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THE HEALING POWERS

OF
BLUEBERRIES

BY

GEORGE FELFOLDI, DD., Ph.D.

Copyright 2007, George Felfoldi

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THE HEALING POWERS
OF
BLUEBERRIES

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CONTENTS

Title Page 1
Subtitle Page 3
Contents 4
Copyright Information 5
Dedication 6
Special Thanks 7
About The Author 8
Other Books 9
History 10
Blueberry-Comparison Chart 13
Scientific Classification 14
Cultivation 15
Growing Areas 26
Growing Seasons 27
Uses Of Blueberries 28
Health 29
What Its Good For? 31
The Improved Blueberry 34
Your Daily Dosage 35
Here Are Some Blueberry Recipes 37
Comments Are Welcomed 81

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COPYRIGHT INFORMATION

Copyright, ALL RIGHTS RESEVED

No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in


any form or by any means, electronically or
mechanically, including photocopying, recording
or any information storage or retrieval system
known or to be invented,
without permission in writing from
the author of from the publisher. Except by
a reviewer who wishes to quote brief passages
in connection with a review from inclusion in a
magazine, newspaper or broadcast.

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DEDICATION

I would like to dedicate this book


to my wife, Bettyann Felfoldi,
who has over the years
introduced me to this
special berry.

And also to all the people


around the world that
love this little
GEM of a berry
as much as I do.

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SPECIAL THANKS

I would like to thank the following individuals


and special companies, and also to individuals or
other companies that I failed to mention.
Thank you ALL.

Bettyann Felfoldi, DBS


Margaret MacPhee-Felfoldi, RN
Wikipedia Organization Inc.
U.S. Department Of Agriculture
Canadian Department Agriculture
University Of Florida
Blueberries New Zealand Inc.
San Jose Farms Web Site
International Society For Horticultural Science
British Columbia Blueberry Council
Florida Blueberry Growers Association
North American Blueberry Council
Michigan Blueberry Growers Association
Australian Blueberry Growers Association
W. D. Nauman Web Site
Mark Gaskell
Waters Blueberry Farm Inc.
Northwest Wildfoods Co. Inc.
Nourse Farms Inc.
Toronto Public Libraries

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

DR. GEORGE FELFOLDI,


is an Independent Baptist Minister, A musician, a composer,
music arranger, song writer and artist and also
an author, who lives in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
George holds various doctors degrees in different fields,
and writes books on subjects such as: Health, Occult
Sciences, Religion, Religious Science, Ships, Herbals,
Poetry and Lyrics.
George is also married and has four full grown children.

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OTHER BOOKS
Here is a list of other books of interest
written by the same author.

2006
The Powers Of Garlic
Katoomba-Columbia
Speaking To God Through Prayers
The Meaning Of New Birth
The Complete Book On Angels
Ginger The Herb And Root Guide
Chamomile The Healing Herb
The Healing Powers Of Aloe Vera
The Healing Powers Of Cranberry
The Healing Powers Of Seaweed And Algae
The Spiritual Key To Healing
The Healing Powers Of Pomegranate
2007
The Healing Powers Of BLUEBERRIES

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HISTORY

IN THE BEGINNING

Gen 1:1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.

Gen 1:29 And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which
is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding
seed; to you it shall be for meat.
Gen 1:30 And to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to every thing
that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, I have given every green herb for meat:
and it was so.

Rev 22:2 In the midst of the street of it, and on either side of the river, was there the tree
of life, which bare twelve manner of fruits, and yielded her fruit every month: and the
leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations.

WHAT IS BLUEBERRIES?

Blueberries are a group of flowering plants in the genus Vaccinium, sect.


Cyanococcus. The plant species are a native to North America and also
eastern Asia. These plants are shrubs that vary in size from 10 cm tall to 4
meters tall; the smallest plants are knows as a lowbush blueberries, and the
largest species are known as highbush blueberries. The leaves on these
plants can be either deciduous or evergreen, ovate to lanceolate, and from 1
to 8 cm long and 0.5 to 3.5 cm broad. The flowers are bell-shaped, red,
white, or pale pink in colors, sometimes it is tinged greenish. The fruit is a
berry 5 to 16 mm in diameter with a flared crown at the end; they are pale
greenish at first, then reddish-purple, and they finally turn to a blue or dark
purple when they are ripe. These berries also have a sweet taste when
mature, with variable acidity. The blueberry season typically runs from May
to October, but it peaks in July.

All the species whose common names in English includes blueberry are

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currently classified in section Cyanococcus of the genus Vaccinium. Other
sections in the genus, native to other parts of the world including Europe,
include other wild shrubs that produce edible berries such as cranberries,
bilberries and cowberries. Many of these plants have blue berries and they
are very similar in use and in taste to blueberries. Furthermore their names in
languages other than English often translate to or as blueberries, e.g.
Scots Blaeberry and Norwegian Blaboer. There is thus considerable scope
for confusion. This book, however, only deals with the plants that are called
blueberry in English, i.e. section Cyanococcus of the genus.

FOR CENTURIES:

For centuries, blueberries were gathered from forests and the bogs by Native
Americans and were consumed fresh and also preserved. The Northeast
Native American tribes revered blueberries and much folklore developed
around them. The blossom end of each berry, the calyx, for the shape of a
perfect five-pointed star; the elders of the tribe would tell of how the Great
Spirit sent star berries to relieve the childrens hunger during a famine.
Parts of the blueberry plant were also used as medicine. A tea made from the
leaves of the plant was also thought to be good for the blood. Blueberry juice
was used to treat coughs. The juice also made an excellent dye for baskets as
well as cloths. In food preparations, dried blueberries were added to stews,
soups and to meats. The dried berries were also crushed into a powder and
rubbed into meat for flavor. Blueberries were also used for medicinal
purposes along with the leaves and roots. A beef jerky called Sautauthig
(pronounced saw-taw-teeg), was made with dried blueberries and meat and
was consumed all year round.

BLUEBERRY THANKGIVING

During the 17th century, settlers from England arrived in the New World to
begin colonies. Immediately, they set about clearing the land and
establishing farms for they could not rely solely on supplies from England.
But the land and the climate were far different from what they left behind.
Many early attempts at farming failed.

In the winter of 1620, the Pilgrims established a settlement at Plimoth


(spelled Plymouth today). Many perished during the first few months, but
those that survived went on to build homes and established farms. Their

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neighbors, the Wampanoag Indians taught the settlers new skills that helped
them survive. The Indians showed them how to plant corn and how to gather
and use native plants to supplement their food supply. One important native
crop was the blueberries. The colonists learned from Native Americans how
to gather blueberries, how to dry them under the summers sun and store
them for the winter.

In time, blueberries became an important food source and were preserved,


and later canned. A beverage made with blueberries was an important staple
for Civil War Soldiers. In the 1880s a blueberry canning industry began in
the Northeast United States.

OTHER SPECIES:

Here below are a list of other species of these plants;

Vaccinium angustifolium (Lowbush Blueberry)


Vaccinium boreale (Northern Blueberry)
Vaccinium caesariense (New Jersey Blueberry)
Vaccinium corymbosum (Northern Highbush Blueberry)
Vaccinium darrowii (Southern Highbush Blueberry)
Vaccinium elliottii (Elliot Blueberry)
Vaccinium formosum (Southern Blueberry)
Vaccinium fuscatum (Black Highbush Blueberry; syn. V. atrococcum)
Vaccinium hirsutum (Hairy-fruited Blueberry)
Vaccinium koreanum
Vaccinium myrsinites (Evergreen Blueberry)
Vaccinium myrtilloides (Canadian Blueberry)
Vaccinium pallidum (Dryland Blueberry)
Vaccinium simulatum (Upland Highbush Blueberry)
Vaccinium tenellum (Southern Blueberry)
Vaccinium virgatum (Rabbiteye Blueberry; syn. V. ashei)

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BLUEBERRIES - COMPARISON
CHART
EARLY SEASON

Names Berry Size Zone Firmness Flavor Freezing Qua. Suited

Duke Medium 4-7 Very Good Excellent Com.


Patriot Large 3-7 Mod Good Excellent Any
Reka Large 4-7 Firm Good Excellent Any

MID SEASON

Bluecrop Large 4-7 Very Good Excellent Any


Bluegold Large 4-7 Firm Good Excellent Any
Blueray Large 4-7 Firm Exce Excellent Any
Northland Medium 3-7 Firm Good Excellent Any

LATE MIDSEASON

Darrow Large 4-7 Mod Exce Excellent Com.

LATE SEASON

Chandler Very Lg. 4-8 Mod Exce Excellent Any


Elliott Med. 4-7 Firm Good Excellent Com.
Jersey Large 4-7 Firm Good Excellent Any

Code

Any = Any grown


Com. = Commercial
Med. = Medium
Lg. = Large

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SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

Blueberry fruit

Scientific Classification

Kingdom: Plantae

Division: Magnoliophyta

Class: Magnoliopsida

Order: Ericales

Family: Ericaceae

Genus: Vaccinium

Section: Cycanococcus
Rydb.

Species

See book for details

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CULTIVATION

These plants or blueberries are both cultivated or they are picked wild. In
North America, the most common cultivated species is the V. corymbosum,
or the Northern Highbush Blueberry. Hybrids of this with other
Vaccinium species adapted to southern United States climates are known
collectively as Southern Highbush Blueberries.

Blueberry Flowers

The wild blueberries, are smaller and they are much more expensive than the
cultivated ones, and they are prized for their intense flavour and colour. The
Lowbush Blueberry, V. angustifolium, is found from Newfoundland
westward and southward to Michigan and West Virginia. In some areas it
produces natural blueberry barrens, where it is practically the only species
covering large areas. Several First Nation communities in Ontario are
involved in harvesting wild blueberries. Low bush species are fire-tolerant
and blueberry production often increases following a forest fire as the plants
regenerate rapidly and benefit from removal of competing vegetation.

There are numerous highbush cultivars of blueberries, each of which have a


unique and diverse flavour. The one of the first wild cultivars of
blueberries is the Rubel. During the Great Depression, in the United States
farmers were offered $20.00 for the best wild blueberry bush they could
find. Rubel is one such wild blueberry cultivar and it the original of many
of the current hybrid cultivars.

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Rabbiteye Blueberry (V. virgatum) is a southern type of blueberry
produced from the Carolinas to the Gulf Coast states.

Other important species in North America also includes (V. pallidum), the
Hillside or Dryland Blueberry. It is a native to the eastern United States,
but common in the Appalachians and the Piedmont of the Southeast.
Sparkleberry, V. arboreum, is a common wild species on sandy soils in
southeastern United States. Its fruit are important to wildlife, and the flowers
are very important to beekeepers.

Highbush blueberries were first introduced to Germany and the Netherlands


in the 1930s and have since spread to Poland and elsewhere on the continent
of Europe.

Wild blueberries collected in Norway.

Many growers in Italy, France and Austria realized too that it pays to
cultivate highbush blueberries, and that good economic gain can be
obtained, according to an industry researcher. Even in Belgium and
Norway some very promising trials with special methods of blueberry
cultivation resulted in a limited commercial production which is very
successful. . Except in the United Kingdom, Spain and Ireland, a
blueberry industry is developing in all regions where the production is
possible due to the climate and edaphic conditions (Nauman, 1993).

In the Southern hemisphere, some countries like Chile, New Zealand,


Argentina and also Australia now export blueberries. South Africa exports
their blueberries to many parts of Europe.

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In the 1950s blueberries were first introduced to Australia, but the effort was
unsuccessful. In the early 1970s, David Jones from the Victorian
Department of Agriculture imported seeds from the United States and a
section trial was started. This work was continued by Ridley Bell, who
imported more American varieties of the plants. In the middle of 1970s the
Australian Blueberry Growers Association (ABGA) was formed. (Clayton-
Greene).

By the early 1980s, the blueberry industry was started in New Zealand and it
is still growing. (BNZ, n.d)

The blueberry industry is even newer in Argentina, Argentine blueberry


production has increased over the last four years with planted area up to
400%, according to the 2005 report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
But that increase comes from a tiny base of 400 hectares in 2001 (to 1,600
hectares in 2004). The industry is new in the country and farmers are still
learning the blueberry business. Argentine blueberry production has thrived
in three different regions: the province of Entre Rios in Northern Argentina,
the province of Buenos Aires, near the countrys capital city of Buenos
Aires, and the southern Patagonian valleys, according to the report. (Gain,
2005)

Wild Mountain Rainer Blueberries

This plant, the Wild Mountain Rainer Blueberries grow naturally organic
high in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains of the Pacific Northwest. This
plant is so closely related to the regions wild huckleberries few pickers know
or can tell the difference. However, a close look immediately reveals a
unique wild berry fruit much different in size and appearance from the
Northwest Wild Blue Huckleberries.

The Wild Mountain Rainer Blueberries are most often smaller in size and
possess a unique tangy, sweet yet tart taste and flavor very different from
sweet tasting wild blue huckleberries. In addition to the wonderful full-
bodied flavor, wild blueberries grow on low bushes that produce fruit with
slightly white powdered look covering a berry that can range in colour from
sky blue to a dark brown.

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Wild Mountain Rainer Blueberry

Wild Blue Huckleberry

Wild Mountain Blackberry

HUCKLEBERRY

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Ericaceae Vaccinium sp.
Highbush blueberry V. corymbosum L.

Lowbush blueberry V. angustifolium Ait.

Rabbiteye blueberry V. ashei Reade

Several species of blueberries are native to the United States, and fruits of
many are gathered from the wild. The three species listed are the ones in
commercial culture. The lowbush is not commercially planted, but thousands
of acres of natural stands are pruned, sprayed and also harvested. The
highbush varieties, produced by breeding during the past century, are now
widely grown. The Rabbiteye is increasing in importance in the Southeast.

Plants of all are woody shrubs, varying from 2 to 3 feet in the lowbush to 10
or more feet in the highbush and rabbiteye, but in cultivation held to 5 to 6
feet by pruning.

Fruit is smooth skinned with a waxy coating or bloom. Individual berries


are borne in clusters, and are round to oblate in shape. Size up to 0.75 inches
in diameter in cultivated varieties; 0.25 to 0.5 inches in natives.

Seasons, bloom to harvest: 2 to 4 months.

Production in the United States: About 27,000 tons.

Use: Fresh, frozen, canned, jams, culinary.

Part of fruit consumed: All.

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Wild Red Huckleberry

LOWBUSH BLUEBERRY

Lowbush Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) is a species of blueberry


native to eastern and central Canada and the northeastern United States,
growing as far south as West Virginia and west to Minnesota and Manitoba.

This plant is a low spreading deciduous shrub growing to 60 cm tall, though


usually 35 cm tall or less. The leaves are glossy blue-green in summer,
turning purple in the fall. The leaf shape is a broad to elyptic. Buds are
brownish red in stem axels. The flowers of this plant are white, bell-shaped,
5 mm long. The fruit is a sweet dark blue to black berry. This plant grows
best in wooded or open areas with well drained acidic soils. In some areas it
produces natural blueberry barrens, where it is practically the only species
covering a large area. This plant is fire-tolerant and its numbers often
increase in an area following a forest fire.

This native plant is also grown commercially in Canada and in Maine,


mainly harvested from managed wild patches. It is also a favorite of

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recreational berry pickers, black bears, rodents and birds. The Lowbush
Blueberry is the state fruit of Maine.

NORTHERN HIGHBUSH BLUEBERRY

Northern Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) is a species of


blueberry that is native to eastern North America, growing from Nova Scotia
and Ontario south to Alabama, and west to Wisconsin.

This plant is a deciduous shrub growing to 4 meters tall, often found in


dense thickets. The dark glossy green leaves are elliptical and up to 5 cm
long. The flowers are white, bell-shaped, 10 mm long. The fruit is a dark
blue to black berry. This plant grows best in wooded or open areas with
moist acidic soils.

This plant is also the most common commercially grown blueberry in North
America. In the wild, it is enjoyed by many different birds, bears, and other
small mammals. This is the state fruit of New Jersey.

Outside of its natural range, it has been introduced into British Columbia and
the state of Washington and further afield into Great Britain and also
Australia. Hybridized forms, known as Southern Highbush Blueberries, have
been introduced into southern parts of North America.

VACCINIUM DARROWII

Vaccinium darrowii (Darrows Blueberry, Evergreen Blueberry, or


Southern Highbush Blueberry) is a species of Vaccinium in the blueberry

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group (Vaccinium sect. Cyanococcus).This plant is native to the southern
United States, in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi.

Darrows Blueberry (Vaccinium darrowii)

It is an evergreen shrub that grows to a height of 30 to 120 cm tall, with


small, simple ovoid-acute leaves 10 to 15 mm long. The flowers are white,
bell-shaped, 4 to 8 mm long. The fruit is a berry 4 to 6 mm in diameter, blue-
black with a whitish waxy bloom.

Cultivation and uses:

The species is grown both for its edible fruit, and as an ornamental plant in
gardens.

Many commercial Southern Highbush Blueberry cultivars are hybrids,


derived from crosses between Vaccinium darrowii with the Northern
Highbush Blueberry V. corymbosum. The following Southern Highbush
Blueberry cultivars, listed by fruit ripening time, are recommended for the
fruit garden and landscaping.

Very early season: ONeal


Early/midseason: Cape Fear
Midseason: Blue Ridge and Georgia Gem (adapted to the Sandyhills
and Coastal Plains; needs frost protection in the Piedmont).
Mid/late season: Legacy and Summit.

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Last season: Ozarkblue (Piedmont only).

Southern Highbush cultivars, in addition to lower chilling requirements, also


have greater tolerance to high summer temperatures, somewhat greater
drought tolerance and develop superior fruit quality under Southern United
States growing conditions. As a rule, Southern highbush blueberries are self-
fertile. However, larger and easier-ripening berries result if several cultivars
are interplanted for cross-pollination.

VACCINIUM ELLIOTTII

Vaccinium elliottii (Elliotts Blueberry) is a species of Vaccinium in the


blueberry group (Vaccinium sect. Cyanococcus). This plant is native to the
southern United States, from southern Virginia south to Florida, and west to
Arkansas and Texas.

It is a deciduous shrub 2 to 4 meters tall, with small, simple ovoid-acute


leaves 15 to 30 mm long with a finely serrated margin. The flowers are pale
pink, bell-shaped, 6 to 8 mm long, opening in the early spring before the
new leaves appear. The fruit is an edible berry which is 5 to 8 mm in
diameter, blue-black, only rearly with a whitish waxy bloom; they ripen
from late spring (in Florida) through summer.

Cultivation and uses:

It produces a particularly large yield of somewhat sour berries. It is popular


for late-season fruit.

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CANADIAN BLUEBERRY

Canadian Blueberry (Vaccinium Myrtilloides) is a species of blueberry


that is native to Canada and the northeastern and northwestern United States,
as well as the Great Lake states. Other common name are Velvetleaf
Blueberry, Common Blueberry, Sourtop Blueberry and Velvetleaf
Huckleberry. Its hybridizes in the wild with the Lowbush blueberry
(Vaccinium angustifolium).

It is a low spreading deciduous shrub growing to 50 cm tall, often in small


thickets. The leaves are bright green, paler underneath with velvety hairs.
The flowers are white, bell-shaped, 5 mm long. The fruit of this plant is a
small sweet bright blue to dark blue berry. The young stems have stiff dense
bristly hairs. This plant grows best in open coniferous woods with dry loose
acidic soils; it is also found in forested bogs and rocky areas. It is fire-
tolerant and is often abundant following forest fires or clear-cut logging.

This native plant is also grown commercially in Canada and Maine, mainly
harvested from managed wild patches. It is an important food source for
deers, black bears, and other small mammals and birds.

RABBITEYE BLUEBERRY

Rabbiteye Blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum). Is a species of blueberry that


is a native to the southern United States, from the North Carolina south to
Florida and west to Texas. Other common names include Southern Highbush
Blueberry, Southern Black Blueberry, and Smallflower Blueberry.

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It is a deciduous shrub growing to 4 meters tall, though usually less,
commonly only 1 to 2 meters tall. The leaves are spirally arranged,
oblancceolate to narrow elliptic, 3 to 6 cm long. The flowers of this plant are
white, bell-shaped, 5 mm long. The fruit is a berry which is 5 mm in
diameter, dark blue to black, bloomed pale blue-gray by a thin wax coating.
It grows best on acid soil and is subject to few pests and diseases.

Rabbiteye blueberries are self infertile and must have two or more varieties
to pollenize each other. Honeybees are inefficient pollinators, and carpenter
bees frequently cut the corollas to rob nectar without pollinating the flowers.
Rabbiteye do best when they are pollinated by buzz pollination bees, such as
the native southeastern blueberry bee, Habropoda laboriosa.

Cultivation and uses:

The species is cultivated for its edible berries, which are similar to other
blueberries. It is also grown as an ornamental plant for its fall colors,
typically bright orange or red.

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GROWING AREAS

The State of Maine in the U.S. produces 25% of all the blueberries in North
America, making it the largest producer in the world. Maines 24,295
hectares which is roughly about 60,023 acres of blueberry were propagated
from native plants that occur naturally in the understorey of its coastal
forests. The Maine crop requires about 50,000 beehives for pollination, with
most of the hives being trucked in from other parts of the United States for
that purpose.

The other states such as, New York, Michigan, North Carolina and New
Jersey are large producers of Highbush Blueberries.

Washington, Oregon and also British Columbia are becoming major


producers of blueberries. California is rapidly increasing planting largely
through the cultivation of Southern Highbush varieties originating largely
from the University of Florida. Southern Highbush is now also cultivated in
the Mediterranean regions of Europe.

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GROWING SEASONS

The blueberry production in North America typically starts from mid-May


(in Florida) and ends in September, when some fruit is held over in
controlled-atmosphere storage in Washington, Oregon and Canada. (Gaskell,
2006).

Many sources give different periods for the growing season in the southern
hemisphere. But according to the University of California Extension Service,
Argentina, Chile and New Zealand begin harvesting in the winter and they
continue till mid-March, when Chilean blueberries are held over in
controlled-atmosphere storage for a proximately six weeks. As the result,
blueberries reach annual peak prices in mid-April. (Gaskell, 2006).

In the country of Chile, San Jose Farms, which reports that (according to its
Web site) that it is one of the oldest blueberry producers in the country and
that (it started in the early 1990s), and also states that its harvest season
starts in November and continues through to March. (San Jose, n.d.).

In Argentina: The marketing year (MY) for blueberries begins in


September and it ends in February, according to the U.S. Department of
Agriculture report. (Gain, 2005).

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USES OF BLUEBERRY

Many people use blueberries in jellies, pies and jams, or baked into muffins,
and are an ingredient in many other snacks and delicacies. Some baked
products incorporate artificial blueberries.

The fruit wines have also become very popular.

Blueberry jam is a jam that is made out of blueberries, sugar and water, and
fruit pectin. Commercial jams often contain preservatives such as citric acid.
Premium jams artisanal blueberry jam is produced in Canada as well as the
United States from wild blueberries, such are smaller and are more difficult
to harvest but it has more intensely flavour than cultivated blueberries. Most
production is in Maine, northern Ontario, and in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-
Jean region of Quebec.

In the last couple of years, blueberry juice has entered the market and is
now considered a whole new category of juice in the beverage aisle of
supermarkets and other grocery stores. The last new juice category that was
successful included was cranberry juice, over 60 years ago. Blueberry juice
brands include, POM, TrueBlue, and R.W. Knudsen Family.

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HEALTH

Blueberries, especially the wild species, contain antioxidants which have


been found to reduce the risks of some forms of cancers. At the 2004
International Conference on Longevity, a group of scientists and researchers
released details of a study that suggests certain compounds found in
blueberries (and some similar fruits, including cranberries) have a significant
impact in reducing the degradation of brain function, as in Alzheimers
Disease and other conditions. Research at Rutgers has also shown that
blueberries may help prevent urinary tract infections. Additional studies
done also found that blueberries were better at lowering cholesterol and lipid
levels in the blood, which helps alleviate and even reverse signs and
symptoms of heart disease. Ciprofibrate was found to be inferior to the
blueberries in lowering cholesterol. The signs point to pterostilbene, which
signals cells to break down lipids and cholesterol. All of these studies were
conducted using high bush, hybrid cultivars of blueberries. A more recent
study has tentatively found that anti-oxidants may be higher in lowbush
blueberries than in the highbush blueberries. The study is flawed in that it
does not specify which of the many unique and diverse cultivars of high
bush blueberries were used (in this study) for the comparison or even where
the blueberries were grown. The soil where the blueberries were grown
impact the composition of the minerals that are present in all plants.

Recent USDA studies has shown that Wild Blueberries are a taste way to eat
right and stay healthy. Scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition
Research Center on Aging ranked blueberries as #1 in antioxidant activity
compared with 40 other commercially available fruits and vegetables. Fresh,
frozen, canned or dried, blueberries are number one in antioxidant activity
when measured against comparable forms of other commercially available
fruits and vegetables.

That means a serving of wild blueberries or wild huckleberries may have


more of the antioxidant power you need to fight aging, cancer and also heart
disease. Blueberries emerged as the top antioxidant capacity fruit in a
laboratory testing procedure called ORAC - Oxygen Radical Absorbancy
Capacity which was developed by the USDA. ORAC has become the
definitive measurement of antioxidant capacity.

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Every day, the cells in our body wage war against free radicals, unstable
oxygen molecules associated with cancer, heart disease and also the effects
of aging. Antioxidants, natural substance that are found in the Wild
Blueberries and other fruits and vegetables, come to the aid and rescue of the
cells, neutralizing free radicals and in turn keeping us healthy.

Antioxidants are the natural zappers of free radicals-unstable oxygen


molecules associated with cancer, heart disease and also the effects of aging.

140 grams of fresh blueberries contain 3 g of fibre. Additionally blueberries


are high in manganese as well as vitamin K and have a very low GL (3) in a
single 155g serving, which makes it an ideal food for diabetics.

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WHAT ITS GOOD FOR?
Blueberries are good for the following:

HEALTH BENEFITS:

Reduces various forms of cancer


Anti-aging
Alzheimers Disease & Short-term memory loss
Helps reduce urinary tract infections
Lowers cholesterol
Lowers lipid levels in the blood
Reverse signs of heart disease
High in Manganese
Aids visual health
Increases Cell Membrane Fluidity
Allows important nutrients and chemical signals to pass in and out of
cells
Reduces inflammatory processes of tissues.
Protects against damage from oxidative stress
Relieves tired eyes and eye strain
Contains ellagic acid
Relieve Coughs

CONTAINS THESE MINERALS:

Calcium
Iron
Magnesium
Phosphorus
Potassium
Sodium
Zinc
Copper
Manganese
Selenium

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CONTAINS THESE VITAMINS:

Vitamin C, Ascorbic acid


Thiamin
Riboflavin
Niacin
Pantothenic acid
Vitamin B-6
Folate
Vitamin B-12
Vitamin A, IU
Vitamin A, RE
Vitamin E

CONTAINS THESE AMINO ACIDS:

Tryptophan
Threonine
Isoleucine
Leucine
Lysine
Methionine
Cystine
Phenylalanine
Tyrosine
Valine
Arginine
Histidine
Alanine
Aspartic acid
Glutamic acid
Glycine
Procine
Proline
Serine

32
CULINARY BENEFITS:

Muffins
Jams
Jellies
Breads and Rolls
Pies
And other snacks and delicacies

OTHER

As a dye
Dying clothes

COMMERCIAL BENEFITS:

Juice
Tea
Beverages
Dairy products - yogurt, ice cream,
Purees and concentrates
Specialty products
And some other products

33
THE IMPROVED BLUEBERRY

For centuries, blueberries maintained popularity in the United States, with a


thriving commercial business in the Northeast United States and Canada. An
important step in the development of the highbush blueberry industry can in
around the turn of the century. Efforts in the early 1990s by Elizabeth White
and Dr. Frederick Coville to domesticate the wild highbush blueberry
resulted in todays cultivated highbush blueberry industry. They selected
desirable plants from the wild forests of the Northeast United States and
cultivated them to develop blueberries that could be commercially grown by
farmers. Their initial breeding work has resulted in the plump, juicy, sweet
and easy to pick cultivated blueberry that we all enjoy today. Without this
cultivation work we would not have fresh blueberries in the marketplace as
we do today.

Over the last decades, plat breeders and pathologists have worked to identify
and enhance the desirable features of various cultivars of highbush
blueberries. For decades cultivated and highbush blueberries have been
improved through natural selection and plant breeding programs to produce
an optimal blueberry with desirable flavor, texture and color for fresh and
processed markets. Cultivated varieties have been enhanced to offer
magnificent plump berries with deep, rich color and a delicious fruity flavor.

These plant breeding programs have resulted in the development of superior


berries both for the consumer and the food processing industry. Our industry
owes a great gratitude to the many agriculturists in the United States and
abroad who have pioneered the development of the US Highbush Blueberry
Industry.

34
YOUR DAILY DOSAGE
It is easy to include blueberries into your daily life and routine. Antioxidants
and other beneficial phytonutrients are concentrated in the pigments of
deeply colored fruits and vegetables - thats why color is the key to healthy
eating.

FOR CHILDREN

2 to 3 years old

1 cup fruit
1 cup veggies

4 to 8 years old

1 to 1 cups of fruit
1 cups of veggies

GIRLS

9 to 13 years old

1 cups of fruit
2 cups of veggies

14 to 18 years old

1 cups of fruit
2 cups of veggies

BOYS

9 to 13 years old

1 cups of fruit
2 cups of veggies

35
14 to 18 years old

2 cups of fruit
3 cups of veggies

WOMEN

19 to 30 years old

2 cups of fruit
2 cups of veggies

31 to 50 years old

1 cups of fruit
2 cups of veggies

51+ years old

1 cups of fruit
2 cups of veggies

MEN

19 to 30 years old

2 cups of fruit
3 cups of veggies

31 to 50 years old

2 cups of fruit
3 cups of veggies

51+ years old

2 cups of fruit
2 cups of veggies

36
HERE ARE SOME BLUEBERRY
RECIPES
Here are some of my favorite Blueberry recipes.

BLUEBERRY CHEESE SPREAD

2 (8 ounce) package of cream cheese, softened


2 tablespoon of Cointreau or Triple Sec
1 tablespoon of lemon juice
1/3 teaspoon of seasoned salt
1 tablespoon of honey
1 cup of crushed pineapple, drained
1/3 cup of dried blueberries
1 cup of chopped red bell peppers

Method:

Beat the cream cheese in a mixing bowl. Add all your ingredients except the
chopped red peppers, then mix well.

Place the cheese mixture on the center of a piece of plastic wrap. Bring
corners up to meet and seal around cheese, molding mixture into a ball.
Refrigerate overnight.

Remove from refrigerator and form once again into a ball. Mixture will be
stiff and easy to form. Roll cheese ball in finely chopped red peppers to
cover.

Garnish with fresh herbs and blueberries, serve with crackers.

Makes: one 16 ounce ball.

37
BUTTERMILK BLUEBERRY MUFFINS

2 cups of all purpose flour


1 cup of sugar
1 cup of buttermilk
pounds of butter or margarine
2 teaspoons of baking powder
teaspoons of salt
2 eggs, beaten
1 cups of fresh or frozen blueberries, rinsed

Sift all your ingredients together into a large mixing bowl. Mix well and add
your buttermilk, eggs, and butter which have been melted and browned
slightly. Mix well. Fold in your blueberries. Fill a well-greased muffin tins
half full and bake in an oven at 400 F for about 20 minutes.

Makes: 24 small muffins

A BLUEBERRY SAUSAGE BREAKFAST

pounds of sausage or pork


2 cups of flour
1 teaspoon of baking powder
teaspoon of baking soda
cup of butter
cup of sugar
cup of brown sugar
2 eggs
8 ounce sour cream
1 cup of blueberries
cup of pecans, chopped (optional)

Method:

Day before: Cook your sausage and drain well. Stir together your flour,
baking powder and baking soda. In a large mixing bowl, beat butter until

38
fluffy. Add in your sugar and beat until it is well blended. Add in your eggs,
one at a time, beat well after each. Alternate adding flour mixture and sour
cream and creamed ingredients; mix well. Fold in sausage and blueberries.
Pour batter into an ungreased 13x9x2 baking pan. Sprinkle pecans on top.
Refrigerate overnight. Preheat to 350 F. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes, until it is
well done. Cool on wire rack.

SWEETENED CRUNCHY GRANOLA WITH DRIED


BLUEBERRIES

Ingredients:

cups of butter or margarine, melted


4 teaspoons of natural honey
2 tablespoons of brown sugar
3 cups of oats (regular or instant)
cup of raw sunflower seeds
1 teaspoons of ground cinnamon
1/3 cup of wheat germ
1/3 cup of sliced almonds
1 teaspoon of almond extract
teaspoon of vanilla extract
cup of dried blueberries (4 ounces)

Method:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a 9x13 making pan, stir together margarine, honey and brown sugar. Mix
oats, cereal, sunflower seeds and cinnamon. Stir every 5 minutes, bake in a
preheated oven for 15 minutes. Stir in the wheat germ, almonds, almond
extract and your vanilla. Bake 10 minutes or until it is golden brown.

Remove from oven and immediately stir in your dried blueberries. Allow
mix to cool before storing.

Makes 5 1/3 cups of granola.

39
BLUEBERRY SPICE SWIRL BREAD

Ingredients:

5 cups of all purpose flour


1 cup of rolled oats
cup of non-fat dry milk
2 packages of active dry yeast
2 teaspoons of salt
1 cups of water
cup of light molasses
2 tablespoons of oil
1 large egg
2tablespoons of melted margarine
3 tablespoons of sugar
1 tablespoons of cinnamon
1 cup of dried blueberries (8 ounces)

Method:

In a large mixing bowl stir together 1 cup of flour, oats, dry milk, yeast and
salt; than set aside.

Hear your water, molasses and oil until warm, 130 degrees F. Pour warm
liquid over flour-yeast mixture in large bowl. Add your egg and beat with an
electric mixer on low speed for about 3 minutes. By hand, stir in 3 cups of
flour. When the dough can be handled, remove from bowl and knead with
hands for 7 minutes, incorporating the remaining cups of flour if needed,
until the dough is firm yet smooth. Place in a greased bowl, cover with
greased waxed paper and let the rest in a warm, humid place free from drafts
until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Thoroughly grease two 8x1/2x4 inch loaf pans; set aside.

Punch the dough and divided it in half. Roll each half into a rectangle, 8x16
inches. Brush each half with melted butter. Combine sugar and cinnamon
and sprinkle over both halves. Sprinkle the dried blueberries evenly over the
cinnamon mixture. Starting at the short end, roll each half tightly. With the

40
seam sides down, place in prepared pans. Cover with greased waxed paper
and let rest in a warm, humid place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Bake in preheated oven at 350 F. for about 40 minutes or until the bread is
golden brown and sounds hollow when tapped. Remove the bread from pans
and allow them to cool on a wire rack.

Makes: 2 Loaves

BLUEBERRY GLAZED BREAKFAST ROLLS

1 (10 oz.) can refrigerated pizza crust dough


Vegetable cooking spray
Flour

Blueberry filling:

cups of blueberries, finely chopped


2 tablespoons of orange juice
2 tablespoons of sugar
2 teaspoons of corn starch
1 teaspoon of grated orange peels

Glaze:

cups of powdered sugar


1 tablespoon of milk
teaspoon of grated orange peel

Method:

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Coat 12 muffin cups with vegetable
cooking spray. In a small saucepan, combine your blueberries filling
ingredients, stirring to dissolve cornstarch. Cook over medium heat, stir
constantly until thick and bubbly (about 3 minutes). Set aside to cool for
about 10 minutes. Unroll pizza dough onto a lightly floured surface; pat into
a 12x9 inch rectangle. Spread the blueberry filling over dough, leaving a

41
inch border along the sides. Beginning with a long side, roll up jelly-roll
fashion; pinch seam to seal (do not seal the ends of roll). Cut into 12 (1
inch) slices. Place slices, cut side up, in coated muffin cups. Bake 15
minutes or until lightly browned. Remove rolls from pan; cool on a wire
rack for at least 15 minutes before adding your glaze.

For glaze; Combine powdered sugar, milk and grated orange peel, stirring
until smooth. Drizzle icing over the rolls.

Makes: 12 rolls

FRENCH TOAST WITH BLUEBERRIES

Ingredients:

1 loaf of white bread with no crust


loaf of French bread
6 cups of fresh or frozen blueberries, rinsed
8 oz. of cream cheese
cup of sour cream
cup of sugar
1 teaspoon of vanilla
7 lg. Eggs
1 cups of milk
1 cups of half and half milk
teaspoon of nutmeg
teaspoon cinnamon
cup of powdered sugar

Method:

Cut white bread into cubes and place into a 9x13 inch pan. Distribute
blueberries evenly over the bread cubes.

Microwave cream cheese in a bowl for 2 minutes. Stir carefully and add
cup of sugar, cup of sour cream, and 1 teaspoon of vanilla. Spread over
blueberries.

42
Cut French bread into approximately 1 inch slices and place on top of cream
cheese mixture.

Beat eggs, milk, half and half, cinnamon, and nutmeg together. Pour over the
bread. Cover with aluminum foil and refrigerate overnight.

In the morning, preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Bake for 45 minutes,


covered. Then uncover and bake for an additional 15 minutes. Once out of
the oven, allow pan to set for 10 minutes before cutting. Sift powdered sugar
over the top just before serving.

BLUEBERRY CARROT MUFFINS

Ingredients:

1 Cup of all purpose flour


1 cup regular oats
1/3 cups of brown sugar
2 teaspoons of baking powder
1 teaspoon of baking soda
1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon
1 cup of milk
1/3 cup of molasses
3 tablespoons of vegetable oil
1 lg. Egg
1 cup of fresh blueberries

1 cup of grated carrots (approx. 2 medium carrots)

43
cup of raisins
1/3 cup of chopped walnuts (optional)

Method:

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees F. Prepare muffin tin by lining with paper
muffin liners.

In a large bowl combine your flour, oats, brown sugar, baking powder,
baking soda and cinnamon.

In a medium mixing bowl place your combine milk, molasses, oil and egg.
Mix it well in the center of the dry ingredients and add the milk mixture all
at once. Stir just until the dry ingredients are moistened. Sprinkle
blueberries, carrots, walnuts and raisins over the muffin batter. Gently fold
in the ingredients until it is evenly mixed. Spoon mixture into prepared
muffin tins.

Bake in oven for 18 to 20 minutes until lightly browned and toothpick


inserted in the center comes out clean.

Makes: 18 Muffins

RASPBERRY-BLUEBERRY SWIRL SOUP

Ingredients:

1 cups of fresh blueberries


1 (10 oz.) package unsweetened, frozen raspberries, thawed
cup of buttermilk
cup of plain non-fat yogurt
cup of vanilla flavored non-fat yogurt

Method:

Place 1 cup of blueberries into a blender or food processor and process until
very smooth. Pour through a strainer to remove skins. To strained

44
blueberries add the buttermilk and plain yogurt, stirring to mix well.
Refrigerate until thoroughly chilled.

To serve the soup, divide the blueberry mixture among two bowls. Divide
the raspberry mixture in half and carefully add to one side of the blueberry
mixture in each bowl. With the tip of a knife, swirl the blueberry and
raspberry together. Garnish the soup with the remaining cup of
blueberries.

Makes: 2 servings

Nutrition Information:

Calories 172; Fats 2 g; Protein 7 g; Carbohydrate 34 g.

TORTELLINI & BBLUEBERRY FRUIT SALAD

Dressing:

cup of low fat poppy seed dressing

Salad:

1 (9 oz.) package of Three Cheese Tortellini Pasta


1 cup of fresh blueberries
1 cup of sliced fresh strawberries
1 (11 oz.) can of Mandarin Orange segments, drained
cups of green grapes
cups of sliced almonds

Method:

Cook pasta according to direction on package; drain. In a large bowl, ass


your pasta and salad ingredients. Pour dressing over salad and toss lightly;
refrigerate until ready to serve.

Makes: 6 (1 cup) servings

45
Note:

Three Cheese Tortellini pasta is found in the refrigerated section of your


supper market or grocery store. Various other fruits such as peaches,
bananas, apples and oranges may be used also.

BETTYANNS BLUEBERRIES CHICKEN SALAD

Dressing:

1 cup of fat free red wine vinegar dressing

Ingredients:

3 cups of spiral pasta


2 cups (or about 1 lb.) cooked chicken, cubed
1 cup of sliced celery
1 cup of fresh blueberries
1 cup of pea pods, trimmed, cut in half
cup of finely chopped red pepper
cup of chopped parsley
cup of chopped onion
cup of white vinegar
3 tablespoons of chopped fresh basil
Pepper and salt to taste
cup of freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Method:

Cook the pasta according to directions on the package. About 1 minute


before it is cooked, add the pea pods. Drain and rinse with cold water. In a
large bowl, add your pasta and pea pods along with the remaining salad
ingredients, except your Parmesan cheese. Toss with cup of vinegar
dressing. Cover; refrigerate several hours or overnight to blend flavors.
Before serving, toss with remaining dressing and Parmesan cheese.

46
Makes: 12 (1 cup) serving

Nutrition Information:

Calories 191; Total Fats 4 g; Cholesterol 36 mg; Sodium 382 mg; Potassium
203 mg; Total Carbohydrates 21 g; Protein 16 g.

CHICKEN AND DRIED BLUEBERRY SALAD

Ingredients:

4 cups of cooked chicken, I inch diced


1 cup of dried blueberries
cup of slivered almonds, toasted
cup of mayonnaise
cup of dairy sour cream
1 tablespoon of lemon juice
cup of chutney
teaspoon of salt
1/8 teaspoon of black pepper
Lettuce leaves

Method:

Combine chicken, dried blueberries and almonds. Combine your


mayonnaise, sour cream, lemon juice, chutney, salt and pepper; add to
chicken mixture and toss well. Cover and chill. Serve on lettuce leaves.

Makes: 6 servings

BLUEBERRY CLUSTER WITH WHITE CHOCOLATE

Ingredients:

1 pound of white chocolate (semi sweet), melting type


1 cup of dried blueberries
cups of unsweetened coconuts
cup of chopped nuts

47
Method:

Melt the chocolate in a pan over hot water (double boiler method). Do not let
the water come to a boil. When the chocolate is completely melted, remove
from heat. Stir in the remaining ingredients immediately. Place the
teaspoonful, or desired size, onto waxed paper. Let cool completely before
removing.

Makes: 24 (2 inch) clusters

FRESH BLUEBERRY & STRAWBERRY PIE

Ingredients:

1 box of unflavored getatin


cup of cold water
2 tablespoon of lemon juice
1 cup of fresh blueberries, finely chopped
1 cup of sliced fresh strawberries, hulled and finely chopped
cup of confectioners sugar
1 (8 oz.) container of lite whipped topping
1 (9 inch) prepared graham cracker crumb crust

Method:

In a small saucepan, sprinkle gelatin over cold water; let stand for 1 minute.
Stir over low heat until getatin is completely dissolved (about 1 minute). Stir
in the lemon juice; set aside to coo. In a large mixing bowl, add blueberries,
strawberries and confectioners sugar; toss to coat. Stir in dissolved gelatin.
Fold in whipped topping; spoon pie mixture into crust. Refrigerate 3 to 4
hours or until firm. Garnish suggestions; whipped topping, additional fresh
fruit or serve with blueberry sauce.

Makes: 8 servings

48
BLUEBERRY SAUCE

Ingredients:

2 cups of fresh or frozen blueberries, thawed


cup of orange juice
cup of water
cup of sugar
1 tablespoon of cornstarch

Method:

Combine all the ingredients in a medium saucepan. Cook and stir constantly
over medium heat 4 to 5 minutes or until the solution is thickened

Makes: about 2 cups

FROZEN BLUEBERRY PARFAIT

Ingredients:

1 teaspoon of vanilla
1 can (16 oz.) of chunky fruits in light syrup, drain and reserve 3 tablespoons
of juice
cup of miniature marshmallows
2 cups of vanilla yogurt
1 cup of fresh or frozen blueberries
1 large banana, thinly sliced

Method:

In a small mixing bowl, mix reserved fruit juice and vanilla. Stir in the
marshmallows, blend to coat each piece. Set aside. In a medium mixing
bowl, add your drained fruit, yogurt, blueberries and banana. Fold in your
marshmallow mixture. Prepare for freezing by following one of the ideas
listed or use your own creative method. Place mixture in a 9x5x3 inch loaf
pan; freeze. Allow to stand in refrigerator for a full 1 hour before cutting into

49
slices to serve. Divide mixture into dessert glasses and freeze until it is firm.
Allow to stand in the refrigerator for 20 minutes before serving. Divide
mixture into 6 ounce paper cups, placing a wooden craft stick in the center
of each cup. Freeze until firm. Peel off the paper before serving.

Makes: 8 servings or 16 freezer pops

BLUEBERRIES AND CREAM PIE

Ingredients:

cups of sugar
3 tablespoons of cornstarch
1/8 teaspoon of salt
Grated peel of 1 lime
1 tablespoon of fresh lime juice
4 cups of fresh blueberries, rinsed and well drained
1 pint heavy cream
1 teaspoon of vanilla
3 tablespoons of sugar
1 baked 9 inch pie crust, cooled (either homemade or store bought)

Method:

To prepare the blueberry pie filling, in a large saucepan combine cups of


sugar, cornstarch, salt, lime peel and juice and 1 blueberries. Cook your
mixture over medium heat, stirring constantly until thickened and the
blueberries are softened, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in your
remaining blueberries. Let mixture cool to room temperature. Chill 15
minutes.

Whip cream with vanilla and remaining 3 tablespoons of sugar until stiff
peaks form. Spread about whipped cream in bottom of pie with spatula.
Top with blueberry mixture. Garnish top of pie with whipped cream, or
serve remaining whipped cream in bowl with pie. Chill pie at least hour.

Makes: 6 to 8 servings

50
BLUEBERRY CREAM CHEESE PIE

Ingredients:

1 pie crust to cover a 13 inch pie pan


1 package of (8 oz.) cream cheese
2 large eggs
cup of sugar
1 teaspoon of vanilla
1/3 cup of chopped walnuts

Topping:

4 cups of fresh or frozen blueberries


1 cup of sugar
3 tablespoons of cornstarch
teaspoon of cinnamon
teaspoon of salt
cup of water
1 tablespoon of butter

Method:

Bake pie crust in the oven at 350 degrees F. for 15 minutes. Blend cheese,
eggs, sugar, vanilla and walnuts, pour over pie crust; return to oven for
another 10 minutes. Cool. For topping, mix 2 cups of blueberries with cup
of sugar; set aside. In a saucepan, mix remaining sugar, cornstarch,
cinnamon, salt and water. Add remaining blueberries, then butter. Bring to a
boil and simmer until it has thickened. Add sugared blueberries. Cool. Pour
into pie shell.

Makes: one 13-inch pie

BLUEBERRY BARS

Ingredients:

51
For blueberry filling:

1 cup of blueberries, chopped


cup of orange juice
2 tablespoons of sugar
2 teaspoons of cornstarch

For cheesecake filling:

1 (8 oz.) package of cream cheese, softened


2 large eggs
cup of sugar
2 tablespoons of fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon of grated lemon peel

For crumb mixture:

1 cups of all purpose flour


cup of rolled oats
cup of firmly packed brown sugar
cup of chopped nuts
cup of margarine, chilled

Method:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly grease the bottom of a 9x13 inch pan.
In a small saucepan, combine blueberries filling ingredients; stir until
cornstarch is dissolved. Cook over medium heat, stir constantly until thick
and bubbly (about 5 minutes). Set aside to cool slightly.

In the meanwhile, in a large mixing bowl, combine all crumb mixture


ingredients except margarine; mix well. Using a pastry blender fork, cut in
margarine until mixture resembles course crumbs. Reserve 1 cup of the
crumbs mixture for topping. Press the remaining crumb mixture firmly in
bottom of greased pan. Bake for 10 minutes.

While the crust is baking, in another medium bowl mix together cream
cheese filling with an electric mixer set on medium speed until well blended;

52
pour into baked crust. Spoon blueberry filling over cream cheese filling,
swirl with knife to blend. Sprinkle reserved crumb mixture over filling. Bake
20 to 25 minutes or until lightly browned. Cool completely. Once cooled
then cut into bars.

Makes: 36 bars

BLUEBERRY CRISS CROSS PIE

Ingredients:

2 cups of flour
1 teaspoon sugar
teaspoon of salt
2/3 cup shortening
1 teaspoon of vanilla
4 tablespoons of cold water

Filling:

4 cups of blueberries, fresh or frozen


4 teaspoons of lemon juice
2/3 cup of sugar
cup of cornstarch
teaspoon of cinnamon
1 teaspoon of grated lemon rind
2 tablespoons of butter

Method:

53
Combine all your dry ingredients. Cut in shortening with pastry blender or
with two knives, until it resembles course crumbs. In a separate container,
combine vanilla with the cold water, add to dry ingredients, tossing with
fork until dough forms a soft ball. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for
about 20 minutes, then roll out about 2/3 of the dough on a lightly floured
surface. Gently line a 9 inch plate, allowing about inch to overhang. Roll
remaining dough to about a 10 inch circle. Cut into inch strips with a knife
or with a pastry wheel.

In the meanwhile, place the blueberries in a bowl and sprinkle with lemon
juice. In a separate mixing bowl, mix sugar, corn starch, cinnamon and
lemon peel. Add this to the blueberries and combine well. Transfer to pastry
shell. Dot with butter. Weave the strips of prepared pastry over top until
covered. Moisten rim with water. Press ends of strips to rim. Fold the
overhanging pastry over and flute the edges. Brush with milk or egg white.

Place in 400 degrees F. oven for about 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to 350
degrees F. and bake for 30 to 40 minutes longer, or until crust is golden
brown. Cool on a wire rack before cutting.

BLUEBERRY STRAWBERRY SMOOTHIE

54
BLUEBERRY LEATHER SMOOTHIE

Ingredients:

4 cups of fresh blueberries


1 cup of fresh strawberries
cup of honey
1 tablespoon of almond extract

Method:

Place your blueberries and strawberries in a blender or food processor and


process until smooth. Pour mixture through a strainer to remove the skins
and seeds. Stir in honey and almond extract. Place mixture in a large skillet
(10 inches is best). While stirring frequently, cook over very low heat for 1
hour until thickened. Prepare a cookie sheet by lining with parchment paper
(paper is best but foil can be substituted). Preheat oven to 150 degrees F.
Pour thickened mixture onto parchment paper and spread to form a 8x12
inch rectangle. Bake for 5 to 6 hours until the fruit sheet is dry enough but
not to stick to your fingers but moist enough to roll. Remove from oven to
cool. Once cool, leather should be stored in an airtight container or rolled in
plastic wrap to keep.

Note: By placing a potholder in the oven door to keep it ajar will help dry
the leather by allowing the moister to escape.

Makes: 6 (3x4 inch) squares

BLUEBERRY GRAHAM CRACKER PASTRY

Ingredients:

1 cup sugar
cup of butter or margarine
2 large eggs
cup of milk
2 cups of fresh or frozen blueberries

55
1 cups of graham cracker crumbs
1 cup of all purpose flour
1 teaspoon of baking powder
1 teaspoon of baking soda

Method:

Cream the butter and beat in the sugar. Beat in eggs, one at a time. Stir in
milk. Combine blueberries, graham cracker crumbs, flour, baking powder
and baking soda. Add all at once and beat until batter is smooth. Pour into a
well greased 8 inch spring-form baking pan. Bake in preheated oven (375
degrees F) for about 50 to 60 minutes or until the top is richly browned.
Serve warm or cold topped with sweetened whipped cream or whipped
topping.

FRESH BLUEBERRY COBBLER

Ingredients:

1 quart of fresh or frozen blueberries, rinsed and drained


cup of granulated sugar
1 tablespoon of corn starch
teaspoon of grated lemon peel
1 teaspoon of lemon juice
teaspoon of cinnamon
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon of granulated sugar
1 teaspoons of baking powder
2 teaspoons of grated orange rind
teaspoon of salt
3 tablespoons of shortening
1/3 cup of milk
1 large egg

Method:

In a medium saucepan combine your blueberries, cup of sugar, corn

56
starch, lemon peel, lemon juice and cinnamon. Cook over medium heat, stir
constantly, until mixture just starts to bubble. Lower the heat and let simmer
about 5 minutes or until the mixture has thickened, stirring frequently. In
another mixing bowl thoroughly combine flour, sugar, baking powder,
orange rind and salt. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles course
crumbs. In an small bowl combine your milk and egg. Beat slightly to
combine. Pour all at once into flour mixture and stir just until all flour is
moistened. Transfer hot blueberry to 2 quart baking dish. Drop heaping
tablespoons of biscuit dough into fruit. Bake at 400 degrees F. for 20 to 25
minutes or until biscuits are browned. Serve with whipped cream or ice
cream, if desired.

Makes: 4 to 6 servings

BLUEBERRY BUCKLE CAKE

Ingredients:

3/3 cup of sugar


cup of vegetable shortening
2 large eggs
cup of milk
1 cups of all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons of baking powder
teaspoon of salt
teaspoon of ground nutmeg
teaspoon of ground cloves
1 1/3 cups of fresh blueberries or 1 (15 oz.) canned blueberries, drained
cup of sugar
1/3 cup of flour
teaspoon of cinnamon
cut of butter or margarine

Method:

In a large mixing bowl, mix your sugar, shortening, eggs and milk until well

57
blended. Stir in flour, baking powder, salt, nutmeg, and cloves. Fold in
blueberries. Spread batter into a well greased 9x9 inch pan. Combine
remaining ingredients and mix until crumbly. Sprinkle crumbs over batter.
Bake in a preheated oven (375 degrees F.) for 45 to 50 minutes or until top
springs back when lightly touched. Serve warm, cut into squares.

GRILLED CHICKEN WITH BLUEBERRY SAUCE

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons of olive oil


3 tablespoons of blueberry (or raspberry) vinegar
1 teaspoons of lime juice
2 garlic cloves, minced
4 chicken breast halves, with skin removed
1 cup of blueberries
1 cup of pureed raspberries

Method:

In an non-aluminum dish or sturdy plastic zipper-type bag, combine oil,


vinegar, lime juice and garlic. Add chicken, turning to coat all sides.
Marinate, in refrigerator for 1 to 2 hours.

Reserving marinade, remove chicken and pat dry with a paper towel.

Prepare sauce by combining marinade, blueberries and raspberries puree in a


saucepan. Stirring occasionally, place over medium heat and cook for 5 to 7
minutes until slightly thickened. Remove from heat and set aside.

To Grill Chicken:

Place over medium heat, cooking for 8 to 12 minutes per side or until the
juices are no longer pink when the chicken is cut to the bone. Serve the
chicken with blueberry-raspberry sauce.

58
Note:

The chicken can also be prepared using a broiler, microwave or pan saute
method.

Makes: 4 servings

Nutrition Information:

Calories 285; Fat 15 g; Protein 28 g; Carbohydrate 11 g.

CORNISH HENS STUFFED WITH BLUEBERRIES

Ingredients:

Salt and pepper to taste


8 Cornish hens, thawed
cup of oil
cup of lemon juice
cup of Angostura bitters
4 cups of fresh blueberries
4 teaspoons of sugar
cup of butter or margarine
8 small bay leaves

Method:

Sprinkle the Cornish hens inside with and out with salt and pepper. Mix oil,
lemon juice and Angostura bitters; brush the Cornish hens with the mixture
inside and out. Fill each bird with of blueberries and teaspoon of sugar.
Sew or skewer opening and place in shallow roasting pan. Spread soft butter
over breasts of birds and place bay leaves on butter. Roast in a preheated
oven at (350 degrees F.) for 1 hour or until leg is easily moved.

Makes: 8 servings

59
BRAN-BLUEBERRY MUFFINS

Ingredients:

3 cups of bran cereal


2 cups of low-fat buttermilk
1 cups of non-fat plain yogurt
3 cups of all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons of baking powder
1 teaspoon of baking soda
teaspoon of salt
cup of wheat germ
cup of egg substitute
cup of maple syrup
cup of brown sugar
1/3 cup of canola oil
3 cups of blueberries

Method:

In a large mixing bowl combine bran, buttermilk, and yogurt; let stand for 15
minutes. In another separate bowl combine flour, baking powder, baking
soda and salt. Stir in the wheat germ, reserve. In another bowl, blend egg
substitute, molasses, syrup, sugar and oil so that mixture is mixed well. Add
to flour-wheat germ mixture and mix just to moisten. Blueberries. Scoop
cup of batter into each greased 1/3 cup muffin tins (36 total) Bake at 375
degrees F. for 20 to 25 minutes or until firm. Serve warm.

Makes: 36 muffins

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AMAZING BLUEBERRY SAUCE

Ingredients:

2 cups of blueberries
cup of cold water
cup of sugar
1 teaspoon of fresh lemon juice
2 teaspoons of corn starch

Method:

In a small sauce pan combine 1 cup of blueberries, cup of cold water,


sugar and lemon juice. Stir and bring to a boil. Turn down and heat for 10
minutes. Mix the corn starch into cup of water until dissolved and
blueberry mixture; stir until it thickens, then add the remaining 1 cup of
blueberries. Cook for 3 minutes on low heat.

Makes: 1 cup

BLUEBERRY SMOOTHIE

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BLUEBERRY LEATHER

Ingredients:

180 g of blueberries, fresh or frozen


180 g of yogurt, vanilla or blueberry
1 tablespoon of honey (only if plain yogurt is used)
cup of ice (3 ice cubes)

Method:

Place all ingredients into a blender. Blend well at high speed. Serve
immediately.

Makes: 2 Smoothie

WILD BLUEBERRY ICE TREAT

Ingredients:

2 cups of frozen blueberries


4 tablespoons of fresh lemon juice
cup of sugar
cup of water

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Method:

Process in a food processor or blend until pureed. Serve immediately or


place in the freezer covered. To serve, thaw (20 to 30 minutes) and stir to
desired consistency. Serve in a small dessert bowls. Garnish with mint
leaves or with thin lemon slices.

GINGERED LEMON BLUEBERRY MUFFIN

Ingredients:

1 lbs. of cake flour


2 tablespoons of baking powder
2 teaspoons of baking soda
teaspoons of salt
2 cups of buttermilk
1 cups of egg substitute
1 cups of granulated sugar
cup of canola oil
1 quart of blueberries
1/3 cup of crystallized ginger, chopped
2 tablespoons of lemon zest
1/3 cup of granulated sugar

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Method:

In a bowl combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt; reserve. In
another bowl mix together buttermilk, egg substitute, sugar and oil; stir into
flour mixture, add blueberries, ginger and lemon zest. Scoop cup batter
into greased muffin tins (36 total). Sprinkle each muffin with sugar. Bake at
375 degrees F. oven for 18 to 22 minutes or until firm to touch. Serve warm.

Makes: 36 muffins

CORN-BLUEBERRY MUFFINS

Ingredients:

2 cups of yellow cornmeal


1 pound of cake flour
1 cups of granulated sugar
3 tablespoons of baking powder
1 teaspoon of baking soda
teaspoon of salt
3 cups of buttermilk
6 large eggs
1 cup unsalted butter, melted
1 quart of blueberries
1 cups of pecans, chopped (optional)

Method:

In a large mixing bowl combine you cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder,

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baking soda. In another bowl, beat together buttermilk, eggs and butter; stir
into the flour mixture just to blend. Fold in the blueberries and (pecans -
optional). Scoop cup of batter into greased muffin tins (36 total) and bake
in the oven at 375 degrees F. for 18 to 22 minutes or until golden brown.
Serve warm.

Makes: 36 muffins

APPLESPICE BLUEBERRY MUFFINS

Ingredients:

1 lbs. of cake flour


2 tablespoons of baking powder
2 teaspoons of baking soda
1 tablespoon of ground ginger
1 teaspoon of ground allspice
1 teaspoon of ground nutmeg
teaspoon of ground cloves
teaspoon of salt
3 cups of chunky applesauce
2 cups of brown sugar
1 cups of egg substitute
cup of canola oil
1 quart of blueberries
2/3 cup of oatmeal
1/3 cup of brown sugar
2 tablespoon of canola oil
1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon

Method:

In a large mixing bowl combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, spices
and salt; reserve. In another bowl combine your applesauce, sugar, egg
substitute and oil; mix well. Stir into flour mix just to blend. Fold in the
blueberries. Scoop cup of batter into each greased muffin tin (36 in all). In
another bowl combine your oatmeal, sugar, oil and cinnamon. Sprinkle 1

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heaping teaspoon, over each muffin and bake in the oven at 375 degrees F.
for 20 to 24 minutes or until firm to the touch. Serve warm

Makes: 36 muffins

PINEAPPLE-BLUEBERRY PARFAIT

Ingredients:

1 can of pineapple chunks, drained


1 container (8 oz.) lemon-flavored yogurt
1 cups of fresh or thawed frozen blueberries
cup of granola

Method:

In a small mixing bowl, combine the pineapple with half the yogurt. In small
wine glasses or juice glasses, alternately layer the pineapples, yogurt
mixture, blueberries and granola. Repeat the layering twice. Top each parfait
with a dollop of yogurt.

Makes: 4 servings

BETTYANNS BLUEBERRY SALSA

Ingredients:

2 cups of blueberries fresh or frozen, thawed


medium onion, diced
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced (add more to taste)
1 medium red bell pepper, diced small
3 tablespoons of chopped parsley or cilantro
cup of lime or lemon juice

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1 teaspoon of salt
Pinch of cinnamon

Method:

Combine all your ingredients, folding in the blueberries last. Refrigerate for
1 hour until its flavor sets. Serve with corn chips or use as a relish with meat
and other poultry dishes.

APRILS BLUEBERRY CRISP

Filling:

5 cups of blueberries
cup of sugar
teaspoon of grated lemon rind
1 cup of (2 medium) diced peeled apples

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Crisp:

cup of light brown sugar


2 teaspoons of cinnamon
1 teaspoon of nutmeg
cup of all-purpose flour
cup of chopped pecans (optional)
cup of rolled oats
3 tablespoons of butter or soft margarine
1/8 teaspoon salt (optional).

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

Method:

Filling:

In a small mixing bowl, combine the blueberries, sugar, lemon rind, and mix
well and place in a well-buttered 8x8x2 inch baking pan.

Crisp:

In a medium mixing bowl, combine brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, flour,


pecans, salt and rub in the butter with your fingers until it resembles course
crumbs. Spread over the blueberry filling. Bake in the oven for 45 minutes
or until the crust is brown.

OLD FASHIONED GRUNT WITH BLUEBERRIES

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Ingredients:

3 cups of blueberries
cup of sugar
1/3 cup of water

Dumpling

1 cup flour
2 teaspoons of baking powder
teaspoon of salt
2 teaspoons of sugar
1 tablespoon of butter or soft margarine or shortening
1/3 to cup of milk
1/8 teaspoon of cinnamon (optional)

Method:

Combine your blueberry with sugar and water in a large saucepan and bring
to boil. Reduce heat and let simmer until berries are soft and begin to thicken
about 5 minutes. Add flour, baking powder, sugar and salt together. Cut in
butter. Gradually stir in evenly, make a soft dough. Drop the batter by
tablespoons on the top of the simmering mixture. Immediately cover
saucepan and cook over low-medium heat for 15 to 18 minutes.

Makes: 4 to 6 servings

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BLUEBERRY LEMON GLAZED CAKE
Cake:

2 cups of blueberries
1 cups of all-purpose flour
cup of sugar
1 tablespoon of baking powder
teaspoon of grated lemon peel
1 large egg or 2 whites
cup of skim milk
2 tablespoons of applesauce
2 tablespoons of melted light butter
1 teaspoon of fresh lemon juice
teaspoon of salt

Glaze:

2 tablespoon of light butter


1 tablespoon of fresh lemon juice
cup of sugar

Cake:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly grease an 8x8x2 inch pan. Rinse the
blueberries. If using frozen berries, partially thaw in microwave for 30

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seconds (or more if necessary). In a small mixing bowl combine flour, sugar,
baking powder, lemon peel. In another bowl, mix egg, milk, applesauce,
melted light butter, and lemon juice until blended. Add to flour mixture,
folding gently to combine. Do not over mix. Batter gently fold in
blueberries. Spread batter in prepared pan. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, if
frozen berries are used, add 5 to 10 minutes to cooking time. When cake test
is done. Lemon glaze evenly over the top. Return glazed cake to the oven
and broil for 3 to 5 minutes, heat until glaze begins to bubble, being careful
not to allow the sugar to burn.

Lemon Glaze:

Melt light butter; stir in cup sugar, and 1 tablespoon of lemon juice and
stir over low heat until the mixture is bubbling. Remove from heat and
follow directions above.

Makes: 9 servings

BLUEBERRY-CRANBERRY CHUTNEY

Ingredients:

cup of raspberry vinegar


cup of sugar
1 medium onion, minced
teaspoon of fresh minced ginger
1/8 teaspoon of ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon of minced lemon rind
Pinch of cayenne pepper
Pinch of salt
3 cups of blueberries
cup of cranberries (dried)

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Method:

Combine the vinegar, sugar, onions, ginger, cinnamon, lemon, pepper and
salt in a large saucepan, bring to a boil and simmer for 15 minutes.

Add 1 cup of blueberries, and cranberries. Simmer for 20 minutes. Stir


frequently.

Suggestions for serving:

Use in place of your favorite relish. It goes perfect with pork, duck, venison,
broiled meats such as chicken or beef, as an accompaniment to Thanksgiving
or Christmas dinner, or as a topping for a turkey or chicken sandwich, as an
appetizer by topping a small wheel of brie cheese with chutney on small
crackers or bread.

Makes: 1 cup or (800 g.)

DOUGS BLUEBERRY SOUP

Ingredients:

4 cups of fresh blueberries


1 cup of Pinot Noir
cup of honey

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Vanilla creme fraiche for garnish

Method:

Put all your ingredients in a food processor (except the vanilla creme
fraiche), combine the blueberries, Pinot Noir and honey; blend the mixture
until it becomes smooth, do not strain. Chill the soup before serving. Garnish
each soup bowl with Vanilla creme fraiche.

Makes: 4 servings

BLUEBERRY VINAIGRETTE

Ingredients:

cup of olive oil


cup of red wine or cider vinegar
2 tablespoons of balsamic vinegar
1 garlic clove, minced
2 teaspoons of prepared mustard
teaspoon of salt
teaspoon of pepper
cup of blueberry fresh or frozen, thawed

Method:

Combine all the ingredients except the blueberries in a jar and shake until it
is thoroughly mixed, or whisk thoroughly in a bowl. Add blueberries. Store
in the refrigerator.

BLUEBERRY A LA CREME BRULEE

Ingredients:

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2 cups of fresh blueberries
2/3 cup of sour cream
cup of vanilla yogurt
1/8 teaspoon of cinnamon (optional)
1/3 cup of brown sugar

Method:

Divide the blueberries between 4 heat-proof ramekins. Combine sour cream,


yogurt and cinnamon and spread over the blueberries, covering completely.
Sprinkle brown sugar over cream mixture and broil 3 inches from heat
source until bubbles, approximately 3 to 5 minutes. Serve while topping is
still hot.

Makes: 4 servings

BOO BLUEBERRY SORBET

Ingredients:

4 cups of fresh or frozen blueberries, thawed


1 can (6 oz.) of frozen apple juice concentrate

Method:

In a food processor or a blender, combine blueberries and apple juice


concentrate; blend until liquefied. Pour into a 11x17 inch aking pan. Cover
and freeze until firm around the edges about 2 hours.

With a heavy spoon, break frozen mixture into pieces. In a food processor or
a blender container, place the mixture and blend until smooth but not
completely melted. Spoon into a 9x5 inch loaf pan; cover and freeze until
firm. Serve within a few days.

Makes: 6 servings

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APRILS BLUEBERRY-BANANA SMOOTHIE

Ingredients:

1 cup of soya milk


1 cup of unsweetened fresh or frozen blueberries
1 large banana
1 teaspoon dried flaxseed/linseed

Method:

In a blender container, combine soya milk, blueberries, banana, and


flaxseed/linseed. Blend until smooth.

Makes: 1 serving

DOUGS BLUEBERRY GRANOLA BARS

Ingredients:

cup of honey
cup of firmly packed brown sugar
3 tablespoons of vegetable oil
1 teaspoons of ground cinnamon
1 cups of quick-cooking oats
2 cups of fresh blueberries

Method:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly grease a 9x9 inch square baking pan.

In a medium size saucepan, combine honey, brown sugar, oil, and cinnamon,

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and bring to a boil. Continue boiling for 2 minutes; do not stir.

In a large mixing bowl, combine your oats and blueberries. Stir in the honey
mixture until blended. Spread onto the prepared baking pan, gently pressing
the mixture flat. Bake lightly brown, about 40 minutes. Cool completely in
the pan on a wire rack. Cut into 3 inch bars.

Makes: 18 bars

GEORGES MANDARIN ORANGE BLUEBERRY MUFFINS

Ingredients:

3 cups of Mandarin orange segments, halved


1 tablespoon of orange or vanilla extract
1 lbs. of cake flour
2 1/3 tablespoons of baking powder
1 tablespoon of baking soda
teaspoon of salt
1 cups of brown sugar
cup of granulated sugar
cup of egg substitute
3 cups of plain yogurt
cup canola oil
1 cup pecans, chopped (optional)
1 quart fresh blueberries

Method:

In a mixing bowl combine orange segments, and extract; reserve. In a large


mixing bowl combine baking powder, baking soda, and salt; reserve. In
another large bowl combine your sugar and egg substitute, yogurt and oil.
Stir into dry mixture and mix just to combine. Fold in mixture, pecans, if
desired, and blueberries. Scoop cup batter into each 1/3 cup muffin tins
(36 total) and bake in the oven at 375 degrees F. for about 18 to 22 minutes
or until firm to the touch. Serve warm.

76
Makes: 36 muffins

SKY BLUE BLUEBERRY MUFFINS

Ingredients:

4 cups of all-purpose flour


3 tablespoons of baking powder
1/3 teaspoon of salt
cup of brown sugar
cup of granulated sugar
2 cups of buttermilk
1 cups of egg substitute
cup of canola oil
1 quart of fresh blueberries
3 tablespoons of granulated sugar
1 teaspoons of ground cinnamon

Method:

In a large mixing bowl combine your flour, baking powder, and salt; reserve.
In a separate mixing bowl whisk your sugar, buttermilk, egg substitute and
oil. Add to the flour mixture and mix just to combine, also add in your
blueberries. Combine sugar and cinnamon. Scoop cup of batter into each
cup muffin tin (36 total) and sprinkle each muffin with sugar and cinnamon
mixture. The bake in the oven at 375 degrees F. for 18 to 22 minutes or until
it is firm to touch. Serve warm.

Makes: 36 muffins

CAJUN BLUEBERRY CHICKEN BREAST

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Ingredients:

teaspoon of Cajun spices


4 halves boneless, skinless chicken breasts
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 teaspoon of olive oil
1/3 cup of red cooking wine
2 cups of blueberries
1 teaspoon of grated lemon rind
teaspoon of salt (optional)

Method:

Dust chicken breasts with Cajun spices. Saute in olive oil until brown and
almost through, 7 to 10 minutes. (If thick, cover for 3 to 4 minutes more.)
Remove the chicken from the pan and keep warm. In the same pan, saute
garlic and onions until they are transparent remaining bits of chicken from
the bottom of pan. Add red wine and cook about until the liquid is
evaporated. All blueberries, lemon rinds and salt. Simmer for 5 minutes.
(blueberries are frozen, until berries are heated through.) Add salt and
pepper to taste. Cook for 5 minutes, off heat, for flavors to blend. Spoon
over chicken breasts and serve.

Makes: 4 servings

BANANA PANCAKE WITH BLUEBERRY SAUCE

Ingredients:

1 cup of pancake/waffle mix


1 cup of water
1 large banana, mashed

Method:

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In a medium size mixing bowl, blend the pancake mix, water and banana
with an electric hand mixer. Meanwhile, preheat a nonstick griddle or skillet
to 450 degrees F. Pour the pancake mixture onto the griddle and cook for 1
to 2 minutes. Then turn the pancake over and cook for another minute.
Transfer the pancake to a plate and serve with blueberry sauce.

BLUEBERRY SAUCE

Ingredients:

1 cup of fresh or frozen blueberries


2 tablespoons of orange juice
1 teaspoon of maple syrup

Method:

In a microwave-safe bowl, combine the blueberries, orange juice and the


maple syrup. Microwave on medium setting for 5 minutes. Drizzle over the
pancakes.

Makes: 2 servings

79
FRESH BLUEBERRIES
Right On The Bush.

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COMMENTS ARE WELCOMED

All your comments are welcomed and greatly appreciated. Please


feel free to write to me in regards to this book or
in regards to my other books.

The mailing address and e-mail address is


listed here below.

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Enjoy!

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