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Appendix 1 Summary questions: exam focus

Summary questions test your ability to:


understand texts
make clear, brief notes
select, order and collate information and present it in your own words
write concisely and fluently.

Core: Paper 1, Question 3 (15 marks)


You will be given one question following Reading Passage B. Question 3 is a two-part
summary question, for which you will have 2530 minutes. For part (a) of this
question, you will need to make notes on key points from the passage. In part (b),
you will be asked to summarise information on a particular aspect of the passage in
100150 words using your notes from part (a).
This question is worth 15 marks, 5 marks of which are for the quality of your writing.
This question tests Assessment objectives R1, R2 and R5, and W1, W2 and W3.

Extended: Paper 2, Question 3 (20 marks)


You will be given one question following Reading Passage B. Question 3 is a two-part
summary question, for which you will have about 4045 minutes. For part (a) of this
question, you will need to make notes on key points from the passage. In part (b),
you will then be asked to write a summary about a particular aspect of the passage
in 200250 words using your notes from part (a).
The question is worth 20 marks, 5 marks of which are for the quality of your writing.
This question tests Assessment objectives R1, R2 and R5, and W1, W2 and W3.

Checklist for success Answering the question:


 Make sure you provide the information the
Understanding the question: question asks for.
 Read the question carefully.  Cover all the main relevant points and structure
 Focus on what the question asks. your summary logically.
 Underline the main points in the passage(s)  Try to use some complex sentences, combining
relating to the question. points that are well punctuated and fluent.
 Write tightly and succinctly.
Preparing to answer the question:  Do not include introductory or concluding
 Locate: find key points from the text, using sentences, but get straight into the summary.
skimming and scanning.
 Avoid including any quotations or examples.
 Select: choose the most relevant points from
those youve found and list these as notes.
 Order: put these points in the best order to
answer the question, using your own words.

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Appendix 2 Writers effects questions: exam focus
Writers effects questions test your ability to understand how writers achieve effects.

Writers effects questions appear on both Paper 1 (Core) and Paper 2 (Extended).
They will ask you to respond to a passage by answering questions about the effect of
particular words, phrases or other techniques the writer uses to make an impact on
the reader.

Core: Paper 1, Question 1


You will be given two questions following Passage A, which will be 500600 words
long. Question 1 is a multi-part comprehension question, for which you will have about
35 minutes. As part of this, you will have two specific tasks on writers effects. These
should take you 1520 minutes in total.
Answer in full sentences where you can, but keep to the point and focus on the task.
The writers effect questions are worth 9 marks in total.

Extended: Paper 2, Question 2


You will read Passage A of about 650750 words. After you have answered an
extended response question on Passage A, the second question (called the language
question in the IGCSE syllabus) will focus on writers effects. Question 2 is worth
10 marks and you will have about 20 minutes to respond to it. It will be broken into
two parts and ask you to:
reread specified paragraphs or sections of the passage
make your own choice of a specified number of words and phrases that create
effects from these sections and write about them.

Checklist for success Answering the question:


 To answer the question, follow a clear process:
Understanding the question: Locate the words and phrases or section
 Read the question carefully. referred to.
 Make sure you understand what the question For Paper 2, select the words or phrases
is asking of you. needed or referred to.
 To understand what effects the writer might be Explain or analyse what is being suggested.
seeking to achieve, work out what sensory or  Make sure you can understand and explain the
emotive appeals the writer is making to the meaning of particular words and phrases.
reader. Ask yourself:
 Draw conclusions and inferences about the
How does the writer/narrator seem to feel? atmosphere and tone created.
How does he or she want us to feel  You choose words and phrases carefully to
or think? answer the question.
What words, phrases or techniques have
been chosen to achieve this? For higher grades:
What mood or atmosphere do these  Read between the lines for implied or suggested
choices create? meanings.
 Aim to not only explain, but also interpret
meaning, using your own words.
 Think about how effects work together so you can
comment on combined effects.

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Appendix 3 Extended response and directed writing
questions: exam focus
Extended response questions appear in Question 2 of Paper 1 (Core) and Question 1
of Paper 2 (Extended), and directed writing appears in Section 1 of Paper 3 (Core
and Extended).
Extended response/directed writing questions test your reading ability that you can:
demonstrate understanding of explicit meanings
demonstrate understanding of implicit meanings and attitudes
analyse, evaluate and develop facts, ideas and opinions.
These questions also test your writing ability that you can:
articulate experience and express what is thought, felt and imagined
sequence facts, ideas and opinions
use a range of appropriate vocabulary
use register appropriate to audience and context
make accurate use of spelling, punctuation and grammar (Paper 3 only).

Core: Paper 1, Question 2, extended response (15 marks)


You read Passage A on the question paper and respond to it as directed with a piece
of extended writing (200300 words). You will have about 25 minutes for this. You will
be marked out of 5 for your writing skills and out of 10 for your reading skills.

Extended: Paper 2, Question 1, extended response (20 marks)


This question refers to Passage A. You are asked to use and develop the information
there in another form as a piece of extended writing (250350 words), e.g. a letter, an
article, a report, a speech or a dialogue. You will have about 40 minutes for this. You
will be marked out of 15 for your reading skills and out of 5 for your writing skills.

Paper 3, Section 1, directed writing (25 marks)


You read one or more texts on the question paper. You are then directed to use and
develop the given information in another form, e.g. a discursive or argumentative letter
or article of 250350 words. You will have about 60 minutes for this. You will be
marked out of 15 for your writing skills and out of 10 for your reading skills.

Checklist for success Match your content to what the question asks:
For example:
Decode the question:  Make your voice convincing if the role/voice is of a
 Make sure you are clear what young reporter, for example, make sure your style matches
the question is asking you to do. how he or she would write.
For example:  Maintain your focus on the purpose; if it is to persuade
what role/voice you need to someone rather than analyse a situation, use appropriate
take on to write the text persuasive language.

why you are writing (main


 If the form is an article, do not write in the form of a letter!
purpose) This may seem obvious, but these things can be easily
missed.
the type or form of writing you  Get the content right. If the question asks you to give the
must do, if provided reasons or evidence, make sure you do just that.
who it is for (the audience)  Use the information you have been given, but make sure
what to include (information you add your own ideas as long as they are linked back
from the texts provided and to what is in the text.
your own ideas).  Organise your answer carefully. Points from the text
should be reused in an order that suits the task.

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Appendix 4 Composition questions: exam focus
Composition is the focus of Section 2 of Paper 3 (Core and Extended). This question
allows you to write more freely without the need to draw information from a specific
passage or text. It offers a real opportunity to show off your writing skills in original,
yet appropriate ways.
The composition question tests your ability to:
articulate experience and express what is thought, felt and imagined
sequence facts, ideas and opinions
use a range of appropriate vocabulary
use register appropriate to audience and context
make accurate use of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

Paper 3, Section 2 (25 marks)


Section 2 makes up 50% of Paper 3 and is worth 50% of the marks, i.e. 25 marks.
You have about an hour to write a 350450 word composition, choosing one title out
of a choice of:
two descriptive titles
two narrative titles.
For the composition response, up to 13 marks are awarded for content and structure
and up to 12 marks are awarded for style and accuracy.

Checklist for success For descriptive or narrative tasks:


 Use ambitious and well-chosen vocabulary.
Choose your task carefully:
 Create vivid images in the readers mind through
 Read all tasks/titles do not just choose the simile, metaphor, use of the senses and varied
first task you find in the list that you like. sentences.
 Choose the task that will allow you to shine  Consider and take an original angle on the
and show off your skills. story or description, particularly when
considering its structure, where
Draw on what you know: experimentation and conscious use of
 You will have spent a great deal of time structural techniques is rewarded.
learning how to write in each of these two  Maintain a focus on correct grammar,
different styles. Remember the specific ideas punctuation, paragraphing, spelling, etc.
about content, structure and style which your
teacher will have discussed with you.

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Appendix 5 Written coursework focus
You have to write three coursework assignments to complete your portfolio, which will
be assessed by an external moderator. There are a total of 50 marks available.

Component 4: Coursework portfolio (50 marks)


You submit a portfolio of three assignments, each of about 500 to 800 words. You can
do the assignments in any order. The assignments are:
Assignment 1: informative, analytical and/or argumentative
Assignment 2: descriptive and/or narrative
Assignment 3: a response to a text or texts chosen by your teachers the text(s)
will contain facts, ideas, opinions and arguments, and you should respond to them
by selecting, analysing and evaluating points from the material. You can write in
any appropriate form that you wish.
Your work may be handwritten or word-processed, and you may use dictionaries.
You must include the first draft for one of the three assignments submitted. This first
draft will not contribute to your mark.
Your Coursework portfolio primarily tests your writing ability i.e. that you can:
articulate experience and express what is thought, felt and imagined
sequence facts, ideas and opinions
use a range of appropriate vocabulary
use register appropriate to audience and context
make accurate use of spelling, punctuation and grammar.
Assignment 3 also tests your reading ability i.e. that you can:
demonstrate understanding of explicit meanings
demonstrate understanding of implicit meanings and attitudes
analyse, evaluate and develop facts, ideas and opinions.
You will be marked out of a total of 40 for your writing skills across the assignments
and (for Assignment 3 only) out of 10 for your reading skills.

Checklist for success  When considering which of your ideas to develop,


think about whether your idea has enough depth
For Assignment 1: and potential to show off your language skills.
 Focus on the purpose: how are you going  Plan the structure of your piece with care.
to inform, analyse or argue? Draw on all  Use ambitious vocabulary, imagery, compelling
the skills and techniques you know about characters, plot twists, sentence variety, as required
writing in this way. by the task you choose.
 Choose a topic or issue that really
interests you and which can be sustained.
For Assignment 3:
 Try to choose an interesting form of  Ensure you refer selectively to the facts, data and
writing rather than a straightforward essay. opinions from the text or texts you have chosen to
write about and evaluate them in your own
response.
For Assignment 2:
 Add your own ideas to those provided in the
 Ensure you are clear about the distinctive
chosen text.
stylistic requirements of narrative and
descriptive writing.  Make sure your response is logical, well
sequenced, argued or explained coherently and
 Generate a range of inventive, ambitious
clearly with language that matches the purpose.
and original ideas by trying out multiple
ideas and story-lines at the planning For all assignments: check your work thoroughly for
stage. correct spelling, punctuation and grammar usage.

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Appendix 6 Speaking and listening: exam focus
You have to give an individual presentation, which will be assessed by an examiner.
You will then discuss the topic with the examiner (or your teacher). There are a total
of 30 marks available.

Part 1: Individual task (34 minutes) (10 marks)


You will give a presentation, a talk, a speech or a monologue. For example, you might
talk about a recent film you have seen, suggesting why others might also like it.
The individual task tests your ability to:
articulate experience and express what is thought, felt and imagined
present facts, ideas and opinions in a sustained, cohesive order
communicate clearly and fluently and purposefully as an individual and in dialogue
with other speakers
use register appropriate to audience and context.

Part 2: Discussion (67 minutes) (20 marks)


The individual task leads into a conversation with the teacher or examiner about your
chosen topic. So, for example, you could develop a talk about a film into discussion of
wider issues such as censorship, popular culture and the film industry.
The discussion tests your ability to:
articulate experience and express what is thought, felt and imagined
present facts, ideas and opinions in a sustained, cohesive order
communicate clearly and fluently and purposefully as an individual and in dialogue
with other speakers
use register appropriate to audience and context
listen to and respond appropriately to the contributions of others.

Checklist for success Use these techniques to impress during the


discussion:
First be sure of your priorities:  Sustain the use of standard English.
 Choose a topic about which you have  Use rhetorical language, where appropriate: Im sure
genuine knowledge. you would agree that; Isnt it fair to say?
 Research, so that basic understanding is  Demonstrate the ability to organise thoughts, even in
well supported by background details. discussion: Could I offer three thoughts in
For example, if talking about a film: response? First, it is fair to say that Secondly...
information about the actors and the  Recognise the need to respond to original ideas:
director, whether the film is a re-make, the That is an interesting idea. I had never thought of
critics views. that before. However, when you think that
 Plan, so that the presentation moves  Have the confidence to challenge, where
smoothly through its different sections. appropriate: Im sorry, but I dont think that is correct.
 Prepare an impressive opening and Most movie lovers are perceptive and make
ending. judgments based on...
To deal with the discussion:  Talk confidently with the examiner, rather than just
answer questions: Yes. And so, have you yourself
 Make a list of further questions the
ever thought: That scene could have been directed
teacher/examiner might ask. For example:
better by...?
Why is this sort of movie popular?
 Be calm and thoughtful.
Is it justifiable to spend so much time and
money on a movie? Finally, stay focused
 Prepare some ideas about how to reply to so you dont forget what the other speaker has said.
these. Stick to the point you are supposed to be talking about.

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Appendix 7 Speaking and listening: coursework focus
You will be assessed by your teacher or an external moderator on your performance
during the course in three different speaking and listening tasks (see examples
below). There are a total of 30 marks available, divided equally between the three
tasks. These tasks test your ability to:
articulate experience and express what is thought, felt and imagined
present facts, ideas and opinions in a sustained, cohesive order
communicate clearly, fluently and purposefully as an individual and in dialogue with
other speakers
use register appropriate to audience and context.
listen to and respond appropriately to the contributions of others (Tasks 2 and 3).

Task 1: An individual activity (10 marks)


This could be a presentation, a talk, a speech or a monologue (in character). For
example, you talk about your favourite hobby or describe a place that enjoyed visiting.

Task 2: A pair-based activity (10 marks)


For example, you and another student role-play an argument between two
neighbours; or your teacher will interview you and another student about how
something at school could be improved.
Task 3: A group activity (10 marks)
For example, you and other students discuss in a group who to invite (and why) to
open the new local shopping centre; in a parole board scenario, your teacher presents
cases for prisoners, and you and other students discuss in a group whether or not
each case merits early release.

 If you are leading a group activity, research the


Checklist for success topic as much as possible. Be prepared to
introduce new detail or ideas into the discussion.
Individual activity:
 Show you are listening to the other person or
 Choose a topic about which you have genuine persons. Ask pertinent questions: for extra detail
knowledge and interest. or clarification; to challenge views; to summarise
 Research the topic thoroughly. Include another viewpoint or argument. This will clearly
essential factual details and important demonstrate that you have heard and understood
attitudes or views others may have, as what has been said: Yes, I see your point, but
background: a place you have visited may have you thought of these consequences?
have tourist leaflets; a book on its history,  If using role play, develop sufficient background
pointing out its good and bad features. to the role to make the character believable.
 Plan the activity carefully. Consider who your  When a role play is prepared, ensure you make
audience will be and structure your activity so an equal contribution to that of your partner(s).
that the audience can follow your line of  If you are taking a role, balance being a
thought or argument throughout. believable character with putting forward the
 Prepare an opening that immediately engages characters views clearly. Dont concentrate on
your audience, and an ending that they will one and ignore the other.
remember. Use these techniques to impress:
Pair and group activities:  Sustain the use of standard English in most
circumstances.
 Prepare thoroughly, by researching factual
details, alternative arguments and views.  Use rhetorical language, where appropriate: Im
sure you would agree that; Isnt it fair to say?
 Have extra detail, to support, develop or
modify your ideas as necessary.
 Demonstrate that you can think clearly, even
under pressure in a discussion.
 In discussion, put your case or view firmly and  Stay calm and be thoughtful.
confidently: I must point out, though, that
 Dont digress: stick to the topic.

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Appendix 8
(1) Two-year scheme of work: Year 1
The tables on these two pages suggest a structure for using the materials in the
Student Book and Teacher Guide over a two-year course. Each year is divided into
six units, with each unit equating to approximately 18 to 24 hours of teaching time.

Year 1
Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3

Skills focus: Skills focus: Skills focus:


An introduction to Reading skills: An introduction to Reading skills: An introduction to Writing skills:
skimming skimming The conventions of forms
scanning scanning Student Book Chapter 3: Lessons 16
selecting selecting
recognising explicit meaning recognising explicit meaning Key technical skills
recognising implicit meaning recognising implicit meaning Student Book Chapter 2
synthesis. synthesis.
Exam focus:
Student Book Chapter 1 Student Book Chapter 1
Extended and directed writing
Exam focus: Exam focus: Student Book Chapter 6
Summary questions Summary questions
Speaking and listening:
Student Book Chapter 4 Student Book Chapter 4
Chapter 5: Lessons 1 and 2
Paired activity: opportunity 2
Speaking and listening: Student Book Chapter 9:
Speaking and listening: Paired activity: opportunity 1 Lessons 13, 68, 1012
Group activity: opportunity 1 Student Book Chapter 9:
Student Book Chapter 9: Lessons 13, 68, 1012
Lessons 13, 612

Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6

Skills focus: Skills focus: Skills focus:


Writing for a purpose Recap on recognising implicit Descriptive writing
Student Book Chapter 3: meaning (One task could be used as
Lessons 715 Recognising words that stimulate Coursework piece 2*.)
the senses Student Book Chapter 7:
Exam focus: Recognising words that stimulate Lessons 1, 2, 3, 4, 7
Extended and directed writing the emotions Chapter 8, Lessons 1, 3, 6
Student Book Chapter 6 Student Book Chapter 1: Lessons 49
Exam focus:
Speaking and listening: Exam focus: Descriptive writing
Individual activity: opportunity 1 Writers effects questions Student Book Chapter 7:
(This activity could be developed Student Book Chapter 5: Lessons 36 Lessons 1, 2, 3, 4, 7
to offer an opportunity to cover
skills ready for the Speaking Speaking and listening: Speaking and listening:
and listening examination if Group activity: opportunity 2 Paired activity: opportunity 3
being taken.) Student Book Chapter 9: Student Book Chapter 9:
Student Book Chapter 9: Lessons 13, 612 Lessons 13, 68, 1012
Lessons 15, 1012

* Students taking Component 4, Coursework, rather than the Paper 3 examination


could utilise a piece of formative assessment from this Unit for their portfolio, as long
as the level of independent work involved was appropriate.

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Appendix 8
(2) Two-year scheme of work: Year 2

Year 2
Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3

Exam focus: Exam focus: Exam focus:


Narrative writing Discursive/argumentative writing Extended and directed writing
(One task could be used as (One extended and developed recap
Coursework piece 2*.) task could be used as Coursework (One task could be developed
Student Book Chapter 7: piece 1*.) into a Coursework piece 3*,
Lessons 12, 56 Student Book Chapter 6: Lesson 4 but additional preparation would
Chapter 8: Lessons 1, 3, 6 Chapter 8: Lessons 1, 2, 6 be required.)
Student Book Chapter 6
Speaking and listening: Speaking and listening: Chapter 8: Lessons 1, 46
Group activity: opportunity 3 Individual activity: opportunity 2
Student Book Chapter 9: (This activity could be developed
Lessons 13, 612 to offer an opportunity to cover
skills ready for the Speaking
and listening examination if
being taken.)
Student Book Chapter 9:
Lessons 15, 1012

Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6


Examination practice Examination practice Examination practice
Chapter 10 Chapter 10 Chapter 10

* Students taking Component 4, Coursework, rather than the Paper 3 examination


could utilise a piece of formative assessment from this Unit for their portfolio, as long
as the level of independent work involved was appropriate.

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