Você está na página 1de 24

EU Sugar

VOL. 27 NO. 5 OCTOBER 2017 FREE COPY WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM

Quota System
Comes to
an end
T
By European Commission The end of the quota system
he very last agricultural quota follows significant reform of the
system in place, managing sector. The very last agricultural
sugar production in the EU, were quota system in place, managing
scrapped on September 30, after sugar production in the European
nearly 50 years, part of a major Union, were scrapped on 30 Sep-
CAP reform and restructuring tember 2017, after nearly 50 years.
process. The decision to end the sugar
The sugar quota system was quotas now was agreed between
introduced with the first Common the European Parliament and
Lauren Agricultural Policy rules on sugar Member States in the 2013 reform
Le Franc, in 1968, along with a support price of the Common Agricultural pol-
icy (CAP) after a major reform
for producers set at a level signif-
a Jamaican icantly above the world market and restructuring process initiated
entrepreneur price. The decision to end the in 2006.
residing in Continued on page 3

Jamaican Coffee Trader


quota system for sugar was taken
the United by EU Member States in 2006.
Kingdom

Wins Entrepreneur Awards


L
Kingston, Jamaica:
auren Le Franc, a Jamaican entrepreneur residing in the United Kingdom, has won
a graduate award from the City University of London to expand her already estab-
lished coffee business, J.A. Island Roasters. As part of her award package, Le Franc also
secured a location for her business at the University's Cass Business School, and she is
looking at commencing operations in the upcoming weeks. Continued on page 4
2 THE AGRICULTURALIST OCTOBER 2017 WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM

Slight
Toxicity

Ectoline
Spray
LARVICIDE SPRAY
HEALING & ANTIMICROBIAL

Always exercise caution


and wear proper safety
gear when handling,
Larvicide Spray, healing and
preparing and using
pesticides; keep out of
antimicrobial agent
reach of children. Refer to Active Ingredients: Fipronil,
Product Instructions for
correct usage. Silver Sulfadiazine, Aluminium

For preventing and treating screwworms.


Aids in preventing Myiasis in general wounds,
Available at Hi-Pro Farm Supplies and leading surgical wounds, eg. Castration, dehorning,
farm stores islandwide. peeling, branding, etc, also in cracks in hoofs,
Telephone: 984-7918/619-1302 and in treating calves navels.
The sad state of Jamaican agriculture
EDITORIAL
WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM OCTOBER 2017 THE AGRICULTURALIST 3

A significant setback for Jamaican


agriculture and food production is
perhaps a lack of reliable and up-to-date
As such, it is the policy of Statistical
Institute of Jamaica (STATIN) and
MICAF to conduct the Census of Agri-
How can Jamaica develop a healthy,
efficient or sustainable agricultural sec-
tor if our inventory and data collection
Perhaps we honestly don't know
what is available on the grounds.
We could, therefore, be importing
information on various aspects of the in- culture once every 10 years. The methods are unreliable? tons of fruits and vegetables while farm-
dustry. The Ministry of Industry, Com- last Census was done in 2007. In our opinion, Jamaica ers in St Elizabeth can't find a reliable
merce, Agriculture, and Fisheries However, we are now in does not have a fair idea as market for their produce.
(MICAF) has a vibrant agricultural data the final quarter of 2017 and to the size of its agriculture Jamaica perhaps needs to pay more
collection division that regularly captures there are no signs that and fishing industries, in- attention to the Food and Agriculture Or-
production data. STATIN/MICAF will be cluding the acreage under ganizations (FAO) new set of guidelines
However, the Census of Agriculture conducting another Census production, the number of that involves some developments taking
is often ignored. soon. livestock and crops being into account the changing nature of data
The Census is the most powerful data After the 1978 Census, it produced as well as the num- use and collection.
collection tool that helps to inform smart took government 18 years be- ber and categories of farmers. According to FAO, the latest data
decision-making by farmers and other fore another one was conducted According to the PIOJ, in collection technologies have been in-
food producers. Data collected provides a in 1996. That track record 2016 agriculture contributes 7% of cluded to drastically reduce the time lag
snapshot of the state of a countrys agri- speaks volumes. the GDP and employs 16.7% of the between data collection and data analy-
cultural sector -- from the size of hold- In fact, the most recent labour force. sis.
ings, land tenure, land use, area harvested, Census that was conducted in However, something is shame- Data collection and management are
irrigation, livestock, labour and other 2007 is still available only in fully wrong with Jamaican farming the hallmarks of every successful indus-
agricultural inputs. preliminary draft and a final re- if a significant amount of the im- try and agriculture is no different.
Data from the Census also helps pol- port is yet to be published.
ported food, which valued at almost
icy-makers shape programmes and initia- Already the interval between
US$1 billion, could be produced lo-
tives that benefit both crops and livestock the Censuses of 10 years is too
cally, while exports struggle at Patrick Maitland
farmers. It also helps farmers diversify long and should be reduced to five
US$200 million during the past 15 years. Publisher & Editor
into new markets, including local and ex- years as in the case of the US, Canada,
patrick@theagriculturalist.com
port food systems, specialty crops and or- Mexico and other countries with vibrant
ganic production. agricultural industries.
The opinions expressed in this newspaper, except for the above, do not necessarily reflect the views of The Agriculturalist and its publishers. Please send your com-

Latin America and Caribbean are


ments or suggestions to editor@theagriculturalist.com. Responses should be no longer than 400 words. Not all articles will be published.

EU Sugar
Quota System falling off path to Zero Hunger by 2030
Comes to an end
T
Santiago, Chile: Only a few decades ago, governments of Some 7.5% of those under the age of 5 in
he total number of persons that suffer the region joined forces to fight against acute South America, or 2.5 million children, suffer
Continued from page 1 from hunger in Latin America and the malnutrition, chronic malnutrition and mi- from overweight and obesity, as do 6% of the
Between 2006 and 2010, the sugar Caribbean has increased, reversing decades of cronutrient deficiency. Today they must also children in Central America and 6.9% of those
sector had been thoroughly restructured progress, even as overweight and obesity fight against overweight and obesity. in the Caribbean. The rate increases with age,
with the support of 5.4 billion. emerged as a major problem in all countries in The region faces a double burden of affecting a third of the adolescents and two
As a result, the sector has been able to the region of the Americas, according to the malnutrition, said PAHO Director Carissa F. thirds of the adults in the region, with women
carefully prepare for this moment and pro- Panorama of Food Security and Nutrition in Etienne. To fight against it, we must ensure being the most affected.
ductivity has improved substantially over Latin America and the Caribbean 2017, pub- access to a balanced diet and tackle the pri- The problem is growing in scale to catch
lished by the Food and Agriculture Organisa- mary social factors that cause malnutrition, up with the regions 11% rate of child stunt-
the last years.
tion of the United Nations (FAO) and the Pan such as, the lack of access to healthy foods that ing due to chronic malnutrition. Acute malnu-
The end of the quota system gives
American Health Organisation (PAHO). are low in sugar, salt and fat, to water and san- trition has been practically eliminated from
producers the possibility to adjust their
In 2016, approximately 42.5 million per- itation, to education and health services and to children in the region.
production to real commercial opportuni-
sons in the region did not have enough food social protection programmes, amongst oth- Nowadays, it is easy to find homes with
ties, notably in exploring new export mar-
for their daily caloric needs, a 6 percent in- ers. one malnourished child and an overweight
kets. FAO and PAHO call on countries to mother, or a chronically malnourished and
crease equal to 2.4 million additional under-
It also significantly simplifies the cur- transform their food systems, paying special overweight child or one with a vitamin and
nourished persons.
rent policy management and administra- attention to the condition of the most vulnera- mineral deficiency, Etienne stated.
It will be very difficult for the region to
tive burden for operators, growers and reach Sustainable Development Goal 2 on ble people, households and territories, and say
traders. Phil Hogan, Commissioner for eradicating hunger and malnutrition by 2030 it will take a great regional effort can the cur-
Agriculture and Rural Development, said: if this trend does not change, said Julio rent trend be reversed and put Latin America
"The end of the quota system represents an Berdegu, FAO Regional Representative. and the Caribbean back on the path that made
important turning point for our European While hunger levels in Latin America and the region a global example of the fight against
sugar sector and marks another important the Caribbean remain low in comparison to the hunger and malnutrition. Publisher & Editor:
step in the market orientation of the Com- rest of the world, there are signs that the situ- Hunger rates declined in 21 of the 27 Patrick Maitland
mon Agricultural Policy. ation is getting worse, especially in South countries of the region, including the
Producers will now have the opportu- America, where the prevalence of undernutri- Caribbean and Mesoamerican as a whole, be- Consulting Editors:
nity to expand their trade on global mar- tion - a proxy for hunger - grew from 5% in tween 2013/2015 and 2014/2016. In Brazil, Vincent Wright, Jairzenho Bailey
kets, and with the right policy supports 2015 to 5.6% in 2016. In Mesoamerica, Cuba and Uruguay, the prevalence of under-
from the European Commission such as nourishment is less than 2.5%, while in Ar- Produced & Published by:
hunger affected 6.5% of the population in
the Sugar Market Observatory which pro- 2016. Although hunger has not increased in gentina, Barbados, Chile, Mexico and
Agri Life Foundation Ltd
vides timely and relevant market informa- the Caribbean, its prevalence is higher at Trinidad and Tobago it is below 5%. Still, the
AMC Complex,
tion they should have every chance of 17.7%, with a peak at 47% in Haiti. absolute number of people suffering from
188 Spanish Town Road,
success. I am confident that, since the end We are heading along a bad path. The hunger increased.
Kingston 11, Jamaica, W.I.
date for sugar quotas was decided, the in- region has taken a significant step backwards Overweight and obesity affect all age
Tel: (876) 923-7471 923-7428
dustry has positioned itself well to benefit in a fight that it was winning. We cannot tol- groups in men and women, and is a public agriculturalist@gmail.com
from the opportunities which the end of erate the current levels of hunger and obesity, health problem in all countries of the Ameri- editor@theagriculturalist.com
sugar quotas presents." as they will paralyse an entire generation, cas, the report notes. www.theagriculturalist.com
warned Berdegu.
NEWS
4 THE AGRICULTURALIST OCTOBER 2017 WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM

Jamaican
Coffee Trader
Wins Awards
Continued from page 1
Le Franc, a qualified barrister of Eng-
land and Wales who first set up the com-
pany in Jamaica in 2011 while completing
her legal education, has been focused on
selling roasted coffee through J.A. Island
Roasters under the brand True Blue 100
percent Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee.
With this award, she is looking for-
ward to importing organic and non-organic
Jamaican green beans to the U.K. from the
world-famous Blue Mountains. She said
the award package also covers operational
costs and comes with mentorship and sup-
port from the university.
"I'm elated to have such an amazing
opportunity to expand my business and to
take brand Jamaica a step further into the
spotlight," said Le Franc.

FERTILIZERS FOR COFFEE FARMERS:


In 2014, J.A. Island Roasters received
approval from the Certification of Envi-
ronmental Standards (CERES) -- an inter- Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Karl Samuda (4th l), looks on as Managing Director, Newport Fer-
national organization which offers san, Dennis Valdez (5th l) hands over a bag of fertilizer to (l-r) coffee farmers Stafford Brooks, Odia Bruce and Will Frazer,
certification for organic farming and food

Samuda pledges $80M to support coffee farmers


at the Ministrys New Kingston offices, on Tuesday, October 3, 2017. Occasion was a media briefing to update farmers and
processing -- to maintain good practices in the country on developments in the coffee industry.
the food industry. She then received ap-
proval from the Coffee Industry Board to

M
export organic certified Jamaican Blue
Mountain green bean coffee. KINGSTON: advised on the way forward, at his New duction of high mountain and lowland cof-
Although she found favour for her inister of Industry, Commerce, Agri- Kingston offices on October 3. fee. The objective will be to ensure that the
roasted coffee in the Asian market, she was culture and Fisheries, Karl Samuda, According to Minister Samuda, given coffee produced in Jamaica, blended or
in search of additional opportunities for de- has pledged continued support to coffee the increased production and lower prices pure, is born of Jamaican soil, grown right
velopment when she came across the City farmers in Jamaica, in an effort to see the being offered for coffee this year to farm- here in Jamaica. This business of being de-
University of Londons Entrepreneur Grad- sector grow. ers, they will be hard-pressed to produce the pendent on imported cheap coffee beans,
uate Scheme competition in 2016. Her big The Minister disclosed that, the Gov- required quantities of inputs necessary to se- which are then blended with our rich Blue
break came when she decided to partici- ernment, through the Ministry, will be allo- cure next years production. Mountain has to come to an end, and we
pate. cating J$80 million from the Productivity Under these circumstances, we have must work towards that objective, he said.
Le Franc, along with 30 other com- Incentive Programme for coffee farmers to- to provide the necessary support to ease the The Minister also added that the goal is
petitors, delivered a business pitch to a wards the purchase of inputs such as fertil- current challenges being faced by our cof- the eventual stop to importation of green
panel of judges on a platform similar to re- fee farmers. Every farmer must be sup- beans into the island.
izers and fungicides, in order to increase
ality shows such as Dragons Den and ported at all levels. This is our first attempt He informed hat under the soon-to-be
their level of productivity.
Shark Tank. Her practical presentation to support them. Anything to move the cof- enacted JACRA Regulations, a cess will be
The Minister was speaking at a press
led to her victory in the competition, which fee industry forward, we are prepared to do placed on imported roasted coffee beans,
briefing where he provided an update on the

Coffee farmers upset about


now allows her to set up the London branch so, the Minister stated. which will be implemented as soon as the
developments in the coffee industry, ad-
of her offices and receive support from the What we want is a coffee industry. regulations are completed.
dressed concerns of the coffee farmers, and
University and interested investors. What we want to do is to increase the pro-
This win is a great step for the Ja-

price paid for the commodity


maican organic coffee industry and a testa-
ment to the hard work I have put in over the
years, said Le Franc, explaining that her
business idea was based on a social-enter-
prise model which focuses on donating a
percentage of the profits from sales to help

R
the local farmers. It was important for me
to give back and one of the main problems
is that small farmers are being squeezed ipe coffee is dropping from They demanded answers Still, Grant has urged them
out of the industry. It is my view that if trees in the Jamaica Blue from Mr. Grant who spoke at a to be patient.
these communities dont develop, the in- Mountains with only one of 18 news conference called by the "We are doing our endeavor
dustry will not grow. processors now purchasing sup- Agriculture Ministry. The farm- best (sic) to close at a price that
Gusland McCook, Acting Director of plies from farmers. ers, who had previously ex- makes it viable for the farmers,
Coffee Industry Board, gave a full en- And that one buyer, Mavis pressed frustration with the the market and the processors.
dorsement of Le Franc, adding that she has Bank Coffee Factory, has re- coffee industry, said the price But if the market insists that we
done well with the development of her duced its purchases to once a being paid for coffee is too low. will not buy at that particular
brand, True Blue 100% Jamaican Blue week from the usual five days. The Agriculture Ministry on price, then the process of re-en-
Mountain Coffee. "It is good to see Lauren Norman Grant, CEO of Tuesday morning announced gagement has to take place," he
as a young entrepreneur capitalizing on the Mavis Bank Coffee and presi- that a major buyer in Japan could declared.
unique opportunity presented by Jamaica dent of the Jamaica Agricultural no longer afford to purchase The Government, in the
Blue Mountain coffee, using her resources Society (JAS), recently faced Blue Mountain coffee for US$60 meantime, has committed to al-
to build her brand, and simultaneously angry coffee farmers who are per kilogramme. locating $80 million from the
highlighting brand Jamaica in the interna- upset about the price being paid Norman Grant But the farmers have said Productivity Incentive Pro-
tional spotlight," said McCook. for the commodity. CEO of Mavis Bank they cannot continue to operate gramme to assist the coffee
Coffee & JAS president in limbo. farmers.
NEWS
JAS membership plunged by 50%
WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM OCTOBER 2017 THE AGRICULTURALIST 5

T
By Patrik Maitland emergence of the PMO whose registra- the end of the period under review. The JAS reports also revealed that
Editor - The Agriculturalist tion is free, thus affecting our ability to The Societys overall revenue the 2016 Denbigh Show recorded a sur-
he reestablishment of the Producers re-affiliate members. jumped to $104.3 million as a result of plus of $10.57 million compared to the
Marketing Organization (PMO) has As of March 2017, JAS paid-up an estimated $9 million each in subven- $6.52 million in 2015.
been blamed for the almost 50% decline membership stood at 2,316 compared tions/grants from Government and sur- Twenty-three directors and members
in paid-up membership dues for the Ja- with 4,389 at the end of the 2016 period. plus from self-financing activities. The of the JAS board of management re-
maica Agricultural Society (JAS) during St Catherine recorded the highest mem- Government contribution of $88.7 mil- ceived $2.21 million as traveling al-
the year 2016-2017. bership with 443, while Westmoreland lion remained the most significant con- lowance, while president Norman Grant
According to the JAS annual report plunged from 229 to only 31 members. tributor's to the JAS revenue. The JAS was paid $1.06 million to cover hono-
of 2016-2017, the organizations effort St Elizabeth with 82, Trelawney, 86, St. recorded a net surplus of $2.6 million, raria, board fee, and travel expenses dur-
to get farmers to pay their membership James, 79, and St. Thomas, 92, recorded reversing the $8.1 million in losses ing the period ending March 2016.

Jamaica Broilers buys a second hatchery in the US


dues were severely impacted by the re- a significant decline in membership at recorded in the previous financial year.

J amaica Broilers Group has acquired


a second hatchery in the United
States, which is expected to grow its
CEO of the Jamaica Broilers Group,
said the investment was made primarily
to enable the group to access a larger
The facility in Pennsylvania will re-
duce delivery mileage by an average of
500 to 600 miles.
hatching capacity by 40 percent. customer base, including new clients on This investment will position the
Previously operating as Bell & the east coast of the USA and Canada. Jamaica Broilers Group to respond to
Evans Hatchery, in Big Valley, Pennsyl- He said the new facility would re- the needs of our expanded customer
vania, the new facility will be renamed duce any bio-security risk factors faced base and facilitate growth in the USA
International Poultry Breeders Hatchery by his companys customers. and Canada, said Levy.
Inc. Currently, Jamaica Broilers Group
The acquisition was effective on has to truck baby chicks from its Inter-
national Poultry Breeders Hatchery in Christopher Levy,
October 4, 2017.
Iowa to the east coast. group president/CEO
In making the announcement,

Sweet River Abattoir


Jamaica Broilers Group Ltd
Christopher Levy, group president and

reports improved finances


Sweet River Abattoir is reporting an im- But it noted that sales were up 32 percent
proved financial position in its year-end re- in the fourth quarter and production up 11
sults. percent for the corresponding period the
The company said it moved into profit prior year.
with earnings of nearly $700,000 com- Sweet River Abattoir said it believes

Beet armyworms again


pared with a loss of more than $2 million. the current financial year will be its best.

affecting Manchester farmers


A
New Forrest, Manchester:
fter almost fully recovering from the However, Conrad Murray, President
devastion caused by the beet army- of the Association, said the situation is still
worm several months ago, escallion farm- serious, as if left unchecked, the beet army-
ers in New Forrest, Manchester, are worm can wipe out a field in a matter of
contending with another infestation of their days.
fields by the pests. He said farmers are doing their best to
Farmers are calling for the Rural Agri- monitor and contain the infestation, how-
cultural Development Authority (RADA) ever, he called on the authorities join in the
and the Ministry of Agriculture to urgently control measures "to ensure that we don't
come to their assistance before the prob- have the outbreak that we had first."
lem worsens. Consumers have also been urged to
One of the affected farmers, Randell brace themselves in the event prices in-
Bellanfante said three and a half acres of crease due to the infestations.
his crop have been under threat from at RADAs CEO Peter Thompson told
least the last three weeks. The Agriculturalist that officers from the
He believes the worms are reappear- authority are monitoring the situation New
ing because of the cooler weather. Forrest and have put in place strategies to
The New Forrest Farmers and Water curtail the activities of the pests.
Users Association has said the infestation
is at a low level.
6 THE AGRICULTURALIST OCTOBER 2017 WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM

Slight
Toxicity

TryClan
50 SP
Always exercise caution
and wear proper safety
gear when handling, CONTACT & STOMACH
INSECTICIDE
preparing and using
pesticides; keep out of
reach of children. Refer to
Product Instructions for
correct usage.

Water soluble, powder contact


and stomach insecticide
Active Ingredient: Thiocyclam
Thrithian-Hydrogen-Oxalate
Controls insects like Tomato Pin Worm (Keiferia sp);
Thrips (Thrip sp), Leaf Miners (Liriomyza sp,
Phyllocnistis sp), Whiteflies (Aleyrodidae sp),
Diamond Back Moth (Plutella sp) on crops such as
Cabbage, Cauliflower, Broccoli, PakChoi, Cucumber,
Available at Hi-Pro Farm Supplies and leading Melon, Squash, Pepper, Garlic, Cantaloupe,
farm stores islandwide. Pumpkin, Onion, Tomato, Eggplant, Corn, Papaya,
Telephone: 984-7918/619-1302 Ornamentals and Rice.
NEWS
WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM OCTOBER 2017 THE AGRICULTURALIST 7

Agricultural appointments & movements

Dermon Spence the Chief Technical Sylburn Thomas former export man- Joseph Gyles was recently promoted Conley Salmon who has been the vice-
Director at the Ministry of Industry, Com- ager, Caribbean Broilers has been ap- to Chief Executive Officer of the Na- president-marketing: Feeds & Agricul-
merce Agriculture & Fisheries has been pointed CEO, Agri Invest Corporation tional Irrigation Commission (NIC) fol- tural Supplies of Jamaica Broilers Group
seconded to the Office of the Prime Min- effective October 17, 2017. He replaced lowing the death of Oliver Nembhard. Limited since 2001 was promoted to the
ister as executive director - Merger and Courtney Cole who has been acting in the Gyles who was the Regional System recently created post President - Jamaica

McPherson reelected
Implementation, effective October 1, position for over two years. Thomas also Manager has been a staff of the NIC for Operations.
2107. chairs the Coffee Board. over 20 years.

president of CASE Alumni


A gricultural consultant and lecturer
Webster McPherson was reelected
president of the College of Agriculture,
2018 were Everett Hyatt, 1st vice-presi-
dent; Kirk Broadie, 2nd vice-president;
Alexi Reid, 3rd vice president; Lincoln
Science and Education (CASE) Alumni Davey, treasurer; Murie Edwards, assistant
Association at their annual general meet- treasurer; Yvette Betty-OConnor, secre-
ing held at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel, tary; Jairzenho Bailey, assistant secretary
New Kingston on September 30. and Michael Williams, public relations of-
Other members elected to serve on the ficer. Former president Orrett Thomas will

Food Hygiene Bureau


executive committee for the year 2017- continue to serve on the executive.
Webster McPherson Dave Fairman the Country Manager for
the Jamaica Broilers Group Limited was

to train food processors


promoted to the recently created post
President - Haiti Operations. In his cur-
rent capacity, Fairman will be responsi-
ble for continuing the profitable growth

J
of Haiti Broilers S.A. and the firm estab-
lishment of thebrands. Fairman joined the
Group in 1990 as a Systems Analyst.
amaican exporters targeting the US reau, Marva Hewitt explains that partici-
markets are to benefit from a three-day pants who completed the course would
training course aimed at qualifying the be qualified to manage a food safety pre-
Preventive Controls Qualified Person, ventive controls program and would be
in accordance with the Hazard-Analysis issued with the official FSPCA 'Preven-
and Preventive Controls Rule of the US tive Controls Qualified Person' certifi-
Food and Drug Administration. cate.
The course has been designed by the Bureau of Standards Jamaica has en-
Food Safety Preventative Controls Al- dorsed the course.
liance (FSPCA) and will be held on No- Registration fee is J$20,000 includ-
vember 28-30, 2017 at the Department of ing all training materials. Call Maxine at
Chemistry, UWI, Mona. 341-3717 or Patrick 923-7471, email:
Certified food safety trainer/execu- info@foodhygienebureau.org or visit
Michael Stern - Businessman and for-
tive director of the Food Hygiene Bu- foodhygienebureau.org mer Member of Parliament for North
West Clarendon, Michael Stern, is the

Tropical Farmers Almanac


Get your copy of new chairman of the Rural Agricultural
Development Authority (RADA). Stern
Lowell Dilworth - Chemical Pathology
is a former state minister of industry, in-
and Lecturer in the Faculty of Medical
vestment and commerce in the Bruce
AMC Complex, 188 Spanish Town Road, Kingston 11, Jamaica, W.I. Sciences, University of the West Indies,
Golding administration. The post of
Tel: (876) 923-7471 923-7428
Mona was recently appointed to the board
board chairman for RADA became va-
of the Rural Agricultural Development
cant following the sudden resignation of
editor@theagriculturalist.com Genille Attalla in June this year.
Authority (RADA).
8 THE AGRICULTURALIST OCTOBER 2017 WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM
WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM OCTOBER 2017 THE AGRICULTURALIST 9
10 THE AGRICULTURALIST OCTOBER 2017 WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

JAMAICA DAIRY DEVELOPMENT BOARD

T
seeks
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
he Jamaica Dairy Development Board (JDDB) is a statutory the company under the Ministry of Industry Commerce
Agriculture and Fisheries, with responsible for transforming the dairy industry by bringing technical, developmen-
tal and regulatory activities to underpin an orderly management of the dairy industry according to the provisions of the
Jamaica Dairy Development Board Act. The JDDB will also provide advice counsel and guidance to government and
stakeholders with respect to all production, technical, regulatory and trade aspects of the Dairy Industry to promote local
milk production and the achievement of efficiency in the production, processing, marketing and other trade in dairy prod-
ucts.

JDDB is seeking to identify a highly motivated and dynamic individual to fill the post of Chief Executive Officer.

RESPONSIBILITIES
Reporting to the Board of Directors the Chief Executive Officer is responsible for the overall management, adminis-
tration and direction of the agency and will ensure that its mandate is efficiently and adequately executed in line with its
vision, mission and goals. The principal duties include:
Offering the highest quality service to the dairy farmers and other stakeholders by utilizing the best available technol-
ogy;
Ensure the efficient adoption and adaption of appropriate contemporary technologies and manage their deployment in
a manner to assure the efficient and orderly development of the dairy industry in all its forms.
Budget management and expenditure control and efficient disposal of any income or revenue accruing to the JDDB with
utmost and obsequious recognition and respect for the Financial Administration and Audit Act, the Public Bodies Man-
agement and Accountability Act, and the Corruption Prevention Act.
Maintain a sound and effective technology generation and transfer program with outputs geared at enhancing acceler-
ated herd expansion, nutrition guarantees, increased milk production and growth in the industry.
Organize and maintain an effective extension program utilizing a strategic collaborative approach with other extension
services providers in the public or private sector.
Forging alliances and partnerships with competent local and international development or funding organizations or
individuals to provide the resources to effectively execute approved projects and programmes in a cost-effective man-
ner;
Develop and maintain an effective management and administrative structure to guarantee safety, quality assurance
and standards compliance to maintain order in the dairy industry.

REQUIREMENTS
1. Graduate Degree in Agriculture, Animal Science, Agricultural Economics, Agri-Business or Dairy Science.
2. Minimum of five years working experience in private or public sector management/administration at the senior
level.
3. A recognized professional certification in Business Administration or Public Administration will be an advantage but
not a requirement.
4. Training and/or experience in project preparation, monitoring and evaluation with excellent organization and com-
munication skills
5. Excellent budget analysis and forecasting skills and proficiency in the use of management software and reporting
systems.
6. Strong analytical and problem-solving skills

EMMOLUMENT
A remuneration package which includes approved benefits will be offered.

Applications must be submitted no later than October 25, 2017 to:


The Chairman
Jamaica Dairy Development Board
Ministry of Industry Commerce Agriculture and Fisheries
Hope Gardens
Kingston 6

Or by email with scanned covering letter bearing your signature to dairyboardjob@gmail.com


Only short-listed candidates will be contacted. No phone calls.
WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM OCTOBER 2017 THE AGRICULTURALIST 11

Denbigh Show 2017 Winners

Norman Grant, JAS president (3rd l) joins Agriculture Minister Karl Samuda as they pet

JAS to launch Eat Jamaican


a chicken at the Hi-Pro booth at Denbigh Show 2017
National Farm Queen Truddiann Ashmead (c) with Shannan Dawkins, first runner-up (1st
l) and Shanique Shand, second runner-up.

14th Anniversary Campaign


JAS president Norman Grant (l) congratulates Denbigh 2017 winners

T he Jamaica Agricultural Society in col-


laboration with the Ministry of Indus-
try, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries,
Baptist Church, 2 Washington Boulevard,
Kingston 20 at 9:00 a.m.
Friday, November 24, 2017 - Eat Ja-
will celebrate the 14th anniversary of the maican Day Exposition at Jamaica 4-H
'Eat Jamaican' Campaign during the month Clubs, 95 Old Hope Road Kingston 10
of November 2017. from 10:00 am to 4:00 p.m.
The schedule of activities include the JAS president Norman Grant is invit-
following: ing companies and organizations to mount
Wednesday, November 1, 2017 Launch exhibits at the exposition.
of Eat Jamaican Month at the Ministry of For further information contact
Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fish- Jamila Francis-Public Relations Officer or
eries, Hope Gardens at 10:00 a.m. Patricia Jackson- Executive Secretary at
Sunday, November 5, 2017 Eat Ja- 922-0610-2 or 948-2901.
maican Thanksgiving Service, Boulevard Martin Zsifkovics Michelle Black

JAS partners with Sovereign Supermarket


National Champion Farmer Woman Champion Farmer

N orman Grant, President of the JAS says,


the Jamaica Agricultural Society has
partner with Sovereign Supermarket to form
fered at the Denbigh Show to consumers in
Kingston.
The official launch was held on Thurs-
the Denbigh Sovereign Farmers Market day, August 10 at Sovereign Supermarket
where consumers will be able to purchase 106 Hope Road, Kingston 6 and consumers
produce at market price within the Sovereign were able to access the offerings for two
Supermarket store. days.
Inspired by the Eat What We Grow The Denbigh Sovereign Farmers Market
Grow What We Eat slogan, Sovereign Su- will be held quarterly. In additional there will
permarket will seek to do this on a continuous be a weekly Farmers Market at the Denbigh
basis bringing the best produce and prices of- Showground on Thursdays.

Condolences to the family of


the late Dr Winston Green
O
Richard Robinson Diandra Rowe
Young Champion Farmer Champion Greenhouse Farmer

n behalf of Board of Management of his general support to the farmers in the rural
the Jamaica Agricultural Society constituency.
and our farmers I wish to express We were all shocked and surprised
condolences to the family of the at his sudden and untimely pass-
late Dr Winston Green, MP for ing. His support for the farmers
St Mary South East on his sud- in his constituency is well
den passing. known and he was regarded by
The JAS and the St Mary the JAS as a farmer friendly
Association of Branch Societies Member of Parliament who gen-
developed an excellent working uinely cared for the farmers and
relationship with Dr Green their families. We are deeply sad-
through his annual support to the St dened by his sudden passing and
Mary Agricultural Industrial and we remain prayerful for his immedi-
Food Show (St Mary Expo) held at Grays ate family, friends , constituents and col- Nicholas Anderson
Patrick Graham Champion Goat Farmer
Inn Sports Club every Easter Monday and leagues. Champion Ginger Farmer

Jamaica Agricultural Society 67 Church Street, Kingston


Phone: (876) 922-0610-2. Fax: 922-0613/967-7419. Email: adminjas114@gmail.com
PHOTOS
12 THE AGRICULTURALIST OCTOBER 2017 WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM

PRODUCT LAUNCH:
J.C. Hutchinson ( 2nd left), Minister
without Portfolio in the Ministry of
Industry, Commerce, Agriculture
and Fisheries, examines fertilizer
being presented to him by Daniel
McHugh, Managing Director of Sap-
phire Agriculture Jamaica Ltd,
along with (from left) Olive Downer-
Walsh, Deputy CEO of Hardware &
Lumber and Lloyd Distant, CEO.
The occasion was the Sapphire Fer-
tilizer Product Launch in Kingston
on September 13.

NATIONAL CHAMPION FARMER:


Tricia Jackson, operations manager, Hi-Pro Farm Supplies Store (4th l),
presents Martin Zsifkovics with the National Champion Farmer trophy
Dr. Gavin Bellamy and the Serge Island team pose with their fantastic trophy haul in the Dairy category at Den- while JAS president Norman Grant (3rd l) and a sales representative of

Book your
bigh 2017. the farm store look on.

advert in...
Hi-Pros
Dr. Michael
Motta on
his ground
breaking
work in

The Agriculturalist
embryo trans-

Call 923-7471
fer
technology as
he
pose with
one of their
champion cat-

agriculturalist@gmail.com
tle at Den-
bigh.
PHOTOS
WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM OCTOBER 2017 THE AGRICULTURALIST 13

Hi-Pro representative presents a bag of brolier ration crumble to


a lucky farmer at Denbigh Show 2017 Director of the Ebony Park Academy, Robert Green (6th l) joins his students as they were declared
winners in the small likestock comptitions at Denbigh 2017.

Serving the
banana farmers
AIBGA Ripening Rooms
The AIBGAs ripening rooms are located at Pembroke Hall, St. Mary; Kensington,
St. James and Fellowship, Portland. We ripen bananas and other fruits.

AIBGAFarm Stores
A leading provider of farm inputs, marked by superior price and quality.

Fellowship, Portland - 913-5630 Reach, Portland


Kensington, St James - 5511784 Gayle, St Mary - 551-1790
Trinity, St Mary - 551-1787; 994-9864

All Island Banana Growers Association


10 South Avenue, Kingston Gardens
Tel: 922-5497 967-3160 Fax: 967-3160
support@aibga.info aibga@cwjamaica.com
www.aibga.info
14 THE AGRICULTURALIST OCTOBER 2017 WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM
INTERNATIONAL NEWS
WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM OCTOBER 2017 THE AGRICULTURALIST 15

Brazil hails WTO decision in


chicken case against Indonesia Germany
TRADE:

gets a Taste
A of Caribbean
BRASLIA: undersecretary at the ministry, told a
Brazilian foreign ministry official press conference on Tuesday the Brazil-
ian government believes it is possible to

Diversity
praised a World Trade Organization
(WTO) decision regarding a dispute op- start exporting chicken to Indonesia next
posing the country and Indonesia, saying year following the ruling.

A
it will effectively remove barriers on Brazil said a WTO panel recognized
chicken trade. Indonesia imposed unjustified restric-

EU suspends Swazi beef imports


Carlos Cozendey, economic affairs tions on chicken trade. diverse collection of food and bever-
age producers from the Caribbean de-
scended upon the worlds leading food fair

amid foot and mouth disease fears


ANUGA in Cologne, Germany in October.
The leading food fair attracts some
7000 exhibitors from over 100 countries
and close to 200,000 visitors, was home to

T
eight producers from the Caribbean under
the Caribbean Kitchen pavilion facilitated
by the Caribbean Export Development
he European Union has banned beef exporter, has meanwhile suspended all cat- Agency (Caribbean Export).
imports from Swaziland following a tle purchases from farmers and the pay- Food and drinks is such an integral
suspected foot-and-mouth disease out- ments of export bonuses until further part of Caribbean culture which continues
break allegedly caused by three buffaloes notice. to be in high demand from the European
donated to the country by Zambian Presi- Vilakati said the embargo is expected markets. The firms selected to exhibit at this
dent Edgar Lungu early this month. to affect local beef farmers in a big way. In years ANUGA exemplify the quality and
Agriculture Minister Moses Vilakati 2001 the EU placed a three-month ban on innovation needed to be successful ex-
confirmed the suspension in a statement on all beef imports from Swaziland following porters highlighted Pamela Coke-Hamil-
Tuesday. When the buffalos arrived into the kingdom's failure to contain an out- ton, Executive Director of Caribbean
the country they were accompanied by break of the same disease. Export.
documents certifying that they had tested The Zambian president has been King The participating companies include
Mswati IIIs guest twice in a period of 2016s Caribbean Exporter of the Year
negative for the disease, Vilakati said. kept under quarantine in Malindza in the
three months as he came here in June and award winners the West Indian Biscuit
The minister however said the Swazi Lubombo region of Swaziland.
Company (WIBISCO) manufacturers of
government is taking precautionary meas- The minister said all animals that in August 2017 where he participated in
cookies and crackers from Barbados.
ures and we have since taken their blood utilise dip tanks located within a radius of the International Trade Fair and the annual
Following a successful event in 2015,
samples for further tests to be conducted in 10 kilometres from where the buffalos are Reed Dance ceremony. Source:
La Benedicta the regions only producer of
South Africa where we seek to confirm the have been quarantined too. Swaziland apanews.net

Africas agriculture needs technological


apple cider from the Dominican Republic
initial test results. The buffaloes are being Meat Industries, the countrys major beef will return.
Four Jamaican firms are participating

transformation Scientists
for their first time including Coffee Solu-
tions with their Ridgelyne Blue Mountain
Coffee; Ecofarms producers of organic
gourmet honey and healthy honey products;

S
Shavuot producers of herbal teas and pow-
der products using indigenous ingredients
Source: Ghana| Myjoyonline Association for Strengthening Agricultural across the continent are meeting at the con- such as Soursop and Moringa.
cientists are calling for technological Research in Eastern and Central Africa ference to discuss how technology can be Also from Jamaica is Southside Dis-
transformation in how Africans under- (ASARECA). applied to help transform agriculture on the tributors producers of a range of condi-
take agricultural production to help improve He was speaking at a high level confer- continent. ments, canned products, juices and syrups
food security on the continent. ence on application of science, technology Africa spends more than $35 billion im- using locally sourced fruits and vegetables.

BASF to Buy
They warn failure to do this will further and innovation in harnessing African agri- porting food every year, although the conti- Source: www.carib-export.com
endanger the continents ability to feed itself cultural transformation at the Speke Resort nent has the capacity to produce a lot of the
and stall development. The scientists blame at Munyonyo in Uganda. imported foods.

LibertyLink
the lack of speedy progress in the Agric sec- The conference which is organized by This is despite more than 70 percent of
tor over the years on the unwillingness of the Ministry of Science, Technology and In- the workforce on the continent being en-

B
stakeholders to embrace fresh innovations, novation of Uganda and the African Agri- gaged in agricultural production for their
which they say must change. cultural Technology Foundation (AATF) is livelihoods. Estimates are that more than
There is tacit evidence that African gov- under the theme: Integrating the path in 200 million of the continents 1.2 billion ASF has signed an agreement to ac-
ernments and farmers are not committed to Africas agricultural transformation. population still live in hunger or are mal- quire Bayers LibertyLink technology

Pork Market on an Export Roll in 2017


use of science in agriculture, claimed Dr. About 100 scientists, civil society rep- nourished. and other significant parts of Bayers seed
Cyprian Ebong, Executive Director of the resentatives and government officials from and nonselective herbicide businesses.
It's all part of a divestment Bayer wants
to make for its planned acquisition of Mon-

W
santo, now slated to close first quarter 2018.
The all-cash purchase price is 5.9 bil-
By Gene Johnston Mostly, its because exports have outper- hams, Meyer says. South Korea, along with lion ($6.97 billion), subject to certain ad-
hile President Trump talks tough formed expectations, he says. Pork exports several Central and South American coun- justments at closing.
about trade agreements that dont well were predicted to be up about 7% from last tries, has also increased its purchases of U.S. Assets to be acquired outlined in a
serve U.S. interests, the U.S. pork industry year. So far, they are up 14%. About 24% of pork. BASF news release include: Bayers global
is quietly setting export records this year. As our total production has been exported. If we, for some reason, should lose our glufosinate-ammonium nonselective herbi-
a result, its basking in a profit windfall. Mexico, the main focus of Trumps pork export markets [disease or canceled cide business, commercialized under the
Hog market consultant Steve Meyer is trade taunting, has been a particularly strong trade agreements], it would put a third more Liberty, Basta, and Finale brands and seed
telling pork producers at the World Pork pork market in 2017, Meyer says. It started pork back on the domestic market. That businesses for key row crops in select mar-
Expo this week in Des Moines, Iowa, that last fall. While Mexico takes all kinds of would send the price of pork down at least kets. Canola hybrids in North America
pig prices are playing out better than many pork cuts from the U.S., the country has 60% on the retail market, he adds. under the InVigor brand using the Lib-
people expected when the year started. been a particularly good buyer of green ertyLink trait technology
16 THE AGRICULTURALIST OCTOBER 2017 WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM
WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM OCTOBER 2017 THE AGRICULTURALIST 17
18 THE AGRICULTURALIST OCTOBER 2017 WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM
WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM OCTOBER 2017 THE AGRICULTURALIST 19

Hutchinson announces push start programme for farmers:


J.C. Hutchinson (3rd l), Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, along with Bobby Montague (4th l), Member of Parliament for West-
ern St. Mary and National Security Minister; Olive Downer Walsh (1st l), Deputy Chief Executive Officer, H&L Agro; and Dennis Valdez, Managing Director of Newport-Fersan (Ja-
maica) Ltd; at the National Irish Potato and Onion Stakeholders Seminar held in Guys Hill, St. Catherine, October 11. MHutchinson, announced a pilot project, Agriculture Push Start
Programme, aimed at giving a start to persons who want to pursue agriculture as a business. Commencing with the production of three crops - Irish potato, onion and Scotch bonnet

Caribbean seafood exporter


pepper, the programme, Minister Hutchinson said, will target youth and women while embracing all agricultural entrepreneurs who have a passion for and are serious about agriculture.
This is about providing opportunities to better provide for self and family, social empowerment and community development, said Hutchinson. Under the programme, several private
sector companies and other Government agencies will be partnering with the Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA) to assist farmers with their agricultural endeavours.

expands sales to five continents


R ainforest Seafoods, a Caribbean
seafood exporter with headquarters in
Jamaica, began exporting conch and spiny
chain as a major supplier to the Caribbean,
Rainforest is now focused on extending its
reach to other global markets.
with more than 500 metric tons being ex-
ported each year and 2,000 people em-
ployed in the sector. A 2017 government
lobster caught in Jamaica's water to the Eu- A news report stated that the company report on Jamaica's lobster industry ranks
ropean Union and the United Arab Emi- was seeking to substantially increase the the spiny lobster as Jamaica's second-most
rates at the start of 2017. percentage of its revenue generated from valuable fisheries' export after the queen
It also began exporting lobster to exports. Conch and lobster represent Ja- conch.
China and the United States last December, maicas two top seafood exports. The country's total spiny lobster ex-
according to a news release carried on the Jamaica's Fisheries Division, a part of ports for 2014 amounted to more than 800
company's website. The company's CEO, the countrys Ministry of Agriculture and metric tons with a value of about USD 13 Brian Jardim
Brian Jardim, said in a company-issued re- Fisheries, ranks the country's queen conch million (EUR 11 million). CEO, Rainforest Seafoods
lease that having established the seafood as its most important fisheries resource, Source: www.seafoodsource.com

SPECIAL ADVISORY
Farmers of South Manchester & South St. Elizabeth
This is a special advisory from the Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA)

Conditions are favourable for an increase in the beet armyworm population


at this time, farmers:

act early to prevent damage from the pest


Monitor scallion, onion and other crops at least twice per week
for detection of egg sacs.
Install pheromone traps to aid in monitoring population
handpick pest where practical
apply appropriate insecticides at egg hatching stage
harvest all mature scallion

Lets work together to keep the beet armyworm population low in your communities.

For more information contact your nearest


RADA Office (toll free) 1-888-ASK RADA (275-7232).
20 THE AGRICULTURALIST OCTOBER 2017 WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM
Knowledge Page
WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM OCTOBER 2017 THE AGRICULTURALIST 21

Water Efficiency in the Age of Climate Change


Jamaica Drip Irrigation Makes the Case for Smart Agriculture
F
Kingston, JAMAICA:
or over 30 years, Jamaica Drip Irrigation
(JDI), a member of the Isratech Ja-
maica Limited Group of Companies, has
manufactured, designed, supplied and in-
stalled complete irrigation systems using the
highest standards, and in recent years has ex-
panded its offering to include the supply and
installation of complete greenhouse systems.
As the only manufacturer of drip irriga-
An aerial view of a greenhouse
tion pipes in the Caribbean, JDI offers a
comprehensive and unique package to the Hodara remarked that water efficiency
agricultural from engineering and design, and cost efficiency are not mutually exclu-
manufacturing and supply of product, to im- sive concepts, but that appropriate design
plementation and maintenance and implementation are key.
From the JDI perspective, the effective Since 1985, Jamaica Drip Irrigation
and appropriate selection, design and imple- (JDI) has manufactured, designed, sup-
mentation of irrigation solutions is critical to plied and installed complete irrigation sys-
high yields and climate-neutral outcomes. tems using the highest standards. The
The company focus, therefore, is on the sup- company subsequently expanded its offer-
ply of a wide range of technologically ad- ing to include the supply and installation of
vanced yet accessible solutions and services, Drip irrigation (above ground)
complete greenhouse systems. For more in-
from water sourcing and harvesting, to irri- change, smart agriculture and irrigation are o Traveller guns
formation, visit their website at www.israt-
gation systems, supplies and maintenance. virtually synonymous. o Sprinkler systems
ech.com. Connect on social media at
Studies show that the highest yields Commonly installed irrigation models Hodara explains that most people are
fb/isratechjamaica or IG@isratech.
that can be obtained from irrigation are more include: familiar with open-field drip irrigation
than double the highest yields that can be o Drip irrigation systems for sub-surface / where water is distributed through the emit-
For more information, contact:
obtained from rainfed agriculture, notes underground ters directly into the soil near the roots
Marketing Department
Benjie Hodara, Vice President of Sales & o Drip irrigation systems for above ground / through a special slow-release device, green-
marketing@isratech.com
Marketing at Isratech Jamaica Ltd. As an surface house systems have advanced to be ex-
(876) 603-3946-7
industry directly impacted by climate tremely viable food production options.

WHAT & WHEN TO PLANT


Tomato - grown year-round.
Turnip - cool climate essential, turnip grows best at
high elevations.
Watermelon - September to April.
Zucchini- can be grown year-round.

DECEMBER
Beetroot - does best during the cool months (Sep-
tember to January) or on lowlands with irrigation.
Cabbage - does best during the cool months (Sep-
NOVEMBER tember to January).
Beet root- does best during the cool months (Sep- Carrot - can be grown year-round, but does best in
tember to January); can be grown at high elevations cool months with a good disease control programme.
year-round or on lowlands with irrigation. Cauliflower - can be grown year-round, but does
Cabbage - does best during the cool months (Sep- best in the cool months.
tember to January); can be grown year-round with Cantaloupe - September to April. FERTILIZER TAILORED TO THE NEEDS OF THE SOIL:
irrigation and good pest control. Celery - does best at high elevations in a cool cli- Coffee Farmers in the Bangor Ridge area of Portland pose with 25lbs bags of a
Carrot - can be grown year-round, but does best in mate; can be grown at lower elevations during the blend of fertilizer tailored to the needs of the soil found in the Bangor Ridge area.
cool months with a good disease control programme. cool months (September to January). Several farmers in the Bangor Ridge area of Portland participated in a program
Cauliflower- does best in the cool months. Cucumber - grown year-round. that saw the complimentary testing of their soil by Newport-Fersans Senior Agron-
Celery - does best at high elevations in a cool cli- Egg Plant - grown year-round. omist Silbert Omeally and Technical Sales Consultant Anthony Bailey. Based on the
mate; can be grown at lower elevations during the Escellion- can be grown year-round. analysis of the soil tests a special blend, the B-Ridge blend was created specifically
cool months (September to January). Lettuce - grown year-round. for the Bangor Ridge region to ensure the soil has the right nutrients required for
Cucumber - grown all year round. Okra - grown year-round. maximum production.

Effective Fertilizer Tips


Egg Plant - grown year-round, especially in the cool Onion - August to December.
months. Pumpkin - grown year-round.
Escellion- can be grown year-round. Radish - does best during the cool months at high
Okra - grown year-round at low elevations, hot elevations. Fertilizer refers to any compound that contains Chemical fertilizers refer to commercially
months in high areas. Sweet Pepper - does best during the cool months at one or more chemical elements, organic or in- manufactured products containing a substantial
Onion - August to December. high elevations. organic, natural or synthetic, that is placed on amount of one or more plant nutrients.
Pumpkin - grown year-round. String Beans - grown year-round, but does best dur- or incorporated into the soil or applied to di- The chemical fertilizers can be broadly classi-
ing the cool season. rectly onto plants to achieve normal growth. fied into: nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium
Radish - does best during the cool months at high The main supply sources of plant nutrients in- fertilizers.
elevations. Tomato - grown year-round.
clude organic manures, plant residues, biologi- A straight fertilizer contains only one of the
Sweet Pepper - does best during the cool season at Turnip - cool climate essential, turnips grow cal nitrogen fixation and commercial inorganic nutrients. A compound fertilizer contains two or
high elevations. best at high elevations. fertilizers. more nutrients.
String Beans - grown year-round, but does best Watermelon - September to April. The type of fertilizers that are most commonly A complex fertilizer that is formed by mixing
during cool season. Zucchini- can be grown year-round. used for crop production in Jamaica are chemi- ingredients that react chemically, as opposed to
cal fertilizers. a mechanical mixture of two or more fertilizers.
EDUCATION
22 THE AGRICULTURALIST OCTOBER 2017 WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM

CASE
targets
University
Status in
five years
I
KINGSTON, Oct. 11 (JIS):
nterim President of the College
of Agriculture, Science and
Education (CASE), Dr. Derrick
Deslandes, plans to transform the
multidisciplinary tertiary institu-
tion into a university within the
next five years.
He said that in order to
achieve the objective, more re-
search-based academic staff will
be hired and new methods and
technologies introduced, such as
clean plant material to improve
farmer productivity; establish-
ment of a tunnel-ventilated
chicken house; and improve-
ments to the piggery and to dairy
production.
He informed that a proposal
has been made to the National
Housing Trust (NHT) to create
more space for offices, class- DENBIGH CHAMPION: Livestock students of the College of Agriculture, Science and Education (CASE) pose with their prized-winning
rooms and dormitories to handle cattle at Denbigh Show 2017. CASE is one of the leading champion exhibitors at the annual agricultural and industrial show.
the expected increase in student

$20M for Knockalva


matriculation. Enrolment has in-
creased by 50 per cent over the
last three years.
Were targeting at least
Agricultural School:
Karl Samuda (2nd left), Minister of
1,500 residential students over
Industry, Commerce, Agriculture
that five-year period in addition
and Fisheries (MICAF), presents a
to the commuting students. We cheque valued $6m, the first
think we need to get to about tranche of a $20m contribution to
3,000 students for us to be sus- the Knockalva Agricultural School
tainable in the long term, Dr. in Hanover, to principal Davia
Deslandes said. Ramgeet-Robinson (2nd right). The
We want CASE to become presentation was made at the World
a critical player in the (agricul- Food Day National Ceremony &
tural) sector in terms of research, Exhibition held at the school on Oc-
the production of good graduates tober 12. Participating in the han-
as well as driving the production dover are (from left) Lawrence
process in critical areas, he Henry, Acting Chief Executive Of-
added. ficer of the Jamaica Dairy Develop-
He was speaking to JIS New ment Board; Chairman of the
at a meeting of the Rotary Club School Board Calvin Brown and
Donovan Stanberry, Permanent
of Spanish Town held on Octo-
Secretary, MICAF. A cheque, val-
ber 10 at the Police Officers
ued at $6 million and representing
Club in St. Andrew.
the first tranche of the financial
Meanwhile, Dr. Deslandes support to the school was also
informed that the institution is handed over at the days event. The
advanced in its application for a funds are expected to provide infra-
cannabis licence. structure development for the

We publish your school and


We have one outstanding school, with specific focus on its
document that were trying to fi- livestock agriculture.
nalise (and) to get out of the way,
but the process is taking place,

college news, photos etc.,


he said.
Dr. Deslandes noted that
there has been significant inter-
est in the undertaking, including
from a Canadian investor,
which wants to partner with
CASE as they were doing with
the University of Technology

The Agriculturalist Call 923-7471 agriculturalist@gmail.com


(UTECH) and University of the
West Indies (UWI).
WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM OCTOBER 2017 THE AGRICULTURALIST 23
24 THE AGRICULTURALIST OCTOBER 2017 WWW.THEAGRICULTURALIST.COM