Você está na página 1de 8

Mirian Diaz

Professor Mahoney

Counseling 200

12/1/17

The impact stress has on college students

The stressful life of college students modern life is full of demands, frustrations, hassles,

and deadlines. Everyone deals with stress daily, but it seems to impact the life of college students

more often than others. A NY times article on Record level of stress found in college freshmen

explains that stress is a pressure or tension exerted on a material object in which a high percentage

of college students face. The article also stated According to a 2008 mental health study by the

Associated Press and mtvU, eight in 10 college students say they have sometimes or frequently

experienced stress in their daily lives over the past three months. This is an increase of 20% from

a survey five years ago. Another article called The Stressed Out College Student sayd a

similar idea when it states Stress is an individuals response to the demand for change. On a

college campus, you are continually bombarded with demands to change your behavior, your

academic performance, your career or major choice, your values. Faced with these demands, you

may seek to resist changing yourself while also trying to manage the stress so that it does not

manage you. There are various of reasons being on why there seems to be stress in college

students. One reason being is they have their first semester as a college student and dont really

expect how things are going to turn out or how to handle so much responsibility in college. I

myself know that this is said of to be true because I have experienced it as well being this is my

first semester here in college and am taking five classes a semester, so I also stress out on having
so much responsibility to doing my assignment from the professors. They expect you to do a lot

of homework and due on a certain time considering half of the time is a lot of work from this.

College is not the time to be messing around and is different to high school as college wants you

to work in a fast past and expect a lot of responsibility from you. College requires significantly

more effort from students than high school. Once you enter college, you will probably find that

you must be more expect of a lot of work than from high school and are more motivated, your

instructors are more demanding, the work is more difficult, and you are expected to be more

independent. Money can stress students as wellbeing that college is expensive and people tend to

work and that can result of balancing school and work as well. Counselors as well as professors

expect going to college to be ready and know your plan after college meaning they want to know

your major and expect you to have one fast if you dont know what you want to be already. Also,

going off to college involves significant adjustments to your daily routine; your sleeping and

eating habits, time-management skills, and stress levels will be altered in one way or another.

Classes as well can stress you out if you dont understand the material from other professors and

might have to deiced if you want to drop the class because it is too much for you. I expect myself

on a stress level again and many other college students when it comes to finals in college

because if you dont study well enough you wont be able to pass the class and expect to have to

take it again next semester. Another reason why stress is an issue for college students is because

most of the college students must balance out school with work and that can sometimes end up

being very stressful for many considering school expects you to do a lot o studying after class

and epically stressful if you have work full time and a college student who also is full time. They

can have a lot on their plate with this. To help you reduce your level of stress as a college student

you can see it as A feeling of control and a healthy balance in your schedule is a necessary part
of managing stress. Learning how to manage your responsibilities, accomplish your goals and

still have time for rest and relaxation requires that you practice time management skills.

Although this is set out to happen, there are resources in college in which can provide college

students with this kind of issue in which a article called College Stress states, Most schools

will have a student health center that likely will also offer [free] counseling services. If the

school has a psychology or behavioral sciences department, inquire about counseling services

from graduate students. If the university has a medical school or affiliated hospital, investigate if

the psychiatric department has a clinic. Visit the school's chaplain or an on campus spiritual

leader. Talk to a friend, professor, or resident advisor and maybe they can accompany you to a

visit with a professional therapist. This can be set out to be very useful as I might want to try and

do some of these things listed. You can also avoid procrastination by putting off assignments or

responsibilities until the last minute can create more mental and physical stress than staying on

top of them. Procrastination can affect many aspects of daily life, such as the quality of your

work, the quality of your sleep, and your mood. Also, another resource I would like to add is

talking to both a counselor and a professor on any subject you are have trouble on, so they can

tell you what to do as well as calm your nerves and reduce your level of stress. You should

always talk to someone as well to see if they can help you whether it be stressing out because of

a final exam or just need to do an assignment, but you dont understand it as well and has a dead

line on when it wants it turned in. Overall, stress is an everyday lifestyle to most and it may

frustrate you at times, you well always be able to overcome when you talk to someone or go to

many of the resources colleges can provide for students, it is something everyone has to get

through and acknowledge.


https://www.anxiety.org/university-student-anxiety-resources

College Stress
PUBLISHED: 03/23/2016
By: Anxiety.org
Attending and graduating from college is one of the most important journeys most
people experience in their lifetime. It can be a gateway to future success and
happiness but it can also be the cause of great anxiety and mental stress. Many
students worry about grades, financing their education, and living up to the
expectations of their parents and family.

The rise of anxiety and other mood disorders over the past decade has been well
documented by college counseling directors and independent researchers. Some of
the more stunning statistics include:

o 95% of college counseling directors noted that the population of students with
significant or severe mental health issues is growing on their campus
o Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students
o 20% of college students surveyed said they had or have had an eating disorder
o Almost 1/3 of college students meet the criteria for being diagnosed with alcohol
abuse
o 80% of college students feel overwhelmed and more than half of those felt things
were "hopeless"

And then there is campus violence, sexual assaults, sleep deprivation, addiction,
depression, romantic relationships, discrimination of all types, and so many other
conditions and influences that students confront and that impact their grades and
chances of success. Campus health centers do not have enough resources and
cannot keep up with demand for mental health services

Anxiety.org is greatly concerned with mental health issues on college campuses


everywhere. That is why we have worked closely with top university and institutional
researchers and leading clinicians to curate helpful and educational resources
specifically for this group of young adults.
Where To Get Help
Do you feel overwhelmed or get easily annoyed or agitated? Trouble sleeping?
Thoughts of suicide? Worried about tests or missing home? These are just a very
few of the symptoms or clues that you may have anxiety or a related mental health
or mood disorder. There should be no stigma associated with your feeling; anxiety is
the most common health issue for college students. Whether it's at school or off
premises, get the help and support you need; go talk to someone.

Find Help On Campus:


o Most schools will have a student health center that likely will also offer [free]
counseling services
o If the school has a psychology or behavioral sciences department, inquire about
counseling services from graduate students
o If the university has a medical school or affiliated hospital, investigate if the
psychiatric department has a clinic
o Visit the school's chaplain or an on campus spiritual leader
o Talk to a friend, professor, or resident advisor and maybe they can accompany you
to a visit with a professional therapist

Off-Campus Resources:
o If the school health center doesn't have the appropriate services, find a local
psychologist, psychiatrist, or social worker with a specialty in anxiety-related
disorders even your family physician may be able to help with a referral
o If you're away from home, be open and straight-forward with your parents so that
they can offer support (especially if there are insurance coverage and payment
issues)
o Support groups can be very helpful and you can probably find one hosted by a
hospital, community center, counseling center, or religious group
Facts
Anxiety disorders is at the top of the list of mental health challenges on college
campuses. Many of the student statistics are worrisome. Consider that:

o 80% sometimes or frequently experience daily stress (AP)


o 25% have a diagnosable mental illness (NAMI)
o 45% of female students and 36% of men said that they felt so depressed they
couldn't function (ACHA)
o 40% of students who need help, don't seek it out (NAMI)
o The number of students with a serious mental illness seeking counseling has
doubled in the past decade (ACCA)

Beyond Stress
There may be a high level of co-morbidity with anxiety disorders. Learn more about
the following disorders, which often affect college students, too:

Body dysmorphic disorder


Depression
Eating disorders
Sleeping disorders
Substance abuse
https://psychcentral.com/lib/the-stressed-out-college-student/

The Stressed Out College Student


By Rita Landino
~ 2 min read

The term stressed out is one that many college students use to describe themselves. Some
students use the term so much as to render it meaningless. When you say that you are
stressed out, what are you saying about yourself? And, more to the point, what is it about
your usual coping style that just isnt working?

Stress is an individuals response to the demand for change. On a college campus, you are
continually bombarded with demands to change your behavior, your academic performance,
your career or major choice, your values. Faced with these demands, you may seek to resist
changing yourself while also trying to manage the stress so that it does not manage you.

Is all stress bad? Should you strive to stamp stress out of your life completely? The answer is
no! Stress serves some very useful purposes in our lives. Did you know, for example, that stress
is essential for learning? Research on learning and stress levels shows that learning takes place
under conditions of moderate stress. So, your goal is not to do away with all of the stress you
experience; your goal is to keep the stress level at a moderate level, neither so low that you are
bored nor so high that you are overwhelmed.

How do you keep the stress level moderate and manageable? All of us use coping strategies to
keep stress manageable. The best coping strategies are those that are not destructive but
healthy ways to prevent stress from increasing or strategies for reducing tension when the
stress level builds up beyond a moderate level.

Destructive strategies to reduce stress include using tobacco, drinking alcohol to get drunk, and
taking illegal drugs or overusing prescribed medications. All of these strategies can bring short-
term relief but at a high cost to both the mind and body. One of the least effective strategies is
to do nothing about a problem, thinking it will go away. Of course, it rarely does the
professor notes poor attendance, late papers, and missed exams, the insensitive friend becomes
disrespectful and even abusive.
One of the healthiest ways to manage stress is to plan for stressful times, like course
registration, midterms, and the end of the semester. Before those times come, build your
support system of family, friends, and study partners. Try to lead a healthy life with good eating
habits and regular sleep patterns.
During times of stress, use tension relievers so you can continue to perform to the best of your
ability. Work out your anger and frustration with physical activity. Talk with people who feed
you emotionally. Meditate, read, or get in touch with your spirit through nature or your
religious faith.

Sometimes, your usual coping strategies do not reduce your level of stress to manageable
levels, your friends say you are starting to be a burden to them, or you may feel as if you are
going crazy. That would be a time that you may want to talk with someone you can trust, like a
coach, resident advisor, or counselor. Most colleges, however small, have a counseling center
where you can talk about your concerns in confidence with a mental health professional who
can help you to learn how to manage the stress in your life