2017 News From PWRDF Power in Partnerships Submitted with photographs by Mona Edwards PWRDF

In Thanksgiving For Blessing Received

6 JUNE 2017 News From PWRDF Power in Partnerships Submitted with photographs by Mona Edwards PWRDF

Kevin Smith

Columnist

There is an inscription in a Bible at Saint Luke’s Chapel that reads, “In Thanksgiving for Blessing Received.” Well, one couple, John and Harriet (not their real names), have decided to put those words into action. That is: they have just had their wills written, and are leaving their entire estate to the Diocese of Eastern Newfoundland and Labrador. The wording in their wills goes like this:

“ t o

t r a n s f e r

t h e

residue of my estate to the

Diocese

to

be used for

the general purposes at the discretion of the presiding Bishop.”

Interestingly enough, they have done something totally different when it came to appointing an Executor. Each spouse names the other as the Executor/Executrix, but if the event that he or she would be unable or unwilling to act, they have appointed the occupant of the office of Bishop of the Diocese at the time of their deaths. I met with John and Harriet and asked why they had taken such action in their estate planning. Here is what they said:

lives we have received many blessings especially finding each other and our home at Bishop Meaden Manor. Over the years we have seen the good works of the Anglican Church and, in particular, that of the Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund. To continue the support of the Anglican Church and it’s vision, we have

named the Eastern Diocese

of Newfoundland and Labrador in the Anglican

Church of Canada as our

beneficiary on Thanksgiving for blessings we have received. We thank Kevin Smith, another blessing, for his continued guidance, help and advice.

Needless to say, Bishop G e o f f r e y P e d d l e w a s delighted with the news, and in a letter to the couple, he said he expressed, “a deep and sincere thank you for your very thoughtful and generous action.” He said, “the bequest was a vote of confidence in the many ministries of the diocese,” and it was encouraging to see such “faith in the future of the church.” Bishop Geoff went on to say that he hoped that such action by this couple would inspire others to prayerfully consider doing something similar for one of the many worthy ministries within the Anglican Church of Canada. If you would like some assistance to leaving a legacy gift for your church, please do not hesitate to contact me. I would be only too pleased to assist.

Kevin Smith is a gift planning consultant for the Anglican Church of Canada. He can be contacted at

709 739-5667 “We have both been raised in homes filled with faith and throughout our or
709 739-5667
“We have both been
raised in homes filled with
faith and throughout our
or by email:
kevinsmith709@gmail.com
Image © geralt/14297 images

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

JUNE 2017

7

Annual Making of Palm Crosses Submitted with photographs by Lisa Brown Come And Journey Article and
Annual Making
of Palm Crosses
Submitted with photographs by
Lisa Brown
Come And Journey
Article and photographs
Genevieve A. Bouzane
Communication, Cursillo,
Diocese of Central Newfoundland
What is Cursillo? Where
are its roots? Who is its
founder? What does it have to
teach us? Is this some form of
weird group? From whence
did it come? Oh, if I could
just answer those questions,
this article would be finished
in a flash. But such is not
the case. I will have to call
on all my super powers—
those wonderful people who
comprise the Cursillo in Central
Diocese. I am sure that there
are many who could write an
article and give you our history
with flare, pizzazz, and pomp.
Here am I, a babe in this
Movement, and trying to write
an intelligent, coherent, and
sensible string of words that
will make each one who has
the fortune (or misfortune) to
read it hang on every word,
and long to become a part of
what Cursillo offers.
With that introduction, let’s
move to the boring aspects
of writing a beginner’s article
about who we are and what
we do. Cursillo is a Spanish
word which means literally
“a short course,” which is a
weekend (Friday evening until
Sunday afternoon). During
that time, we listen, share,
pray, and participate in a
variety of worship services
and creative activities. Then
we are sent forth to continue
our life journey supported by
weekly meetings (in groups of
4), and monthly gatherings of
all Cursillistas in the Diocese.
These monthly gatherings are
filled with people who are
on fire for the Lord. The joy,
love, faith, excitement and
camaraderie is electrifying.
In other words, Cursillo is
about moving our everyday
lives in a Godward direction,
remembering that all we are
and all we do is for others and
the honour and glory of God.
Therefore, when we hear
On April 6th, Members of St. James’ Church in Port Aux Basques met to
make palm crosses for our church service on Palm Sunday.
the word Cursillo, we can
envision groups of people
constantly searching for God
in their daily lives through
personal and communal
prayer, through their actions
(reaching out to others, being
of service, being ready to
give at any moment), and
fellowship—sharing fun times
and sad times, breaking
bread together, and having a
wonderful picnic where God
is at the centre of our every
breath.
We are a people whose
ideal is to listen to the “sounds
of silence,” not only with
our ears, but also with our
hearts. We are constantly
being formed and allowing
ourselves to be formed into the
people that we are called to
be—a people fashioned after
God’s own heart. In God, we
are still and we listen intently
to all the turmoil, confusion,
disappointments in our lives
and realize that we have a
family around us—our Cursillo
family who lifts us up in prayer
and holds us in their hearts,
and gives a ready, willing,
and blessed smile with words
of encouragement all along
the way. One need never be
alone—call any member of
the Cursillo, and you will be
welcomed with open arms.
You will be listened to, heard,
and will move forward with a
joyful heart.

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

8

JUNE 2017

Diocese of Central Newfoundland Holds 44th Session of Diocesean Synod

8 JUNE 2017 Diocese of Central Newfoundland Holds 44th Session of Diocesean Synod Submitted by The

Submitted by The Ven. Terry Caines Photographs by Carl Rose

The weekend of April 28th–30th saw the Rt. Rev’d John Watton back to his first Parish (Grand Bank – Fortune – Lamaline) for his first Diocesan Synod as Bishop.

family. I also know there is nothing new in your ears when I offer my pennyworth. We have reached several tipping points in relation to ministry, numbers, finances, vision, and

8 JUNE 2017 Diocese of Central Newfoundland Holds 44th Session of Diocesean Synod Submitted by The

Bishop John Watton addresses the first Synod of his Episcopacy

The 32 Parishes of Central Newfoundland were well represented by both clergy and laity. At Friday night’s opening service, at St. Alban’s in Grand Bank, Bishop John stated that, “Our Synod worship tonight centres on the Eucharist. Here, we celebrate the unity of belonging to the larger Church that has its being because of the life of each congregation, parish, diocese, country and the world. As I present my first Charge to our Diocese, I know that my task is to provide the clearest picture of who we are and where we are as a diocesan

discernment.” Let us begin by Christ’s assurance that when we, at Synod, humbly acknowledge our need of the Spirit’s wisdom and guidance, and like the Apostles, with one heart and mind cry: “Lord, Increase our faith!” It shall be done. (Luke 17:5) NRSV Bishop John welcomed Mr. Gerald Ralph as the new Chancellor; The Rev’d Terry Caines was appointed as our first ever Executive Archdeacon; and Mr. James Spencer was ordained to the Diaconate. Bishop John also stated that, “The ordination of a Deacon reminds us of

the humility, grace, power, and love the Church needs to reclaim.” The Bishop’s Charge provided the Diocese with a new starting point, and a challenge that we must move forward with faith, believing the waters shall part! The diocesan representatives and the congregation present were reminded that we all need to transform our communities. “God is calling us to step forward in faith because that’s the only time we will see the waters part,” and “That the Diocese must move from Survival to Mission.” The introduction of Central

Diocese’s new policy on “Sustainable and Strategically Missional Ministry” must be able to identify and enable the ministry of both clergy and laity. Open communication with all ages is necessary for the Church today so we can better understand who we are as the Body of Christ. This being a Business Synod, Saturday was a day of reports, elections, and motions held at St. Alban’s in Grand Bank. One of the motions passed was that in 2018, Synod would be held in the month of September. The day concluded with a gospel concert at St. Mary the Virgin in Lamaline.

Synod ended Sunday with a Confirmation service at All Saints’ Church in Fortune, with five individuals receiving the Laying on of Hands. The 44th Session of Synod, held in 2017, was well attended, and the hosting parishes are to be commended for their hospitality and fellowship.

8 JUNE 2017 Diocese of Central Newfoundland Holds 44th Session of Diocesean Synod Submitted by The
8 JUNE 2017 Diocese of Central Newfoundland Holds 44th Session of Diocesean Synod Submitted by The

Bishop John Watton ordaining James Spencer to the sacred order of deacons; also in photo is the Ven. Terry Caines

8 JUNE 2017 Diocese of Central Newfoundland Holds 44th Session of Diocesean Synod Submitted by The

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

JUNE 2017

9

JUNE 2017 9 Clergy and students & faculty from Queen’s College who attended the ordination of

Clergy and students & faculty from Queen’s College who attended the ordination of John Spencer

JUNE 2017 9 Clergy and students & faculty from Queen’s College who attended the ordination of

Layreaders and server from the Diocese of Central Newfoundland who attended the ordination of John Spencer

JUNE 2017 9 Clergy and students & faculty from Queen’s College who attended the ordination of

Members of the 44th Synod of the Diocese of Central Newfoundland

JUNE 2017 9 Clergy and students & faculty from Queen’s College who attended the ordination of

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

10

JUNE 2017

10 JUNE 2017 Spring Cleaning For The Soul The Allison Billard Columnist Sunshine does wonders for

Spring Cleaning For The Soul

10 JUNE 2017 Spring Cleaning For The Soul The Allison Billard Columnist Sunshine does wonders for

The Allison Billard Columnist

Sunshine does wonders for my soul. Maybe it’s the vitamin D (I really should look into a decent supplement), but I think it’s more than just that. Everything is so bright, the air feels cleaner, it really makes me feel cheerful. I can’t wait to go home and open the windows and start cleaning out the house from all winter, let the air blow through and finally get rid of all the dust and cobwebs. I don’t mean to make it sound as though I never clean my house. However, there is something special about that first cleaning in the spring with the sun shining in the (rather dirty) windows and the air blowing through. Maybe it’s just me but even the boys like to help with spring cleaning, and they have really come along to helping mommy tidy up, at least sometimes. Spring is also great for “starting over” on healthy living goals. January is nice and all—new year, new you and all that. However, in the spring the daylight lasts longer, the temperatures are warmer, and it’s so much easier to get outside, and to find decent produce. I find I’m more motivated to meet my goals,

and to help my family achieve a healthier lifestyle. Go for a run, make a salad—who needs junk food anyway? The boys of course LOVE to be outside. Blowing bubbles, playing with sidewalk chalk, going to the playground or the park, and even catching Pokemon. It’s also BBQ season (not that it’s ever really not BBQ season), and they are already anticipating splash pads and water tables, and all the fun that summer brings.

Every evening they ask to go outdoors, no matter that it’s

already bedtime!

Spring is also a great time to reconnect with your spiritual goals. Breathe some energy into those spiritual practices, take a walk, sit on a bench, bask in the beauty of creation. I can feel God’s presence closer in springtime, when everything comes back to life, the sun shines brightly in the sky. It is not hard to feel and see His hand in all of it. For me, it’s time to revisit some of those goals we made a few months ago, make sure we’re still on track, and if we’ve fallen off it’s time to get back on. It’s never too late to start, or start over, as the case may be. We can always be working towards being our better selves. The boys have really gotten into the habit of prayers at bedtime, and they often argue over who gets to say grace at mealtimes—luckily there are several opportunities each day for that one! Life is all about balance, isn’t it? Work, play, eat, clean. Everything has it’s place. When the sun shines and we can get outside and clear our heads and invigorate our bodies, hopefully balance is a little easier to find. Where can you find a little more balance?

Companions on an Ancient Path Article by Randy Murray; photograph courtesy of The Rev’d Canon Dr.
Companions on an
Ancient Path
Article by Randy Murray; photograph courtesy of The Rev’d Canon Dr. Sr. Constance Joanna Gefvert
And the Sisters of St. John the Divine, Toronto
Pictured above, Companions dining with the Primate, the Most Rev’d Fred Hiltz
The Sisters of St. John
the Divine (SSJD, an Anglican
monastic community in Toronto)
have opened applications for
the 2017-2018 cohort of their
program called Companions on
an Ancient Path. This is a great
opportunity for young women
in their 20s and 30s who have
a passion for the gospel, who
want to serve others, who seek
ways to deepen their lives as
followers of Jesus, and who
would like an experience of
intentional community
The SSJD are now about 4
months into the first year of the
program, and are excited and
privileged to have five young
women from across Canada and
from various denominational
backgrounds living with them
this year. In fact one of the
participants, Christine is from
St. Catherine’s, Port Coquitlam
and was inspired to apply after
reading the article about the
first year of the program in
the January 16 issue of Topic
the monthly publication of the
diocese circulated as part of
the Anglican Journal.
You can read more about
the program at the following
links:
•The Companions website
and blog:
www.ssjdcompanions.org
•The Sisterhood’s website:
www.ssjd.ca
Here are a few highlights
of Companions on an Ancient
Path.
It is a FREE opportunity
for women to spend a year
building community among
themselves, learning from a
healthy traditional community,
and developing spiritual
disciplines that they can take
out into their future lives.
The program is supported
by SSJD and by a generous
grant from the Anglican
Diocese of Toronto.
It would appeal especially
to those who would like to take
a gap year in their studies, a
year off between studies and
work, or a leave of absence
from their work.
And the program is offered
in partnership with Wycliffe
College where Companions
will have the opportunity
to take courses in spiritual
formation that may transfer
back to their home institutions.
Program coordinator
on behalf of the SSJD, the
Reverend Canon Dr. Sr.
Constance Joanna Gefvert is
asking for help to make the
program more widely known,
by sharing this information
with any young women who
might benefit from such an
opportunity.
Helping clients
achieve their goals.
Taking the time to understand
your unique needs.
The Harnum Group
Cabot Place, Suite 390
100 New Gower Street
St. John’s, NL A1C 6K3
Tel: 709-724-7327
Toll Free: 1-800-776-0077
rick.harnum@nbpcd.com
david.harnum@nbpcd.com
www.bmo.com/nesbittburns
BMO Wealth Management is the brand name for a business group consisting of Bank of Montreal and certain of its affiliates, including BMO Nesbitt Burns Inc., in providing wealth management
products and services. ® “BMO (M-bar roundel symbol)” is a registered trade-mark of Bank of Montreal, used under licence. ® “Nesbitt Burns” is a registered trade-mark of BMO Nesbitt Burns Inc.
BMO Nesbitt Burns Inc. is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bank of Montreal. If you are already a client of BMO Nesbitt Burns, please contact your Investment Advisor for more information.
Member - Canadian Investor Protection Fund and Member of the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada
Photo Emily F. Rowe

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

JUNE 2017

11

Queen’s College Convocation

Article and photographs by Emily F. Rowe

Queen’s College held its Convocation on Thursday, May 4 th , 2017, at St. Mary the Virgin Church in St. John’s. In attendance were Their Honours the Lieutenant Governor of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Honourable Frank Fagan and Mrs. Patricia Fagan; The Honourable Perry Trimper, Minister of Service NL; Dr. Sean Cadigan, Associate Vice-President (Academic) of Memorial University. C o n v o c a t i o n b e g a n with prayer, led by The Rt. Rev’d Geoffrey Peddle, and continued with the installation of the new Provost and Vice- Chancellor, Dr. Richard Charles Singleton by the Chancellor, the Most Rev’d Percy Coffin. Archbishop Coffin said that he was pleased to have the chance to install a Provost of Queen College before he retires later this year—this was the first time that he had had the privilege of doing so. Following his installation, the new Provost gave his report to Convocation. Dr. Singleton thanked his predecessors, and reminded us all that our success is built only by “standing on the shoulders” of those who came before us,

and it is always important to

remember their tremendous

contributions to Queen’s College. He said that Queens’ is currently in a very good place, and that it has a bright future to look forward to.

She warned the graduates that the world watches us to see if our words and our actions gel. Are we inclusive? Committed to our faith? She assured them that they could be all of this and more through the

JUNE 2017 11 Queen’s College Convocation Article and photographs by Emily F. Rowe Queen’s College held

Left to right: Dr. Rick Singleton, Bishop John Watton, Archbishop Percy Coffin, Bishop Geoffrey Peddle, Bishop Jane Alexander

accomplishments, and praised his devotion to his Church. Following the conferring of degrees, scholarships and awards were presented. Dr. Singleton then drew attention to the Administrative Assistant at Queen’s College, Mrs. Susan Foley, who has decided to retire at the end

of 2017 after over 30 years of dedicated service to Queen’s College. Mrs. Foley was presented with flowers, and received a standing ovation from all present. To conclude Convocation, the Rt. Rev’d John Watton led the closing prayer.

JUNE 2017 11 Queen’s College Convocation Article and photographs by Emily F. Rowe Queen’s College held
JUNE 2017 11 Queen’s College Convocation Article and photographs by Emily F. Rowe Queen’s College held

Dr. Rick Singleton is installed as Provost and Vice-Chancellor of Queen’s College by The Most Rev’d Percy Coffin.

The Convocation address this year was given by the Rt. Rev’d Jane Alexander, Bishop of Edmonton, and Co-Chair of the End Poverty Edmonton Task Force. In her address, Bishop Alexander told the graduates that everyone is looking for hope in this world— hope for themselves, their children, and grandchildren. We give the message of hope. We matter and are all loved by God, and our names are written in the palm of His hand.

JUNE 2017 11 Queen’s College Convocation Article and photographs by Emily F. Rowe Queen’s College held

prayerful support of Jesus. A total of 34 degrees, diplomas, and certificates were conferred. These included: a Masters of Divinity Honours; A Master of Divinity’; A Master of Theology; 11 Associates in Theology (Discipleship and Ministry); 4 Associates in Theology; 7 Diplomas in Theology and Ministry (Clarenville); 8 Diplomas in Theology and Ministry (Roman Catholic Stream). Queen’s College also awarded the degree Doctor of Divinity (honoris causa) to The Rev’d Thomas W. Moulton. The Rev’d Dr. David Bell spoke to all assembled about Rev’d Mouton’s many

Show your school spirit!

Show your school spirit!

Show your school spirit! Send them with a loving prayer and a Hope Bear dressed in

Send them with a loving prayer and a Hope Bear dressed in a scarf of their college colours.

www.anglicanfoundation.org

Know a student who’s going to college?

Perfect for graduation too!

Graduates and Faculty of Queen’s College, Convocation, 2017

The Rt. Rev’d Jane Alexander addresses Convocation

Graduates and Faculty of Queen’s College, Convocation, 2017 The Rt. Rev’d Jane Alexander addresses Convocation

The Rev’d Thomas W. Moulton is awarded an honourary Doctor of Divinity

JUNE 2017 11 Queen’s College Convocation Article and photographs by Emily F. Rowe Queen’s College held

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

12

JUNE 2017

News From St. James’, Carbonear

Submitted with photographs by Kenneth Murray Children’s Talks New Layreader Receives License Mrs. Eva Howell is
Submitted with photographs
by Kenneth Murray
Children’s Talks
New Layreader Receives
License
Mrs. Eva Howell is presented with her license as the newest layreader in the
Parish on Carbonear.
Th Rev’d Irene Sutton talks with the children who are in church on Easter Sunday morning
Ringing Bells!
Journey With The Cross–A Wonderful
Tradition
On Good Friday, April 14th,
2017, St. James’ Church in
Carbonear took part in the
Journey of the Cross. This is
a yearly event. We start with
prayer, and the journey itself
lasts about one and a half
hours, and brings awareness of
the cross to the community. It
also reminds us of the journey
that Christ made to Calvary,
and of the hope and assurance
that Jesus gave to all people.
After the journey with the
cross, we shared in a time of
fellowship and reflection the
the church hall.
Sexton, Eric Colbourne, gives bell ringing lessons to some eager cchildren
on Easter Sunday morning.
During the Summer Months,
Please Remember To Keep
People gathered together on Good Friday for the annual Journey of the Cross.
In Mind During Your Parish’s Celebrations! Continue to send you stories and pictures in, and they
In Mind During Your Parish’s Celebrations!
Continue to send you stories and pictures in,
and they can go in the September issue!

Keep Up To Date With Anglican Life Like Us On Facebook

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JUNE 2017

13

Mr. Know-It-All

   
Mr. Know-It-All
resurrection morning soul and body meet again.” That’s the answer to my friend’s question. Apparently, when

resurrection morning soul and body meet again.” That’s the answer to my friend’s question. Apparently, when we die, Jesus meets our souls and brings us lovingly into heaven. Our bodies, however, are still laid in the grave to “sleep” till the glorious Resurrection Day. Our resurrected bodies, fortunately, will not be the troublesome mortal ones that

Ronald Clarke

we had on earth, thank God, but pure immortal ones, fit

 

Columnist

for eternal bliss in heaven. No

 

God’s Positioning System

Isn’t it wonderful when

more suffering—no more pain! That made sense to my

After further discussion we

people believe that because you’re “well educated,” you must know everything about

friend, as it does to me.

Article and photographs by Sandra Taylor

 

everything?

both agreed that discarding so much “old” stuff may not be

 

During the weekend

sessions were held with the youth, and a wide variety of

Youth Conference concluded with our Sunday morning

Recently, an old friend,

totally appropriate sometimes.

 

of March

30th - April 2nd,

not that much older than me really, asked me how people

We “oldsters” often long for some of the “good old” stuff

All Saints’ Parish, Foxtrap,

hosted a Youth

activities were completed. The

worship.

could be gloriously alive in heaven, while at the same time “asleep,” dead really, in

which seems to be no longer available. As long as we continue to

C o n f e r e n c e h Archdeaconry.

f

o

r

t

e

e

the grave.

value and hold onto the good

It

was open to

Impossible, he stated.

stuff of Jesus Christ, all will

y o u t h

o f

t h e

Fortunately I remembered

be well.

Diocese aged

11

-

19.

Bishop

that old beloved hymn, replaced now by “modern” stuff, that stated: “On the

G o d

h a s

s o

m u c h

wonderful stuff in store for us! Alleluia!

Bill Cliff from

the Diocese of

 

Brandon

was

 

o u r

k e y n o t e

speaker. Training

and information

JUNE 2017 13 Mr. Know-It-All resurrection morning soul and body meet again.” That’s the answer to
JUNE 2017 13 Mr. Know-It-All resurrection morning soul and body meet again.” That’s the answer to
JUNE 2017 13 Mr. Know-It-All resurrection morning soul and body meet again.” That’s the answer to

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

14

JUNE 2017

The Rev’d Jolene Peters with the ladies of the parish of St. John The Evangelist at
 

The Rev’d Jolene Peters with the ladies of the parish of St. John The Evangelist at their lenten Quiet Day

 

Our Lenten Journey

 

St. John The Evangelist, Topsail

Article by Louise Smith Photograph by The Rev’d Jolene Peters

At St. John the Evangelist Church, Topsail, our Christian journey throughout Lent was quite a trip.

our most important sojourn of the year, Rev’d Jolene treated the women of the parish to a “Quiet Day.” The theme was:

same time, assuring us of God’s Grace in healing each of these adversities. In this Lenten season,

and found at the end of the

 

Not unlike other parishes, Ash Wednesday was the antecedent or starting point of worship. That day was marked with the ceremony of anointing with ashes as an important first step for the established commitments we endeavoured to uphold for the next forty days leading up to the celebration of Easter. As St. Paul said, “practice and cultivate and meditate upon

Faith, Hope, and Love; the purpose of this was to instil in us the assurance of God’s promise and presence along our way. The focus of each Lenten service was built around a series of prayers of restoration in Christ. Specifically: “Broken Hearts,” “Broken Vessels,” “Broken Trust,” “Broken Bread,” “Broken Promises,” and “Broken Justice.”

while concentrating on Christ’s sacrificial death and glorious resurrection, faith, hope, and love are magnified and renewed. The feet washing, the Gethsemane watch, the Saturday night Vigil, and every other step in the parish’s Lenten path heightened the flavour of what we hoped for

road.

these duties.” (Timothy 4:15)

Each lesson appropriately

T h e n

i n

p r a i s e

a n d

However, immediately following Ash Wednesday, and before embarking upon

reminded us of today’s brokenness, both in our world and in our lives. But at the

thanksgiving, we joyfully shared in the blessing of another Easter Day.

 

Congratulations To Canon Shirley

 

Photograph submitted by Carol Bartlett

The Rev’d Jolene Peters with the ladies of the parish of St. John The Evangelist at
 

The Parish of St. Philip’s had the privilege of celebrating a very important event in the life of our church family. April 29th marked the 25th anniversary of the ordination of Canon Shirley Gosse to the Dicaonate in the Church of God. Congratulations, Canon Shirley!

Room To Doubt

Article by The Rev’d Jeffrey H. Petten

image: https://it.www.wikipedia.or/wiki/Pietrelcina
image: https://it.www.wikipedia.or/wiki/Pietrelcina

Padré Pio

In John 20: 19-31, we read of the post-resurrection experiences of the disciples with Jesus, and the infamous doubt of Thomas. Jesus gives to us the room to doubt and the room to believe. In order to believe, we need the room to doubt, and in order to doubt we need the room to believe. We all know people who have questions about what we believe as Christians. After all, it is not all of the world’s religions that believe in such an interaction between God and humanity. Yet for us and for Muslims, we believe that Jesus rose from the dead, and both Christians and Muslims believe that Jesus will come again. Yet we live in a world where there is hatred and malice of those who believe in such things. The one thing that can bring people to believe is evidence. Hence the r e a s o n why before his death that Jesus said that p e o p l e w o u l d recognize h i s disciples and friends by their love of other people. Yet for people like Thomas, the thing that makes one believe are the wounds of Christ. Throughout history there have been those who have been given the wounds of Christ known as the stigmata. Some people who had these wounds were St. Francis of Assissi and Padré Pio. Both men received such wounds through fervent prayer, asking for forgiveness and to become more like Christ. Yet one of the most descriptive versions of the wounds of Christ that I have ever heard of is that which is written in the book Heaven is for Real. In that book the little boy named Colton talks about

the wounds of Christ being in his hands and his feet. The author of that book ends with these words: “What is the same with Jesus on earth and in heaven? His wounds.” So if a little boy can see and believe, if Thomas could see and believe, then why can’t we trust their words? Well, we want to see as well. The thing is, we do see but we choose what we see. We choose what we want to believe. In reality, Jesus stands among us raised and glorified every day. We see Jesus on the newscasts of the world every evening at 6 pm. We see Jesus every time we hold a newborn baby. We see Jesus every time we look at someone who is taking their last breaths. We see Jesus in those who mourn and weep and we see Jesus in everyone who has a reason to celebrate something in their life. We choose what we see in order to believe, and sometimes in order to believe we choose what we want to see, and that is spiritual blindness. Yet St. Peter has it right when he wrote the words in which we hear in the epistle:

“Although you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and rejoice with an indescribable

image: https://upload.wikimedia.org
image: https://upload.wikimedia.org

and glorious joy, for you are receiving the outcome of your faith, the salvation of your souls.” (1 Peter 1:8) So how is Jesus revealed to you? We know how he was revealed to Thomas and the rest of the disciples. We know how he was revealed to a 6 year old boy named Colton and his pastor dad. How is Jesus made real for you? How has he revealed his risen self to you? May we indeed look for the risen Christ. May we doubt and may we believe. In our doubting and in our believing, let there be peace among us and may we not be the victims of our own oppression.

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

JUNE 2017

15

Between The Lessons–The Difficult Story

JUNE 2017 15 Between The Lessons–The Difficult Story The Rev’d Jonathan Rowe Columnist Finally we come

The Rev’d Jonathan Rowe Columnist

Finally we come to the Difficult Story: the story that almost gave me second thoughts about this whole project. I sometimes say that it doesn’t always feel like all of the pages in the Bible are gold-edged. If so, this is one that you have to struggle the hardest to find a gold edge for. Saul had turned out to be a rather disappointing king of Israel. He had trouble being patient and following instructions. His rash oaths

caused problems when he took his army into battle. What’s more, he himself didn’t take the king’s place at the head of the army. Finally, it seems, God was ready to take the crown away from him. In 1 Samuel 15, Samuel comes to Saul with a difficult message. He says that God has ordered him to utterly destroy the Amalekites, who were a neighbouring tribe and

an ancient enemy of Israel.

Saul is caught in a no-win situation. If he fails to carry out

this commandment, he will be showing his disobedience yet again. However, if he does obey, he will be committing nothing short of genocide, because God has apparently ordered the destruction of all the Amalekites: men, women, children, and animals! This is supposed to be a story that explains why God rejected Saul as king, but it’s very hard to paint God in a good light in this story. It is unsettling to believe in a God who would approve of genocide, and

punish someone for not carrying it out. It is perhaps more comfortable to imagine that someone (like Samuel) said that God commanded this, to further their own earthly agenda.

had left Egypt, the Amalekites had been the symbol of all that was hostile to Israel. In recent years, Jews have called Hitler an Amalekite—that’s how much ‘Amalekite’ had become synonymous with evil. Is it okay

“The Victory of Joshua over the Amalekites” by Nicholas Poussin
“The Victory
of Joshua
over the
Amalekites”
by Nicholas
Poussin

image: wikimedia commons

It is unthinkable for us in the twenty-first century, in the wake of two World Wars, the Holocaust, and countless other black marks of history, to be so comfortable with such an atrocity, but the first Israelites to hear and read this story were coming from a different perspective. Ever since they

to wipe someone out, even a whole nation, if we could take it for granted that they were utterly, irredeemably evil? Who is bad enough for that kind of judgement? The Nazis? ISIS? The original audience would have heard this as a story about being told to wipe out evil, and about

being unable or unwilling to do so. This is a challenge to the way we think about the problem of evil. From a human perspective, the tools we’re most used to, such as power and violence, seem to be the best ones for the job, but God’s perspective is different. Saul is a failure as a king not because of disobedience, but because all human ‘Final Solutions’ will be failures. In rejecting the king who is only a success by human standards, God is preparing the stage for a better king: ‘a man after God’s own heart.’ As the Book of Samuel tells the story, he is setting the stage for King David. As Christians, we might say that he’s setting the stage for Jesus Christ, the King of kings, who will deal with the problem of evil in a way no human king ever could. But those are other stories, and unlike the stories in this column, they are stories that we do get to hear in church.

Ecumenical Fellowship

Port Aux Basques

Submitted with photographs by Lisa Brown

JUNE 2017 15 Between The Lessons–The Difficult Story The Rev’d Jonathan Rowe Columnist Finally we come
JUNE 2017 15 Between The Lessons–The Difficult Story The Rev’d Jonathan Rowe Columnist Finally we come

Pictured above: Margaret Osmond, Marguerite White, Joan Savory, Kay Baker, Viola Parsons, Faye Coffin, Ethel Savory, Phoebe Payne, Betty Keeping, and Diane Hewitt.

JUNE 2017 15 Between The Lessons–The Difficult Story The Rev’d Jonathan Rowe Columnist Finally we come

Left to Right: Viola Parsons, Kay Osmond, and Jane Allen

On April 25th, the ACW of St. James’ Church in Port aux Basques hosted an Ecumenical Fellowship Meeting. There were 147 ladies who attended this fellowship. The ladies enjoyed an evening of entertainment consisting of music, skits, and great food.

anglican life Newfoundland&Labrador

16

JUNE 2017

Walk Strong Workout

Article by

Sharlotte Ryan

Three mornings a week, a group of women meet at the Anglican Church Parish Centre in Bonavista for a “Walk Strong Workout”. We started this a couple of years ago with just 5 or 6 women from our church. Since then the number of people has grown, to where on some days we have 25 people or more. We play videos by Leslie Sansone, a fitness personality who started leading aerobics classes in her church basement. A lot of people didn’t want fast-paced aerobics, so she developed a walking program for a broad range of people using music as the pace. She says she

started this as a way to fulfill her Christian commitment to serve God by serving others. We always start our workout with a prayer asking God to bless us as we exercise and thanking Him for our health. On Mondays, we do a video with a 2 mile walk, which usually takes a half an hour. On Wednesday we do some strength training with stretchy bands or light weights. And on Friday we do a 3 mile walk. These workouts keep us moving and our bodies fit, but it’s also a fun time getting together with friends and encouraging each other.

Photo by The Rev’d Shaun O’Connor
Photo by The Rev’d Shaun O’Connor

Spring Sale

Spring Sale Do You Know Someone Who Would Like To Get
 

Do You Know Someone Who Would Like To Get

Submitted with photographs by Lisa Brown

Submitted with photographs by Lisa Brown
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On May 1st, the ACW of St. James’ in Port Aux Basques held its annual spring sale. The ladies made and sold approximately 925 cold plates. There was also a sale of wonderful baked goods, and there was a white elephant table. A huge thank you goes out to all of the ladies who helped to make this happen.

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