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9thGradeLiteratureandCompositionEOC(GSE)Quiz

Reading Literary - (ELAGSE9-10RL1) Cite Textual Evidence - Lit, (ELAGSE9-10RL2 ) Determine Theme/central Idea, (ELAGSE9-
10RL3) Complex Characters, (ELAGSE9-10RL4) Meaning Of Words/phrases, (ELAGSE9-10RL9) Author Draws On/transforms
Reading Informational - (ELAGSE9-10RI6) Author's Point Of View/purpose, (ELAGSE9-10RI8) Delineate And Evaluate
Language -

Student Name: _______________________ Date: _________


Teacher Name: Adrian Dunmeyer Score: _________

An Unlikely Heroine
Elizabeth Kibler

1
Teresa gasped and sputtered as she ran a final lap around the gym. Most of the other players had already completed the
half-mile run; however, Teresa was only now crossing the finish line. The other players had already moved onto ball
dribbling and passing drills. Teresas older sister, Alisa, tossed the ball adeptly to the other players and expertly shot
basket after basket.

2
Because Alisa was the team captain, she was in charge of the practice. Looking over to her sister, Alisa waved for Teresa
to come join the team. Holding her forehead in her hands, Teresa feigned a headache. Complaining about the pain, Teresa
went to the locker room to take a shower.

Teresa had planned to quit the basketball team for three weeks. She liked spending time with sister, but she just felt like
she wasnt cut out for basketballs rapid pace. Teresa felt like a fish out of water. After they got home from school, Teresa
knocked at her sisters door. Slightly opening the door, she saw her sister shooting a miniature basketball into a plastic
hoop on the wall.

4
You caught me, laughed Alisa. I just cant stop playingits my obsession.

5
Alisa hurled the ball to Teresa who tossed the ball, missing the net. Teresa sat down somberly with a serious face and sad
eyes. She told her older sister how she felt about the basketball team. Teresa admitted that she would like to do other
things with her time and that she could never see herself enjoying the game. Frowning, Alisa asked Teresa to stay on the
team for the rest of the seasononly two weeks remained. With some hesitation, Teresa agreed to stick it out for the rest
of season.

6
Two weeks after the sisters conversation, Teresa and Alisa suited up for an important game. Teresa knew she would
spend most of her time on the benchas she usually did. As she watched her team struggle, Teresa knew the game was a
rough one. Unexpectedly, Teresa observed a scuffle on the floor. Then, she saw her sister on the floor. Moaning in agony,
Alisa grasped her right hand. Teresa darted over to her sister as the trainer inspected her hand. The trainer said that Alisa
sprained her wrist and would be unable to play for the remainder of the game.

7
The rest of the team looked astonished; Alisa was the team captain and everyone was lost without her guidance. Without
thinking, Teresa started giving orders to her teammatesand they listened. After telling the players where to go and what
to do, Teresa nervously sat down beside her sister and grasped Alisas left hand. As the buzzer was about to sound, their
team made the winning basket. Teresa and Alisa jumped up and down. The other team members rushed over to them.
They had won the game and Teresa was a heroine!

8
A week after the game, Teresa again sat on the bench; this time, however, she was coaching.
1) The critical moment in the story is when Alisa gets hurt and Teresa steps in to coach the team. Though Teresa is the "unlikely
heroine," how did Alisa also make the happy outcome of this story possible?
A) by encouraging Teresa to try activities other than basketball
B) by encouraging Teresa to stay on the team until the end of the season
C) by making Teresa realize that she liked basketball more than she admitted
D) by making Teresa realize that spending time with her was not worth the effort

2) Katie is writing a literary analysis of this selection. She has decided that its theme is that people should finish what they start.

Which detail from the selection BEST supports her interpretation?


A) the fact that not quitting the team allowed Teresa to discover her coaching gifts
B) the fact that Alisa is so obsessed with playing basketball that she sprains her wrist
C) the fact that Teresa is extremely jealous of her sister's success playing basketball
D) the fact that Alisa faked a headache because she didn't want to play anymore

3) Which statement BEST expresses the unstated main idea of this selection?
A) It is wrong to pressure people to do things that they are not cut out to do.
B) Sometimes people are capable of doing more than they realize.
C) Excessive enthusiasm for sports usually leads to injury.
D) People should not try to avoid their responsibilities.
The Invisible Man
H. G. Wells

The Strange Man's Arrival

1
The stranger came early in February, one wintry day, through a biting wind and a driving snow, the last snowfall of the
year, over the down, walking from Bramblehurst railway station, and carrying a little black portmanteau in his thickly
gloved hand. He was wrapped up from head to foot, and the brim of his soft felt hat hid every inch of his face but the shiny
tip of his nose; the snow had piled itself against his shoulders and chest, and added a white crest to the burden he carried.
He staggered into the "Coach and Horses" more dead than alive, and flung his portmanteau down. "A fire," he cried, "in the
name of human charity! A room and a fire!" He stamped and shook the snow from off himself in the bar, and followed Mrs.
Hall into her guest parlour to strike his bargain. And with that much introduction, that and a couple of sovereigns flung
upon the table, he took up his quarters in the inn.

2
Mrs. Hall lit the fire and left him there while she went to prepare him a meal with her own hands. A guest to stop at
Iping in the wintertime was an unheard-of piece of luck, let alone a guest who was no "haggler," and she was resolved to
show herself worthy of her good fortune. As soon as the bacon was well under way, and Millie, her lymphatic aid, had been
brisked up a bit by a few deftly chosen expressions of contempt, she carried the cloth, plates, and glasses into the parlour
and began to lay them with the utmost eclat. Although the fire was burning up briskly, she was surprised to see that her
visitor still wore his hat and coat, standing with his back to her and staring out of the window at the falling snow in the
yard. His gloved hands were clasped behind him, and he seemed to be lost in thought. She noticed that the melting snow
that still sprinkled his shoulders dripped upon her carpet. "Can I take your hat and coat, sir?" she said, "and give them a
good dry in the kitchen?"

3
"No," he said without turning.

4
She was not sure she had heard him, and was about to repeat her question.

5
He turned his head and looked at her over his shoulder. "I prefer to keep them on," he said with emphasis, and she
noticed that he wore big blue spectacles with sidelights, and had a bush side-whisker over his coat-collar that completely
hid his cheeks and face.

6
"Very well, sir," she said. "As you like. In a bit the room will be warmer."

7
He made no answer, and had turned his face away from her again, and Mrs. Hall, feeling that her conversational
advances were ill-timed, laid the rest of the table things in a quick staccato and whisked out of the room. When she
returned he was still standing there, like a man of stone, his back hunched, his collar turned up, his dripping hat-brim
turned down, hiding his face and ears completely. She put down the eggs and bacon with considerable emphasis, and
called rather than said to him, "Your lunch is served, sir."

8
"Thank you," he said at the same time, and did not stir until she was closing the door. Then he swung round and
approached the table with a certain eager quickness.

4) What inference can you make from this passage?


A) Mrs. Hall is attracted to the strange man.
B) Mrs. Hall regrets allowing the man into her home.
C) Mrs. Hall is confused by the man's strange behavior.
D) Mrs. Hall thinks the strange man will stay for several days.

5) What inference can you make from this passage?


A) The stranger was wounded on the train.
B) The stranger is a relative of Mrs. Hall.
C) The stranger has visited Mrs. Hall before.
D) The stranger does not want his appearance revealed.
Passionate Shepherd To His Love
Christopher Marlowe

Come live with me and be my Love,


And we will all the pleasures prove,
That hills and valleys, dales and field,
Or woods or steepy mountain yields.

And we will sit upon the rocks 5


And see the shepherds feed their flocks,
By shallow rivers, to whose falls
Melodious birds sing madrigals.

And I will make thee beds of roses


And a thousand fragrant posies, 10
A cap of flowers, and a kirtle
Embroider`d all with leaves of myrtle.

A gown made of the finest wool,


Which from our pretty lambs we pull,
Fair lined slippers for the cold, 15
With buckles of the purest gold.

A belt of straw and ivy buds


With coral clasps and amber studs:
And if these pleasures may thee move,
Come live with me and be my Love.20

Thy silver dishes for thy meat


As precious as the gods do eat,
Shall on an ivory table be
Prepared each day for thee and me.

The shepherd swains shall dance and sing25


For thy delight each May - morning:
If these delights thy mind may move,
Then live with me and be my Love.

6) Which statement BEST summarizes the passage?


A) The shepherd is looking for a woman to live with him.
B) The shepherd wants his love to live and work with him.
C) The shepherd is trying to find a way to have his love leave him.
D) The shepherd wants his love to live with him so he promises her a life of luxury.

7) What is the main idea of this passage?


A) The shepherd is in love.
B) The shepherd's love is going away.
C) The shepherd wants to work hard for his love.
D) The shepherd is generous and caring.
Battling Cancer: One Woman's Journey
Tracy Wilson

1
Julianne had never given much thought to cancer before one dismal Monday morning last April. The dawn clouds were
gray and heavy, and it looked as though it might rain at any second as Julianne meandered to the mailbox at the end of
the lawn. As she opened the box, the rusty hinge made a screech much like someone scraping fingernails across a
blackboard. The news Julianne received in a postcard that day was much more unnerving. It was simply stated: "Miss
Taylor, please call our office to schedule a follow-up appointment as soon as possible. Tests from your annual physical
examination have revealed an abnormality." "Abnormality?" Julianne questioned. What kind of abnormality could a 24-
year-old woman, who exercised religiously and consumed a healthy diet, possibly have? Within hours she learned the
answer to this question only to pose a thousand more in its place.

2
Cancer, "the big C," as it is often called. Her doctor felt sure but ordered more tests to confirm his suspicion. While
cervical cancer in a woman Juliannes age was rare, her doctor admitted, it certainly was not unheard of in her
demographic group. Her doctor explained that this type of cancer is often caused by a common virus that many women do
not even realize they have. The human papillomavirus can lead to this type of cancer if a womans immune system does
not fight off the virus in its initial stages. Julianne was devastated. Her doctor began to discuss treatment options and
suggested an oncologist specializing in this type of cancer, but Julianne heard very little of what he said. Her head was
spinning with questions. Overwhelmed, she wondered how she would break the news to her family and friends.

3
Initially, they would feel the same shock and dismay Julianne experienced after receiving the devastating news. As the
shock wore off and cancer became the reality they would be living, they immediately offered tremendous support. Along
with her parents and a close friend, Julianne went to the oncologist her doctor had recommended to determine a
treatment plan to combat her cancer. The oncologist was optimistic that with a combination of surgery to remove the
cancerous cells followed by six chemotherapy treatments to ensure that all of the cells were destroyed, Julianne could
overcome this cancer and go into remission. He determined that since Juliannes cancer had been discovered in an early
stage of development, perhaps her fertility could also be saved. Julianne had dreamed of having children ever since she
was a child herself, so this news was very encouraging.

4
In May, Julianne had an operation to remove the cancerous cells from the lining of her cervix. The surgery to remove the
cells was painful in the days immediately following the procedure, but it was the chemotherapy treatments that were the
most debilitating. For several days after each of the six treatments, Julianne was unable to get out of bed. The physical
pain coupled with the extreme bouts of nausea and vomiting were more than she thought she could bear. While her hair
became thin and brittle during the treatments, she did not lose it entirely.

5
By autumn, Julianne was looking and feeling much more like herself. In late October, the results of treatment were
conclusive; she was in remission. Even though doctors consider Julianne cancer-free, she has made lifestyle changes to
prevent the cancer from returning. These changes include increasing the consumption of certain nutrients that have
proven to reduce cancer-causing agents from attacking healthy cells in the body.

6
Lycopene, an amino acid found in abundance in tomatoes and tomato-based products such as tomato sauce and paste,
has been proven to be a preventative for many types of cancer. Vitamins and minerals found in green, leafy vegetables
such as spinach and broccoli are also rich in cancer preventing antioxidants. Julianne also heeded her doctors advice to
exercise regularly and to engage in activities such as yoga or meditation to help manage stress and keep cancer at bay.

8) The main idea of section one is that Julianne received some upsetting news. Which detail from section one supports this main
idea?
A) The bad weather was upsetting to Julianne.
B) The postcard referred to abnormal test results.
C) The postcard stated Julianne must come in for additional tests.
D) Julianne was upset that private information was on the postcard.
9) "Julianne had dreamed of having children ever since she was a child herself, so this news was very encouraging."

What does this quotation suggest is another fear Julianne was experiencing?
A) She feared that the cancer would spread.
B) She feared that her cancer would return.
C) She feared that she might pass on the disease to her own children.
D) She feared that the cancer and the treatments would leave her infertile.

10) Julianne argues that her test results couldn't show a serious abnormality since-
A) She is not a smoker.
B) She works at a hospital.
C) She is only 24 years-old.
D) There is no history of cancer in her family.

Wichita Mourning
David Matherne

Pipe organsdusty and tarnished

Bellowed the ancient song,


As movers carried the pews
For one last time.

Frozen branchesheavy with ice arms 5


Couldnt perform their dance,
As workmen shuffled inside
The worn-out floors.

Sally Richardsbroken and mourning


Watched while her father left, 10
As painters brought in their cans
For the first time.

Stained-glass windowsbuckled and broken


Surveyed commotions cause
As commerce won in the end 15
Yet one more time.

Reverend Richardsfeeble and finished


Cried as his exit was lost
On Christians who worshiped the dime;
A change of the times. 20

11) To present the theme that change and progress are often painful, the poet uses
A) repetition of words to symbolize pain.
B) characters that express their feelings.
C) sensory images to create a feeling of loss.
D) rhyming words to create a rhythm of sadness.

12) Which lines BEST reflect a theme of the poem?


A) Lines 1 and 2
B) Lines 9 and 10
C) Lines 13 and 14
D) Lines 19 and 20
13)

The subject of both of these is a church. However, if you look closely at the photo and the words of the poem, you will also notice
that their themes are similar as well. What is that similarity?
A) Churches are always treated with reverence.
B) Older buildings can coexist with newer skyscrapers.
C) People will always protect the sanctity of the church.
D) The beautiful, historic elements of our lives are often destroyed because of progress.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Chapter 6 (excerpt)
Mark Twain

1 MONDAY morning found Tom Sawyer miserable. Monday morning always found him sobecause it began another
week's slow suffering in school. He generally began that day with wishing he had had no intervening holiday, it made the
going into captivity and fetters again so much more odious.

2 Tom lay thinking. Presently it occurred to him that he wished he was sick; then he could stay home from school. Here
was a vague possibility. He canvassed his system. No ailment was found, and he investigated again. This time he thought
he could detect colicky symptoms, and he began to encourage them with considerable hope. But they soon grew feeble,
and presently died wholly away. He reflected further. Suddenly he discovered something. One of his upper front teeth was
loose. This was lucky; he was about to begin to groan, as a "starter," as he called it, when it occurred to him that if he came
into court with that argument, his aunt would pull it out, and that would hurt.

3 So he thought he would hold the tooth in reserve for the present, and seek further. Nothing offered for some little time,
and then he remembered hearing the doctor tell about a certain thing that laid up a patient for two or three weeks and
threatened to make him lose a finger. So the boy eagerly drew his sore toe from under the sheet and held it up for
inspection. But now he did not know the necessary symptoms. However, it seemed well worth while to chance it, so he fell
to groaning with considerable spirit.

4But Sid slept on unconscious. Tom groaned louder, and fancied that he began to feel pain in the toe.

5No result from Sid. Tom was panting with his exertions by this time. He took a rest and then swelled himself up and
fetched a succession of admirable groans.

6Sid snored on. Tom was aggravated. He said, "Sid, Sid!" and shook him. This course worked well, and Tom began to groan
again. Sid yawned, stretched, then brought himself up on his elbow with a snort, and began to stare at Tom. Tom went on
groaning. Sid said:

7"Tom! Say, Tom!" [No response.] "Here, Tom! TOM! What is the matter, Tom?" And he shook him and looked in his face
anxiously.

8Tom moaned out: "Oh, don't, Sid. Don't joggle me."

9 "Why, what's the matter, Tom? I must call auntie."

10 "Nonever mind. It'll be over by and by, maybe. Don't call anybody."

11 "But I must! DON'T groan so, Tom, it's awful. How long you been this way?"

12 "Hours. Ouch! Oh, don't stir so, Sid, you'll kill me."

13 "Tom, why didn't you wake me sooner? Oh, Tom, DON'T! It makes my flesh crawl to hear you. Tom, what is the matter?"

14 "I forgive you everything, Sid. [Groan.] Everything you've ever done to me. When I'm gone"

15 "Oh, Tom, you ain't dying, are you? Don't, Tomoh, don't. Maybe"

16 "I forgive everybody, Sid. [Groan.] Tell 'em so, Sid. And Sid, you give my window-sash and my cat with one eye to that
new girl that's come to town, and tell her"

17 But Sid had snatched his clothes and gone. Tom was suffering in reality, now, so handsomely was his imagination
working, and so his groans had gathered quite a genuine tone.

18 Sid flew downstairs and said: "Oh, Aunt Polly, come! Tom's dying!"

19 "Dying!"

20 "Yes'm. Don't waitcome quick!"


14) Which best describes how Tom is characterized throughout this passage?
A) Tom is characterized as unhappy by his interactions with Sid.
B) Tom is characterized as creative primarily through the use of action.
C) Tom is characterized as shifty primarily through external description.
D) Tom is characterized as clever though both internal monologue and dialogue.

15) Which classic American trait is displayed by Tom Sawyer in this passage?
A) joyful admiration
B) sorrowful moroseness
C) deceit and manipulation
D) clever inventive ingenuity

Wuthering Heights
Emily Bront

1
I sympathized awhile; but when the children fell ill of the measles, and I had to tend them, and take on me the cares of a
woman at once, I changed my ideas. Heathcliff was dangerously sick; and while he lay at the worst he would have me
constantly by his pillow; I suppose he felt I did a good deal for him, and he hadnt the wit to guess that I was compelled to
do it. However, I will say this, he was the quietest child that ever nurse watched over. The difference between him and the
others forced me to be less partial. Cathy and her brother harassed me terribly; he was as uncomplaining as a lamb;
though hardness, not gentleness, made him give little trouble.

2
He got through, and the doctor affirmed it was in a great measure owning to me, and praised me for my care. I was vain
of his commendations, and softened towards the being by whose means I earned them, and thus Hindley lost his last ally:
still I couldnt dote on Heathcliff, and I wondered often what my master saw to admire so much in the sullen boy, who
never, to my recollection, repaid his indulgence by any sign of gratitude. He was not insolent to his benefactor, he was
simply insensible; though knowing perfectly the hold he had on this heart, and conscious he had only to speak and all the
house would be obliged to bend to his wishes.

3
As an instance, I remember Mr. Earnshaw once bought a couple of colts at the parish fair, and gave the lads each one.
Heathcliff took the handsomest, but it soon fell lame, and when he discovered it, he said to Hindley

4
You must exchange horses with me: I dont like mine; and if you wont I shall tell your father of the three thrashings
youve given me this week, and show him my arm, which is black to the shoulder.

5
Hindley put out his tongue, and cuffed him over the ears.

6
Youd better do it at once, he persisted, escaping to the porch (they were in the stable): You will have to; and if I speak
of these blows, youll get them again with interest.

7
Off dog! cried Hindley, threatening him with an iron weight used for weighing potatoes and hay.

8
Throw it, he replied, standing still, and then Ill tell how you boasted that you would turn me out of doors as soon as he
died, and see whether he will not turn you out directly.

9
Hindley threw it, hitting him on the breast, and down he fell, but staggered up immediately, breathless and white; and,
had not I prevented it, he would have gone just so to the master, and got full revenge by letting his condition plead for
him, intimating who had caused it.

10
Take my colt, gipsy, then! said young Earnshaw. And I pray that he may break your neck: take him, and begone, you
beggarly interloper! and wheedle my father out of all he has.; only afterwards show him what you are.
16)

Heathcliff was "as uncomplaining as a lamb."

What is the connotation of lamb in this sentence from the first paragraph?
A) white and pale
B) woolly and soft
C) meek and quiet
D) trusting and loyal

17)

He got through, and the doctor affirmed it was in a great measure owning to me, and praised me for my care.

In the sentence from the passage, what does the word affirmed mean?
A) to be amused by
B) to judge as valid
C) to be suspicious of
D) to have contempt for

18)

The difference between him and the others forced me to be less partial.

In this sentence from the passage, the phrase less partial could easily be replaced with which synonym?
A) fair
B) forgiving
C) loving
D) strict

19)

I wondered often what my master saw to admire so much in the sullen boy, who never, to my recollection, repaid his
indulgence by any sign of gratitude."

What does indulgence mean in this sentence from the passage?


A) tendency to be overprotective
B) determination to find out the truth
C) obligation to provide the boy with wealth
D) willingness to be lenient rather than strict

20) Which word in paragraph 1 shows that the speaker did not have a choice in caring for the sick children?
A) compelled
B) partial
C) sympathized
D) uncomplaining
At the Earths Core
Edgar Rice Burroughs

1
Lets have a look beyond that door, David, he cried.

2
Together we stepped out to stand in silent contemplation of a landscape at once weird and beautiful. Before us a low
and level shore stretched down to a silent sea. As far as the eye could reach the surface of the water was dotted with
countless tiny islessome of towering, barren, granitic rockothers resplendent in gorgeous trappings of tropical
vegetation, myriad starred with the magnificent splendor of vivid blooms.

3
Behind us rose a dark and forbidding wood of giant arborescent ferns intermingled with the commoner types of a
primeval tropical forest. Huge creepers depended in great loops from tree to tree, dense under-brush overgrew a tangled
mass of fallen trunks and branches. Upon the outer verge we could see the same splendid coloring of countless blossoms
that glorified the islands, but within the dense shadows all seemed dark and gloomy as the grave.

4
And upon all the noonday sun poured its torrid rays out of a cloudless sky.

5
Where on earth can we be? I asked, turning to Perry.

6
For some moments the old man did not reply. He stood with bowed head, buried in deep thought. But at last he spoke.

7
David, he said, I am not so sure that we are ON earth.

8
What do you mean, Perry? I cried. Do you think that we are dead, and this is heaven? He smiled, and turning, pointing
to the nose of the prospector protruding from the ground at our backs.

9
But for that, David, I might believe that we were indeed come to the country beyond the Styx. The prospector renders
that theory untenableit, certainly, could never have gone to heaven. However I am willing to concede that we actually
may be in another world from that which we have always known. If we are not ON earth, there is every reason to believe
that we may be IN it.

21)
2
Together we stepped out to stand in silent contemplation of a landscape at once weird and beautiful. Before us a low and
level shore stretched down to a silent sea. As far as the eye could reach the surface of the water was dotted with countless
tiny islessome of towering, barren, granitic rockothers resplendent in gorgeous trappings of tropical vegetation, myriad
starred with the magnificent splendor of vivid blooms.

3 Behind us rose a dark and forbidding wood of giant arborescent ferns intermingled with the commoner types of a primeval
tropical forest. Huge creepers depended in great loops from tree to tree, dense under-brush overgrew a tangled mass of
fallen trunks and branches. Upon the outer verge we could see the same splendid coloring of countless blossoms that
glorified the islands, but within the dense shadows all seemed dark and gloomy as the grave.

Which MOST COMPLETELY analyzes this excerpt for a comment about life?
A) Beauty is kind and inviting.
B) Nature is evil and forbidding.
C) There is no risk in following beauty.
D) What appears beautiful can also be deadly.

22) Which statement BEST reflects the human experience that is represented in this excerpt?
A) Humans desire to control nature.
B) Humans are frightened by nature.
C) Humans are fascinated by nature.
D) Humans cannot understand nature.
23)

This excerpt involves David, who travels with an inventor named Perry. They test their experimental invention, a vehicle that
burrows into the Earth's crust.

Which statement BEST reflects the human experience that is represented in this excerpt?
A) Humans are not always reliable guides.
B) Humans desire wealth and a life of ease.
C) Humans are drawn to explore and experiment.
D) Humans attempt to conquer and control nature.

Ain't I A Woman?
Sojourner Truth (1797-1883)

1
Well, children, where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter. I think that 'twixt the negroes of the
South and the women at the North, all talking about rights, the white men will be in a fix pretty soon. But what's all this
here talking about?

2
That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best
place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain't I a
woman? Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me!
And ain't I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man - when I could get it - and bear the lash as well! And
ain't I a woman? I have borne thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my
mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a woman?

3
Then they talk about this thing in the head; what's this they call it? [member of audience whispers, "intellect"] That's it,
honey. What's that got to do with women's rights or negroes' rights? If my cup won't hold but a pint, and yours holds a
quart, wouldn't you be mean not to let me have my little half measure full?

4
Then that little man in black there, he says women can't have as much rights as men, 'cause Christ wasn't a woman!
Where did your Christ come from? Where did your Christ come from? From God and a woman! Man had nothing to do with
Him.

5
If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together
ought to be able to turn it back , and get it right side up again! And now they is asking to do it, the men better let them.

6
Obliged to you for hearing me, and now old Sojourner ain't got nothing more to say.

24) Which device or technique does the author employ in paragraph 2 with her repetition of the phrase "Ain't I a woman?"
A) alliteration
B) onomatopoeia
C) personification
D) rhetorical question

25) The author uses which rhetorical device to prove her point that women are as good as men?
A) alliteration
B) allusion
C) dialogue
D) repetition

26) What do the word choices and writing style of the passage reveal about the author?
A) She seems to be uneducated.
B) She does not care about the topic.
C) She is very passionate about the topic.
D) She is an influential member of society.
27) In the second paragraph, Sojourner Truth uses imagery
A) to illustrate how strong women are.
B) to describe how women should be treated.
C) to try to take attention away from injustice
D) to emphasize the hardships that she has endured.

Plugged In, but Tuned Out: The Evil Inuence of Ear Buds
Darrell Thomas

I. Invasion of the Body Snatchers:


Have you noticed a change in the world around you recently? Have you seen how more and more people are walking
around with little rectangles in their hands or pockets with long wires plugged straight into their ears? At the grocery store
yesterday, I counted at least twenty people completely lost in the music provided by their ever-present cell phones. Its as
if the old science-fiction movie Invasion of the Body Snatchers was coming true; we are being overtaken by pod people. So
at the risk of appearing to be a crotchety old man complaining about the good ole days, I have to make a stance against
the evil influences of the cell phone and ear-bud phenomena on our society.

II. A Rational and Well-Thought Out Fear:


Now, I am not a Luddite; I have no desire to go around smashing up every cell phone or technological gadget in sight. I
enjoy and benefit from technological advances just like everyone else. I have a microwave, a television, a lap-top
computer, and a gas stove, and I use them all practically every day. I am not accusing people listening to music on their
cell phones of having detrimental effects upon our society because I hate music either. I profoundly do not hate music
but I do, ridiculous as it sounds, hate when cell phones are used to block out the real world.

III. The Dangers and Distractions of Ear Buds:


People who have ear buds in their ears simply cannot hear danger approaching. All they hear is the pretend soundtrack of
their lives. People walking with ear buds in cannot hear a dog dashing up behind them nor can they hear the footsteps of a
thief or murderer sneaking up behind him or her either. People who drive their cars with ear buds plugged in their ears (an
act that is considered a traffic violation in many states) cannot hear a child screaming or a horn blowing in warning. Cell
phones are known to be a factor in many car accidents. I wont even mention how distracting ear buds plugged into a cell
phone can be for a student in a classroom setting! We basically have handed a device to students that invites them to not
pay attention to the real world around them.

IV. Narcissism:
Beyond just being distracting and dangerous, ear buds are detrimental and damaging to society as a whole. Ear buds work
against a community of listeners. Everyone is walking all over the neighborhood, plugged into their latest favorite playlist,
but no one is talking to anyone. People who are addicted to their ear buds dont care about other people. They dont want
community and contact with the real world. Ear buds also actively destroy live musicians' ability to make a living with
their art form. No one wants live music anymore when they can pay less to hear it instantly and privately anytime they
want. If we dont curb our use of ear buds, all our musicians will languish and no new music will be developed.

V. Toss Them In the Trash!


People refuse to recognize the danger of ear buds because they simply love their ear buds too much to give them up. Ear
buds are probably doing serious physical damage to their inner eardrums or even the brain itself, but apparently that
doesnt bother anyone. I shudder to think of what the future will be like if we continue on the path of ear bud slavery were
traveling. Next time youre tempted to plug in and tune out, remember my warning. Either we learn to live without ear
buds, or were going to turn into a nation of complete zombies. Is that where you want to live?

28) What makes the following sentence a weak argument?

Ear buds are probably doing serious physical damage to their inner eardrums or even the brain itself, but apparently that doesnt
bother anyone.
A) The author is not a medical doctor.
B) The sentence is not a weak argument.
C) The author is too angry to be persuasive.
D) The author is speculating, but not providing concrete evidence.
29) Which sentence from the article has a flaw in its logic?
A) Is that where you want to live?
B) I enjoy and benefit from technological advances just like everyone else.
I profoundly do not hate musicbut I do, ridiculous as it sounds, hate when cell phones are used to block out the real
C)
world.
D) If we dont curb our use of ear buds, all our musicians will languish and no new music will be developed.

30) Which sentence from the article demonstrates a logical flaw?


A) Next time youre tempted to plug in and tune out, remember my warning.
B) People who have ear buds in their ears simply cannot hear danger approaching.
C) I wont even mention how distracting ear buds can be for a student in a classroom setting!
D) People refuse to recognize the danger of ear buds because they simply love their ear buds too much to give them up.