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LEARNER GUIDE

CPC40110 CIV Building and Construction (Building)


CPCCBC4005A Produce labour and material schedules
for ordering.

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LEARNER GUIDE

CONTENTS
Introduction to unit CPCCBC4005A ............................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.
REFERENCES......................................................................................................ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.
ABOUT THIS COURSE ................................................................................................................................................ 5
Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Research Activity ........................................................................................................................................................ 10
TOPIC 1 – REVIEW THE PROJECT PLAN ................................................................................................................... 10
TOPIC 2 – CONFIRM PROJECT REQUIREMENTS ...................................................................................................... 11
TOPIC 3 – CONFIRM MATERIAL AND LABOUR REQUIREMENTS ............................................................................ 12
TOPIC 4 – ORDER LABOUR AND MATERIALS .......................................................................................................... 13
TOPIC 5 – MONITOR PROJECT COSTS ..................................................................................................................... 14
TOPIC 6 – KEEP AND MAINTAIN SITE FILES............................................................................................................. 15
1.Review the project plan ........................................................................................................................................... 16
1.1 REVIEW THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN ............................................................................................ 16
Learning Activity 1: Project scheduling basics ...................................................................................................... 18
1.2 PLAN AND ORDER RESOURCES ................................................................................................................. 20
2.Confirm project requirements ................................................................................................................................. 22
2.1 REVIEW THE BUILDING CONTRACT DOCUMENTS .................................................................................... 22
Learning Activity 2: Contract variations ................................................................................................................ 25
2.2 REVIEW THE PERMITS AND APPROVALS................................................................................................... 28
Learning Activity 3: Implications for the project plan .......................................................................................... 30
Learning Activity 4: Identify required permits and authorisations ...................................................................... 33
Confirm material and labour requirements ............................................................................................................... 34
3.1 CONFIRM THE MATERIALS ........................................................................................................................ 34
Learning Activity 5: Reasons for waste ................................................................................................................. 36
Learning Activity 6: Check the materials ............................................................................................................... 37
3.2 SOURCE THE MATERIALS .......................................................................................................................... 34
3.3 HIRE EQUIPMENT AND PLANT .................................................................................................................. 38
3.4 CONFIRM LABOUR SCHEDULE .................................................................................................................. 39
Learning Activity 7: Check the labour.................................................................................................................... 40
Order materials and labour ........................................................................................................................................ 41
4.1 THE ORDERING PROCESS .......................................................................................................................... 41
4.2 CONFIRM WITH A PURCHASE ORDER ....................................................................................................... 41
4.3 RECORD ON CALL FORWARD SHEET ......................................................................................................... 41
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Learning Activity 8: Order the windows................................................................................................................ 45


Monitor project costs ................................................................................................................................................. 47
5.1 CHANGES TO COSTS .................................................................................................................................. 47
Learning Activity 9: Prime cost items .................................................................................................................... 49
5.2 ESTIMATED VS ACTUAL COSTS........................................................50ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.
Learning Activity 10: Estimated vs actual costs ................................................................................................... 54
Learning Activity 11: Cost control ......................................................................................................................... 57
Keep and maintain site files........................................................................................................................................ 58
6.1 LEGAL REQUIREMENTS ............................................................................................................................. 58
6.2 TRACKING AND MONITORING .................................................................................................................. 60
6.3 ORGANISING YOUR SITE FILES .................................................................................................................. 60
Learning Activity 12: Your site files ....................................................................................................................... 62
Assessment tasks ........................................................................................................................................................ 60
ASSESSMENT TASK 1 COVER SHEET........................................................................................................................ 60
ASSESSMENT TASK 2 COVER SHEET........................................................................................................................ 70
Appendices ................................................................................................................................................................. 79
APPENDIX 1 – EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS .................................................................................................................... 80
APPENDIX 2 – QUALIFICATION STRUCTURE ........................................................................................................... 60
APPENDIX 3 – UNIT OF COMPETENCY .................................................................................................................... 82
APPENDIX 4 – SAMPLE WORKSHEETS .................................................................................................................... 89
References .................................................................................................................................................................. 60

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Introduction to unit CPCCBC4005A

Welcome to the Learner Resource for CPCCBC4005A Produce labour and material schedules for ordering. This unit
forms part of the CPC40110 Certificate IV in Building and Construction (Building) which is a qualification designed
to meet the needs of builders and managers of small to medium-sized building businesses.

The builder may also be the appropriately licensed person with responsibility under the relevant building licensing
authority in a particular state or territory. Builder licensing varies across states and territories, so additional
requirements may be required to become licensed in the particular state or territory.

Occupational titles may include:

• Builder
• Construction manager

This unit of competency specifies the outcomes required to produce schedules of resource requirements so that
orders can be placed for materials and labour for residential and commercial projects and to record and track
costs as they are incurred. Knowledge of codes, regulations and approval processes, contractor systems, physical
resource and supplier identification and the ability to assess the availability of and requirements for skilled labour
are essential.

This unit of competency supports the needs of site managers and forepersons, estimators, project managers and
builders in the construction industry with a responsibility for producing schedules for ordering materials and
labour.

The qualification has core unit of competency requirements that cover common skills for the construction
industry.

Additional units of competency may be required to meet builder registration requirements in various states and
territories.

A copy of the full unit of competency is included in Appendix 3 of this Learner Resource. Appendix 2 includes a list
of all the units required to complete the CPC40110 Certificate IV in Building and Construction (Building).

Note: The unit of competency in this Learner Resource was current at the time of publication. Please check
www.training.gov.au to make sure you have the latest version.

References
This Learner Resource is the only text you will be supplied with for the unit you are studying. As reference is
sometimes made to other texts, such as the Building Code of Australia and Australian Standards, it is your
responsibility to either purchase these, or access them through another source, such as a library or your Trainer.

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ABOUT THIS COURSE


This Learner Resource is one of a set of resources that you will use to complete the CPC40110 Certificate IV in
Building and Construction (Building).

Unit structure
The structure of this unit is made up of the following three components:

Research Activities
You are asked to conduct some research activities that will supplement your learning and may involve
accessing the Internet, Moodle, visiting your local library to read other texts, reading newspaper or
magazine articles, or talking to building practitioners. These research topics are important for expanding
your knowledge and for creating backup proof of competency.

Learning Activities
These are activities done in and out of class that form part of your portfolio of evidence, and may be
required by your trainer to be submitted for those reasons. These activities are an important element of
your learning.

Assessment Tasks
• Where on-site activities are part of the assessment, you may refer to your own worksite or a similar
construction site.
• Submit your assessment tasks on or before the due date and time set by your trainer.
• All assessments will be submitted by uploading an electronic file to the relevant MyLearning
(Moodle) site.
• Make sure the assessment tasks that are submitted by uploading an electronic file to the relevant
MyLearning (Moodle) site are clearly labelled with your name, assessment task title, date etc. You
will also be required to include a completed ‘Assessment Task Cover Sheet’ located in this Learner
Guide.
This Learner Guide is used to provide you with most of the information you need to complete this unit.

When completing this unit it is important to:

• Set and document clear timelines to read and understand a topic and to complete all the research activities
and assessment tasks
• Email your trainer and ask questions if there is anything you don’t understand.

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What you will study


This Learner Resource contains seven topics that you should work through step by step. The topics are:

1. Review the project plan


2. Confirm project requirements
3. Confirm material and labour requirements
4. Order materials and labour
5. Monitor project costs
6. Keep and maintain site files.

There are also learning activities that you should complete before moving on to the next topic. These are
provided to help you apply and reinforce what you have learnt in each section. If you have trouble answering any
of them, you should contact your Trainer.

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Your time commitment


It should take about 40 hours to complete this unit. However, depending on your circumstances or prior
knowledge, you may find that it takes a little less or more time to finish the work.

Activities and assessment


Throughout this Learner Resource, there are activities to help reinforce the learning associated with a new topic.
Your Trainer may require you to forward your responses to these activities to them as part of your formal
assessment. If this is required you will be advised by your Trainer. The assessment tasks are provided at the back
of this Learner Resource.

The assessment tasks can be attempted as you work through the Learner Resource. You don’t have to wait until
you have completed all the activities before attempting an assessment task.

There are two assessment tasks for this unit that you must submit to your Trainer on or before the agreed date
and time. The titles of the assessment tasks are:

1. Scheduling labour and materials

2. Ordering labour and materials.

Make sure that all work you submit is your own and that you appropriately acknowledge and reference source
materials. When you have completed an assessment task, send it to your Trainer who will assess your work and
provide appropriate feedback about whether you have satisfied the requirements of the assessment task. If you
have any questions about your assessment results, please contact your Trainer.

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Satisfactory completion of the unit

You will be deemed competent for this unit on the basis that you can provide evidence of:

• identifying materials required for the project and gathering supply information effectively
• planning and allocating human and physical resources
• producing documentation that meets the time frames and quality standards established by the
organisation
• communicating information effectively within the organisation and to external agencies and the client, as
required

Employability Skills
Employability Skills are the generic skills required not only to gain employment but also to progress within the
workplace. These skills help you to achieve your potential and to successfully contribute to the strategic directions
of an organisation or your business.

Employability Skills are embedded within every competency and included in all assessments. The Employability
Skills within this unit are presented in Appendix 1 of this Learner Resource, mapped against the assessment
activity.

Getting started
It’s now time for you to start working through this Learner Resource. We wish you all the best with your study in
this unit and all the other units required to complete the CPC40110 Certificate IV in Building and Construction
(Building).

Remember, if you have any questions about your study please contact your Trainer for clarification.

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Acronyms
The following acronyms are used in this unit.

Acronym Definition
AS Australian Standards

BCA Building Code of Australia

CAD Computer-aided design

CFMEU Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union

EPA Environment Protection Authority

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Research Activity
Before you attend the first session of this unit, you are required to complete the following research activities:
• Topic 1, activity 1.
• Topic 2, activity 1.

Your Trainer will advise when the other research activities should be completed.

Topic 1 – Review the project plan


1. Overview of project scheduling
There are different ways to prepare a project schedule and many standard templates are available to help with
visual planning.

View the following construction example:

• Construction Scheduling Tutorial: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hhmv-PZp7rQ

Think about:

• When should the project schedule be generated?


• Why is it important?
• Why a project schedule is considered a ‘working tool’?

Your notes:

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Topic 2 – Confirm project requirements


1. Contract variations
Refer to the Variations section on the following website:

• The Law Handbook: www.lawhandbook.org.au/handbook/ch14s02s03.php

Describe the impact of variations to contract price and delays and extensions of time.

What does the term liquidated damages mean?

Your notes:

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Topic 3 – Confirm material and labour requirements


1. Preparing material requirements
There are purpose built software applications for estimating building materials.

Research on the Internet building estimating software applications. What is their main purpose? What materials
can they assist you to estimate?

Your notes:

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Topic 4 – Order labour and materials


1. Call forward sheets and purchase orders
Refer to:

• Call forward sheets and purchase orders:


www.dlsweb.rmit.edu.au/toolbox/buildright/content/bcgbc4005a/03_prepare_site_files/03_call_forward_sheets
/page_002.htm

Complete the activity, which shows how the call forward sheet is linked to the purchase order.

Your notes:

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Topic 4 – Monitor project costs


1. Project cost analysis
Refer to:
• Project cost analysis:
www.dlsweb.rmit.edu.au/toolbox/buildright/content/bcgbc4005a/04_monitor_project_costs/02_project_cost_a
nalysis/page_001.htm
Familiarise yourself with the examples of project cost analysis. What is the main purpose of each project cost
analysis method?

Project cost analysis Purpose


method

Cost against time

Accumulative actual costs

Estimated and actual cost

Accumulative estimates
and actual costs

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Topic 6 – Keep and maintain site files


1. Necessary information
Refer to:

• Necessary documentation:
www.dlsweb.rmit.edu.au/toolbox/buildright/content/bcgbc4005a/03_prepare_site_files/01_necessary_doc/pag
e_001.htm
Select the different tabs on the folder to find more information about each document in the site file.
Your notes:

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1. Review the project plan


You spent a lot of time preparing the estimate for the job, referring to the
plans and specifications, making sure it would cover your costs and give
you a profit and then presenting it in a professional way.

All your hard work paid off and you were awarded the contract to
undertake the build.

You know that you need to plan and track the building project to make
sure it is completed on time and on budget while ensuring it meets client
expectations. When planning the work that needs to be done and when,
you will create and use various documents and techniques to monitor the
time, costs, quality and scope of projects as shown in the image at right.

To help you plan for and order materials and labour efficiently, you should
review the schedule in the project management plan.

1.1 Review the project management plan


Building and construction projects are often complex, so planning is
essential. Poor project planning can lead to:

• cost overruns
• quality issues
• disputes

To help avoid these issues, you need to develop a project management plan that helps you to:

• clearly understand the requirements of the project


• schedule when tasks should start and when they should be completed so that there are no delays and the
project is completed as quickly as possible
• calculate the labour requirements so that the number of workers is just right. If there are too many, the
activity level drops and if there are too few, the project will be slowed down
• calculate the materials requirements so that the quantity is just right. If there is too much, materials will
be wasted and if there is too little, time will be wasted while more materials are being ordered
• calculate the financial requirements to avoid the risk of the project being held up due to lack of finances
• schedule the materials, labour, transportation and equipment so that everything needed for the project is
on-site when it is required
• have clear lines of communication
• identify risks and have risk management strategies, including contingency plans
• implement workplace health and safety requirements
• address environmental requirements
• prepare reports

The project management plan provides the framework for developing materials, labour and cost schedules.
The details of costs and timing are then used to complete the contract pricing and timing.

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The project schedule


During the planning stage, you will have identified the major stages and specific tasks of the project.

The project schedule is a calendar that shows:

• the duration of each task


• the start and end dates
• the dependencies of each task
• whether tasks must be completed in sequence or whether some tasks can be done at the same time as
others

The project schedule then allows you to:

• identify when the resources and materials need to be ordered


• show all stakeholders the key tasks and when the work will be performed
• check on the progress of the tasks

Discussion notes: Refer to Research Activity 1. Overview of project scheduling.

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LEARNING ACTiVITY 1 Project scheduling basics

The objective of this activity is to develop a basic project schedule for a list of tasks.

Instructions:

• Write each of the tasks below on a sticky note given to you by your Trainer.
- Site preparation - Remove waste - Order fixtures

- Arrange plant/ - Excavate the site - Electrician to start


equipment hire

- Obtain occupancy - Obtain building - Build frame


permit permit

• Arrange the tasks in the order they should be completed. Consider:


- the requirements of each task
- dependencies between tasks
- the duration of each task
- whether one needs to be completed before the next one can start, or can they be done in
parallel?
• Once you have the tasks in the correct order write them and the duration in the following table.
• Define the start and finish day for each task in the table, starting from 1 June. For example, if the first task
is ‘Order fixtures’, it starts on 1 June and finishes on Day ‘x’ according to the duration you have assigned it
and the time frame across the total period of the build. In other words, obtain the building permit may
take two days in total, but these days may be spread over two months.

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Task Duration in Start Finish


days
1 June

* Retain this learning activity as part of your portfolio of evidence.

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1.2 Plan and order resources


Once you have reviewed and confirmed the schedule on the project
management plan, you need to plan for and order the materials and
labour required to complete the job.

To plan for and order materials and labour, you need to:

• confirm project requirements


• confirm material and labour requirements
• order materials and labour
• monitor project costs
• keep and maintain site files

As part of the ordering process, you will create or refer to the following
documents and information:

• The materials schedule


• The labour schedule
• Costs and payments schedule.

These documents and information will help you to:

• minimise resource use


• reduce waste
• improve productivity
• increase profits

The material schedule

A material schedule is a list of materials that acts as a guide for ordering and for determining when the materials
should be on-site.

A materials schedule usually includes:

• what is to be ordered
• how much to order
• when it will be required
• which part of the building the materials are for

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The labour schedule

A labour schedule shows which workers are needed and when they should be on-site. This schedule is mainly
based on your project schedule.

The main factors to consider when working out the schedule for the labour are:

• what tasks can be completed in parallel and what tasks have dependencies on them before they can start
• the start and end dates of the tasks

Costs and payments schedule

Throughout the project, you need to monitor the project costs and compare actual costs against the estimated
costs. Obviously, if the actual costs are higher than you estimated, you may be out-of-pocket, depending on the
cause of the extra costs.

By continuously monitoring your costs, you should be able to avoid major deviations from the original estimate.

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2. Confirm project requirements

Once the contract has been signed, the project begins. The first task is to revisit the requirements of the project
so you can ensure that the project scheduling is in line with the project requirements.

You need to review the:

• building contract documents


• permits/authorisations requirements

2.1 Review the building contract documents

Before beginning building, review the building contract documents and use them to develop your project,
materials and labour schedules.

The building contract is normally made up of three documents:

1. Building contract – a legal document, which describes the roles


and the rights and responsibilities of your client and you, as the
builder.
2. Specification – this details the work to be carried out, the goods
to be supplied and the way in which the work will be done.
3. Drawings or plans – these detail the work to be done and are
developed by an architect or draftsperson.

Information regarding the materials can be documented in the building contract, the project specifications and
the drawings or plans. It is important to review the documents before you order the materials, to check if any
changes or variations have been made since you performed the estimate for the quote. If so you should update
the estimating and costing worksheet you used when estimating the type, quantities and costs of labour and
materials.

It may be that the plans, specifications and other project documentation nominate specific materials that are to
be used. They could include materials that need to be imported from overseas or interstate or materials, which
need to be custom made.

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Often these need a long lead-time for ordering. For example, the
9 x 8 metre glass mural on the front of a Melbourne home (left) would
have needed to be organised early if the project was not to be held up.

Sometimes the project documentation specifies a nominated supplier.


For example, a particular supplier might be specified for the supply of the
windows. In that instance the order must be placed with that supplier.
‘White Noise’, Melbourne

Source:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NEWMAN_2_lowres.jpeg>

Building specifications
If all the information related to a project appeared on the drawings, they would be very difficult to read. The
building specifications (specs) provide supplementary information to the drawings and have priority over any
notations on the drawings. A building spec may include:

• a description of the job, the site, the proprietor and any other parties in the contract arrangement
• a trades section detailing standards and quality of work. This may be set by the Australian Standards (AS)
or by samples constructed for the architect's approval
• the materials schedules containing detailed information and location of each item, for example:
- windows, showing frame material and type of glass
- doors, specifying size and materials
- finishes to walls, floors and ceilings
- door accessories including locks, latches, hinges, push plates and pull handles
- colour selections

Discrepancies
If you notice any discrepancy between what is stated on the plans, in the specs or in the contract, for example a
paint colour:

1. the specs override the plans


2. the contract overrides both the plans and the specs

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Contract variations
You may need to modify your materials and labour schedules and requirements as a result of a contract variation.

Variations to the contract, plans or specifications may be requested by:

• the home owner or developer


• you as the registered builder or other building practitioner, for example a building surveyor, architect,
building inspector or engineer

Variations may affect:

• materials required
• labour required
• the project schedule
• the price

Variations may occur as a result of changes made to:

• the contract, plans and specifications


• prime cost items
• provisional cost items

Discussion notes: Refer to Research Activity 1. Contract variations

Variation notice
By law, you and the client must agree in writing to the variations using a variation notice. The notice must include
the details and cost of the changes and the new completion date.

To avoid the possibility of disputes, it is recommended that all changes are made in writing and signed by both
parties.

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LEARNING ACTIVITY 2 Contract variations

1. Refer to the project documents for Case study 2 residence. Give three examples of possible variations that you,
as the builder, might need to make to the building contract so that you can complete a job.

2. Give an example of a variation that the owner of Case Study 2 might make.

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3. Give an example of a variation that may be requested by a building surveyor or other authorised person.

4. What do you need to do when there is a variation to the contract?

* Retain this learning activity as part of your portfolio of evidence.

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Producing overlay drawings


An overlay drawing is a printing or drawing on a semi-transparent sheet, drawn at the same scale, that is designed
to lay over a plan showing changed or additional details.

Overlay drawings are used for two reasons, to:

• illustrate detailed contract variations


• show the detail of specific requirements, for example, the structural beams and joins

Illustrate contract variations

To accurately visualise the variations to a building plan, the builder or the architect may produce an overlay
drawing, rather than redrawing the plan.

Once the variations have been accurately drawn on the overlay, updates can be made to all the schedules and
specifications if required.

Detail of specific requirements

Overlay drawings can also be used to emphasise or show detail of specific requirements for example:

• locations of specific items for example data points, exit locations or the wall locations of a lower floor
• the detail of specific structural requirements

Overlay drawings are generally produced to be used with commercial plans, however a structural overlay may be
produced to clearly show the requirements for a two storey house.

Developing an overlay drawing is most commonly achieved using Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. When
developing the overlay:

• the colour of the existing plan is changed to red (ie all text, lines and boxes)
• the plan with the design changes is drawn in blue
• the two drawings are laid over the top of each other to see exactly what differences there are between
them

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2.2 Review the permits and approvals


All necessary authorisations such as permits should have been obtained before the scheduling of labour and
materials commences. However one of your key tasks is to review the project documentation to ensure your
have the appropriate permits and authorisations and that the project is meeting any conditions of approval they
may contain. If the permits and authorisations have not been obtained or contain specific conditions, this may
impact the timing of your project.

These permits or authorisations include:

• planning permits, including environmental requirements


• building permits
• work zone permit
• services connections and authorisations

Obtaining these permits and authorisations are key tasks to be included in your project schedule. The authority
that is providing the permit/authorisation will define the timing of these tasks; the sooner you contact the
authority that is providing the permit to ascertain lead times, the better.

Planning permits, including environmental requirements


Planning permits

Planning permits are concerned with the use of land to ensure that land is well managed taking into account the
needs of the community and the environment. They are issued by local councils or shires and ensure the
development complies with local and state government regulations.

When issuing a planning permit, the local government looks at:

• what the land can be used for (houses, shops, factories, parks)
• the size and type of existing and proposed buildings
• landscaping
• whether additional infrastructure is needed
• how others may be affected

As the registered builder, you will not usually be required to apply for a planning permit – this should be done by
the client or the client’s architect or building designer.

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However, you are required to comply with the planning permit’s conditions. For example, if planning permit
conditions specify when works must start and finish, this timing will need to be included in your project schedule.

Environmental requirements

Local government requirements

A number of local governments have environmental requirements that you may need to consider and plan for
when building your client’s home or other structure. These requirements will usually be incorporated into the
planning permit conditions.

These requirements may include:

• vegetation removal
• earthworks and limiting silt run-off and other pollutants into stormwater drains
• waste management
• durability and reusability of building materials
• limitations on using water from a local river or creek

It is a good idea to check the planning permit and the local government website as environmental conditions
required by local governments can change at any time.

Other regulatory bodies

In addition to local government requirements, all states and territories in Australia have environmental
regulations that you must comply with. The regulations are enforced by various statutory bodies, for example the
Environment Protection Authority (EPA) in Victoria.

In addition to enforcing the law, these statutory bodies also:

• can carry out environmental audits to assess the environmental


condition of your building site and advise whether potentially
contaminated land is suitable for residential, commercial or industrial
use
• provide approvals for the installation of non-sewerage wastewater
treatment systems. This includes greywater systems, waterless
composting toilets and septic tanks.

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LEARNING ACTIVITY 3 Implications for the project plan

How could a planning permit or environmental requirements affect:

• the materials you use


• the timing of the project tasks
• cost

* Retain this learning activity as part of your portfolio of evidence.

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Building permits

Building permits authorise the construction or alteration of a building/s, focusing on its structural safety and
amenity. They:

• are issued by the local council/shire or a private building surveyor


• approve and allow building projects to proceed
• ensure the building regulations are followed
• ensure key structural stages of the project are independently inspected

When you are scheduling your project you will need to include the key tasks to gain the building permit:

• Check the building plans and specs


Before you apply for the permit, check that the building plans and specs meet legislative requirements,
including AS, as you will not be granted the permit if they don’t comply.
For more information about legislative requirements and AS, refer to CPCCBC4008B Conduct on-site
supervision of building and construction projects.
• Consider staged/partial permits
Usually, you would apply for a building permit for the whole construction. However, you may obtain a
stage/partial permit, for example, a base permit for the concrete slab. This may occur if you need to
provide additional information or documentation to enable the permit to be issued for the whole
building.

When both a planning permit and a building permit are required for a proposal, then the planning permit must be
approved and issued before the building permit. The building permit must be consistent with the planning permit.

Work zone permits

All local councils and shires offer a work zone permit for use on construction sites. However, the use of the work
zone and the criteria to apply for one can vary significantly between each local government. Some allow only for
the loading and unloading of goods or temporary access for plant or equipment, while others provide parking
permits for workers.

The fee for a work zone permit also vary significantly with some local governments asking a flat fee, and others
varying the fee based on the location of the work zone.

Check with the relevant local government for your building project to determine the work zone conditions and
fees.

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Services connections and authorisations

Another key task to be included on your project schedule is to apply to local utilities companies to connect or
suspend services before, during or after construction.

Most utilities companies have application forms that must be submitted either online or posted using print-based
forms.

As part of the application, you may be required to include:

• building plans
• details of the site
• specifics of materials used in the construction process, for example, the size of internal pipework’s
• proposed location of the water meter location, pipes, etc.
• types of appliances that will be connected to the service, e.g. gas

These services authorities may impose conditions with any connection or disconnection they provide, and this
may also affect your project schedule.

Once the permits, approvals and connections from authorities are received, labour and material scheduling can
commence.

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LEARNING ACTIVITY 4 Identify required permits and authorisations

Refer to the contract documents for Case Study 2 residence.

What permits/authorisations are required to start this project?

Permits/authorisations required:

* Retain this learning activity as part of your portfolio of evidence.

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3. Confirm material and labour requirements

To make sure timelines are met and the project is completed to specification,
it is vital that as the project manager you know exactly what resources you
need, where you will get them, how much they will cost and when they will be
available.

Once you have confirmed the information in the contract documents and
reviewed the permits and authorisations, you need to:

• confirm the materials


• source the materials

3.1 Confirm the materials

Now that you have checked the project documents you need to update the estimating and costing worksheet to
ensure you note:

• any changes or variations to the original estimated list of materials and labour
• any changes or variations to the quantities of materials or labour, including allowances for waste
• any additions to the actual items which need to be ordered

Sometimes the architect has developed their own estimating and costing worksheet. If this is the case, it is still
important to check that the project requirements have been interpreted correctly.

There are various estimating and materials software programs that can help you estimate and confirm the
material requirements.

Discussion notes: Refer to Research Activity 1. Preparing materials requirements.

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Material schedules

Material schedules are lists of a particular material type, for example, doors, door handles, windows or paint
colours and finishes. They include the:

• specific requirements of the material (model, brand, colour, finish, type)


• measurements, if applicable
• location for each separate item

Material schedules may be found on the plans or in the specifications document.

Allowances for wastage

Purpose built software and forms give consistency to the way that information – like dimensions or weight – are
calculated. This is important for accurately pricing materials and minimising waste.

However, waste must still be factored in to your calculations. With many materials, such as wallpaper, tiles,
floorboards, paint, sand, mortar and plasterboard you need to allow for some waste. Wastage can occur as a
result of many reasons including:

• poor planning
• unclear drawings or specifications
• incorrect measuring and calculations
• pieces cut to the wrong size
• damage during transportation
• inappropriate storage
• ordering errors
• minimum quantities you are required to order
• changes to the design

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LEARNING ACTIVITY 5 Reasons for waste

In pairs, discuss what may cause wastage for each of the materials listed:

• Write your suggestions in the ‘Reasons for waste’ column.


• Add two more materials to the table and suggest the reasons for waste.

Material Reasons for waste

Concrete

Gyprock

Sand bed for concrete slab

Studs

Fibro-cement sheets for eaves

Tiles

Timber wall framing

* Retain this learning activity as part of your portfolio of evidence.

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LEARNING ACTIVITY 6 Check the materials

Congratulations you have won the contract for the Smith residence!

It is time to order the materials for the project but after checking the project documents, you have found that Mr
Smith has decided to increase the number of tiles in the bathroom and ensuite to enable floor to ceiling wall
coverage.

You need to update the estimating and costing worksheet so it includes the actual quantities for the job. To
complete this you will need to:

• refer to the estimating and costing worksheet (provided by your Trainer or used in a previous unit) for the
Smith residence
• re-check the contract, plans and specifications to calculate the impact of this change on the quantities
ordered
• update the spreadsheet to include the changes and the actual quantities and costs of materials

* Retain this learning activity as part of your portfolio of evidence.

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3.2 Source the materials

The estimating and costing worksheet contains information on the supplier, quantity and cost of materials
needed for the project.

You might choose a local supplier, the nominated supplier (if one has been specified in the project
documentation), your company’s preferred supplier or a wholesaler.

You can also find suppliers by referring to industry associations or searching the Internet.

To check availability, contact each supplier to see if they have the type of products and in enough quantities so
that they can guarantee supply.

The timing of the delivery of materials is important:

• On the one hand, you do not want too much material cluttering the site and making it difficult to work.
• On the other hand, you want to make sure materials are there when you need them.

The final cost should include the cost of freight or transport to the site or the workshop for the project.

3.3 Hire equipment and plant

Equipment and plant hire is also a scheduling and cost consideration.

To make sure the machinery is available when you need it, it is a good idea to contact the appropriate hire
companies during the planning stages of the project to be sure they have sufficient stock and that it is available.

On some large projects that run for long periods, it is sometimes more effective to organise a long continuous hire
at a reduced rate, even if the plant is not required for the whole period. This eliminates the risk of plant or
machinery not being available.

Another important consideration of the hiring process is to establish whether the equipment provider is also able
to organise maintenance and repairs, preferably on-site, as this will be more cost and time effective for your
building project.

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3.4 Confirm labour schedule

As labour makes up a large part of the project cost, hiring workers with the right skills, knowledge and judgement
is crucial. A shortage of labour can result in overtime or delays. Good planning of the labour requirement of the
job is vital.

The estimating and costing worksheet lists all the estimated materials and labour for the job. For labour it
includes:

• a description of the task to be completed


• estimated quantity depending on how the subcontractor costs his work that is number of days, square
metres, outlets to be fitted, etc
• the supplier/tradesman name
• the estimated cost per unit of labour
• estimated total cost

These estimates of the labour costs and quantities were developed prior to the contract signing.

Once you have won the business you need to:

• confirm the start and end dates of the labour in the project schedule
• contact the supplier of the labour to confirm the availability of tradespeople and their costs
• update the timing and costs in the estimating and costing worksheet, if required

Note: The building contract may specify whether workers must be union members and these details
need to be noted in the description section of the estimating and costing worksheet.

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LEARNING ACTIVITY 7 Check the labour

It is now time to confirm the labour requirements for the Smith residence. John decided to increase the number
of tiles in the bathroom to enable floor to ceiling wall coverage.

You need to update the estimating and costing worksheet so it includes the changed labour requirements for the
job now that the tiler is laying more tiles. To complete this you will need to:

• refer to the estimating and costing worksheet for the Smith residence
• re-check the contract, plans and specifications to see the impact of this change on the estimated labour
time and costs
• update the spreadsheet to include any changes and the actual quantities and costs of labour

* Retain this learning activity as part of your portfolio of evidence.

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4. Order materials and labour

Now that you have confirmed the quantities and costs for labour, materials and plant hire, you need to order the
materials and labour.

Having decided on where you will source them, you now need to think about the ‘how’. Never operate on a
verbal agreement and a handshake. While verbal agreements are enforceable, they are very difficult to prove if
there is a building dispute that is taken to court.

Written order documents provide a useful audit trail of everything ordered and received. Call forward sheets and
purchase orders are used for this purpose. It is important that all the purchasing documents are kept in one place.

4.1 The ordering process

To order labour and materials you should:

1. place the order

2. confirm the order with a written purchase


order

3. record the purchase order details on the call


forward sheet

Place the order

Refer to the sample call forward sheet on the following page.

A call forward sheet provides a snapshot of what is needed on any given day and makes it easy to place the order
and see exactly what materials will be coming from the supplier and what labour is allocated for that day.

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Sample call forward sheet

Activity Task/activity Order date Required Supplier Supplier Purchase order Instructions or comments
ID delivery contact details no
date

11 Site toilets 29-Sep-14 6-Oct-14 TST Hire 03 9999 9999 Require delivery before 9.00 am

Keep ‘Em Out


12 Temporary fencing 25-Sep-14 6-Oct-14 1300 199 999
Fencing

13 Bobcat hire 29-Sep-14 8-Oct-14 Bob’s Rentals 0419 999 999 Speak to Bob for best price

Erosion control –
14 1-Oct-14 8-Oct-14 C Fullards 03 9888 0000
Jute blanket

Erosion control –
15 1-Oct-14 8-Oct-14 C Fullards 03 9888 0000
Filter cloth

16 Top soil 1-Oct-14 13-Oct-14 C Fullards 03 9888 0000 Category C soil (see website)

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The call forward sheet is used twice for any given item:

• On the first use, the call forward sheet guides the timing of the ordering. It shows the dates when each
item needs to be ordered and the supplier details.

It is used to record:

• the tasks that need to be completed, in date order


• associated materials or labour:
- the date, the materials or labour need to be ordered
- the date, the materials or labour need to be delivered to the site
- supplier name and contact details

Use this information to place your order.

4.2 Confirm with a purchase order

You may not currently use purchase orders when ordering supplies and materials – let’s face it, it’s easier to make a
phone call to the supplier and get what you want without messing around with paperwork, isn’t it? Why bother?

There are actually some good reasons to use them.

A purchase order is a document issued by a buyer to a seller. It shows the type, quantity and price of products or
services to be provided. When a supplier or service provider (seller) accepts your purchase order, it forms a
contract between you and the supplier. Before then, no contract existed.

As well as being a binding document, a purchase order provides a written record of materials and services ordered.
If there are any problems with the goods delivered or the price, you have an ‘audit trail’ to refer to.

Refer to Appendix 4 to see what information is typically included in a purchase order.

Once you have completed and sent the purchase order, note the purchase order number and the actual order date
on the call forward sheet.

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4.3 Record on call forward sheet

The second use of the call forward sheet is to record the purchase order number once it has been created and sent
to the supplier.

Discussion notes: Refer to Research Activity 1. Call forward sheets and purchase orders.

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LEARNING ACTIVITY 8 Order the windows

You are preparing to order the windows for the Smith residence. Your supplier is Wayne’s Windows, phone 0414
555 666. He needs a 30 day lead time, so you are ordering them today for delivery in
30 days’ time.

• Refer to the windows schedule on the plans and the specifications.


• Refer to the estimating and costing worksheet with the price estimates for the windows, or a costing guide.
• Complete the call forward sheet in Appendix 4 with the following information:
- Order and delivery dates
- Supplier details.
• Complete the purchase order on the following page with the following information:
- Delivery address
- Site contact person (you)
- The required delivery date
- The number and size of the windows to be ordered
- Type and colour
- The price of each size of window, according to your initial estimate or the costing guide
- The total costs.
• Update the call forward sheet with the purchase order number.

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* Retain this learning activity as part of your portfolio of evidence.

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5. Monitor project costs

As a project manager, it is vital that you have accurate details about costs and develop realistic cash flow
requirements. These are necessary if you are to deliver the expected outcomes within the project budget.

During the project, you must monitor actual costs and compare them with estimates to determine if there is a
variance. Variances will affect the project budget and possibly your profit margin.

Discussion notes: Refer to Research Activity 1. Project cost analysis.

5.1 Changes to costs

In the first stage of a construction project an estimate of all materials and labour costs is produced. These estimates
are based on quotes received from suppliers. The quotation includes all costs from the start to the end of the
building project and includes:

• planning, administration and design costs


• labour
• materials

However, costs can change due to:

• contract variations, including changes to prime costs or provisional sums


• costs due to unforeseen circumstances or builder error
• differences between the estimated cost and actual cost

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Contract variations

Variations made to the building contract, specifications or plans can impact the cost of the project.

From an estimating perspective, it is also important to remember that the contract includes prime costs and
provisional sums on items that have not been finally decided:

• Prime costs – these costs are an estimated cost of the item itself, for example, wall tiles for the bathroom,
but exclude the labour costs as this has already been calculated and has been included in the contracted
price.
• Provisional sums – these amounts refer to materials and labour costs on something not yet decided, for
example, flooring.

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LEARNING ACTIVITY 9 Prime cost items

Refer to the contract for the Smith residence. List six items described in the prime costs items schedule.
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

* Retain this learning activity as part of your portfolio of evidence.

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Costs due to unforeseen circumstances or builder error

On some projects, there are unforeseen costs that cannot be claimed as a variation to the contract price and need
to be absorbed by the builder’s profit margin. For example:

• Problems with the construction of structural elements due to the builder’s oversight that only become
apparent once work starts. If they are correctly shown on the contract documents, any oversight is at the
builder’s expense. In these cases, extra work may be required to fix the problem.
• The recorded cost of materials or a product is increased by the manufacturer after a contract has been
signed. In this situation, the cost of the product must be absorbed by the builder.

If the builder has not included all costs or there has been an oversight in relation to the technical requirements
of the job then it is also the builder’s responsibility to cover the additional costs.

5.2 Estimated vs actual costs

To successfully monitor project costs, you should compare the actual cost of the project with the estimated cost.

The estimated costs originally quoted by the supplier may be different from the actual prices. Monitoring the
difference between the estimated cost and actual costs is an important part of your project management role.

You can compare actual prices with the estimated cost:

• at the end of each stage by comparing the subtotal


• for each task (eg earthworks)
• for each item (eg timber)
• at the end of each month.

If you notice the actual cost is higher than the estimated cost for the month, you may need to look for ways to
reduce costs in the next month. By continually monitoring costs on a monthly basis, you will have time to respond
to changes before it is too late.

By comparing these figures, you can obtain a clear snapshot of where the business is at any given time.

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Estimated project costs schedule

The project costs schedule shows the estimated costs at each stage of the project and when they are due to be
paid. Estimating how much you owe each month is important so there are enough funds to cover costs and pay
suppliers.

The sample ‘Estimated project costs schedule’ on the following page illustrates how estimated costs will be paid
throughout the project. It includes the following information:

• The estimated number of days to complete each of the tasks.


• The name of each task, and the estimated total cost of the task.
• The body of the table shows the progress payments to be paid at different stages of the project according
to the work completed in that period of time.

For example, the task ‘Electrician’ has an estimated time of six days of work, which
will take place at key phases from week 10 to week 27 of the project. The total
payment to the electrician will be $19,200. Note that this will be paid at certain
time frames throughout the project.

Another example is the plumber who will work for a total of eight days and receive
$25,800. The plumber will receive the following progress payments:

• 10% of his payment upfront


• 40% in week 12
• 20% in week 19
• 20% in week 23
• a final payment of 10% in week 27.

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Estimated project costs schedule

Estimated project costs schedule – page 1

(Source: www.dlsweb.rmit.edu.au/toolbox/buildright/content/bcgbc4005a/04_monitor_project_costs/01_analyse_quote/page_002.htm)

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Estimated project costs schedule – page 2

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LEARNING ACTIVITY 10 Estimated vs actual costs

1. Refer to the ‘Estimated project costs schedule’ on the previous page:

- Transfer the estimated costs for each month of the project into the following table.
- Calculate the variance, based on the sample ‘actual’ costs.

Month Estimated costs Actual costs Variance


(estimated costs
minus actual costs)

March 32,640 40,000 -7,360

April 60,500

May 65,245

June 62,900

July 33,860

August 45,890

September 37,420

Total $318,800

2. What is the total difference between the estimated cost and the actual cost?

3. What are the possible impacts of the cost overrun?

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4. Who will pay, if the builder makes an error in costing of materials?

5. The following table shows an example where actual costs are lower than estimated costs. The builder for this
project has overestimated the actual cost for every month. This shows as positive numbers in the difference
column.

Month Estimated costs Actual costs Variance


(estimated costs
minus actual
costs)

March 32,640 31,540 1,100

April 58,560 55,620 2,940

May 56,960 53,210 3,750

June 59,040 55,000 4,040

July 31,840 29,540 2,300

August 41,446 40,500 946

September 36,806 35,150 1,170

Total 316,806 300,560 16,246

What is the impact if the builder overestimates the project cost?

* Retain this learning activity as part of your portfolio of evidence.


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Analysing project costs


An effective way to monitor project costs is to graph the estimated and the actual costs. This enables the project
manager to visually interpret the costs for each task. It will also assist in the analysis of profit and loss for each
month.

Difference (estimated costs minus actual costs)


Actual costs
Estimated costs

Comparing estimated costs against actual costs

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LEARNING ACTIVITY 11 Cost control

Part of your responsibility as a site supervisor on a commercial building is to control on-site costs.

Your manager has advised you at a weekly site meeting that the particular area that you are responsible for (which
is 25% completed) has a current cost overrun of 18%.

Your manager has requested a written report from you that outlines:

• the reasons for the overrun


• how you intend to prevent further cost overruns

1. Outline some reasons that may have caused the 18% cost overrun.

1. Provide a plan, which explains how you intend to prevent further cost overruns.

* Retain this learning activity as part of your portfolio of evidence.

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6. Keep and maintain site files


Paperwork! It can be annoying and seem unimportant however there are a number of reasons why it is essential to
maintain accurate and organised site files:

• It may be required by law


• They can help you track and control the ongoing costs and schedule
• They are helpful for estimating future work
• Provide a paper trail of information, which may be required in a dispute with the client, a supplier or a
subcontractor.

Discussion notes: Refer to Research Activity 1. Necessary information.

6.1 Legal requirements


There are federal, state and local government laws, Acts and regulations that state you must keep certain files and
documents
on-site and available to be checked and audited by the relevant authorities.

Important
If an authority checks your site file and fails to find the necessary documents it may have the right to issue fines,
stop all construction work on-site or even prosecute. For example:

• There may be workplace health and safety investigations where safety records and processes need to be
checked and prosecutions can occur.
• The local council or shire can issue a stop work notice if you have incomplete or incorrect documentation
and permits.

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Building Regulations requirements


Regulation 317 of the Victorian Building Regulations states that a copy of the building permit and documents
relating to the permit and other details must be kept on-site.

The required documents you need to keep on-site include:

• building permit, including the number of the permit and the date of issue
• plans
• specifications
• contract, including variations
• other documents relating to the building permit, including soil tests, engineers report

In addition to these documents, the registration numbers and contact details of the builder and the building
surveyor must be displayed in a conspicuous position that can be seen by the public.

For more information refer to the:

• Victorian Current Regulations


Building Regulations 2006 – Reg 317
www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/vic/consol_reg/br2006200/s317.html

Occupational health and safety requirements


You are also required by law to keep health and safety records on file for both your employees and the
independent tradespeople and subcontractors you use.

This information includes your site induction information, records of incidents and accidents and completed claims
forms.

For more information, refer to the following pages on the Victorian WorkCover Authority website:

• Employer Rights & Responsibilities


www.worksafe.vic.gov.au/laws-and-regulations/employer-rights-and-responsibilities

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• Site Establishment Checklist for Builders and Building Trades Contractors


www.vwa.vic.gov.au/forms-and-publications/forms-and-publications/site-establishment-checklist-for-
builders-and-building-trades-contractors

Fair Work requirements

You are legally required to keep records relating to the workers you employee, including apprentices and casual
labourers. The following details should be kept on-site or in easily accessible location, in case you are audited:

• Employee names, status of employment


• Pay slips
• Wage rates (or salary) and any penalties, loadings or allowances paid
• Timesheets, attendance records, rosters showing hours worked (including overtime hours), leave taken
• Leave taken and owing
• Proof of superannuation payments
• Flexibility arrangements.

For more information, refer to the:

• Fair Work Ombudsman: Pay slips & record-keeping:


www.fairwork.gov.au/Pay/pay-slips-and-record-keeping

If you use independent tradespeople or subcontractors, you should keep copies of relevant employment contracts,
invoices and records of payment, along with details of services they have provided.

6.2 Tracking and monitoring

Project schedule

As discussed earlier, you need to create and regularly update your project schedule to track the progress of the
project’s tasks and the materials and labour requirements.

Your project schedule can also help you to identify any potential delays before they impact the project, so it also
needs to be kept at the building site.

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Contract documents
In addition to having the contract, specifications and plans on-site for legal purposes, you should also be regularly
referring to them to ensure you are meeting the client’s requirements and expectations.

Any variations to the original plans, specifications or contract should also have been documented and must be
followed.

By regularly referring to and following the requirements in these documents, you should reduce the potential for
misunderstandings and disputes.

Purchasing and invoice documents


To help you monitor project costs and cash flow you should keep all documents relating to purchases you make and
payments you receive. These include:

• call forward sheets


• purchase orders
• invoices received
• invoices provided to the client
• receipts for purchases
• receipts you provide to the client for payments received

Project history
Recording and saving all correspondence relating to the project will allow you to follow-up on the project’s history
from the start, if required. Consider keeping:

• records of phone calls, emails and written correspondence to and from the client, the architect,
tradespeople and supplier
• progress photographs
• site diary
• labour time records, equipment use
• meeting minutes
• purchase orders and invoices
• progress payments made and received
• your original estimating calculations
• your quote, including inclusions and exclusions

While all of these records may not need to be kept on-site, you should be able to access them quickly if needed.
This means they need to be kept in an ordered way.

6.3 Organising your site files


As you can see, the site file needs to contain a number of different documents.

How you organise the documents is up to you, but you may wish to consider using a folder with tabs to indicate
different sections and include a table of contents.

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LEARNING ACTIVITY 12 Your site files

Think about the files you keep on the worksite of your current building project.

Make a note of:

• any files you need to add to your site files for legal or monitoring purposes
• any improvements you could make to your current filing system to make your records more ordered and
easy to find

* Retain this learning activity as part of your portfolio of evidence.

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Assessment tasks
You are now ready to attempt the assessments for this unit. You will need to complete the following tasks and
submit them to your Trainer on or before the agreed date and time:

1. Scheduling labour and materials

2. Ordering labour and materials.

If you have any questions, please contact your Trainer.

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Assessment task 1 cover sheet


Assessment task 1 – Scheduling labour and materials
Please complete all sections below. Office Use Only

This cover sheet must be completed for each assessment.


Attach this cover sheet to your assessment and return to your Trainer.

Remember to keep a copy of your assessment.

Student name:

Student ID:

Student address:

Unit code and name: CPCCBC4005A Produce labour and material schedules for ordering

Mark/grade:

Trainer name:

Trainer signature:

Trainer report:

Declaration:

• I am aware that penalties exist for plagiarism and unauthorised collusion with other students.
• I am aware of the requirements covering style and layout standards as specified by my Trainer.
• I have retained a copy of this assessment.

Student signature: Date:

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Assessment task 1 – Scheduling labour and materials


Purpose of assessment
To assess skills, knowledge and ability to plan and allocate human and physical resources for a building project and
produce documentation that meets the time frames and quality standards established by the organisation.

This assessment task accounts for 50% of total assessment.

Assessment task
Consider the labour and materials scheduling activities of your own organisation, or for the Smith residence to
complete the following three steps.

Step one
Complete the following table to report what challenges you face when scheduling labour and materials for this
building project and list some improvements you could make to the process.

Task Challenges Improvements

Project scheduling

Calculation of material
quantities

Calculation of labour
quantities

Calculation of material
costs

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Task Challenges Improvements

Calculation of labour
costs

Keeping labour and


materials schedules up-
to-date

Ordering the materials

Ordering the labour

Monitoring project costs

Keeping and
maintaining site files

Step two
Refer to the flowchart on the following pages.

For each task:

• Note the key documents you will refer to and complete during each task. For example, during the project
scheduling task you will refer to the contract, the plans/drawings and the building specifications
documents. You will also use a project scheduling template which lists the tasks and timing of each task to
complete the build.
• List who you will communicate with during each task, for example, you may talk to suppliers about your
materials requirements during the material calculation task.

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Task Documents: Communicate with:

• •

Project scheduling •

• •
Calculation of material

quantities

• •
Calculation of labour

quantities

• •

Calculation of material costs •

• •

Calculation of labour costs •

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Task Documents: Communicate with:

• •
Keeping labour and material
schedules •
up-to-date

• •

Ordering the materials •

• •

Ordering the labour •

• •

Monitoring project costs •

• •
Keeping and maintaining site

files

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Step three
List five good communication practices, which will support you to achieve the scheduling tasks listed in the flow
chart.

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Assessment task 2 cover sheet


Assessment task 2 – Ordering labour and materials
Please complete all sections below. Office Use Only

This cover sheet must be completed for each assessment.


Attach this cover sheet to your assessment and return to your Trainer.

Remember to keep a copy of your assessment.

Student name:

Student ID:

Student address:

Unit code and name: CPCCBC4005A Produce labour and material schedules for ordering

Mark/grade:

Trainer name:

Trainer signature:

Trainer report:

Declaration:

• I am aware that penalties exist for plagiarism and unauthorised collusion with other students.
• I am aware of the requirements covering style and layout standards as specified by my Trainer.
• I have retained a copy of this assessment.

Student signature: Date:

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Assessment task 2 – Ordering labour and materials


Purpose of assessment
To assess skills, knowledge and ability to identify materials required for the project and gather supply
information and communicate effectively as required.
This assessment task accounts for 50% of total assessment.
Assessment task
Task 1

• Refer to the documents on the following pages.


• Refer to the subcontractor agreement for the labour requirements to complete the office floorboards for
the Smith residence.
• The subcontractor, JJ Flooring will complete the floor in two phases:
- the first phase will include supply and installation of floorboards
- the second phase will include the sanding, staining and coating of the floor
• Complete the call forward sheet with the required details.
• Complete a purchase order for each phase of the flooring.

Task 2

It is two weeks later and the client has just changed their mind. They would like to change the floor timber from
Tasmanian Oak to Victorian Ash. You have completed a contract variation and the client has signed it.

• Update the relevant documents in the ordering process.

Submit all documents to your Trainer.

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Subcontractor agreement, task 1

SUBCONTRACTOR AGREEMENT

This Subcontractor Agreement is made effective as of 25 March 2015, by and between


Bob Carpenter, 33 Penthouse Street, Fitzroy and JJ Flooring, 33 Thomas Street, Pasco.

AGREEMENT

In consideration of the mutual promises contained in this Agreement, the parties agree
as follows:

Description of services

Beginning 25 March 2015 JJ Flooring will provide the following services and materials, in
line with the contract requirements:

• Supply of Tasmanian Oak floorboards


• Installation of Tasmanian Oak floorboards
• Stain of Tasmanian Oak floorboards.

These services will be performed at 22 High Street, Collingwood.

JJ Flooring will complete the services in accordance with the applicable plans and
specifications as contained in the Original Contract, and in a workmanlike manner,
meeting all local and state building codes and including local regulations.

Payment of services

In exchange for services Bob Carpenter will pay the amount of $3,000. Payment will be
made when the service is completed.

Signed by client: Bob Carpenter _____________ Date: _________

Signed by provider: JJ Flooring ______________ Date: _________

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Call forward sheet, task 1

Activity Task/activity Order Required Supplier Supplier Purchase Instructions or comments


ID date delivery contact order No
date details

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Purchase orders, task 1

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Subcontractor agreement, task 2

SUBCONTRACTOR AGREEMENT

VARIATION

This Subcontractor Agreement variation is made effective as of _______________,


by and between Bob Carpenter, 33 Penthouse Street, Fitzroy and JJ Flooring, 33
Thomas Street, Pasco.

AGREEMENT
In consideration of the mutual promises contained in this Agreement, the parties agree as
follows:

Description of services

Beginning the _______________, JJ Flooring will provide the following services


and materials.

• Supply of ___________________________

• Installation of ___________________________

• Stain of ___________________________

In line with the contract requirements.

These services will be performed at 22 High Street, Collingwood.

JJ Flooring will complete the services in accordance with the applicable plans and
specifications as contained in the Original Contract, and in a workmanlike manner,
meeting all local and state building codes and including local regulations.

Payment of Services

In exchange for services, Bob Carpenter will pay the amount of $3,000. Payment will
be made when the service is completed.

Signed by client: Bob Carpenter _________________ Date: _________

Signed by provider: JJ Flooring _________________ Date: _________

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Call forward sheet, task 2

Activity Task/activity Order date Required Supplier Supplier Purchase Instructions or comments
ID delivery contact details order No
date

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Purchase orders, task 2

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Appendices

Appendix 1 – Employability Skills

Appendix 2 – Qualification structure

Appendix 3 – Unit of competency

Appendix 4 – Sample worksheets

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Appendix 1 – Employability Skills


The following table shows the Employability Skills embedded within this unit together with the appropriate
assessment task that assess these skills. Note that not all the Employability Skills in the qualification are assessed in
every unit. Assessments for other units will cover the remaining Employability Skills.

Employability Skills Evidenced by Assessment task


Communication Oral and written communication skills Task 1
that contribute to productive and Task 2
harmonious working relations between
co-workers, customers and other
stakeholders

Teamwork Skills that through cooperation and Task 1


collaboration contribute to productive
working relationships with others to
achieve the desired outcomes of the
project
Problem solving Appropriate analytical skills that Task 1
contribute to timely completion of tasks Task 2
and productive outcomes
Initiative and enterprise Skills that contribute to innovative Task 1
outcomes, within scope of responsibility

Planning and organising Task management skills that support the Task 1
attainment of project goals and Task 2
objectives and the strategic planning of
the organisation
Self management Skills to manage personal reactions to Task 1
responsibilities and challenges in
workplace and contribute to self-
satisfaction and growth

Learning Skills that contribute to ongoing Task 1


professional development Task 2

Technology Skills that contribute to effective Task 1


execution of tasks using a range of
appropriate technological options and a
willingness to embrace emerging
technologies

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Appendix 2 – Qualification structure


This Learner Resource, CPCCBC4005A Produce labour and materials schedules for ordering forms part of the
CPC40110 Certificate IV in Building and Construction (Building) qualification.

CPCCBC4001A Apply building codes and standards to the construction process for low rise building projects

CPCCBC4002A Manage occupational health and safety in the building and construction workplace

CPCCBC4003A Select and prepare a construction contract

CPCCBC4004A Identify and produce estimated costs for building and construction projects

CPCCBC4005A Produce labour and material schedules for ordering

CPCCBC4006B Select, procure and store construction materials for low rise projects

CPCCBC4007A Plan building or construction work

CPCCBC4008B Conduct on-site supervision of building and construction projects

CPCCBC4009B Apply legal requirements to building and construction projects

CPCCBC4010B Apply structural principles to residential low rise constructions

CPCCBC4011B Apply structural principles to commercial low rise constructions

CPCCBC4012B Read and interpret plans and specifications

BSBSMB402A Plan small business finances

BSBSMB404A Undertake small business planning

BSBSMB405B Monitor and manage small business operations

BSBSMB406A Manage small business finances

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Appendix 3 – Unit of competency

CPCCBC4005A Produce labour and material schedules for ordering

Modification History

Not applicable

Unit descriptor

Unit descriptor This unit of competency specifies the outcomes required to produce schedules of resource
requirements so that orders can be placed for materials and labour for residential and
commercial projects and to record and track costs as they are incurred. Knowledge of
codes, regulations and approval processes, contractor systems, physical resource and
supplier identification and the ability to assess the availability of and requirements for
skilled labour are essential.

Application of the Unit

Application of the unit This unit of competency supports the needs of site managers and forepersons, estimators,
project managers and builders in the construction industry with a responsibility for
producing schedules for ordering materials and labour.

Licensing/Regulatory Information

Not Applicable

Pre-Requisites Nil

Employability Skills Information

Employability skills This unit contains employability skills.

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ELEMENTS AND PERFORMANCE CRITERIA PRE-CONTENT

Elements describe the Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement
essential outcomes of of the element. Where bold italicised text is used, further information is detailed in
a unit of competency. the required skills and knowledge section and the range statement.
Assessment of performance is to be consistent with the evidence guide.

Elements and Performance Criteria


ELEMENT PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
1. Identify and apply all contract 1.1 All contractual requirements are included in the schedules.
conditions to the schedules
1.2 Local government and regulatory bodies ' conditions of approval
are included in the schedules.

1.3 Schedules include colour selections.

1.4 Variations to contracts, raised by the client or the builder, are


included in the schedules.

2. Produce material and labour 2.1 Nominated suppliers and contractors are detailed in work
schedules, overlays and orders schedules.

2.2 Relevant overlay drawings are produced.

2.3 Orders include contract details and instructions.

2.4 Contract rates are applied to material and labour schedules.


3. Prepare site files
3.1 All necessary site documents are included, including approved
plans and specifications

3.2 Call forward sheets are prepared detailing all orders.

4. Monitor and report on project 4.1 Project costs are analysed against estimates during construction.
costs
4.2 Approved variation costs are analysed..

4.3 Final project cost analysis is provided.

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ELEMENT PERFORMANCE CRITERIA


5.Maintain data files of 5.1 Approved variation cost increases are incorporated into
standard costs site files.

5.2 Changes to standard plans, specifications and cost files are


included in site files.

REQUIRED SKILLLS AND KNOWLEDGE


This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit

Required skills

Required skills for this unit are:

• communication skills to:


• enable clear and direct communication, using questioning to identify and confirm requirements, share
information, listen and understand
• communicate information effectively within the organisation and to external agencies and the client
• read and interpret:
- contracts
- drawings and specifications
• use language and concepts appropriate to cultural differences
• use and interpret non-verbal communication
• written skills to:
- prepare and maintain site files
- produce schedules and orders
• identify and analyse relevant information
• numeracy skills to apply calculations

Required knowledge

Required knowledge for this unit is:


• operation and structure of the organisation's costing and contracting system
• state or territory building and construction codes, standards and regulations relevant to the form of
building or construction being undertaken
• types of building or construction drawings and specifications commonly used in the industry
• types, scope and usage of labour through the employee and contractor systems

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EVIDENCE GUIDE

The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the performance criteria,
required skills and knowledge, range statement and the Assessment Guidelines for the Training Package.

Overview of assessment This unit of competency could be assessed by the


preparation of schedules for materials and labour for a
building project.

This unit of competency can be assessed in the


workplace or a close simulation of the workplace
environment, provided that simulated or project-based
assessment techniques fully replicate construction
workplace conditions, materials, activities,
responsibilities and procedures.

Critical aspects for assessment and A person who demonstrates competency in this unit
evidence required to demonstrate must be able to provide evidence of the ability to:
competency in this unit
 identify materials required for the project and
gather supply information effectively
 plan and allocate human and physical resources
 produce documentation that meets the
timeframes and quality standards established by
the organisation
 communicate information effectively within the
organisation and to external agencies and the
client, as required

Context of and specific resources for This competency is to be assessed using standard and
assessment authorised work practices, safety requirements and
environmental constraints.

Assessment of essential underpinning knowledge will


usually be conducted in an off-site context.

Assessment is to comply with relevant regulatory or


Australian standards' requirements.

Resource implications for assessment include:

• documentation that should normally be available


in a building or construction office
• relevant codes, standards and regulations
• office equipment, including calculators,
photocopiers and telephone systems
• computers with appropriate software to view 2-
D CAD drawings, run costing programs and print
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copies
• a technical reference library with current
publications on measurement, design, building
construction and manufacturers' product
literature
• a suitable work area appropriate to the
construction process

Reasonable adjustments for people with disabilities must


be made to assessment processes where required. This
could include access to modified equipment and other
physical resources, and the provision of appropriate
assessment support.

Method of assessment Assessment methods must:

 satisfy the endorsed Assessment Guidelines of


the Construction, Plumbing and Services Training
Package
 include direct observation of tasks in real or
simulated work conditions, with questioning to
confirm the ability to consistently identify and
correctly interpret the essential underpinning
knowledge required for practical application
 reinforce the integration of employability skills
with workplace tasks and job roles
 confirm that competency is verified and able to
be transferred to other circumstances and
environments

Validity and sufficiency of evidence requires that:


 competency will need to be demonstrated over a period
of time reflecting the scope of the role and the practical
requirements of the workplace
 where the assessment is part of a structured learning
experience the evidence collected must relate to a
number of performances assessed at different points in
time and separated by further learning and practice,
with a decision on competency only taken at the point
when the assessor has complete confidence in the
person's demonstrated ability and applied knowledge
 all assessment that is part of a structured learning
experience must include a combination of direct, indirect
and supplementary evidence

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Assessment processes and techniques should as far as is


practical take into account the language, literacy and
numeracy capacity of the candidate in relation to the
competency being assessed.
Supplementary evidence of competency may be
obtained from relevant authenticated documentation
from third parties, such as existing supervisors, team
leaders or specialist training staff.

RANGE STATEMENT
The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. It allows for different work environments and
situations that may affect performance. Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed
below. Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work
situation, needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be
included.

Local government and regulatory  electricity regulatory authorities


bodies include:  environmental authorities
 health departments
 shire or municipal councils
 water corporations
Plans and specifications include:  building codes
 colour selections
 contract requirements
 material and labour schedules
 materials specifications
 plans, sketches and drawings
 statements of requirements
Project costs include::  building or construction materials
 communications costs
 fuels, lubricants and other consumables
 organisational and subcontract labour costs
 overheads
 professional indemnity and other insurance
costs
 project administration costs
 site facilities, such as toilets and storage sheds

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UNIT SECTOR(S)
Unit sector Construction

CO-REQUISITE UNITS
Co-requisite units Nil

FUNCTIONAL AREA
Functional area

Appendix 4 – Sample worksheets

This section of the Learner Resource provides a number of worksheets that you may find useful in this unit.

The sample worksheets provided on the following pages are:

1. Call forward sheet

2. Purchase order

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Call forward sheet

Activity Task/activity Order date Required Supplier Supplier Purchase Instructions or comments
ID delivery contact details order No
date

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Purchase order

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References
In addition to the websites referenced throughout this Learner Resource, the following references were used:

• Learner Resource for CPCCBC4008B Conduct on-site supervision of building and construction projects.

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