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FULL METAL JACKET

Written by Syd Segal and JC Wagner

Cover Design by Dan and Dave Buck


Editing by Doug Brewer and Bryan Brush
Crediting Help from William Goodwin

All rights reserved 2005


A G Films Production

Layout and Illustrations by RFA Productions


www.rfaproductions.com
Table of Contents

A Logical Lesson JC Wagner & Syd Segal ....... 2


Jennings Double Olram Subtley (Rhythm Count)

Very Fair Triumph Syd Segal ............................ 5

Final Closer JC Wagner........................... 7


Ian Baxter Four Ace Production
Gene Finnell Free Cut Principle
Gamblers Cop

Extra Thoughts and Substitutions for Final Closer JC Wagner ......................................................................10


Vernon Transfer

No Cop/Ditch Method for Final Closer Syd Segal .........................................................................11

T(w)oo Wild Jokers Syd Segal .......................... 14


Criss-Cut Force
Daryl Martinez Change (Peter Dufe Handling)
Gamblers Cop

Open Ditch Method for T(w)oo Wild Jokers Syd Segal .........................................................................16
Elmsley Count

Royally Wild Syd Segal .........................................................................16


(alternate handling for T(w)oo Wild Jokers)

Even More Four On The Floor JC Wagner......................... 18


Jordan Count
Elmsley Count
Wagner Displacement Count

Thank You Le Paul Syd Segal .......................... 22


Chris Kenner ForFourFor Switch
John Cornielus Winter Change
KM Move
Top Change

Packet Lie Detector #2 JC Wagner......................... 26

Interview With A Legend..................................................... 29

Credits and References ...................................................... 32


Full Metal Jacket 1
The handling for this effect came about after J.C. watched Larry Jennings do A Logical Conclusion, from THE
CARDWRIGHT. J.C.s revision of this effect really gives it a whole new look. One thing that J.C. was always striving for
was a proper ending. He especially wanted to reveal the nal two cards as the 9 and 10 of Clubs (you will understand this
statement at the end of the routine). After watching J.C perform his handling, I went home and devised what we believe
to be the perfect ending. We hope you enjoy performing this effect as much as we do.

Effect:
Eight cards are removed and shown to be two four-of-a-kinds. One of the sets is the four 3s. The other is the four 7s.
The two packets are combined and a simple question is asked, If I add 3 and 7 together, what do I get? The spectator
responds logically with 10. The cards are counted onto the table in a very fair manner to reveal 10 cards. Next, the
magician removes 2 cards from the 10 card packet and asks, If I take 2 away from 10, what is left? The spectator will
answer 8. The cards are then dealt to the table one-at-a-time face up. To the spectators amazement, the cards that are
dealt out are now the Ace through Eight of Clubs! The two cards that were removed just moments earlier are also turned
face up to reveal the Nine of Clubs and the Ten of Clubs bringing this lesson to a logical and successful conclusion!

Setup:
Start by removing the Ace through 10 of Clubs. You will also need to remove the 3 of Hearts, 7 of Diamonds, and any
2 mates (these should be court cards). For this explanation, the court cards will be the King of Hearts and the King of
Diamonds. The remainder of the deck should be face down on the table. On top of the face down deck, place the King of
Hearts face up. On top of the King of Hearts, place the 7 of Diamonds face down followed by the 8 of Clubs, 6 of Clubs,
7 of Clubs, 5 of Clubs, 3 of Clubs, 4 of Clubs, 2 of Clubs, 3 of Hearts, and the Ace of Clubs. All of these cards on top
of the King of Hearts should be face down. From here, turn the deck face up and place the remaining King (Diamonds)
onto the face. On top of this King, place the 10 of Clubs face down followed by the 9 of Clubs. These remaining 2 Club
cards should be face down on top of the King on the face of the deck. At this point, case the deck but make sure you
know which side contains your preset packet of Ace through 8 of Clubs. This will be the side you spread at the beginning
of the effect.

Method:
Spread the top ten cards of the deck, being sure to stop at the face up king of hearts. After they are spread, simply square
the ten card packet and table it face down without calling attention to the number of cards. Remember, DO NOT
spread past the face up king of hearts. After you have removed the 10 cards from the top of the pack, drop the remainder
of the pack onto the left side of the table with the mate facing up. To the spectator, it should look like you had the cards
you needed already setup on the face of the deck. If you want, before placing the pack onto the table, ash the backside.

2 Full Metal Jacket


This will further prove the condition of the pack before
continuing on with the routine.

Call attention to the cards that you just removed. Retrieve


them from the table and state that they are two 4 of a kinds.
Casually spread them between your hands and catch a pinky
break underneath the 5th face down card. Do not give the
spectators too much time to count the cards. A quick spread
Fig. 1
and close will be sufcient. Re-square the cards and place
them into right hand biddle grip. In the process, your break
should be transferred to the right hand thumb. Drop the lower packet (cards beneath the break) to the table and transfer
the packet back into your left hand. With the 5 cards in your left hand re-spread them again holding the last 2 cards as
1 to show them as four cards. Square up and catch a left hand pinky break underneath the 2nd card from the top. What
follows is J.C.s handling of Larry Jennings Rhythm Count. With the packet being held in your left hand, pinky break
under the 2nd card, execute a double turnover. This should show the 3 of Hearts. Turn the double down and deal the top
card to the table. This card should be separate from the other packet on the table. The larger portion of the pack should
be off to the far left. After dealing the top card to the table, thumb off the next top card in the right hand. With this
card face down in the right hand ngertips, the left hand will turn palm down and ash the face of its packet . (Figure
1 is spectators view) The 3 of Clubs will show. Turn the left hand back palm up. As this hand turns back palm up, the
right hand tilts upwards ashing the face of the card at its tips. This will show the 3 of Hearts. As the face of this card is
ashed, the left hand thumbs off the top card of its face down packet on top of the single card . The card in the right tips
is tilted back face down and dropped onto the now 2 cards resting on the table. Remaining in your left hand are 2 cards.
Your right hand picks off these 2 as 1 into biddle grip. The right hand turns palm up to ash the face of this card (3 of
Clubs). Turn your right hand back palm down and drop this double onto the 3 cards resting on the table. This count will
effectively show four 3s.

Gesture down to the other small packet on the table and pick them
up. The Rhythm Count sequence just performed with the 3s packet
is repeated to show the four 7s. Once this count is completed, place
the 7s packet on top of the 3s packet. This entire group is picked up
and placed face down in left hand mechanics grip. Ask the spectator
the following question, 3 plus 7 is what? They will answer with
10. Deal the cards in your left hand onto the table one at a time. It
is important that they are dealt face down and that you reverse their
order in the process. Counting the cards out loud as you deal you
Fig. 2
should come to the number 10. To the spectator, this should come as
a surprise. The 8 cards you just showed them a moment ago have now
become 10.

Gather up the 10 cards from the table and place them back into left hand mechanics grip. Next, tilt the cards so that
the faces are towards you and spread them from hand to hand. You will notice that they run in perfect order. All that
is required is to get rid of the 3 of Hearts and 7 of Diamonds. This is taken care in the following step. As you spread
through the packet, up-jog the 3 of Hearts and the 7 of Diamonds. Strip them from the spread and place them onto the
table face down. The packet in your hand is squared and also dropped to the table face down. None of the cards should
be in contact with each other. Reach to the left side of the table and pick up the pack with the mate facing upwards.
These cards should go in left hand mechanics grip with the King of Hearts face up on top. With your free right hand,
retrieve the 3 and 7 from the table and place them face down on top of the face up mate. In one action, your left hand will
table the pack and your right hand will pick up the 8 card packet (gure 2). When your left hand drops the pack to the

Full Metal Jacket 3


table, it will turn it over. With the misdirection of your right hand
Fig. 3
approaching the packet on the right, your left hand simply turns
palm down and places the pack on the table (gure 3). An extra
subtlety here would be to spread the top few cards on top of the
pack once it hits the table. When the spectators attention returns
to the deck, everything will look as it is supposed to. What they
are really seeing are the 9 and 10 of Clubs and the mate of the
previous face up card (gure 4).

Question the spectators again with a comment like, If I remove 2


of the cards from the 10, what would that equal? Again, with logic
(or at least a somewhat decent education), they should answer
with 8. With the 8 card packet now retrieved and in left hand mechanics grip, deal the cards one at a time to the table
face up. Count each of the cards out loud to reveal the Ace through Eight of Clubs run. This will denitely be a surprise
to the spectators. To nish the routine you will reveal the 9 and 10 of Clubs. Gesture back to the pack sitting off to the
side of the table and make a comment about the 2 face down cards on top of the pack. Slowly pick them off one at a time
turning them face up to reveal the 9 and 10 of Clubs.
Fig. 4
When performing this for magicians, I like to pick the pack back
up and turn it face down. I then casually spread the cards between
the hands, hiding the reversed card at the 3rd position, to show all
face down. Most of the time they are fooled by the ending and even
more puzzled once I show all of the cards face down.

4 Full Metal Jacket


Triumph, a creation of Dai Vernon, is one of the best effects that can be performed with a pack of cards. In fact, the original
handling in STARS OF MAGIC is still one of the best methods around. I include my variation to this wonderful effect here
on the recommendation of my good friend, J.C. Wagner.

Effect:
A selection is removed from the pack and signed by a spectator. The selection, after noted by all, is returned to the pack
and lost. Half of the cards are turned face up and dropped to the table. The other half is left face down and also dropped to
the table. These two halves are legitimately shufed together face-up into face-down. With the pack in this condition, the
magician snaps his ngers and spreads the cards. To everyones amazement, the entire pack has straightened itself out to one
direction (face up) except for one card, the signed selection!

Setup:
None

Method:
Start by handing the pack out for shufing or simply shufing the cards between your hands. It is very important to instill
the fact that all of the cards face one direction prior to the beginning of the effect. Once the cards are shufed, spread them
between your hands (face down) and ask for a card to be selected. Have the card shown around and signed if you like. The
signature, while not necessary, does add to the effect and leaves the spectator with a nice souvenir. Put the face down deck
into right hand biddle grip. Swing cut a little less than half of the deck into your awaiting left hand. Have the selection
replaced on top of this half. Place the remaining half of the cards in your right hand on top of the selection (and cards) in
your left hand. When replacing this half, your left hand pinky maintains a break between the 2 halves.

With their selection beneath your break near the center of the pack, spread the cards from left to right. While spreading, it is
an easy task to keep your left little nger break separating the two halves . As you get through about half of the cards above
your break, stop spreading. Break off these cards and ip them face up onto the top of the pack. You should still be holding
the pinky break above the selection. Immediately after the face-up cards come into contact with the face-down pack, your
right hand comes over and picks off all of the cards above the break being held with your pinky. These cards are dropped to
the right side of the table. These actions should simply look as if you spread through the pack, turned some cards face up, and
then dropped them to the table. In reality, you have just dropped a packet to the table that consists of half face-up/half face-
down cards.

With the remaining cards in your right hand, spread them to show that they are all face-down. After the display, square
them, and drop them to the left side of the table. With both of these packets on the table, arrange them in preparation for a
standard tabled rife shufe.
Full Metal Jacket 5
Begin to shufe the 2 packets together, but in the following
manner: Start rifing off the face down cards in your left hand
(gure 1). After you have dropped 7 or 8 cards, begin to drop
cards from your right hand. Both packets are now being shufed
into each other. Eventually, the packet in your left hand will begin
to run short on cards. Also, the packet in your right hand will
run out of face down cards. When you feel that the right hand
packet is running low on face down cards, drop all of the cards in Fig. 1
your left hand except for the top card (gure 2). After the cards
in your left hand have been depleted (except for the selection),
your right hand will start to drop face up cards. About half way
through the face up run, drop the remaining face down card in
your left hand. This is the selection and will be shufed into
the center of the face up cards. Make sure to keep your shufe
tight so that your spectators dont see the reality of this shufe.
After the cards are interweaved, slowly push them together. It is
important to keep this entire sequence very fair.

After the cards have been pushed ush, retrieve the pack from
the table and place it into your left hand. The situation of the
pack should have 20 or so face up cards on top of the pack, the
Fig. 2
selection face down in the center of those 20 face up cards, and
the remainder of the pack face down beneath the face up cards.
To further prove the face up/face down condition and straighten
out the mess, pick a few cards off the top of the pack into right
hand biddle grip. Be careful not to cut to the selection. Rotate Fig. 3
your right hand palm up and deliver the line, Some cards face
up Return your right hand palm down and replace its packet
back on top of the packet in your left hand. Reach over the
pack again with your right hand and cut off another packet of
cards. This packet of cards will be all of the face up cards (with
selection). This should be easily accomplished due to the natural
break created by the back-to-back cards. With this packet in
right hand biddle grip, rotate your right hand palm up and
deliver the line, Some cards back-to-back Rotate your right
hand palm down and use its packet to ip the packet in your left
hand face up (gure 3). While gesturing, use your left hand pinky
to obtain a break about 10 or 15 cards down in the packet in
your left hand. Keep this break open and feed the cards in your
right hand directly into this break (gure 4). This straightens
out the entire pack (face up) and places the selection face down
approximately in the center of the pack.

From here, all that is required to do is build up the effect. Ask


the spectator if he wants his card face up or face down. If they
answer face down, simply spread the cards on the table to show
the one face down card in the center. If they name face up, turn
the pack over and spread the cards on the table. This will reveal Fig. 4
the selection face up in the center. Even though you did nothing
more in the handling, revealing their selected card in the orientation they named is very strong.

6 Full Metal Jacket


This is the re-worked, re-vamped handling of my Super Closer routine from COMMERCIAL MAGIC. This handling
takes care of every discrepancy within the original routine. I have also eliminated the spelling sequence to produce the
Kings. I myself prefer this method by far over the original. I think you will too.

Effect:
The four Aces are magically produced from a pack that has been shufed by two different spectators. Each Ace is now
freely cut into a separate part of the pack by spectators. The Aces are now found by spelling the name of each from the
top of the pack. Next, after the Aces have been found, the magician is left with a small packet of cards. These are turned
over to reveal the four Kings. In dealing for the Aces, four piles of cards have been made. These piles are turned face up
to display that the entire deck has been magically separated into the four suits.

Setup:
Remove the four Aces, the four Kings, and then separate the rest of the pack into four suits. Now assemble the pack in
the following order from the face: Any two Aces, the Heart run, the Spade run, ten Club cards, the remaining two Aces,
the King of Clubs, the remaining Club card, the King of Hearts, the King of Diamonds, the King of Spades, and nally
the Diamond run. This entire setup is shown in Figure 1.

Fig. 1

Method:
Start by giving the pack a few false cuts and false shufes. I use the Zarrow shufe and an up-the-ladder type cut. Any
that work for you should sufce. After you supposedly mix the cards, pick them up and spread them faces towards you.
You will now break the pack into four packets. Start by thumbing off all of the Heart cards (with Aces) into your right
hand. The right hand tables these face down at the far right. Continue to spread the cards from left to right until you
come to the end of the Spades run. Break these cards off into the right hand and table them face down to the left of the
Full Metal Jacket 7
rst packet. With the remaining half in your hands, spread until you come
to the end of the Clubs. Break these cards off into the right hand and
Fig. 2 place them to the left of the Spades packet. The remaining cards in your
hands are the Diamonds (plus 4 Kings, 2 Aces, and Club card). These are
dropped to the left of the Clubs packet or the furthest left.

Once the pack is separated, you will now call upon 2 spectators for
shufing. Turn to somebody on your left and hand them the 2nd pile.
This will be the 10 Club cards. Instruct them to give it a casual overhand
shufe. As you give them this pack, you will pick up the 1st pile of cards.
This is the pile of Diamonds, Kings, Aces, and Club card. While they
shufe, you will shufe your packet. With your packet in hand, start to
give it a standard overhand shufe but make sure that you run at least
the last 7 cards singly. This will bring the Aces, Kings, and Club card to
the top of this packet but will reverse their order. After you are nished
shufing, drop your packet back to its original spot on the table. Retrieve
Fig. 3
the packet of cards from the spectator on your left and replace them at
their original spot on the table also.

Repeat the above actions with the 3rd and 4th packets on the table. Hand a
spectator on your right the 3rd packet (all Spades). Instruct them to give it
a shufe (gesturing an overhand shufe). Pick up the last packet, furthest
to your right, and begin to overhand shufe it. Make sure that you shufe
the nal 2 cards (Aces) singly on top of the packet. Once the shufing is
over, retrieve the packet back from the spectator on the right and put it
back in the 3rd position. Your packet is also dropped back to the table to
the far right.
Fig. 4
What follows next an idea of Ian Baxter and one that I used in the original
handling. The situation of the packets on the table is as follows: On your
far left, you have 2 Aces on top of the packet, followed by the KC, Club,
KH, KD, KS, and the Diamonds. The two center packets contain Clubs
and Spades and the packet on your far right contains the 2 Aces on top
followed by the Hearts. With them in this row, your left hand approaches
the packet on the far left and picks off the top card of the packet.
Fig. 5 Simultaneously the right hand approaches the far right packet and picks
off its top card. These two cards are placed IN FRONT of the center 2
packets (Figure 2). The left and right hands then re-approach the outer
packets to pick them up. They are picked up and dropped onto the packets
directly next to them, the 2 center packets. This creates 2 large packets on
the table with 2 single cards (Aces) sitting directly in front of them. Next,
move the combined packets back to the outer sides of the table. They will
occupy the same space that the 1st and 4th packets did just a moment ago.
After the move, simultaneously remove the top card of each packet and
place them directly behind the single cards in the center of the table. The 4
Fig. 6 Aces are now in a square in the center of the table and the 2 large packets
rest on the outside (Figure 3). Build up the fact that the spectator shufed
the cards themselves and reveal the 4 Aces.

8 Full Metal Jacket


Replace the Aces onto the table but in a specic order. They should run
from your left to right in CHaSeD order. Simply put, the Club should
be on your left followed by the Heart, Spade, and nally the Diamond.
Once the Aces are in this order on the table, retrieve the large packet on
your left. Spread those cards face up in your hands so that only you can see
them. Break the packet in half where the Clubs meet the Diamonds. The
Diamonds (plus King packet) will go into your left hand while the Clubs
remain in your right hand. Turn both of these packets face down onto the Fig. 7
table. The packet in your left hand (Diamonds) will go behind the Ace of
Clubs and the packet in your right hand (Clubs) will go behind the Ace of
Hearts. Repeat these same actions with the remaining packet on your far
right. Spread them between your hands. Separate where the Hearts meet
the Spades. The Hearts are placed face down behind the Ace of Spades
and the Spades packet is placed behind the Ace of Diamonds (Figure 4).

The next sequence utilizes a wonderful principle in magic. This is, of


course, Gene Finnells Free Cut Principle. Reach down to the table and
pick up the Ace of Clubs. Place this card face up onto the face down packet Fig. 8
resting behind it. It is important to leave the card up-jogged for half of its
length. Instruct any spectator to reach over to the 2nd pile (packet that rests
behind the Ace of Hearts) and pluck off any amount of cards they would
like. Once they do, have them place these cards on top of the Ace of Clubs.
Next, place the Ace of Hearts onto the packet resting behind it. Any
amount of cards can be cut off of the packet behind the Ace of Spades and
placed onto the Ace of Hearts packet. Next is the Ace of Spades. This is
placed onto the packet resting behind it and a portion of cards from the
packet behind the Ace of Diamonds are placed on top of it. Last is the Ace
Fig. 9
of Diamonds. This is placed onto the cards resting behind it (Figure 5).
At this point, there isnt another packet to take any cards from. That is ok.
Here is how you will cover it. Fig. 10

Without burying the Ace of Diamonds into the packet, gather up the
packets starting at the far right. The rst person I saw use this technique
of not burying the nal Ace was Scotty York. Place the Ace of Diamonds
packet onto the Ace of Spades packet. This combined packet is then placed
onto the Ace of Hearts packet and then nally the entire portion dropped
onto the Ace of Clubs packet. Square up all of the Aces and explain that
they are lost in the pack. To illustrate this fact, spread the cards between
your hands face down. This will show face up Aces evenly distributed
Fig. 11
throughout the pack except for the Ace of Diamonds. As you reach the
bottom of the spread you will notice the face up Ace of Clubs. Spread the
Ace of Clubs into your right hand followed by 3 more face down cards
(Figure 6).

Before you square up, catch a break beneath that 3rd face down card. This
card is the King of Diamonds. With a break held at this position you will
apparently loose the Ace of Diamonds into the pack. To loose the Ace,

Full Metal Jacket 9


double undercut all of the cards beneath the break to the top of the pack. This
Fig. 12
will position the Ace of Diamonds in the correct position. If you do not want
to do a double undercut, simply place a strong crimp into the King of Hearts
prior to the effect. When it comes to this point in the routine simply cut your
crimped card to the bottom of the pack. This will effectively place the Ace of
Diamonds in the correct position.

After completing the Free Cut sequence, the Aces are now ready to be spelled
to. With the pack face down in your left hand, begin to spell Ace of Diamonds.
Start by dealing the rst 2 letters onto the table. On the 3rd letter (E of Ace),
deal that card slightly to the left of the rst 2 cards. It is not dealt separately
from the rst 2, just slightly to the left but still in contact. The remaining cards
are then dealt directly on top of the 3rd card. The Ace of Diamonds will be
Fig. 13 revealed on the card AFTER the s. Deal the face up Ace onto the dealt out
packet on the table (Figure 7). Table the packet in your hand to the right side
and pick up the just dealt out packet. When you pick it up, using your left
pinky, pull down on the 2 side-jogged cards on the bottom of the packet and
get a break above them. These were the rst 2 cards that were dealt out on A
and C. With a pinky break being held, deal the face up Ace of Diamonds onto
the table. Next, place the packet in your hand onto the Ace of Diamonds but
before you do, Gamblers Cop out those bottom 2 cards of the packet (Figure
8). Once the cards are in Cop, the right hand places this small packet onto the
Ace of Diamonds. Do not cover the entire face of the Ace. You will want to
leave at least half of its face showing. Your right hand immediately retrieves
the larger packet from the right side of the table and adds it to the Copped out
cards in your left hand (Figure 9).

The remaining Aces will be dealt out sleight free. The 2nd Ace to be revealed will be the Ace of Spades. Start dealing one
card to the table for every letter until you are nished dealing Ace of Spades. The Ace will become visible following the
nal s. Deal this Ace onto the packet just dealt. Drop the packet in your hand off to the right and retrieve the packet
that has the face up Ace of Spades on top of it. Deal the Spade onto the table and drop the packet in your hands on top
of it. Retrieve the larger portion of the pack and replace it into your left hand. It is very important that you make all of
these actions look similar to the dealing actions of the rst Ace.

The next Ace is the Heart. Deal one card to the table for every letter in the words Ace of Hearts. The Ace of Hearts
will arrive on the card following the s. Repeat all of the actions as above keeping them as copasetic as possible. Spell out
the nal Ace, the Ace of Clubs in identical fashion to the Spades and Hearts. Make sure to complete all of the dealing
procedures and to make them look similar to what has already taken place three times before it.

After the nal deal out to nd the Ace of Clubs, you should be left with a small packet of cards on the table. To be exact,
there are 5 cards there. These cards are the 4 Kings and the Club card. Retrieve them from the table and place them
into your left hand face down. Casually spread over the upper 3 cards, without reversing their order (Figure 10). Hold
the last 2 cards as 1 in your left hand. This will display four cards. Square the cards back up and catch a break beneath
the 2nd card from the top. Turn over the top card of the packet to show the King of Clubs. Pick off the King of Clubs
and the card beneath it as one. Picking off this double should be easily achieved due to the fact that you were holding a
break. This back to back double is dropped onto the face down pile resting on top of the Ace of Clubs (Figure 11). As
the right hand drops this double on top of this packet it simultaneously applies downward pressure. Your right hand is
then moved back towards yourself and spreads the packet (Figure 12). This move is completely motivated and unloads

10 Full Metal Jacket


that extra Club card where it needs to be. Turn over the new top card of the packet in your hands to reveal the King of
Hearts. This is dropped onto the packet resting behind the Ace of Hearts and the packet spread. Turn over the next card
to reveal the King of Spades and drop it onto the packet behind the Ace of Spades. Again spread this packet. The nal
card in your hand is the Kind of Diamonds. Drop this card onto the packet resting behind the Ace of Diamonds and
spread them.

The last thing to do in the routine is build it up and reveal the separated suits. Using the face up Kings resting at the
back of the face down spread, scoop up the face down cards and turn them face up (Figure 13). Re-spread them in the
same fashion as before back towards yourself. This will leave you with a great climax and beautiful display of separated
suits (Figure 14).

Fig. 14

EXTRA THOUGHTS & SUBSTITUTIONS


Some of you reading this routine may be afraid of the Gamblers Cop involved. For that, I will include a version that uses
the Vernon Addition in substitution of the Cop.

The rst changed involved is in the setup. This new setup from the face goes like this: 2 Aces, Heart run, 9 Spade cards,
10 Club cards, 2 Aces, King of Clubs, Remaining Club card, King of Hearts, King of Spades, King of Diamonds,
Remaining 2 Spade cards, and the Diamond run. If you notice, the only real difference to the setup is the 2 Spade cards
now resting above your Kings/Club/Aces stack and the swap of the King of Spades and King of Diamonds.

Begin the routine as normal with the division and shufing sequence. Produce the Aces using the Baxter idea. Continue
on with the division of the packets behind the face up Aces on the table. Complete the Free Cut sequence supposedly
loosing the Aces into the pack. Here is where it differs slightly. Instead of catching a break 3 cards beneath the face up
Ace of Clubs, grab your break 5 cards beneath the Ace of Clubs. This 5th card that you have a break beneath should be
the King of Diamonds. Double Undercut the pack at that point to lose the Ace of Diamonds. In reality, you have just cut
the 2 Spade cards to the top of the face down pack and set yourself up for the spelling sequence.

Full Metal Jacket 11


Start your spell the same as before, side-stepping those rst 2 letters spelled out.
Again deal through until the Ace of Diamonds appears. Deal it onto the small packet Fig. 15
on the table, drop the large pack in your hands directly in front of you, and pick
up the Ace of Diamonds (and packet) into your left hand. Get that same break as
before with your left pinky and transfer the cards into right hand biddle grip. The
break from the pinky will be transferred to your right thumb (Figure 15). With the
cards in this position, the left hand will approach the bottom of the packet. The left
pinky will kick those 2 cards at the bottom of the packet over into the right hand.
The cards will not be palmed but gripped by the right pinky and thumb (Figure 16).
Those two ngers should have a hold of the 2 cards by the indexed corners.

The next movement is very important. Simultaneously, the packet in your right hand Fig. 16
will be placed back into your left hand. At the same time, your right hand drops
naturally to the large packet sitting directly in front of you. The 2 cards that were
gripped between the pinky and thumb go along for the ride and land back on top of
the face down pack (Figure 17). The reasoning for your hand to drop to the pack on
the table is to move it out of the way. You should slide it off to the far right side. If your
movement of the right hand is straight downward onto the pack, the addition will go
unnoticed. It is important not to distant the large packet on the table. The further you
have to travel to unload those 2 cards, the more it will be noticeable.

After you have slid the pack to the right,


deal the Ace of Diamonds onto the table.
The small packet now in your left hand is placed on top of the Ace of
Diamonds, just like in the above handling. The remainder of the method
is identical to that already explained before. Hopefully one of these two
methods are satisfactory for your needs. If not, check out this no cop/no
switch method by Syd Segal. Here is the explanation in his words.

Fig. 17

NO COP/NO SWITCH METHOD by Syd Segal


To accomplish this effect without a switch prepare the pack in the following order. Starting at the face you should have 2
Aces, Heart run, Spade run, 10 Club cards, King of Clubs, Remaining Club card, King of Hearts, King of Spades, King
of Diamonds, 2 Jokers, and the Diamond run. This setup is nearly identical to that of the Vernon Addition method. The
difference being that instead of having the 2 Spades above your Kings/Club/Aces stack, you have the 2 Jokers.

As for the method, everything is identical to that of the Vernon Addition method except for the side-stepping of Ace
of Diamond packet. No side-step is needed due to the fact that you will not need to transfer any cards. The rst 2 cards
dealt down in the opening spell (Ace of Diamonds) will be the 2 Jokers. The addition of these 2 Jokers will offset the
spelling sequence so that no cards need to be added back to the pack to spell correctly to another Ace. After you are
legitimately nished spelling out the 4 Aces, produce the 4 Kings as described in the Final Closer.

While this method has eliminated the above mentioned sleights, there still is a little work to not expose the Jokers.
This work is accomplished when revealing the suit separation. Using the King of Diamonds to scoop up the face
down Diamonds, turn over the whole block face up and spread them back towards yourself. As you spread the face up
12 Full Metal Jacket
Fig. 18 Diamond packet to reveal the climax, spread only 9 or 10. Keep at least the last 3 cards (2
Jokers and King of Diamonds) completely square (Figure 18). This will effectively hide the
Jokers underneath the King on the face. Continue on with the other packets and reveal that
the other suits have also separated.

Do not worry about those Jokers being hidden. If for some reason one or both are exposed
in the spread, simply throw in the line, Well, Jokers always loved Diamonds! and continue
on as if they were supposed to be there.

Full Metal Jacket 13


This four of a kind production is very visual and acts as a perfect opener to any four of a kind routine. The highlight of
the routine is the face up color change which was originally a creation of Daryls. I happen to use an alternate handling
created by Peter Dufe which he has been gracious enough to let me include here. Enjoy!

Effect:
The deck is mixed and offered to a spectator. The spectator cuts to a face down card which remains a mystery for a
moment. The performer removes the card box and dumps out its contents. Inside are 3 wild Jokers. According to the
performer, they can change into any cards they wish. The box is put away and the mystery card that was just cut to
is turned face up. It is shown to be the King of Diamonds. With a brush of the thumb, the rst face up Joker visibly
changes into a King. A second Joker is gently rubbed against the selection and it too changes to a King. The nal Joker,
which lays face down between the just produced Kings, is removed by the spectator and changes into the nal King!

Setup:
You will need a deck of 52 playing cards as well as the 2 Jokers. While it is not necessary, I prefer to have 2 identical
Jokers in the deck for this effect. Start by removing the 4 Kings and placing one on top of the face down deck. It is
important to remember what King this is. For our example, lets say this is the King of Diamonds. Next, remove the 2
identical Jokers and put them on the table face up. Beneath these Jokers will go the remaining 3 Kings with the mate of
the selection going last. The order of the Joker packet from the face to back should be: Joker, Joker, Black King, Black
King, King of Hearts. This packet is placed into the card box with the faces towards the half moon cut out. The box can
be in your pocket or on the table before you start.

Method:
Start by giving the deck a few cuts or shufes retaining the position of
Fig. 1 the top card. You will now perform the Criss Cut force to force the King
of Diamonds on the spectator. Place the deck on the table and instruct a
spectator to cut off a packet of cards and have them table it. Pick up the
remaining packet on the table and place it on top of the packet they just
cut off. It is important, when placing your packet on top of theirs that you
angle your packet about 45 degrees . While doing this above action, deliver
the line that you are marking the place at which they cut.

After completing the cut sequence, reach into your pocket or onto the
table and retrieve the card box. Open the ap and remove the 5 card
packet from within. This packet should be face down in left hand

14 Full Metal Jacket


mechanics grip. Table the box off to the left side so that the half
moon cut out faces upwards and the ap is open. Next, you will
show to the audience that you are holding 3 Jokers. With your
left thumb, execute a block push off of the upper 4 cards turning
this block face up to display a Joker. Turn the block face down and
thumb off a single card into the right ngertips. Execute another
block push off turning over a triple with the right ngertips, while
holding a card in the right hand. This will show another Joker
(gure 1). Turn the triple down back onto the packet. Follow Fig. 2
up by dropping the single card in your right hand on top of the
packet. With your free right hand, turn the packet in your left
hand face up and show the bottom Joker as 3 . As a nice subtlety,
thumb-off the Joker on the face when you count it as 3. This will
show another Joker beneath it. When pulling the 3rd Joker back
onto the packet, catch a left pinky break beneath it. Fig. 3

At this point, you will ditch one of the 2 Jokers. This is done when
you reveal the selected card on the table. With your free right
hand, reach forward and remove the top card of the lower half.
This was originally the top card of the deck (King of Diamonds).
Two actions will now happen at once: As the right hand removes
the selection, the left hand drops to the table and retrieves the card
box (gure 2). The box is picked up ush with the packet in your
left hand while the left hand pinky maintains the break. After the
selection is removed and turned face up, the right hand goes back
to the left hand and removes everything above the pinky break.
The box and selection hidden underneath are taken as one and
Fig. 4
pocketed. This effectively ditches one of the two Jokers. Keep in
mind the action of turning over the selected card is performed at
the exact time the Joker is loaded on the card box. It is completely
natural for your right hand to return the left and remove the box.
No one should suspect any covert action during these procedures.

Explain that one at a time the wild Jokers will change into cards
more similar to the selection. Turn the packet in your left hand
face down and thumb off the top card. Using this card, ip the
packet in your left hand face up. With your left pinky, pull down
the bottom card of the packet (or buckle the bottom card, your
choice). Insert the face down card in your right hand into the Fig. 5
break but leave it injogged for an inch. With your right hand, push
the injogged card ush with the packet. As the card goes ush,
push down with the right thumb and catch a left pinky break
under the top 2 cards of the packet. At this point, you are ready
to start changing the Jokers. For the rst change, we will use Peter
Dufes handling of a Daryl Martinez change published in the
New York Magic Symposium. The right hand approaches the
packet in the left hand and picks off the 2 cards above the break as
one card. This double should be held by the inner right indexed

Full Metal Jacket 15


corner, rst and middle ngers below and thumb on top. Brush the face of the double a few times with the thumb of the
left hand being careful they dont split. On the 3rd or 4th brush, the left ngers open slightly and the card on the face of
the right hands double is pushed off and under the left hands cards (gure 3). The push off by the right-hand thumb is
completely covered by the brushing of the left thumb. Even after the change has taken place, brush the face of the card a
few more times. If you are having problems understanding how this move should look, email me at btl6380@aol.com for
a short video clip.

After the change, a black King should be face up in your right ngertips. With your left hand, pinky pull down (or
buckle) the bottom card of the packet. With your right hand, take the 2 cards above the break as one. These cards should
be taken beneath the single face up King but slightly side-jogged to the left (gure 4). A face-up Joker should now be
displayed in the left hand. This was the Joker wiped under the packet during the Dufe Change. With your left hand,
turn your hand palm down and tap the Joker against the King selection on the table. Turn your left hand palm up and
act surprised that the change did not happen. Place the side-jogged double held by the right hand onto the face-up Joker
in your left hand. Immediately, as if you had another idea, slide the top card of the packet in your left hand just slightly
to the right. Just enough to allow the right hand to take the card under the single card already there. As this card is placed
beneath the King in your right hand, the left hand immediately turns palm down to again tap the selection on the table
(gure 5 sideview). This wrist kill is important because you do not want to ash the King on the face of the double now
held in your left hand. Tap the double against the selected King on the table and again turn your left hand palm up. This
time the second (?) Joker has changed into the other black King, matching the selection.

Replace the 2 single cards in your right hand on top of the double in your left outjogging the face-down red King
between the face-up black Kings (the leftmost King is a double). Have a spectator reach forward and remove the
remaining face down card in the center. Have them turn the card face up to reveal the nal change into a red King. As
they are turning the card face up, Gamblers Cop the bottom card ( Joker) of the packet into the left hand. This is the
remaining Joker. Toss the Kings to the table and leave everything for examination.

EXTRA THOUGHTS AND SUBSTITUTIONS


When I originally created this effect, I ditched the Joker at the beginning in a much different way. I thought I would go
over my original handling for this as well as give you a different possible revelation.

OPEN DITCH METHOD


For starters, I originally showed that the packet in the box contained 4 Jokers, not 3. To do this have the packet in the box
stacked as follows starting at the face: Joker, Joker, Black King, Black King, King of Hearts, Joker. Remove the packet as
before but this time give it an Elmsley Count face up and display 4 Jokers. As the 3rd Joker is counted catch a little nger
break. The nal Joker in the count is placed on top of the packet (now a pinky break is held beneath the top 2 cards). At
this point, the right hand picks off the cards above the break (2 Jokers), masking them as a single Joker and simply box
them using the excuse that I only needed 3 wild Jokers for this next effect. While this isnt bad, it wasnt the best and
later I changed it to the handling written above.

ROYALLY WILD (or WHY I CHANNEL MARLO LATE AT NIGHT)


Here is an idea if you are going to go with the Open Ditch Method. Start by having the packet in the box in the
following order from the face: Joker, Joker, 10 of Spades, Jack of Spades, Queen of Spades, Joker, Ace of Spades. It is also
important that the cellophane wrapper is still intact and secured around the card box. On top of the deck, have the King
of Spades.

16 Full Metal Jacket


Start the routine as before with the selection process. Remove the box and
open it. Reach in and pull out all of the cards except the Ace of Spades.
Your ngers simply push this card back into the box as the remainder of the
packet is brought out. The box is tabled half moon side down. Continue
with the No Ditch Method and remove the double from the face of the
packet. Using your left hand, pick up the card box from the table. Your
right hand will now put the 2 Jokers directly into the space between the
cellophane wrapper and the box (gure 6). This preceding action should
look identical to how it would look if you were putting the Jokers into the
card box. After the Jokers have been loaded into the cellophane space, the
box is tabled and the remainder of the routine is the same. After the nal
Fig. 6 change, make a comment that one more card is necessary to complete the
royal ush. Make a gesture back to the box and comment on the remaining
Joker inside. Open the card box and let the Ace of Spades fall from within
to conclude the routine.

Full Metal Jacket 17


This effect was originally shown to Paul Green about 30 years ago. Paul has since published his version on a recent
DVD. My version has been updated over the years and now includes a nice move not in the original routine. Do not
overlook this effect. The method, while simple, produces one of the strongest reactions possible from my spectators.

Effect:
A card is selected, shown around, and returned to the pack. Once lost in the mix, the performer runs through the pack
face up and removes four cards. The deck is set aside and no longer used in the effect. One of the four cards is turned
face up, the packet given a shake, and shown that all four cards have turned face up. Next, two face down cards are
sandwiched between two face up cards. The entire packet is turned face down and shown again (after some magic) that
all four cards face the same direction, face down. Once last time, the top card of the packet is turned face up. With a
snap of the ngers, all of the cards within the packet turn face up. To conclude, each card is shown and dropped onto the
ground. The question, Have you seen your selection? is asked to the spectator as each card is dropped to the oor. They
answer with a denite No. They are then asked to place a foot on top of any of the four cards. The card they touch is
turned over to show that it has changed into the selection!

Setup:
None

Method:
From a shufed pack, have any card selected and shown around. Once the Fig. 1
spectators have committed its identity to memory, have it returned. Control
it to the top using your favorite method. The method I use is explained in
Packet Lie Detector #2. After it is controlled, turn the pack so that the faces
are towards you. Do a wide spread and catch a glimpse of the selection resting
on top of the pack. Once you know what the selection is, square the pack and
drop the cards back to waist level. Cut about 10 cards from the face to the
back of the pack. This will bury the selection down about 10 or so cards from
the top of the pack. Again, bring the cards back to your eye level and spread
through the pack. You will now remove the selection and 3 contrasting cards.

For example, if the glimpsed selection is the 4 of Hearts, you will remove
a black Jack, black Queen, black King, and the selection. The suits of the opposite cards should be a mix, not just
spades or clubs. Say the selection is a King of Spades. In this case, you will remove a red Three, red Four, red Five, and
the selection. Again, remove both diamonds and hearts for the contrasting cards. The order of the cards is also very
18 Full Metal Jacket
important. The order they need to be in, after they are removed, will be the
selection at the face followed by the opposite cards. The setup is quite easy to
accomplish without drawing undue attention to your actions. More than likely,
the selection will be the last card removed from the pack. Use this to scoop up
the 3 cards already removed on the table (Figure 1). This will put you in the
proper starting position.

After you have removed the four cards from the pack, place them in left hand
mechanics grip. The packet should be face down. Obtain a break above the
bottom card in preparation for a triple lift. A break can be created from either
a rst nger buckle or a pinky pull down. If you prefer not to get a break,
Fig. 2 simply do a block push-off of the upper 3 cards when doing the triple. Anyway,
after your break is obtained, execute a triple lift. Explain that if you turn one
card face up, they all turn face up. After delivering this line, execute a Jordan Count. This will display 4 face-up court or
number cards. The selection will not be seen. If you are unfamiliar with the Jordan Count, here is a brief description:

Your right hand grasps the right long side of the packet between thumb
(above) and rst and second ngers (beneath). Your left thumb peels the
top card onto your left palm. Peel the next card onto the rst one. As your
left hand returns back to take the third card it aligns the rst two cards
beneath the original packet. Your right thumb immediately pushes all the
cards above the bottom card to the left as a block. These are taken by the
left hand as you pretend to take the third card. Simply place the last single
card held by your right hand on top of the cards in your left hand.

After showing the 4 cards face up, thumb off the top card of the packet
and use it to ip over the 3 card packet in your hand. Place this card face
up but up-jogged for half its length on top of the packet in your hand Fig. 3
(Figure 2). Reach under the packet with your right hand and remove the
bottom card of the packet. Turn this card face up and replace it back to
the bottom of the packet. This card is left in-jogged for about half of its length (Figure 3). Explain that you will sandwich
2 face up cards between 2 face down cards. Square up the entire packet and ip it face down. Perform an Elmsley Count
to display that all of the cards have now turned face down. If you are unfamiliar with the Elmsley Count, here is a brief
description:

Your right hand grasps the right long side of the packet between thumb
(above) and rst and second ngers (beneath). Your left thumb peels the
Fig. 4 top card onto your left palm. Next, using the right thumb, push over all of
the cards above the bottom card of the packet. The left hand comes back to
retrieve this block. Two actions now happen at once. First, your left hand
clips the block from the right hand. Second, the left hand replaces its single
card back onto the bottom of the packet (really only one card) now in your
right hand. Finish the count by simply peeling off the remaining two cards
from the right to the left hand.

While executing the Elmsley Count to show the 4 face down cards, be sure
to catch a break after the 3rd card is counted. After the Elmsley, 4 cards
should have been shown face down and you now have a break beneath the

Full Metal Jacket 19


second card from the top. Execute a double lift, turning supposedly one card
Fig. 5
face up. Execute another Elmsley Count to show 4 cards now face up. At no
point during all of these counting procedures have you even mentioned their
selection. You do not need to. After every count the spectators are seeing that
their selected card is not there. We are slowly leading them down the garden
path

To continue, after the Elmsley Count is used to show 4 face up cards, thumb
off the top 2 cards of the packet into your right hand. Place these to the
bottom of the packet in your left hand and turn the entire packet over. The
next sequence will show the faces of 4 cards, none of which is their selection.
It also uses a sequence of moves, using a reverse nger action that I previously
published on my Queens Debate videotape called the Wagner Displacement Count.

With the packet face down in your left hand, turn the top card of the
packet face up. Next, get a break above the bottom card in preparation Fig. 6
for a triple turnover. Again, if you want, simply do a block push-off.
Execute a triple lift to turn the card face down. Immediately, after the
triple has landed face down, catch a natural break between the 2nd and 3rd
cards in the packet. These 2 cards are back-to-back so getting this break
should not be a problem. The next move will reverse the 2nd card in the
packet. What it should look like to the spectators is that you snap the
top card of the pack and drop it to the ground. With your break under
the top 2 cards, the right hand will grasp the right side of the double and
slide it across the top of the packet (Figure 4). The drag is equivalent to
the opening action when turning over a double. As the 2 cards come to
the far right edge of the packet, the cards in the left hand are tilted into
a perpendicular position to the double being held at the right hand ngertips (Figure 5). In one quick brush upwards, the
bottom card of the double held at the right ngertips is re-deposited onto the packet in the left hand (but face down). To
accomplish this, extend your ngers contacting the face of this card (Figure 6). This will cause the card to turn back face
down. At the same time the bottom card is replaced onto the packet, the left hand thumb gives the back of the face down
card in the right hand a snap. The audible sound of this snap will cover any sound the lower card makes as it falls back
onto the packet. After the snap, the card is immediately dropped to the ground. This card is the selection. This above
sequence sounds very confusing on paper, but with the help of the illustrations provided, it should take no time at all to
master. If you continue to have trouble visualizing these moves, email Syd Segal at btl6380@aol.com for a short video
clip explanation.

After the rst card is dealt down onto the ground, turn over the next card in the packet. This will show a completely
different card. This is a nice touch that the previous sequence leaves you in. Turn this card face down and drop it to
the ground. It is very important to duplicate the actions that you used previously for the rst card. Do not simply drop
the card to the ground without giving it that audible snap. Also, make sure to drop this card to the right or left of the
selection on the ground. You will want the cards completely separated for the nale to the routine.

For the third card, reach under the 2 cards left in your hand and pull out the bottom card. Turn this card face up onto
the remaining card in your left hand. Turn it down, give it the snap, and deal it off to the ground. This too needs to fall
to the right or left of the selected card. What you are aiming for is a straight row of cards with the selected card falling at
either the 2nd or 3rd position in the row.

20 Full Metal Jacket


To show the nal card, my right hand simply picks it up, ashes the face and drops it to the ground. This was the rst
card shown in the sequence but enough time has passed that the spectator will not remember it. When I drop the card to
the ground, I also make sure it falls to the proper position that I need it. If the selection was on my far left and the other
2 cards were to the right of it, I would need this nal card to go the left of the selection. This would place it in that 2nd
position in the row (from left to right).

After the row is set (selection in one of the 2 middle positions), I ask the spectator to place their foot on top of any of the
cards on the ground. Most of the time, they will put their foot on top of the selection. This happens close to 90% of the
time. If they do, build the effect up as much as possible then reveal the change. There will be times that they do not put
their foot on top of the selection. From here, some simple Magician Force techniques can be applied to arrive at your nal
destination.

Here are a few thoughts on which position to place the selection. As I have mentioned above, it must fall at one of the
center positions. If the spectator is standing to my left, I will drop the selection in the 2nd position (from my left). If they
are standing more on my right side, then the selection goes to the 3rd position (from my left). If you follow this simple tip,
more often then not, they will place their foot on the selected card.

Full Metal Jacket 21


This is simply my handling of an effect in The Card Magic of Le Paul. The original effect, 4 Ace Transposition, had a
repetitive feel to it. I changed the handling to t my style as well as made each change more impossible.

Effect:
The four Aces are shown and dropped to the table. The pack is mixed and four more indifferent cards are removed.
The Aces are lost into four separate parts in the pack and the magician claims that he will try to make the indifferent
cards switch places with the Aces. One at a time, the indifferent cards change places with the Aces with the nal change
happening in the spectators hand!

Setup:
None

Method:
Start by having the Aces produced or taken from the pack. To produce them, I would suggest T(w)oo Wild Jokers
elsewhere in this book. Either way, have the Aces on the table for examination. With the pack face down in your left
hand, retrieve a break beneath the upper 3 cards. Make sure that the tip of the left pinky is actually in the break. Retrieve
the Aces face up from the spectators and execute Chris Kenners
Fig. 1 ForFourFor switch. Heres how: With the Aces spread face up in your
right hand ngertips they are brought over the top of the pack. The
left pinky nger is extended outwards. This causes the cards above
the break to open like a book. This is covered by the spread of aces
in the right hand. As the Aces are displayed, the right hand ngers
(underneath the Aces) contact the 3 cards that were just opened
(Figure 1). The right hand ngers grasp those cards adding them to the
back of the 4 Aces. The entire 7 card packet is then turned face down
on top of the pack. This will effectively switch out 3 of the Aces. For
a brief video clip explanation of this move, please contact Syd Segal at
btl6380@aol.com

After you have completed the switch, the Aces should be at the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th positions in the pack. Spread over the
top 4 cards, square them and drop them to the left side face up. The spectators should believe that these are the 4 Aces.
In fact, they are 3 indifferent cards and 1 Ace. Next, give the pack a few shufes and false cuts retaining the 3 Aces on top
of the pack. After you have done this, spread over the top 4 cards of the pack, square them and drop them to the right

22 Full Metal Jacket


side of the table face up. Refer to these as indifferent cards. These are
Fig. 2 really 3 Aces and 1 indifferent card.

At this point, you will loose the supposed Aces into four separate spots
in the pack. Retrieve the packet on the left side of the table (3 indifferent
cards and 1 Ace) turning them face down in the process. Refer to these
cards as Aces and have them face down in your left hand. Your right
hand moves the deck so that it sits directly in front of you on the table
horizontally. Thumb off the top card of the 4-card packet into your right
hand. Your left hand, with cards, approaches the pack on the table and
lifts 3/4 of the pack off the table. To do this, your left hand must turn
palm down (Figure 2). The face of the packet in your hands will ash that
Ace on the face. This is a brilliant subtlety that Le Paul incorporated into
his original routine. Place that rst face down card into this spot in the pack. Replace the larger portion of the pack onto
the tabled packet but leave the card just placed outjogged for half of its
length. Repeat the above actions for the next 2 cards each time burying
them a little higher up in the pack. With the last card, the only Ace, your
left hand simply lifts off the top 2 cards of the pack on the table and
the Ace is inserted 3rd from the top. It is important to make it look very
normal and non-rehearsed. If they think you are placing this last Ace in a
specic spot, the effect is lost. At this point, these 4 cards are still sticking
out of the pack in four separate locations. Slowly and deliberately push
them ush with the pack. To the spectators, the Aces are completely lost.
Pick up the deck and place it into your left hand face down.
Fig. 3
Next, focus all of your
Fig. 4 attention on the face up packet on the right side of the table. To the
spectators, these should be the indifferent cards. With your right hand,
turn this packet face down on the table and pick up the top card of the
packet. As your reach forward to retrieve this card, your left hand will
push over the top card of the deck and get a break under it. Place the face
down card in your right hand on top of the deck and immediately execute
a Double Turnover to display an indifferent card. Turn the double face
down and thumb off the top card of the pack into your awaiting right
hand. At this point, invoke the magic (I usually twirl the card on my
extended nger) and turn the card face up to reveal the change. Drop this
Ace off to the right side of the table. Most of the time your spectators
will immediately jump for that card to see if they can nd the secret. If
they do look at the card, thats great. If not, instruct them to take a look at the card. While they are examining the Ace,
slip cut the top card (the indifferent card you just showed) into the center of the pack. Briey, with the deck in left hand
mechanics grip, your right hand approaches the deck from above with thumb at the back and ngers in the front. Your
right thumb rifes up the back of the pack to about the center. The left thumb contacts the top card of the pack and
applies downward pressure. In one quick action, the upper half of the pack is separated and swept to the right by the
right hand. Simultaneously, the left hand thumb drags that top card of the pack into the center. This shouldnt look like a
move and should be done on the off-beat.

Once they are nished examining the Ace, your right hand retrieves the next face down card from the packet on the table.
Again, obtain a break underneath the top card of the deck. The same technique as before can be used. Place the card

Full Metal Jacket 23


Fig. 5 in the right hand on top of the pack maintaining that break. Execute another
Double Turnover to display yet another indifferent card. With the double
face up on top of the pack you will execute John Cornelius Winter Change.
To do this change, get a left hand pinky break underneath the face up double
on top of the deck. With the deck in your left hand, right hand above, your
left ngers will extend and push out the lowermost card (Ace) of the double
(Figure 3 with right hand missing). As this card exits from beneath the face-
up indifferent card, it is fed into the right hand palm. The card is not actually
palmed, but is being held against the right hand palm by the up-wards pressure
of the left hands ngertips (Figure 4 under view). The positioning of the card
in the right hand palm is also very important. The right-hand ngertips should
be able to spread apart and have the card completely hidden. After the card
is freed from the deck and resting against your right hand palm, begin to move your right hand (with card) back across
the face of the pack. Your left thumb drops onto the face of the pack and the right hand palm and card are slid across
the face. The left thumb keeps the card from dropping onto the face of
the pack prematurely. Continue moving across the face of the pack, using
your left thumb and wrist to keep the card in contact with your right hand
palm (Figure 5 with right hand missing). Move your right hand back to
the right, back across the face of the pack and deposit the Ace onto the
face. Make sure to remove your left thumb from the face of the pack before
your right hand makes the journey back across to deposit the card. This
is a very visual change and can be devastating when performed properly. If
interested, email me for a short video clip explanation of this move.

After the change is completed, you will need to clean up your situation. To
clean up, you will need to execute the KM Move. With the double still face Fig. 6
up on top of the pack, left hand pinky break beneath it, your right hand
grasps the right edge of the double. The right hand now drags the double to the right edge of the deck. Simultaneously,
the left hand begins to turn palm down and the left edge of the double cards pivot against the right edge of the deck and
begin to close book-fashion. The right ngers extend pushing the indifferent card of the double against the top of the
deck (Figure 6). The double cards are wiped against the top of the deck as the indifferent card is left on top of the deck
and the Ace snaps away, still held by the at the ngertips. The KM Move should be done under the guise of a gesture by
the left hand against the just-produced Ace.

After the KM Move is done, the face up Ace in your right hand is immediately used to scoop up the rst Ace on the
right side of the table. This larger action of scooping up the Ace will cover the KM Move completely. After the scoop,
you should now be holding 2 face-up Aces in the right hand, and the deck in the left. Drop these Aces to the left side of
the table and ask a different spectator to fully examine them. While these Aces are being looked over, do another slip cut
with the top card of the pack. This is the nal slip cut in the routine.

So far, the changes have escalated in their impossibility with every phase. The rst card was changed face down, the
second face up, and now the third will be changed without even touching it. With the pack in your left hand, use your
right hand to rife the front edges of the pack towards the remaining 2 face down cards on the table. Act as if some magic
has taken place and slowly approach the top card of the 2 on the table. Turn this card face up to reveal the 3rd Ace. This
Ace is then dropped with the other 2 already revealed.

The nal Ace, in my experience, has the strongest affect on your laymen audience. The card on the table really is an
indifferent card and the nal Ace should be resting on top of the face down pack. This puts you in a perfect position to

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do a Top Change. Turn over the nal face down card on the table
Fig. 7 and act surprised at the fact that it hasnt changed into the nal Ace.
Pick the card up in your right hand and gesture to a spectator to
hold out their hand palm up. When all attention is focused on the
spectator following your directions, execute a Top Change with the
card in your right hand. Heres how: The left hand gestures with
the deck toward the spectator, then moves back toward the body.
At this point in the left hand movement, the card held by the right
hand is exchanged for the top card of the deck. Basically the left
thumb slides the top card of the deck over, while the right-hand
card slides over and almost completely aligns with this side-jogged
card (Figure 7). The right hand thumb pushes the top card toward
the deck while the ngers below drag the bottom card into the
right hand ngertips. There is a very soft, push-pull movement
Fig. 8
here on the two cards as they are exchanged over the top of the
deck (Figure 8). Immediately after the change is made the left hand
moves away and gestures toward the spectator. The top change
is most effective when it is part of the larger body movement of
pointing or gesturing at something or someone. The right hand
should not move as the gesturing and change is made. After the
card is switched out, immediately drop the deck to one side of the
table. Next, place the single face down card into the awaiting palm
of the spectator. Have them cast a shadow or do anything magical.
Conclude by having them turn over the card in their hand to reveal
the nal change.

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This effect came about after reading through an old issue of Apocalypse. The original effect titled Spel(l)egant (Vol. 20,
Issue #4, April 1997) used an idea from Jim Steinmeyer. After playing with this method, I worked out a handling in which
I was able to show the question cards as being correct. I was also able to work out a way, where at the end, the spectators
could name ANY card and spelling that card would reveal their selection. This is something I have done now for quite
sometime and it never lets me down. Try it out, I think you will agree.

Effect:
A card is selected by a spectator, returned to the pack and lost through shufing. The magician removes a small packet of
cards to use as a lie detector. A series of questions regarding the spectators selection are asked and the spectator is given
the option of lying or telling the truth. No matter the answer, the small packet reveals whether they have lied or told the
truth. After 3 questions are asked, the selected card is determined but not yet found. The spectator is asked to name ANY
card (could even be the selection). The magician spells out the named card with the small packet and at the end of this
procedure nds the selected card!

Setup:
None

Method:
From a completely shufed pack, spread the cards between the hands and have a card selected. Have the card noted by the
spectators and replaced in the pack. Control this card to the top of the pack via your favorite method. I use a variant on the
double undercut which goes like this. Swing cut the upper half of the deck into your awaiting left hand. The selection is
replaced on top of this packet. The remaining cards in your right hand are placed on top of the cards in your left hand and
a left pinky break is maintained. A subtlety I usually throw in here is to simply rife the front edge of the pack. This will
reinforce that no breaks are being held, even though one is.

With the cards in this position, your right hand approaches the deck and picks off a small packet of cards off the top.
These cards are dropped to the table. These actions are repeated 2 or 3 times more until you have only a few cards left
above your break. When you get to this position, simply remove all of the cards ABOVE the break and place them onto
the table. Remaining in your hand is about half of the pack with the selection on top of it. This packet is taken from
your left hand by your right and dropped in its entirety on top of the half that is already on the table. This will bring the
selection back to the top. Immediately from here, do a normal rife shufe keeping the selection on top of the pack.

After the spectators are sure that their selection is really lost, pick the deck up and spread the cards faces towards you.
What you are looking for is the spectators selection, which just so happens to be on top of the pack. Spread the cards out

26 Full Metal Jacket


wide and glimpse their selection (Figure 1). For this write up, Fig. 1
imagine the selection to be the 4 of Diamonds. Their selection
will determine which 12 cards you will now remove. This 12
card packet will be your lie detector.

The order of this packet is essential. The order from the face of
the packet to the rear is:
Any Card
Same Color as Selected
Same Suit as Selected
Same Color as Selected
Any Card, Selected Card
Same Value as Selected but Opposite Color
4 Same Suit Cards as Selected Fig. 2
Any Card.

This 12 card packet is removed in two steps. After glimpsing


the selection, cut about 10 or so cards from the face of the
pack to the back. This will bury the selection about 10 cards
from the top. Now, spread through and remove the rst 6
cards for the lie detector packet. These 6 cards are removed
in this order: Any Card, Same Color as Selected, Same Suit as
Selected, Same Color as Selected, Any Card, and the Selected
Card (Figure 2). Once these 6 are up-jogged in the spread, strip
them out and place them on the table face down. Next, after
Fig. 3
the rst 6 are removed, spread the pack again and up-jog the
nal 6 cards. They are: Same Value as Selected but Opposite
Color, 4 Cards with the Same Suit as Selected, and Any Card
(Figure 3). Again, strip these 6 out and place them face down
on top of the 6 already on the table. The deck is dropped to one
side of the table and is no longer used in the effect.

With the 12 cards in hand, face down, explain to the spectator


that you will ask him 3 questions regarding his selection. With
each question, the spectator can either lie or tell the truth. The
rst question that is asked is, Was your card a Number Card or a Court
Card? If they answer with Number, deal one card to the table for each Fig. 4
letter. When you reach the letter R, you will deal that card in front of the
others already dealt. If the spectator names Court, the procedure is slightly
different. Start dealing the cards face down onto the table up to the letter T.
The card following the T in Court will be the card that is placed in front of
the dealt out packet. Either way, whether they name Court or Number, the
6th card down is always dealt to the front of the others (Figure 4). This card
should be dealt face up.

When nished with the dealing procedure, drop the remaining cards in
your hand on top of the dealt out cards. Pick up the now 11 card packet and
point attention towards the single card dealt out in front of all the others.

Full Metal Jacket 27


Depending on whether they lied or told the truth will determine your patter. In
this example, since the card was the Four of Diamonds, the card dealt will be a
number card with the same value but opposite color.

The next question you ask the spectator will be if their card was Red or Black?
This time, no matter the answer, you will deal one card for each letter and place
Fig. 5 the nal letters card in front of all others (Figure 5). Again, drop the packet in
your hands onto the small packet on the table. Again, comment on whether they
lied or told the truth and continue on. This card by the way will be one of Same
Color as the Selected Card.

The nal question asked will determine which suit the selected card is. Ask,
Was your card a Club, Heart, Spade or Diamond? Again, deal a card onto the
table for every letter of the suit they name. Make sure you do not make the suits
plural. At the end of the deal, on the last letter of the suit named, place that
card in front of the rest (Figure 6). This card should match the suit. A few cards will be left in your hand, a few on the
table, and one in front of the rest. Instead of dropping the cards in your hand onto the dealt out packet like before, catch
a break between the 2nd and 3rd cards from the bottom. You can do this by simply spreading the packet in your hands.
Once the break is maintained, cut all of the cards above the break
to the packet on the table. Follow this by placing the remaining 2 Fig. 6
cards in your hand onto the packet on the table. This positions the
selection 2nd from the top of the face down packet.

To reveal the selection, make a gesture back to the cards that are
face up on the table. There should be 3 of them. Mention that if
combine the card on your left and the card on your right you will
have the selection. While this is amazing, you have still not found
the selected card. What they do not know is that it rests 2nd from
the top of the small packet resting in your hand. To nd it, you
can spell the selection or ANY other card in the pack. Make this
choice up to your spectator. No matter their answer, here is the
procedure to correctly reveal their selection.

The process is identical for 3 of the suits, the Clubs, Hearts, and Spades. I will go over these 3 possibilities rst. Say the
spectator says 4 of Clubs. First, spell out the word four, one card for each letter onto the table. After the spell, drop the
cards in your hand onto the packet on the table. Pick the packet back up and spell out the word of , again one card for
each letter. When nished with this word, drop the packet in your hand on top of the packet on the table and pick them
up. Last, you will spell the word Clubs. This time, no matter the suit, the suit itself will be made plural. After you deal out
the 5 cards for the word Clubs, turn over the top card of the packet in your hand to reveal their selection.

Now, what if they name a Spade or Heart? No problem. Everything is the same as above except for which card to turn
over. For the Spades and Hearts, you must turn over the card dealt out on the letter s. This will reveal the selected card.

The tricky suit is the Diamond. The dealing procedure differs slightly but not in an obvious manner. Instead of only
spelling the value on the rst deal, you will combine both the value word and the word of on the rst deal. That is to say,
if the spectator names the King of Diamonds, you will deal out 6 cards (4 cards for the word King and 2 for the word
of ) on the rst deal. After dealing out those particular cards, proceed as before and drop the remaining packet in your
hand onto the packet on the table. Pick them up and proceed to deal out the word Diamonds. Turn over the card on the
S of Diamonds to reveal the selection.

28 Full Metal Jacket


Q. Explain briey, when and how did you get into magic?

A. I got started in magic when I was about 8 years old. I was originally fascinated with magic after seeing a
magician at an elementary school Halloween carnival.

Q. Who were some of your mentors coming up in magic?

A. Some of my mentors included Don Alan, Harry Lorayne (more specically Close Up Card Magic) and of
course Dai Vernon.

Q. At what point in your magic career did you decide to go behind the bar and why?

A. It was 1969 that I decided to get into bar magic. At the time I was a hurting for cash and needed a job.

Q. You were close friends with magicians like Michael Skinner, Larry Jennings, and Dai Vernon. Out of all of
your time spent with them, what do you feel was the best advice they ever gave you?

A. Each one of those greats gave me advice I still go by today. With Vernon, he emphasized naturalness. Keeping
it natural and simple are two guidelines I live by. Jennings would always tell me to pull down when getting
breaks. He never liked lifting up. Skinner loved effects with surprise endings. One bit of advice he gave me
was to construct effects with endings that the spectators wouldnt see coming. Overall though, each of them
told me something that has proven true for the last 36 years. That is to ALWAYS include a classic in your
repertoire.

Q. Tell me a great story from either your early experiences at the Castle or at your own Magic Lounge.

A. Well lets see. At the Magic Lounge, after doing a dice stacking routine, I would always produce a shot glass.
This particular shot glass would be lled with watered down coke and give the impression that it was alcohol.
After producing it I would always drink it. One night, John Kovarovic, Mike Stilwell and Terry Lunceford
switched out that shot glass for one that was lled with 151 Rum. I produced it as normal and drank it. I
almost fell right on my ass not expecting the kick it was gonna have. I coughed for a few moments and just
stood there while everyone laughed.

Full Metal Jacket 29


At the Castle, my most memorable times were spent with the great Francis Carlyle. He and I became good
friends and I will always remember the ner points on misdirection and the top change that he gave me.

Q. At one point in your magic career, you took somewhat of a break. If you can, why did you take that break and
what persuaded you to come back?

A. After my lecture tour in 1990, I had felt that all of the goals I had set out had been accomplished. My goals
were very simple and included becoming an author, publishing a book, doing a national lecture tour, owning my
own bar and most importantly, teaching the fraternity. Another driving point to my break was to spend time
with my family.

I decided to come back after realizing that I had been missed by my friends. Bob Sheets and Terry Lunceford
would attend conventions and would come back to me and say people would come up to them asking if I was
ok or where had I been. There were even rumors that I had died. I realized that I still had a lot to teach and
wanted to be apart of the community once more.

Q. Out of all of the effects that you have created, which do you like most performing? Which gets you the fucking
money so to speak?

A. My favorite effect would be the original Torn and Restored card from 7 Secrets. Another favorite is the glorpy
handkerchief trick also from 7 Secrets (Spectral Silk).

Q. In your spare time, when you are not working, do you practice?

A. Of course I still practice daily. I try to dedicate at least 3 hours working out new ideas.

Q. Are you currently lecturing?

A. Yes I try to lecture whenever possible. In fact, in June 2005 I will be lecturing in Minnesota at their local
Convention. I will also be appearing in September at the Magic In The Rockies Convention. Lectures are
really my favorite thing to do because I love giving back to the community.

Q. If someone was interested in bringing you in for a lecture or convention, how could they contact you?

A. I can be contacted through my website: www.jcwagnersmagic.com

30 Full Metal Jacket


Questions That Didnt Quite Cut It by Anthony Miller

Q. If people could only know one thing about you, other than magic, would it have anything to do with your
adventures in that Mexican prison?

A. No just the Diego from Diego.

Q. Hottest MARRIED babe in magic... A- Hannah Ammar B- Alison Martinez C- Jinger (of Mark Kalin &
Jinger)... Please explain why...Your own wife or girlfriend is NOT eligible... Unless she performs regularly at a
gentlemans club... If so provide pictures.

A. All of the above could come into my bar anytime and I would show them the handkerchief trick.

Q. If you could have any card in the deck permanently removed from all decks, what would it be? (This question
was selected from many asked on The Magic Cafe)

A. 2 of Clubs

Q. Boxers or briefs?

A. Briefs

Q. As a magic bartender, would you use your powers for evil? If the money was right?

A. I do it ALL the time ha ha.

Q. If Dai Vernon and Ed Marlo were revived as esh eating zombies, would you still try and session with them?

A. Sure, I love eating esh.

Q. If you were a betting man who would you put your money on in a all out ght between David Coppereld and
David Blaine?
A. David Blaine

Q. For a large sum of money, would you arm wrestle Rene Lavand?

A. Yeah but I would probably loose.

Q. Between Lee Asher or Paul Harris, who would you trust more with your girlfriend on a deserted island for a
week?

A. Probably Paul Harris. Knowing him, he would never put his deck down.

Full Metal Jacket 31


CREDITS AND REFERENCES
A LOGICAL LESSON
The original routine, A Logical Conclusion, was published by Larry Jennings in A Visit With Larry Jennings (1982). It was later
re-printed in The Cardwright.
Rhythm Count - This rst appeared in A Visit With Larry Jennings (1982) where it is referred to as a Double Olram Subtlety. There
are two handlings in the notes. The rst appears in the effect Uni-Flection and the second in the effect A Logical Conclusion. The
second handling is what appears in Classic Magic where it was rst christened the Rhythm Count.

VERY FAIR TRIUMPH


The Triumph plot was created by Dai Vernon and published in Stars of Magic.

FINAL CLOSER
This original handling for this routine was published in JC Wagners Commercial Magic. The name of that routine is Super Closer and
can be found on page 23.
Ian Baxter Four Ace Production This can be found in Baxters Linking Ring One Man Parade(1969) or in JCs Commercial Magic
(page 24)
Gene Finnell Free-Cut Principle - First appeared in John P. Hamiltons marketed effect, Eyes Of The Gods (1948). Finnell later
named it the Free-Cut Principle.
Gamblers Cop While the origin of this move is unknown, a great write up discussing its details can be found in Roberto Giobbis
Card College Volume 3.

EXTRA THOUGHTS AND SUBSTITUTIONS FOR FINAL CLOSER


Vernon Transfer - This is a gamblers move that Vernon introduced to magicians in Ten Card Problems (1932).

T(W)OO WILD JOKERS


The Wild Card premise was created by Peter Kane and was published under the title Watch The Ace! in Hugards Magic Monthly
(April 1962).
Criss-Cut Force - Max Holden. According to Roberto Giobbi it rst appeared in the effect The New Knife and Selected Cards in
the July 1925 issue of The Magical Monthly.
Daryl Martinez Change This change was originally published in Jon Racherbaumers M-U-M Column under the title Jack Flash
Transpo. It was later reprinted in the rst New York Magic Symposium under the title Passing The Sandwich. Peter Dufes addition
to this change was to use the taken card as cover for the bottom of a small packet. This is demonstrated in the T(w)oo Wild Jokers
routine as well as in unpublished routine by Dufe himself.
Gamblers Cop See FINAL CLOSER

OPEN DITCH METHOD FOR T(W)OO WILD JOKERS


Elmsley Count Alex Elmsley. Appeared in the marketed effect, The Four-Card Trick (1959).

32 Full Metal Jacket


EVEN MORE FOUR ON THE FLOOR
This original routine was shown to Paul Green and later published in his notes. JCs newer method eliminates any discrepancies but
uses Pauls idea of dropping the cards onto the ground.
Jordan Count Charles Jordan. Appeared in the effect The Phantom Aces in Thirty Card Mysteries (1919).
Elmsley Count See OPEN DITCH METHOD FOR T(W)OO WILD JOKERS
Wagner Displacement Count This was originally published on JC Wagner Queens Debate video tape.

THANK YOU LE PAUL


The original handling for this effect can be found in Paul Le Pauls wonderful book, The Card Magic of Le Paul under the title 4 Ace
Transposition.
Chris Kenner ForFourFor Switch - Kenner had this in both The Right Stuff (1985) and The Magic Man Examiner One (1991). It
appears the basic idea goes back to Marlo (Expert Card Conjuring, 1968, p. 37).
John Cornelius Winter Change Originally appeared in Harry Loraynes Apocalypse Issue 9.
KM Move - Tony Kardyro, Edward Marlo (The K.M. Move, Marlo, 1962).
Top Change Another move whose origin is unknown. A great write up on the exact mechanics can be found in Roberto Giobbis
Card College Volume 1.

PACKET LIE DETECTOR


JCs inspiration for this routine came after reading Jim Steinmeyers Spel(l)egant in an old Apocalypse (Vol. 20, Issue #4, April 1997).
The Lie Detector plot dates back to Martin Gardener.

Full Metal Jacket 33